Issuu on Google+

Teaching Families Self-Reliance through the Small Scale Agriculture Model

1


2

Agriculture

Component

La Piedra

Nueva Esperanza

Cura Mori

Community

Multi-crop

Rotational Gardens

Multi-crop

Rotational Gardens

Multi-crop

Rotational Gardens

Project

2012 Outcomes

PERU

Mono crop in place. Either Corn, Cotton or Rice.

Only growing fruit for sale including lemon, Mango, Passion Fruit, Tree tomato or peppers None

None

Mono crop in place. Either Corn, Cotton or Rice.

None

Before 59% of families have Rotational gardens working effectively. 8 types of locational appropriate vegetables growing: Radish, Beets, Squash, Italian tomatoes, Peppers, Carrots, Cabbage, Caigua 100% of families have 8 different crops: cow peas, Lima Beans, Soybeans, Sweet Corn, Yellow corn, Sweet potatoes , Zarandaja and Cassava 100% of the families have Rotational gardens with 8 locational appropriate vegetables growing: Radish, beets, squash Italian tomatoes, peppers, carrots, cabbage and caigua. 100% of the families have 8 types of crops growing: cow peas, Lima Beans, Soybeans, Sweet Corn, Yellow corn, Sweet potatoes, Zarandaja and Cassava 90% of families have Rotational gardens working effectively. 8 types of locational appropriate vegetables growing: Radish, Beets, Squash, Italian tomatoes, Peppers, Carrots, Cabbage, Caigua 55% of families have 8 different crops: cow peas, Lima Beans, Soybeans, Sweet Corn, Yellow corn, Sweet potatoes, Zarandaja and Cassava

After

Not all families hop on board at the same time. Some take seeing their neighbors to want to do it.

10% could not install due to lack of water.

The types of crops planted changes based on climate, altitude, culture, soil, etc. and varies from community to community. Overall crop production has gone up by an average of 60%

Overall crop production has gone up by an average of 40%

The rest of families could not install due to external factors, including: No space, No available water, etc..

Observation

The government has spent millions over the past few years and has only been able to reduce malnutrition by a couple of percentage points. With 1/20th of the budget, we have made 20x the impact. That is who we are and what we do.


Nutritional Consumption Outcomes At the start of each project, we asked families this question.�How many of the following essential vegetables do you have in your diet? The results are from 3 cities: Cura Morí, Nueva Esperanza and La Piedra. Type of Vegetable Radish Beets Carrots Broccoli Cauliflower Spinach Pumpkin Caigua Celery Chard Lettuce Cabbage Tomatoes Peppers

Vegetable consumption before % of population 11.43 14.29 5.71 5.71 25.71 5.71 17.14 2.86 14.29 11.43

Vegetable consumption after % of population 88.57 85.71 88.57 65.71 54.29 48.57 80.00 40.00 48.57 34.29 94.29 65.71 100.00 91.43

100 90 80 70 60 50

Vegetable consumption before project %

40 30

Vegetable consumption after project %

20 10 0

3


4

Animal Husbandry

Component

Cura Mori & Nueva Esperanza

Community

Before

Training

Maintenance of small animals

None

Families kept animals housed inside their homes with them. Animal Health Diseases like chicken pox, scabies and parasites were common Animal No plot for animal Nutrition feed. Food for animals had to be bought or animals were given whatever grew in the neighborhood causing lower quality of animals. Type of 0 in Cura Mori Animals 1 family had guinea pigs in Nueva Esperanza.

Scope

Since better quality of food introduced, much healthier and much larger animals being harvested.

Feed crops planted. 100 m2 of Alfalfa 200 m2 of corn husks, Hydroponics are used in areas where no land for animals available.

90% of families took training in Cura Mori. 100% took training in Nueva Esperanza.

Guinea pig has been added as a valuable protein component to the family diet.

This problem occurs in all communities to which we have access and is the first practical action area. Significantly improved animal health and significant reduction in animal fatalities

100% of families separated a space for their animals. 100% of animals housed and placed according to the species. To date there have been no further cases of these diseases. 100% animals have been de wormed.

We only gave animals to families that had planted the feed for them (Alfalfa and Corn). Each family now has between 15-20 animals. 100% of families now have Guinea pigs in Nueva Esperanza. Cura Mori: 18 lessons, 5 workshops and 4 special classes. Nueva Esperanza: 24 lessons, 5 workshops

Observation

After

Animal Husbandry Outcomes


5

Health and Nutrition

Component

La Piedra

Nueva Esperanza

Cura Mori

Community

Malnutrition

Training

Malnutrition

Training

Malnutrition

Training

Scope Families had not received any training on basic health issues related to nutrition and family or food storage 86.96% had Chronic Malnutrition. Families had not received any training on basic health issues related to nutrition and family or food storage. 76.46% had Chronic Malnutrition. Families had not received any training on basic health issues related to nutrition and family or food storage. 84.62% had Chronic Malnutrition.

