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January/february 2013

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Vertical Ethiopia Exploring new angles of an ancient country.


የባህር ዳር ጨርቃ ጨርቅ አክሲዮን ማኅበር

natural fiber W E C A R E F O R Y O U R H E A LT H !

DAILY PRODUCTION CAPACITY:

natural fiber

SPINNING: 15 tons of yarn.

WE AVING: 95,000 m2 of fabric.

PROCESSING: > 125,000 m2 of fabric.

GARMENT: 10,000 pairs of bed sheets. ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY PROCESS

Waste Water Treatment Plant with a capacity of 1,000 m3 per day.

BAHIR DAR TEXTILE SHARE COMPANY, BAHIR DAR/ETHIOPIA +251 918 340337/911 523 931 +251 582 200104/582 200455 +251 582 202 012 E-MAIL: marketing@ethionet.et WEBSITE: www.bdtsc.gov.et

W e c a r e f o r y o u r h e a l t h ! 

`ˆÌi`Ê܈̅ʘvˆÝÊ* Ê `ˆÌœÀÊ ‡ÊvÀiiÊvœÀʘœ˜‡Vœ““iÀVˆ>ÊÕÃi° /œÊÀi“œÛiÊ̅ˆÃʘœÌˆVi]ÊۈÈÌ\Ê ÜÜÜ°ˆVi˜ˆ°Vœ“É՘œVŽ°…Ì“

Daily Production Capacity: SPINNING: 15 tons of yarn. WE AVING: 95,000 m2 of fabric. PROCESSING: > 125,000 m2 of fabric. GARMENT: 10,000 pairs of bed sheets. Environmental Friendly Process Waste Water Treatment Plant with daily capacity of 1,000 m3 per day.

BAHIR DAR TEXTILE SHARE COMPANY, BAHIR DAR/ETHIOPIA +251 918 340337/911 523 931 +251 582 200104/582 200455 +251 582 202 012 E-mail: marketing@ethionet.et Website: www.bdtsc.gov.et


“ My mobile saves my wife  and son’s life… ” ----- by Tefaye, a farmer from Eastern Africa

“If it was not for this mobile, I couldn’t have found the doctor who was far from my house when my wife started giving birth in a hurry and had labour difficulties. Now, you see, I can talk with anybody at anytime from anywhere. Even if I stay in my house, my coffee can be sold at a good price. I’m really grateful to my mobile, it not only brings me a little wealth but it has also saved my wife’s and my son’s lives.” ZTE is employing mobile and internet technologies to enhance access to, and the quality of, public services in Africa. More than 60  million african people are now enjoying the freedom and benefits of modern communications with ZTE mobile devices. As a global leader  in  telecom  solutions,  we  design  everything  specifically  to  meet  the  exact  needs  of  individual  operators  and  their  customers.  Begin  building the mobile devices your customers really need at www.zte.com.cn.


Contents |

selamta

Features On the Cover

Author Majka Burhardt makes a first ascent of “Vertical Baboon,” a till-then unexplored route up the sandstone cliffs of Northern Ethiopia.

Hollywood of the North

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Toronto’s thriving film industry.

Kenya’s Mobile Tech Revolution

42

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Nairobi takes its place among the global I.T. community.

The Petronas Towers

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Combining the cultural beauty of Malaysia with hopes for its future.

Kristie Arend climbs “Jewel in the Sand” — a first ascent up a sandy buttress outside Gheralta, Ethiopia.

Vertical Ethiopia

G AB E RO G E L / RO G E L M E D IA

Exploring new angles of an ancient country.

selamtamagazine.com

Selamta brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Join us online for more of the adventure of travel, the vitality of business and the richness of culture found in Ethiopia, Africa and the world.

contact editor@selamtamagazine.com, advertising@selamtamagazine.com facebook.com/selamtamagazine

twitter.com/selamtamagazine

january/february 2013

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selamta

| Contents

Departments

5 from the ceo

6 news Ethiopian Airlines lands in Kuala Lumpur and celebrates key awards.

60 cuisine Learning to cook, Zanzibar-style.

11 around addis Where to sample the capital’s best Italian sweets.

62 24 hours Delhi: Many a splendid thing.

16 diplomacy + development Optometrists on the rise in Mozambique, plus an effort to save India’s tigers. 18 events + excursions What to do with a few extra days in Dubai, London or Rome. 20 Hotels + Hotspots A luxurious safari lodge in the Serengeti and a zen-like oasis in Beijing. 22 style + substance Video-game watches and cushions that rock.

Spotlight 55 faces Musician Meklit Hadero opens minds and creates connections. selamtamagazine.com

Sheba

59 Travel tools Big pictures from small cameras.

Panorama

14 commerce + capital Ancient Egypt returns to life, and the Palace of Versailles travels on wheels.

4

58 take 5 Free traditions in London.

64 1,000 words Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

Fly Ethiopian 67 travel tips In-flight exercises to keep you limber, helpful pointers for travel to Ethiopia, and a quick introduction to Amharic.

duty-free catalog Arguably the best African shopping in the sky — a selection of must-have items at duty-free prices.

70 fleet 72 route maps 76 Sales and agents offices

Entertainment 81 movies, tv, audio 91 puzzles 96 Vintage A glimpse into the past.

D H OX A X / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M

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From the CEO |

selamta

Welcome Aboard Esteemed Customers,

ክቡራን ደንበኞቻችን

t is my pleasure to welcome you aboard and to wish you a happy and prosperous 2013. In the New Year, we will continue to introduce improvements in our products and service delivery, with the aim of further enhancing your travel experience with us. We will phase-in brand new aircraft, including our fifth B787 Dreamliner, our sixth B737-800 with sky interior, our sixth B777-200 LR and our first B777-300 ER. We will also complete the expansion project of our business class (Cloud Nine) lounge at our main hub in Addis Ababa Airport, which will contain new amenities and facilities such as a spa and an Ethiopian cultural corner. The year 2013 also marks the golden jubilee of the African Union. Its predecessor, the Organization of African Unity, was established on 25 May 1963 in Addis Ababa. Since then, Ethiopian Airlines, with its motto of bringing Africa together and closer to the world, has played a key role in advancing the organization’s core objectives by enabling mobility and connectivity, which are essential for socio-economic development. We firmly believe that the 21st century will be an African century. With its young and dynamic population, most of the world’s uncultivated arable land, untapped natural resources, a rising middle class, and fast economic growth, Africa will be the next and perhaps the last frontier in the advancement of globalization. Ethiopian’s fast-growth strategic roadmap, Vision 2025, is based on the conviction that Africa’s time has indeed come. Major infrastructure facilities will be completed at our main hub in Addis Ababa Airport to lay the foundation for the progressive realization of the overarching objectives in our Vision. By February 2013, we expect to inaugurate the new building of our US FAA and EASA certified Aviation Academy as well as the new cold chain cargo warehouse — with an extra 65,000 tons per year capacity to cater to the ever-growing horticulture exports from Ethiopia. Moreover, we are in the process of building a new cargo terminal with a total design capacity of 1.2 million tons per year, which will make it one of the biggest in the world. As the largest cargo operator in Africa, we have a decisive competitive advantage of offering total cargo solutions to our continent’s business travelers through our extensive cargo network covering Africa, the Middle East, Europe and Asia. I thank you for choosing to fly with us and wish you a pleasant flight.

ኢትዮዽያ አየር መንገድ ለመብረር እንኳን ደህና መጣችሁ እያልኩኝ መልካም የአውሮፓውንያን አዲሰ ዓመት እንዲሆንላችሁ እመኛለሁ። በአዲሱ ዓመት ከኛ ጋር የምታደርጉት በረራ ሁሉ የተሳካ እንዲሆን የጀመርናቸውን የአገልገሎት ጥራት ማሻሻያዎች አጠናክረን እንቀጥላለን። በርካታ አዳዲስ አውሮኘላኖችንም እናስመጣለን። ከነዚህም ውስጥ፥ አምሰተኛው ቦይንግ 787 ድሪምላይነር፣ ስድስተኛው ቦይንግ 737-800 ስካይ ኢንቴሪየር፤ ስድስተኛው ቦይንግ 777-200LR እንዲሁም የመጀመሪያው ቦይንግ 777-300ER ይገኙበታል። ከዚህም በተጨማሪ በያዝነው ዓመት የጀመርነውን በቦሌ ዓለም አቀፍ አውሮፕላን ማረፊያ የሚገኘውን የክላውድ ናይን መንገደኞች ማስተናገጃ ሳሎን ማስፋፊያ እናጠናቅቃለን። ሥራው ሲጠናቀቅም በውስጡ ስፓና የተለያዩ መዝናኛዎችን ያካተተ ይሆናል። ከዚህም በተጨማሪ በአውሮውፓውያን ቀመር 2013 የአፍሪካ ሕብረት 50ኛ ዓመት የምስረታ በዓሉን ያከብራል። ቀዳሚ የነበረው የአፍሪካ አንድነት ድርጅት የተመሰረተው እ.ኤ.አ. ግንቦት 25 ቀን 1963 እዚሁ አዲሰ አበባ ውስጥ ነው። ከዚያን ጊዜ ጀምሮ የኢትዮጰያ አየር መንገድ “አፍሪካን እርስ በርስ ማገናኘት እና ከአለም ጋር ማቀራረብ” በሚለው መርህ መሰረት የአፍሪካ አንድነት ድርጅትን ዓላማ በማሳካት ለማህበራዊና ኢኮኖሚያዊ እድገት ከፍተኛ አስተዋፅኦ ሲያበረክት ቆይቷል። 21ኛው ክፍለ ዘመን የአፍሪካ ዘመን እንደሆነ በፅኑ እናምናለን። አፍሪካ በወጣቶች የተሞላች ፤ በአለም ሰፊ የሚታረስ መሬት የያዘች ፤ በርካታ መካከለኛ ገቢ ያላቸው ህዝቦች እየተፈጠሩ ያሉባት እዲሁም ፈጣን የኢኮኖሚ እድገት እያስመዘገበች ያለች አህጉር በመሆኗ በቀጣይነት የግሎባላይዜሽን ማዕከል ትሆናለች። የኢትዮዽያ አየር መንገድ ፈጣን የእድገት አቅጣጫ “ራዕይ 2025” የተቀረፀው የአፍሪካ የለውጥ ዘመን መምጣቱን በማመላከት ነው። በቦሌ አለም አቀፍ አውሮፕላን ማረፊያ የጀመርናቸውን ትልልቅ የማስፋፊያ እቅዶቻችን በቅርቡ ሲጠናቀቁ ለራዕያችን መሳካት ምቹ ሁኔታዎችን ይፈጥራሉ። በአውሮፓውያኑ የዘመን ቀመር የካቲት ወር 2013 ላይ በአሜሪካና አውሮፓ በአቪዬሽን ጥራት ተቆጣጣሪዎች እውቅና ለተሰጠው የአቪዬሽን ማሰልጠኛ ተቋማችን የምናሰራውን አዲስ ሕንፃ እንዲሁም ተጨማሪ 65 000 ቶን መያዝ የሚችል አዲስ ቀዝቃዛ የእቃ ጭነት መጋዘን እናስመርቃለን። ከዚህም በተጨማሪ አዲስ የእቃ ጭነት ተርሚናል በመስራት ሂደት ላይ ያለን ሲሆን ሥራው ሲጠናቀቅም በዓመት 1.2 ሚሊዮን ቶን እቃ በማስተናገድ በዓለም በጣም ትልቅ ከሚባሉት ተርሚናሎች አንዱ ይሆናል። በአፍሪካ ትልቁን የእቃ ጭነት መጓጓዣ አገልግሎት የምንሰጥ እንደመሆናችን በአውሮፖ፤ በመካከለኛው ምስራቅና በአፍሪካ እየተስፋፋ በሚገኘው የአገልግሎት መስመራችን አማካይነት ለአህጉሪቱ የንግድ ተጓዦች ተስማሚ የሆነ ሁሉን አቀፍ የእቃ ጭነት አገልግሎት እንሰጣለን። የኢትዮዽያ አየር መንገድን የበረራ ምርጫችሁ ስላደረጋችሁ ከልብ አመሰግናለሁ። መልካም በረራ!