Before

We have been working with this new project for about 6 months and are seeing great progress.

Families have received 14 classes from basic family health issues and nutrition. They also received 4 nutrition workshops and are working establishing food storage.

73.07 % of kids with Chronic This project is new and we are Malnutrition so far this year with only working on them. a few months in the program.

35.29% reduction in Malnutrition in 1 year.

Very receptive families.

30.44% reduction in Malnutrition in 1 year.

10% of the families either missed classes, left the program or were removed for lack of desire.

Observation

41.17% of kids with Chronic Malnutrition.

100% of families received a total of 27 classes from basic family health issues and nutrition. They also received 9 nutrition workshops and classes on Food storage.

56.52 % of kids with Chronic Malnutrition.

90% of families received a total of 27 classes from basic family health issues and nutrition. They also received 9 nutrition workshops and classes on Food storage.

After

Malnutrition Reduction Outcomes


How we expand the program SRA works in 3 basic levels. Each level represents a format in which we carry out the program. Each Level has advantages and disadvantages. each level is described below and examples of actual programs based on these levels are outlined in the following pages.

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

Level 1 projects are programs in which we directly control the program. We fund it and execute it ourselves. These programs have the most powerful outcomes because we have the most control. However, this is also the most expensive way of carrying out the program and has the most limited effect.

Level 2 projects are programs in which we have indirect control over a program. These are programs where we generally have partnered with a University or Government. The advantage is that we are leveraging their resources, manpower and funds to greatly expand the program. The disadvantge is that we have less control over the program and follow up. We also have to wait for funding from their sources. Our cost is significanly reduced with this model.

Level 3 projects are programs in which we have little overall control. These are generally programs where another NGO or government program has already started, and they have asked us to come in and help them out with their existing program. The advantage is that these tend to be already established programs or programs that have already been funded. We can generally reach large numbers of family with this level, but the overall benefit on malnutrition will probably be limited. These programs tend to be useful for getting the word out of what SRA does in order to generate more Level 2 projects.

6


LEVEL 1 Executor Financing

Families

Plan development Land requirements Monitoring Access to data and statistics

Direct Control - Direct Influence Advantage

SRA and it’s technicians

Disadvantage

We have complete control over the program and can execute any phase whenever we need to. We control where the money goes so that it can have the greatest impact

We are limited by how many technicians we have available to reach families 100% SRA We are limited by our own donations. There is no ‘skin in the game’ for local governments Selected based on best We can choose the most We don’t have the chance for success prepared and excited families knowledge or insight that and have the best chance for the government has already immediate and long term success developed in many areas of the country. SRA controls 100% of We can plan based on the long We lack the ability to connect Project term needs of the family with other organizations and coordinate our efforts. Average of 7000 meters Complete self sufficiency can be More travel time to find to implement all modules achieved families that meet all of Small Scale Agriculture requirements. Model. 100% done by SRA We can make sure that modules Not enough staff for are being implemented correctly adequate monitoring 100% SRA We have complete access to all Takes more time and data as we take it ourselves resources that we could use in other areas.

OUTCOMES Number of Beneficiaries Cost per family Malnutrition Production Level Ability to expand

50-100 families per year. Up to 600 individuals $1,527 dollars

100% Nutritional selfsufficiency met by families. Highest production of crops and small animals.

We expand by talking with local community leaders and by using graduated families to teach other families

Our potential for success is at it’s Less ability to reach large maximum amount of families Much cheaper than keeping families on government aid for the rest of their lives. Highest level of impact

Too expensive for long term viability Lowest number of families impacted

Best chance for not only Lowest number of families nutritional self sufficiency, but impacted helping pull families more quickly out of poverty We create duplication by using Slowest way of expanding graduated families to teach program. others.

7


Level 1

Direct Control Direct Influence

Project: Cura Mori, Nueva Esperanza, La piedra

IMPACT: 50-100 families per year. Recommendation 15% of time 5% of time on Innovation Overall recommendations: In order to overcome some of the disadvantages, we are doing the following: 1. We are reducing our time in level 1 activities in order to focus on Level 2, which is more sustainable and scalable. 2. We are breaking apart our program into more adaptive modules that can be implemented even if other parts of the program might not be. 3. We are becoming more efficient in our use of time so that we can monitor and gather data more efficiently. 4. We are becoming more stringent in our family filtering process so that we don’t work with families that are not ready to be helped.

Goals:

1. Continue to have a limited number of families (around 20 or so). Enough to keep making improvements to the system. Continue to improve the model. 2. Invest a small percentage of time on allowing staff to work on own projects. 3. Invest more time in Level 2 projects. 8


LEVEL 2

Semi-Indirect Control - Semi-Indirect Influence Advantage

Executor

Financing

Families

Plan development Land requirements Monitoring Access to data and statistics

Technicians from other Institutions

We expand our influence and ability to reach families in need by using the resources SRA Technicians 30% and manpower of other participation organizations. 80 - 90% Externally funded Significantly reduced need for Outside financing. More ‘skin 10-20% funded by SRA (Seeds, in the game’ Animals training) Criteria established by other Less time commitment on organizations with 30% having to find families. influence by SRA. They already have relationship developed Other projects control 90100% of project

Less time and cost used for SRA staff

Disadvantage We have less control over technicians in what they teach, what data they gather

We depend on their ability to fund project. Delays inevitable. Their projects are less efficient and they pick families based on politics or other criteria that might not be optimal. Less control of project parameters.

Average of 3000 meters to More families will be included Not enough land for full implement some modules of in projects. Less travel time project, will have to adapt Small Scale Agriculture Model. 90% done by other projects Less cost for our staff Not enough staff for adequate monitoring Data obtained by technicians Less time and cost used for Limited access to data and for project SRA staff Statistics

OUTCOMES Number of Beneficiaries

Up to 600 families per year.

Cost per family

$305 dollars (20% inputs by SRA) Reduction in Malnutrition by 50%-80% Average Production levels increase by 50%

Malnutrition Production Level Ability to expand

3600 Individuals

Increased ability to reach many more families and expand program Reduction in cost by 80%

Less ability to control or monitor success

Less input means less influence in project. Significant impact with highly Not complete reduction reduced cost Production increases no Difficult to achieve full self matter how much land family sufficiency without 7000 has meters We can expand by connecting We can grow in many areas Our ability to expand with or starting joint projects much quicker than we could depends on the number of by ourselves projects and organizations that are working in Social programs

9


Level 2

Semi-Indirect control Semi-Indirect Influence

Project: Alta Piura

Recommendation 60% of time IMPACT: 600 families

Frias, Huarmaca, chalaco

Partners

Overall recommendations: In order to overcome some of the disadvantages, we are working at: 1. Help technicians apply these techniques in their own homes first so that they can see the benefits for themselves. It’s important to convert the trainers before they will become fully engaged themselves. 2. Adapt the program to fit the needs of homes that don’t have as much land as the program currently requires for full self-sufficiency. 3. Contribute more in terms of cheat inputs that have a lot of ‘value’ such as seeds in order to increase our influence and get greater access to data.

Goals:

1. Create a model using the Level 2 structure to create a program that is cost effective and can be scaled more efficiently.

10


LEVEL 3

Indirect Control - Indirect Influence Advantage

Executor Financing Families Plan development Land requirements Monitoring Access to data and statistics

Externally run Project

Jump on other projects that have already been funded and are running 90 – 100% Externally funded Least amount of funding 10% funded by SRA needed by SRA. Usually just Training provided Criteria established by other Programs usually already organizations started so families already in place 100% developed by other Plan typically already projects developed. Can work immediately Average of 3000 meters to More families will be included implement some modules of in projects. Little if No travel Small Scale Agriculture Model. time. 100% done by other projects. No cost for our staff Data obtained by other organizations

No time and cost used for SRA staff

Disadvantage Most other programs teach commercialization and we have less influence to change We have to adapt to their current project in what ever way we can. Families might be moving with different goals in mind. Plan already in place, we have to adapt to current plan. Not enough land for full project, will have to adapt Not enough staff for adequate monitoring Very limited access to data and Statistics

OUTCOMES Number of Beneficiaries

1000+ families per year.

Cost per family

$152 dollars (10% of inputs by SRA) Reduction in Malnutrition by 40%-70% Average Production levels increase by 40%

Malnutrition Production Level Ability to expand

6000+ individuals

Highly Increased ability to reach many more families and expand program Reduction in cost by 90%

Even Less ability to control or monitor success

Less input means less influence in project. Significant impact with highly Not complete reduction reduced cost Production increases no Difficult to achieve full self matter how much land family sufficiency without 7000 has meters We can expand by connecting Our time commitment is Our ability to expand with or starting joint projects minimal so we could reach a depends on the number of large number of areas quicker projects and organizations that are working in Social programs

11


Level 3

Indirect Control Indirect Influence

Project: Various

Recommendation 20% of time IMPACT: 2,000,000 viewers Thousands of families, etc...