I

Tewolde GebreMariam

Chief Executive Officer, Ethiopian Airlines january/february 2013

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selamta

| News

Ethiopian Airlines Lands in Kuala Lumpur

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ethiopianairlines.com

When Dr. Chia Njiti boarded ET flight 618 from Addis Ababa to Kuala Lumpur on October 31st, he had no idea he was about to participate in a historic journey. As one of the passengers on Ethiopian Airlines’ maiden flight to Malaysia, the Cameroonian physician was welcomed with a rose and a gift bag at the departure gate. The treats continued in the air, as the cabin crew served cake and champagne. “I booked at the last minute, and I didn’t know this was an inaugural flight,” said Dr. Chia as the plane approached cruising altitude. “I am pleasantly surprised. It’s an honor to be a part of making history.”  Kuala Lumpur, capital of Malaysia, is the 70th destination to be added to Ethiopian Airlines’ growing international network. Kuala Lumpur International Airport is one of Asia’s busiest airports, with more than 40 million passengers passing through its gates every year. Ethiopian is the 60th airline to be welcomed there.  A large contingent of Malaysian officials was on hand to welcome the new Ethiopian flight, including representatives from the Ministry of Tourism, KLIA and the Malaysian Transport Minister, Datuk Seri Kong Cho Ha. At the inaugural press conference, Ato Isaias Woldemariam, Ethiopian’s vice president of global sales, predicted that the new Kuala Lumpur route would be a catalyst for increased trade between Asia’s “tiger” economies and Africa’s fast-growing “roaring lions.”  Ethiopian Airlines’ entrance into the Malaysian market has also triggered discussions of a partnership with Malaysian Airlines. Code-sharing agreements are currently being planned that will allow Ethiopian Airlines’ passengers to fly into Kuala Lumpur and then connect to cities across Asia via the Malaysian Airlines network. In turn, Malaysian Airlines’ customers would have access to Ethiopian Airlines’ network of 44 destinations across Africa.

( AL L ) R AH MAN ROSL AN

Officials from Ethiopian Airlines and Kuala Lumpur International Airport join forces to celebrate the airline’s inaugural flight to its 70th international destination, including a salute from two water canons on the runway (below).


top awards

News |

selamta

doing good

African CEO of the Year

African Airline of the Year

In November 2012, Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde GebreMariam received one of four awards granted to top African businesses and business leaders: African CEO of the Year. The other awards, all granted by African CEO Forum at its first gathering of top-level business leaders, were Private Equity Investor of the Year, International Corporation of the Year and African Company of the Year. The Africa Report calls African CEO of the Year “the most coveted” of the four awards. “I am honored,” Tewolde said. “The award is a recognition of all employees of Ethiopian whose tireless and continuous dedication and hard work is making Ethiopian Airlines the leading aviation company in Africa.” African CEO Forum was organized by African Development Bank and Groupe Jeune Afrique, publisher of The Africa Report.

Ethiopian Airlines recently received two awards from African Travel Quarterly magazine: African Airline of the Year and Africa Legend of Travel. The latter was bestowed specifically on Captain Desta Zeru, vice president of flight operations (above). Ethiopian was given the awards during Akwaaba: African Travel Market Exhibition, an annual event that focuses on the aviation, travel and tourism sectors in Africa. Ethiopian received the airline award for its excellent service and pioneering spirit in the aviation industry in Africa with the introduction of the continent’s first Boeing 787 Dreamliner. “Ethiopian Airlines, in the last one year, has made Africa proud and smaller,” said event organizers. “As Africa emerges as a united group of nations, Ethiopian has been driving this integration by opening new routes and linking neighbors. The B787 is the icing on the African Aviation pie.” Captain Desta was recognized as the first African captain to fly the Dreamliner.

great ethiopian run

( AL L ) E T H I O P IAN AI R L I N E S

Ethiopian Airlines personnel and guests celebrate with the winning male ambassadors and Haile Gebrselassie.

Since 2001, more than 200,000 runners have competed in the annual 10-kilometer Great Ethiopian Run. Elite runners also compete (cofounder and Olympian Haile Gebrselassie won the 2011 men’s race), but the GER primarily showcases up-andcoming talent in this country known for the long-distance runners it produces. The November 2012 race saw approximately 36,000 runners, including ambassadors and members of the diplomatic community. Ethiopian Airlines sponsors the ambassadors race as part of the greater GER.

Dreamliner Delivers Humanitarian Aid Ethiopian Airlines’ third Boeing Dreamliner arrived in Addis Ababa on October 24, 2012, with a full load of precious cargo: 20,000 pounds of humanitarian aid for the city’s Black Lion Hospital. The Boeing Humanitarian Delivery Flights program is a collaborative effort between Boeing, airline customers and nonprofit organizations to deliver humanitarian aid to communities in need or crisis. The humanitarian items are loaded into the empty cargo space of new airplanes being delivered to the customer’s home destination. In this case, Ethiopian Airlines’ nonprofit partner was Seattle Anesthesia Outreach. The shipment included several anesthesia machines, monitoring equipment, intensive care beds and other surgical equipment. Additionally, SAO sent more than 20 medical personnel to help set up the equipment and teach in Addis Ababa’s hospital. “Thanks to this partnership,” said Dr. Julian Judelman, board member of Seattle Anesthesia Outreach, “we have been able to ship 40 tons of medical equipment over the last two years at little to no cost, which is important for a small nonprofit organization like ours.” Ethiopian Airlines is committed to support worthy social activities that help build sustainable livelihoods.

january/february 2013

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selamta

| About

Contributors Volume 30 | Number 1

Tyler Anderson is a photojournalist based in Toronto, where he works as a staff photographer at the National Post. A two-time Canadian Photojournalist of the Year, he has covered such assignments as the 2012 London Olympic Games and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. He recently spent time in northern Uganda documenting the country's recovery from its long civil war. See “Hollywood of the North” on p. 34. Rooted in: Toronto, Canada Best meal while traveling abroad: White Rose dumplings, made from a secret family recipe found only in Hoi An, Vietnam.

Majka Burhardt is an author, professional climber, filmmaker and entrepreneur. She has an uncanny knack for blending vertical exploration with multistage international ventures focused on current cultural and global issues. Read about her climbing adventures in “Vertical Ethiopia” on p. 24. Rooted in: New Hampshire (USA) Best meal while traveling abroad: A gemsbok (a type of antelope) steak in Windhoek, Namibia, after a month-long trip culminating in a new technical rock climbing route up the Brandberg, Namibia's highest peak.

Selamta — meaning “Greetings” in Amharic — is published bimonthly on behalf of Ethiopian Airlines by JourneyGroup+C62, LLC. JourneyGroup+C62, LLC 418 Fourth Street, NE TK Building Charlottesville, VA 22902 Office #102 U.S.A. Bole Road +001 434 961 2500 (phone) Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +001 434 961 2507 (fax) +251 116 180365 (phone) EXECUTIVE GROUP Managing Director Executive Editor Creative Director Marketing Director

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Photography Editor Associate Editor Sr. Writer/Photog. Writer/Researcher Researcher

Diane J. McDougall Phil De Jong Jr. Jodi Macfarlan Ron Londen Hope Mills Kalkidan Mulugeta

DESIGN Design Director Digital Director Production Designer

Laura Cameron is a freelance magazine and newspaper writer who covers a range of topics, including business, crime and the arts. After spending a year divided between the wilderness of Northern Ontario and the Antipodes, she returned to the adventures of city life in her hometown of Toronto. She introduces us to the Canadian metropolis in “Hollywood of the North” on p. 34. Rooted in: Toronto, Canada Best meal while traveling abroad: Pastry-wrapped Cornish game hen in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Philip De Jong Amanuel Mengistu Greg Breeding John Baltes

Mike Ryan Zack Bryant Lindsay Gilmore

PRODUCTION Production Director Lead Developer Production/Sales Printing

EDITORIAL BOARD Mengistu Adelahu Philip De Jong Diane J. McDougall

Brad Uhl Josh Bryant Belsabe Girma Emirates Printing, Dubai Amanuel Mengistu Tsedenia Tadesse

ADVERTISING Journeygroup+c62, LLC

Carla Sapsford Newman is a freelance journalist who has covered stories floating up the Amazon, on the high seas off Africa, in the shadow of Rio de Janeiro's Christ the Redeemer statue and more. Her first career in nonprofit development sent her to Ethiopia, where she fell in love with the people and yirgacheffe. See “The Petronas Towers” on p. 48. Rooted in: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Best meal while traveling abroad: Castelli’s in Addis Ababa, where she experienced truffles, espresso and grappa for the first time.

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International sales

Azariah Mengistu TK Building Office #102 Bole Road Addis Ababa, Ethiopia +251 116 180365 (phone) +251 116 180367 (fax) azariah@C62media.com

North America Sales

Sam Voelkel 418 Fourth Street, NE Charlottesville, VA 22902 U.S.A. +001 434 961 2500 (phone) +001 434 961 2507 (fax) samv@journeygroup.com

As the continent’s premier carrier and a member of the prestigious Star Alliance, Ethiopian Airlines brings Africa to the world and the world to Africa. Selamta does the same, celebrating the adventure of travel, the vitality of Africa’s role in global business affairs, and the richness of culture across all of Ethiopian Airline’s many, varied destinations. This complimentary copy is yours to keep. While every care is taken to ensure accuracy, the publisher and Ethiopian Airlines assume no liability for error or omissions in this publication. All advertisements are taken in good faith, and the opinions and views contained herein are not necessarily those of the publisher. All copyrights and trademarks are recognized. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without written permission by the publisher. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review. © 2013.

L I N DSAY G I L M O R E / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Gabe Rogel is an adventure photographer who has been known to stand on the hoods of moving vehicles, rappel off 3,000-foot rock walls and ski from the summit of an 8,000-meter peak for the perfect image. Check out the images he captured of climbing the Gheralta Mountains in “Vertical Ethiopia” on p. 24. Rooted in: Idaho (USA) Best meal while traveling abroad: Dinner on a remote beach in Thailand with my new bride, Sara. Between the stars overhead, the gentle waves lapping the shore, the sand underfoot, my new wife across from me and, oh, the fresh-caught fish poached in coconut-milk curry, the meal was memorable, to say the least.


The Power of Friendship


Many imitations, only one original.

Addis Ababa Branch Offices: Urael +251 118 96 44 91 Piassa +251 118 96 44 90

Other African Country Contacts: Kenya 020 2086655 Tanzania 022 2775138 Uganda 071 2853285 Nigeria 080 33126151 Ghana 0243 284859 South Africa 021 4265810 Angola 923341083 Other +44 1525 634255


co m p i l e d by h o p e m i l l s

panorama around addis 11 | commerce + capital 14 |

dIplomacy + development 16 | events + excursions 18 | hotels + hotspots 20 | style + substance 22

Around Addis Although Ethiopian food still dominates the local restaurant scene in Addis Ababa, when it comes to foreign dishes, Italian reigns supreme. This preference is particularly pronounced in the area of cakes, pastries and all things sweet. The Italian influence stems largely from the many Italians who settled in Addis after World War II. A significant number entered the hospitality business, establishing restaurants, cafÊs and bakeries. These establishments eventually won over the palates of the local people. Today, Italian desserts are considered a hometown favorite. Turn to page 12 for our recommendations of the best Italian desserts that Addis Ababa has to offer — and where to find them.

top view

T Z ACHAR IAS AB U B E K E R

o try some of the best panna cotta in the city (left), head to Top View, in Yeka hills above Meganagna. With a panoramic view of Addis Ababa, this restaurant offers the perfect location in which to linger over the rich, vanilla-infused custard dish. for more of our picks, turn to page 12.

january/february 2013

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Around Addis

bruno’s As the weather heats up, the sweetest way to beat the heat is with a few scoops of cool gelato — Italy’s version of ice cream. Bruno’s, located on the road behind Bole Medanealem Church, is one of Addis Ababa’s top gelaterias, serving such delectable flavors as hazelnut, strawberry, coffee and mango. Juventus club

Juventus Club, just behind Meskel Square, has been a gathering place for Addis Ababa’s Italian community for more than six decades. Thankfully, you don’t have to be a club member to enjoy the wide range of authentic Italian dishes, including crème caramel, a sweet, egg-based pudding topped with a layer of caramelized sugar.

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don vito ristorante

One of Addis Ababa’s most popular Italian eateries, Don Vito Ristorante (located near to Atlas Hotel) is known for its pizza, clay pan-baked lasagna and tiramisu. The latter, a coffee-soaked cake with sweet cream and topped with a dusting of cocoa powder, goes perfectly with a piping hot cup of Ethiopian coffee.

( BOT TO M L E F T ) A Z AR IAH M E N G IST U / C 62 ( OT H E RS ) Z ACHAR IAH AB U B E K E R

Enrico’s

For the best millefoglie — a cake that combines multiple layers of flaky puff pastry with thick chantilly cream — head to historic Enrico’s in Piazza. One of the first pastry shops in Ethiopia, Enrico’s was established in 1953. Many decent competitors have emerged over the years, but Enrico’s is still the go-to location for authentic, madefrom-scratch millefoglie. In fact, customers who don’t arrive early enough in the day will often find the shop sold out of the tasty treat.


pa n oram a

Commerce + Capital

Tomb Revival

Versailles on Wheels

The Palace of Versailles is currently riding around Paris via commuter train. Palace officials recently came together with the national rail operator to transform an RER transit system train into carriages resembling the royal palace. The new décor, achieved through high-tech plastic film covering the walls, includes lavish paintings and golden statues reminiscent of different areas of the palace and its grounds. 14

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Golden Days

Sudan’s first gold refinery recently opened in Khartoum, where 328 tons of gold will be produced every 12 months, making the refinery one of the largest plants in Africa. The country hopes to sell up to US$3 billion in gold this first year (more than doubling last year’s revenue).