Partners APU has contracted with us to shoot videos on all topics that SRA covers free of charge. They will get sponsors. Our only costs are the costs of sending our technicians to meet with the film crew to shoot videos.

Entre Gente and Piura Tierra Paraiso are television programs that deal with Peru social issues. Apu introduced us to them. They have already given us free marketing in terms of an interview with Oscar and a video for the Jeppson trip. They have agreed to show the videos on national television. They have a viewership of 2,000,000 viewers. The goal will be to have government officials in different areas of the country see the televison programs and want to contact us to partner on Level 2 projects. 12


Help has asked for us to teach their technicians how to use our methods so they can apply them in their projects. In exchange, they are giving us soilets(composting toilets), etc.

INIA has a great deal of expertise in Agricultural investigation, but have been frustrated with their lack of being able to get the word out. They liked our partnership and wish to teach any classes we need alongside us free of charge. We are creating a series of classes to teach universities and professionals across the region. FAO has several projects in Lima and they are trying to get us to help them. They are working at creating the partnerships necessary to bring our Small Scale Agriculture program to their area in a manner that will affect many families and be financially viable.

AntaMina is a private company known for generating great social programs. FAO introduced us to them and they have asked for a $1,000,000 proposal. We are now working at developing a project with them.

Overall Recommendations: Level 3 projects can reach a large number of people and can gain us valuable resources and exposure, however, their direct impact on families is more difficult to verify or track. In order to overcome some of the disadvantages of the program we plan on: 1. Use Level 3 programs as a way to obtain the exposure and connections we need to establish Level 2 programs. 2. Use these programs to create connections with governments, universities, and other organizations for the purpose of marketing the program.

13


Participation Level 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Level 1

2012 80%

2013 50%

2014 20%

Level 2

15%

40%

60%

Level 3

5%

10%

20%

Conclusions: 1. We have learned that although we can make the greatest difference when we control all aspects, it limits our ability to make widespread change. The information and success we have obtained have drawn the interest of other organizations and we can now start focusing on a gradual transition to working more directly with other organizations. 2. We need to keep our feet in all three levels as each one provides unique benefits that will help us in the long run. 3. Using this new model, we can keep the costs relatively the same, but we can increase the number of families being helped significantly.

14


Simple Hydroponics:

Innovating as we grow.

Benefit: Allow us to help families that don’t have enough land to still increase production and have animal protein

Bug nets Bug Catchers

Benefits: Savings of 20-30% on pesticide use

Retrain indigenous plants:

Benefits: They are more tolerant and hardy and will thrive where other plants struggle. We can plant in more difficult terrain this way.

INIA alliance:

We reduced pesticide use by 25% in the first planting and 50% in the second planting after inviting INIA to share some of the techniques they have developed. We also made up the cost of the technicians time by a clever idea from Oscar.

Demo Farm:

We now have 5 Hectars of land developed and as much land as we want from University (up to 30 Hectars, if we can use it) We have used the 5 Hectars to create a Guinea pig farm and a Seed multiplication program for our project so we can be self sustaining. It costs between $8-$11 for good quality Guinea pigs. We can grow them for $3.25.

15


Expand our Visibility

We have obtained a $120,000 per year grant for free advertising on google adwords. If we can use it correctly, it will increase to almost $500,000 per year. We are not experts on google adwords, so we have contacted Eastern Michigan University. They teach a Masters Class in advertising-focus on Google. They are volunteering their class in order to help us create effective advertising campaigns. The Robert H. Smith School of business provides consulting grants to Non-profits. We have obtained free consulting from their group of MBA students for guidance on business development, marketing, goals, etc. for a whole quarter with weekly meetings. We have partnered with Google.org in order to gain some help with Tech-based philanthropy. They have designed an app that shows our projects to millions of donors and allows donors to donate directly to us. It is currently in beta. Incorporating the concepts of Square Foot Gardening have helped to significantly reduce our land requirements for vegetable growing.