Ethiopia Gets a Little Sweeter

Ethiopia is on a sugar high. With the help of loans from the China Development Bank Corporation and others, Ethiopia Sugar Corporation is building two sugar refineries in the South Omo Zone — a project that is creating jobs for local pastoralists. The company hopes these new refineries will help it reach its goal of making Ethiopia one of the world’s top 10 sweetener exporters by 2025.

( C W F RO M TO P ) SE T H N I CK E RSO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P, N O R MAN CHAN , ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P, WE N N . CO M

Ancient Egypt is returning to life. After a decade-long restoration period, the country has reopened its second-largest pyramid, along with six tombs in the Giza necropolis. Thanks to these extensive renovations, tourists can now visit more ornately painted resting places, including that of Queen Meresankh III, granddaughter of the king who built the nearby Great Pyramid at Giza. Egypt is expecting that the historical beauty carved into the walls of these ancient burial sites will keep tourists booking flights to Egypt.


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Diplomacy + Development

Saving India’s Tigers

inspirational bug

The Namib Desert Beetle is one tough bug. Dwelling in one of the world’s driest climates (only half an inch of rain each year), the Namib survives by harvesting moisture from morning fog and then storing the water on its back. Now, a U.S. startup called NBD Nano is using the beetle’s survival methods as inspiration. The start-up is finishing its first fully functioning prototype and hopes to create a cost-effective way to provide water to dry regions of the world. And, according to The World Health Organization, roughly 3 billion people live where water is scarce.

India’s tiger reserves have long been popular tourist spots. But if you’re headed to one in the next couple of months with hopes of seeing the powerful cats, you might have to wait awhile. The dwindling number of tigers in India — which is home to half of the world’s population — has caused a new (temporary) ban on tourism inside core areas of the 41 reserves. Conservationists hope this decision will protect the 1,700 tigers left in the world.

Cashing in on Cashews Thirty years ago, cashew farming was a booming industry in Kenya. Gradually, the lack of direct access to processing plants and competitive markets caused a significant drop in market price. Many farmers began to give up on the crop. But a new government project wants to bring the boom back by distributing new seedlings, helping farmers establish associations and providing training to help them better manage their harvests. The Nut Processors Association of Kenya thinks cashew output could increase fourfold — to 40,000 tons a year — by 2015. 16

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Seaweed — yes, the slimy stuff found in oceans worldwide — might soon prove to be a valuable resource. Recent studies show that a genetically engineered microbe can turn seaweed into a low-carbon biofuel. It could, in theory, supply the world’s energy needs several times over. Challenges remain in making the process economically viable, but hopes are high. In the meantime, seaweed keeps on growing.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) K AR E L G AL L AS / SH U T T E RSTO CK . cO M , JAM E S LO U G H MAN , CO L E T T E 3 / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , K E N N E T H D E D E U / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , L I N DSAY G I L M O R E / J O U R N E YG RO U P

The New Energy Source: Seaweed


pa n oram a

Events + Excursions End up with an extra few days in Rome, London or Dubai? Here are a few events you can easily join, whether for one hour or five.

Carnevale in Rome If you find yourself in Rome this February, don’t miss a chance to participate in Carnevale, the traditional celebration that takes place 40 days before Easter. In fact, it might be difficult to avoid, with all the parades and parties, music and masks. Get the latest on all the festivities at selamta.co/carnevale.

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www.yolyhotel.com tel (011.25111) 663.2828 p.o.box 5668 Addis Ababa

selamtamagazine.com

CO U RT E SY O F CAR N E VAL E

February 2013


january–April 2013

Sandance in dubai

CO U RT E SY O F LO N D O N ’ S ROYAL ACAD E MY, CO U RT E SY O F SAN DAN CE

January–April 2013

Manet in London London’s Royal Academy will host 50 of French painter Edouard Manet’s portraits between January 26 and April 14. The exhibit — Manet: Portraying Life — spans the artist’s career, presenting well-known works from public collections as well as private owners. The curator also promises a few surprises. Intrigued? Visit selamta.co/manet.

Sandance, a music festival in Dubai that coincides with the city’s cooler months, begins in October and occurs monthly through April. Only three years old, the festival has already brought in artists like Omar Basaad, Mat Kearney, The Fray, Frankie Knuckles and DJ Wire. The Atlantis Hotel provides a beachside venue for each month’s 12-hour event, so bring your swimsuit and be ready to party in the moonlight. To buy tickets and see who’s performing during your next visit, go to selamta.co/sandance.

ROHA HOTEL Lalibela

Roha Hotel provides all the services you need and expect from a 3-star hotel. A beautiful 3-star hotel to stay at when you visit the rock-hewn churches of Lalibela, Ethiopia. Tel.: +251-115525323, 115541534 Fax: +251-11515868 E-mail: reservation@rohahotels.com or info@rohahotels.com Website: www.rohahotels.com


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Hotels + Hotspots

Bahir Dar, Ethiopia: Blue Nile

brussels, belgium: hotel bloom

Next time business or pleasure takes you to Brussels, treat yourself to a stay in a hotel where every room features original work by European artists. There are other perks too — like the hotel’s central location near the botanical gardens; sleek meeting spaces with Wi-Fi, integrated screens and LCD projects; and SmoodS, the hip living-room–styled restaurant where “atmospheric islands” allow you to select exactly what mood you’re in and what you want to eat. The hotel blog also keeps you up-to-date on the latest things to do and see around the city. For more information, visit selamta.co/hotelbloom. 20

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Serengeti National Park: Four Seasons Safari Lodge

Over dinner at one of the Four Seasons Safari Lodge Serengeti’s restaurants, you just might watch a family of elephants ambling toward the skyline. And since the Safari Lodge is entirely within Serengeti National Park, the elephants aren’t the only wild animals that might enliven your stay. Boasting 60 rooms, 12 suites and five villas, as well as several restaurants, a spa and an infinity-edge swimming pool, the Lodge promises a unique experience with superior service.

Beijing, China: the opposite house A place of contrasts, the Opposite House will both surprise you and seem instantly comfortable and familiar. An emerald glass exterior conveys an oasis of calm, and once inside you can choose from a variety of rooms, each with plenty of natural light, high ceilings and under-floor heating. The oak bathtub in each room is the perfect place to unwind from the day. Afterward, enjoy dinner and a drink at one of the hotel’s five restaurants.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) CO U RT E SY O F B LU E N I L E H OT E L , CO U RT E SY O F FO U R SE ASO NS , CO U RT E SY O F T H E O P P OSI T E H O U SE , CO U RT E SY O F H OT E L B LO O M

The shore of Lake Tana — the Blue Nile’s birthplace and Ethiopia’s largest lake — is now home to Constellation Hotels & Resorts’ first Avanti resort. A mere 8 kilometers (roughly 5 miles) from the Bahir Dar Airport, the Blue Nile Hotel offers lake views from each of its 135 rooms, as well as from its multiple patios, bars and restaurants. No matter what your party size, you’ll find a space — and a view — that works for you.


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Come and visit us for all your vehicle & after sales needs, Ries Engineering Share Company Debrezeit road or at our showroom in front of Nyala Motors, P.O. Box 1116, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Tel: +251-11-4403506/+251-11-8-400617, Fax: +251-11-4420667, E-mail: ries.psd@ethionet.et, Website: www.riesethiopia.com

Come and visit us for all your vehicle & after sales needs, Ries Engineering Share Company Debrezeit road or at our showroom in front of Nyala Motors, P.O. Box 1116, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Tel: +251-11-4403506/+251-11-8-400617, Fax: +251-11-4420667, E-mail: ries.psd@ethionet.et, Website: www.riesethiopia.com


pa n oram a

Style + Substance

For more than 10 years, husband and wife Peter and Otsile Mabeo have been handcrafting award-winning furniture for their eponymous company, Mabeo. The couple collaborates with international designers and then brings the furniture to life with a team in Botswana. Mabeo has won several Editors’ Choice awards for best craftsmanship at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair. See their stunning array of work online at selamta.co/mabeo.

CO U RT E SY O F MAB E O / ASH L E Y WALTO N / J O U R N E YG RO U P

Fab Furniture

Use your

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Moving Forward


Cushions That Rock The softest stone you’ll sit on this year could be South African designer Ronél Jordaan’s rock cushions, made with a traditional felt material (100% cotton). Jordaan also creates rugs, throws and wall hangings. Even more importantly, her materials and dyes are eco-friendly, and she’s trained more than 40 previously unemployed women to become professional felters.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) CO U RT E SY O F RO N E L J O R DA AN , CO U RT E SY O F RO MAI N J E RO M E , CO U RT E SY O F N ISHAN T J E T H I

Portable PAC-MAN Pac-Man has been on T-shirts, hats and posters, but it’s never been the subject of a luxury watch — until now. Swiss-based company Romain Jerome is producing four different limited-edition styles, with only 20 in each style, inspired by one of the world’s most recognizable video games.

Not Just “A” Birdhouse These 3-D wooden alphabets and numbers are sleek and modern, and they double as birdhouses. Mumbai-based artist Nishant Jethi designed and created the hollow, wooden nameplates and house numbers as alternative homes for nearby sparrows losing their dwellings to new construction.


Vertical Ethiopia we ight

Exploring new angles of an ancient country. By Majka Burhardt

F

our women rock climbing in Ethiopia — climbing anywhere, really — are hard to miss. Each of us was adorned with 25 pounds of metal and nylon, and we took turns contorting our hands and feet into orange sandstone as we tried to get higher. Our purpose? Charting a new course into the unknown. Launching yourself up vertical inclines is not normal. I have learned that in my 17-year career as a climber. It is, however, glorious — when it works. And on that day in March 2007, it was glorious. Five months before, in October 2006, the idea of rock climbing in Ethiopia was no more than a hunch. I’d spent a week traveling through the country’s rich, green coffee lands doing research, during which I caught occasional glimpses of another landscape that would appear and then vanish. The basalt and limestone escarpments tucked into verdant valleys were playing tricks with my mind. I seized my first opportunity to learn more once I arrived in Jimma, the largest city in southwest Ethiopia. It took me five minutes to locate the singular Internet connection in the three-block radius of the downtown. Ten minutes later I watched a photo appear over the dial-up connection, horizontal line by horizontal line. The screen flickered. I waited, holding my breath. And then I saw confirmation: sanguine and orange bolts of sandstone stretching 600 feet into the sky. (continued on page 26)

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ge a r

25 lbs he i ght

p h o t o s b y GA B E ROGEL

of

of

cliffs

600 ft

4 tota l

wome n

| Kristie Arend climbs “Jewel in the Sand” — a first ascent up a sandy buttress outside Gheralta, Ethiopia.

cap ti on


sect i o n

o n e

of Vertical Ethiopia highe st

A

p oint

ethiopi a Im agined

t the time, Ethiopia was not known as a climbing destination. The world had been primed to pay attention to this country because of the stories of Axum, Haile Selassie I and the famine of 1984; stories of the Derg, the Queen of Sheba, coffee and more — but not climbing. Prior to 2006, even my concept of Ethiopia had been that of a dry, flat and barren land. That’s when I was exposed to the country’s coffee lands — and surprised by the mountains, jungles, bucolic abundance and bougainvillea. I learned that more than 60 percent of Ethiopia lies above 2,000 feet, the highest point being 14,928-foot Ras Dashen. None of this was the Ethiopia of my previous imagination. The moment I saw the sandstone towers in the photograph, Ethiopia became my next climbing destination. A plan came together quickly: assemble a team of top female climbers and a photographer, and commit to a book deal. Our goal was to expand the dialogue about Ethiopia and to do so via adventure. The sandstone towers were from the Gheralta Mountains in Tigray, 800 miles north of Jimma. My team flew to Mekelle, Tigray’s capital, and we set off driving north in the evening so that we arrived at the mountains in the darkness. Sunrise revealed overlapping massifs of towering rock formations tumbling together in a high desert landscape. We were climbing just a few hours later.

The moment I saw the sandstone towers in the photograph, Ethiopia became my next climbing destination.

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14,928 ft

c a p t i o n s | (Above) A local man climbs up the worn cliffside to Abuna Yemata, a rock-hewn church near Hawzein. (Opposite page) Author Majka Burhardt (far right) and three other climbers discuss potential routes up the Gheralta massif, outside the town of Megab.

section two

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way s a n d m e a n s

A

t its purest, rock climbing involves finding a weakness in an expanse of rock and exploiting that weakness to get to the top. There are many variations on this primary objective. If the rock face or cliff is long, then you need to puzzle it out in rope lengths, or pitches. When the climber puts several such sections together, the result is a multi-pitch climb. To keep yourself safe while climbing, you use a complex array of gear (see fig. 1 on page 30) called protection, and a nylon rope tested and rated to withstand forces far greater than what a long plummet might generate. In Ethiopia, the weaknesses we sought were cracks — pinky-finger size to head size. Cracks

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provide both a place to cram hands and feet to make upward progress and a place to put the protective gear that will keep you safe should you fall. These cracks were also a better and safer bet than the crumbling face surrounding them. On our first attempt at an ascent, I was roped-in with Helen Dudley. She and I had four days of climbing as a pair before the other women would arrive. I went first and reached my hands inside a yawning fissure and felt normalized by the stone biting against my flesh. This was what we had come for. The glory lasted approximately 25 feet. At that point, the crack, which had previously seemed like such a good idea, became a splayed and unstable pillar. It was time to find plan B: another crack on


s ec t i o n

t wo

c o n t i n u e d

Rock climbing involves exploiting a rock’s weakness. another rock formation that might yield to the human body. Helen and I retreated and hiked the hour back down to our truck to meet Teddy Berhanu, our driver, translator and liaison, who would soon become my closest friend and advisor in Ethiopia. “Are we finished climbing then?” Teddy asked when we arrived. It wasn’t clear if he meant for the day or forever. “We’re just getting started,” I said.

section three

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c a p t i o n s | (Opposite page) Climbers work in tandem, taking turns leading the way and finding the right cracks. (Top) Majka Burhardt chooses cams for the climb she is preparing to lead. (Above) Ethiopian life continues on around them.