We have created allinaces with Governments and Universities

Professional media

16


Staff Alan Silva is an experienced business manager and public speaker. He

is presently the Director of Operations for The Institute for Self-Reliant Agriculture. Alan also owns Bright Spot Productions, and is the President of Square Foot Gardening. He has been teaching improved gardening methods for several years and has helped many families to create more self-sufficiecy for themselves. He has taught many seminars and 3 day symposiums all over the country and has designed simple water irrigation systems that have become one of Square Foot Gardening’s best selling products. Alan has owned or ran several companies over the years and has a love for helping companies grow and prosper. Alan is well known for his public speaking in front of large crowds, has extensive computer skills, marketing and management skills. His upbeat enthusiasm is contagious. He is a go-getter and is kept busy making Promotional videos for companies such as IBM and HP in his spare time. Alan was born in Colombia and is therefore very fluent in Spanish. He currently resides in Homosassa Florida. He considers his greatest accomplishment to be that of husband, and father. In his own words: “My family gives my life purpose”. Alan will oversee the project from the United States. His goal will be to: *Continue to establish and foster beneficial relationships between SRA and the government of Ecuador *Work with the local staff to make sure all project goals are met. *Travel to the projects to speak with officials in order to expand the project and foster more partnerships. *Become a liaison between the US and the Ecuador staff. He will conduct interviews with the staff on a consistent basis to make sure SRA is providing all support and encouragement needed for success.

17


Peru Director: Oscar J. Vilela Seminaro Oscar is a sharp young man with much potential. He has good people skills, has experience in accounting, and has transitioned from the accountant in Peru into an effective office manager. His previous employment was for an auditing firm in Piura (Chavez R.G Auditores Asociados S. Civil), a Product Contract Administrator for a telecommunication firm (Telmex Peru S.A.), and a Financial and Accounting Advisor to a media firm (Tito Alberto Vilela Zapater). Oscar has a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and Finance from the National University of Piura. Other courses include a “Specialist in International Trade and Customs” from Juris Aduanas, a “Human Relations and Oratory” from Leonardo Da Vinci Group, and “Accountancy and Finance Student Congress” from the National University of Trujillo, to mention a few. Oscar has a great attitude and is always willing to learn. He has gained respect from our staff as one that is firm but fair. He also has negotiated agreements with the Piura Regional Government that focus on the win/win principle. Oscar can communicate in English. He is an avid swimmer, and stays active in other sports as well. Oscar was born in Piura Peru and resides there to this day. Kelly Zapata Balcazar - Accounting National University of Piura, in the School of Accounting and Finance. Her work experience includes having worked in the accounting firm as assistant to Lucy Bermejo Accounting and Financial. She has served as assistant to ESSALUD, and has also worked for Banco Financiero del Peru. She is currently the Assistant for SRA administration and accounting.   Ana López Cáceres- Head of the Animal Husbandry Animal Science Engineer, graduated with a degree in animal husbandry. She has worked as director of a pig farm where goats and guinea pigs were raised as well as ducks and turkeys fattened. SHE has also worked in agricultural extension in farmer associations. Jesus Silva Cesar Pere- Assistant Animal Husbandry Husbandry Engineering degree from the University of Piura, with experience in animal health. He has worked at CENASA and has experience in farm rooster care.

18


Carlos Urbina Abraham Vences- Head of Agronomy Agricultural Engineering degree from the National University of Piura, with Masters level studies in Agribusiness at the Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina. He has done graduate work in Foreign Trade. He has worked as an external consultant with associations of small producers of organic bananas, on the subject of foreign trade advisory. He has also served as production manager in watermelon seed. He has experience in managing legume crops, cereals and tubers. José Abel Gómez Panta- Assistant Agronomy Agronomist, graduated from the National university, he has worked as head of the field in polyculture EQUAQUICOLA company and has also been supervising phytosanitary applications in cotton cultivation. He has experience in quality control in hydrothermal export crops and is now the assitant agronomist for SRA. Wilmer Cruz Lamadrid- Head of the Nutrition BA in nursing from the Private University of Piura with master’s level studies in university teaching and research. He is qualified in nutrition, dietetics and food security and has also worked at the main hospital Cayetano Heredia. Has experience working in NGOs in social support as regional manager, was assistant in the area of Nutrition ​​ TIFSRA, currently serves as Head of Health and Nutrition for SRA. Rosamaria Garcia Pastor- Assistant Nutrition She has a nursing degree focusing on educational management, from the Piura José Cayetano Heredia Hospital. She is currently assistant in the area of health ​​ and nutrition, and has become a community liason working with families. She enjoys helping to prevent disease and the opportunity to be here. She gets great satisfaction from seeing grateful families and smiling children. She is currently obtaining a masters degree in research and teaching in order to help communities and universities engage in scientific research.

19


Peru 2012 Report