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of Vertical Ethiopia

t hr e e

T

a commitment to vertical he reality of establishing first ascents is that you are often only actually climbing for five percent of your time. The other 95 percent of the time you spend hiking, discussing, trying, failing, hiking, discussing, doubting and then, if you are lucky, succeeding. Climbing in Ethiopia was no different in this regard, save for the fact that it was Ethiopia. Many places in the world offer vertical exploration in a cultural vacuum. In Ethiopia, that seclusion was impossible. We wound our way through farmers’ fields dodging last season’s dried-out barley shoots, around immaculately crafted stone houses and threaded terraces built to save soil, water and crops. The sun in the blue sky seared unforgivingly as we searched for our next line of possible ascent. Young children tucked their hands in ours, older children told us stories and taught us Tigrayan words, and soon parents and elders met us outside their homes and welcomed us inside. We drank barley beer; heard stories of a 1988 massacre that had happened right where we were spending our nights; listened to inspiring stories of new wells and schools; learned of boom harvests and lean harvests; held babies and shook everyone’s hand. I am a physical explorer. I am drawn to the tactile — feeling the arch of my foot roll over the unexpected pebble, running my thumb across boulders to know what the rock will feel like 400 feet above, tunneling my shoulders through a chute of branches and having the scratches to show for it. This is how I have gained complexity and understanding in other places. It is addictive. Yet Ethiopia’s complexity had become for me both human and physical.

fig.

1

/

s p o rt- c l i m b i n g

ge a r

l i st

• Climbing Ropes • climbing harness • rock climbing shoes • climbing helmet • Belays and Carabiners • Quickdraws

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Ethiopia’s complexity had become for me both human and physical.

c a p t i o n s | (Above) Children in the mountain village of Megab smile for the camera, before scampering up a rock face in tandem with the American climbers. (Opposite page) Helen Dudley places a cam into the crack — a spring-loaded device that will catch the rope and  climber in the event of a fall.

section four

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l e a r n i n g t h e h a r d way

H

elen and I hiked up to the towers I’d seen on that photo in Jimma and to a weakness we’d spied the day before. The climbing kept going this time, and once we were 200 feet up, I knew we’d be able to make it to the top of the spire. The feeling was brilliant. The feeling was emboldening. And then I saw a young boy poke his head out of a nearby bush. I’d just climbed 200 feet up a technical, vertical face — one that had taken Helen and me more than 90 minutes to conquer. That one boy was joined by another, and another. I was tethered in via a climbing rope; they moved freely to the edge of the face and back into what I’d learn was a deep, brush-choked gulley leading to our place of ascent. This pattern continued the rest of the way up the 500-foot climb. We took the technical, challenging way, and the children found an alternative. In the

end it was only the final summit mushroom that was ours alone. We opted for their non-technical route down and named our initial route “Learning the Hard Way.” When we arrived back at the base, Teddy was waiting, wondering what we were up to in that scalding sun. The children swarmed him, and we were curious to know if they had climbed that route before. With Teddy’s help translating, we learned that they had not. They’d simply followed our lead and started exploring in tandem. “Do they think we are crazy?” I asked Teddy to ask them. The children shook their heads no and laughed in response. “Do you?” we asked Teddy. “Yes.”

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sect i o n

f i v e

H

of Vertical Ethiopia

e t h i o pi a’ s p o s s i b i l i t i e s

elen and I, along with two other women*, went on to climb a half-dozen more routes in the Gheralta. And our story, Vertical Ethiopia: Climbing toward possibility in the Horn of Africa, was released in February 2008. Over the next year I went on a 50-event speaking tour and started a dialogue about Ethiopia in the midst of the current global landscape, where religion, politics and setting continually interact and react. The conversation has yet to end. Today, I still get monthly emails from curious climbers. Several have since gone to Ethiopia, some have established routes, and all have been touched

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greatly by the country and its people. But I also hear from nonclimbers who have simply fallen in love with this ancient land. I always write back and say what I still know is true: There is adventure to be had in Ethiopia. How much, how scary, how true, how certain is up to you. Climb, walk, mountain bike, run, hike. You will find a willing partner in Ethiopia. In exchange, I wager you’ll help give Ethiopia a more complex place at the table during the next global conversation.

[ conclusion ]


a f t e rwo rd

In the years since her first climbing trip in Ethiopia, Majka Burhardt has explored the country multiple times. In February 2013 she’ll return again for Accelerate Ethiopia — the firstever trail race in this country, supporting imagine1day and the Himalayan Cataract Project. You can purchase her book Vertical Ethiopia at her website (majkaburhardt.com), on Amazon.com, or — in Ethiopia — at Book World. * Majka Burhardt’s climbing partners, Helen Dudley, Caroline George and Kristie Arend, were each instrumental in establishing routes for that initial Ethiopia trip.

c a p t i o n s | (Opposite page) The topography of the Gheralta Mountains shows itself at sunset. (Above) The author purchases food in a local market during a break from climbing.

Fi nd Yo u r A dv e n t u re P o rta l

Climbing is not the only way to be tactile and to explore the beautiful complexities of Ethiopia. Given the nature of the soft rock, it might be better to forgo the climbing (unless you’re an expert with a penchant for the extreme) and try any of the following instead: » Hike virtually anywhere or everywhere, especially in the mountains around Addis Ababa. Other options include the Bale and Simien Mountains. » Join hundreds of other runners in Addis or in the countryside, taking to the streets and trails before dawn. Ethiopia’s running culture is thriving and inclusive of all. » Combine a visit to the churches of Lalibela with walking, hiking or mountain biking in the surrounding valleys and mountains. » Windsurf, paddle and swim northwest of Addis Ababa on Lake Langano in the Rift Valley.

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h o l ly w o o d o f t h e n o r t h Toronto’s thriving film industry. B y L a u ra C a m er o n p h o t o s b y T y ler A nders o n

A

nyone who watches Good Will Hunting is rooting for workingclass hero Matt Damon when he flaunts Minnie Driver’s phone number to a group of Harvard

students, challenging them with the now-famous line, “How do you like them apples?” What most people watching the movie do not realize is that they are looking at the Upfront Bar & Grill in downtown Toronto, not a campus pub in Boston. Avid movie watchers might be surprised how often — over the years, across all genres — they have been led to believe they were watching scenes shot in an American city, when they were actually seeing pieces of this Canadian metropolis.

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In many cases, Toronto’s signature characteristics are what enable it to morph into a different place altogether. In the 2007 production of Hairspray, the city’s iconic electric streetcars made it a perfect stand-in for 1960s Baltimore. In X-Men, Toronto’s 1914 citadel, Casa Loma, became Professor X’s school for the gifted. The 2000 satirical horror American Psycho stands as another example. Toronto native Mary Harron chose to film the New York City–based drama in her hometown because of the visual similarities between Toronto’s TD Centre and New York’s Seagram Building (both designed by Bauhaus architect Mies van der Rohe). The TD Centre, at the heart of the Canadian financial system, seamlessly transformed into Wall Street. At its core, Toronto is a patchwork of neighborhoods and cultures that are integrated into the broader metropolis, creating a truly multicultural fabric. Indeed, half of the city’s population hails from other countries. So it’s easy to see why director Joel Zwick chose a house in Toronto’s Greek area as the location for the Portokalos home in My Big Fat Greek Wedding, a story that was actually set in Chicago. Film lovers who visit Canada’s largest city will recognize other local landmarks that have been featured in movies ranging from art-house films to Hollywood blockbusters. In fact, the city’s popularity as a filming location is what originally earned it the moniker “Hollywood of the North” (despite Vancouver also claiming the title) — a reputation that is underscored by the surprising depth of its film landscape.

At its core, Toronto is a patchwork of neighborhoods and cultures that are integrated into the broader metropolis, creating a truly multicultural fabric.

Canada’s largest city, with its iconic CN Tower (above), plays host to the Toronto International Film Festival. TIFF rolls out the red carpet for directors and authors such as Deepa Mehta and Salman Rushdie (right). And the city’s classic Royal Cinema (left) serves as a daytime postproduction studio of movies that might one day be awardwinners.

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Abo u t

toronto

Nickname the queen city Country Canada Province Ontario Established August 27, 1793 (as York) Population 2,615,060 Ethiopian Airlines Flies twice-weekly

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Actress Laura Linney signs autographs for fans before stepping onto the red carpet during the gala screening of her new film, Hyde Park on Hudson.

F i l m , s t a r s and p r e s s

E

very September, the Toronto International Film Festival further bolsters Toronto’s reputation as a satellite of Los Angeles — rivaling the famous Cannes Film Festival in terms of press attention and stars. Yet TIFF’s distinction comes less from the red carpets and more from its position in the festival line-up as a place to strike distribution deals and launch Academy Award contenders. The atmosphere throughout the city during the festival is nothing short of electric. Everyone is talking about movies and celebrity sightings. In 2012, Ryan Gosling, Kristen Stewart, James Franco, Penelope Cruz and Christopher Walken were among the stars who made an appearance. From the cocktail waitress who volunteers at the fall festival on her days off, to people at the coffee shop fueling up for a Midnight Madness screening, film is on everyone’s mind. Bars stay open after hours and line-ups of hundreds of people snake through the city. Daniel Madore, an aspiring filmmaker from Los Angeles, travels to Toronto every year for the festival and buys a 20-pack of tickets. In 2012, he attended lectures by two of his icons: Brian De Palma, director of Scarface, and Rian Johnson, who made Looper, the sci-fi picture with Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt that kicked off the festival. “I feel like a little boy when I come to TIFF,” says Madore, who compares his two-week sojourn in Canada to his own version of film school. “I’ve loved movies all my life, and it reminds me why.” On the last day of the festival, there is a free screening of the film that won the People’s Choice Award, which in the past has been a bellwether for the Oscars. Back in 2008, the festival was initially considered just a pit stop on the way to DVD for Slumdog Millionaire; but after winning the People’s Choice Award, the film grossed more than $140 million at North American box offices and swept up eight Academy Awards.

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Eager moviegoers (below) patiently wait in line at the Bell Lightbox in hopes of securing tickets to one of hundreds of film screenings at last September’s film festival.

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In 2012, David O. Russell’s comedy-drama Silver Linings Playbook, starring Robert De Niro and Bradley Cooper, took the crowd-pleaser accolade. In recognition of Toronto’s status as a movie mecca, the city built the TIFF Bell Lightbox in 2010 to house the festival and provide a year-round anchor for the film industry. The building combines elements of a multiplex theater with architectural aspects of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The open, airy space embodies the aesthetic of an industrial loft, featuring high ceilings and contemporary building materials. The three-story atrium is encircled by a fluid loop of ramps and stairs leading up to a stepped roof, inspired by the Villa Malaparte in Capri, as featured in Jean-Luc Godard’s 1963 film Le Mépris. In addition to its five theaters, the Lightbox houses galleries, student centers, a library and an upscale market-bistro. During TIFF, it plays host to directors’ talks, gala presentations and press conferences.

Toronto’s historic theaters support a wide range of festivals in addition to the mega TIFF, with more than one theater celebrating a century of entertainment.


Historic cinemas

A

side from the TIFF, dozens of smaller film festivals have arisen to reflect Toronto’s multicultural richness, including: • Hot Docs (North America’s largest documentary festival) • Inside Out (Lesbian and gay film and video festival) • Rendezvous with Madness (sponsored by Toronto’s worldrenowned Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) • Toronto Jewish Festival • Reel Asian International Film Festival • Cinefranco (a celebration of francophone films from around the world) • ImagineNATIVE (the world’s largest festival showcasing indigenous media)

This broad range of festivals exists because of the handful of historic cinemas that host them, including the Revue in the Roncesvalles area. The 100-year-old cinema continues to show the silent films it screened during its heyday. The surrounding neighborhood rallied to raise $130,000 to purchase and preserve the Revue when it was threatened with closure in 2006. The Bloor is likewise celebrating its 100th year as a cinema in 2013, after reopening in March 2012 under new management. And the Royal, in the heart of Little Italy, where much of Toronto’s local film talent lives, has survived by converting into a post-production facility by day. The neighborhood surrounding the Royal is also a popular film location because of its old-fashioned gelaterias, colorful fruit markets, maple-lined boulevards and Victorian heritage homes. On a fall evening, nearby Clinton Street was shut down and filled with bright lights and costumed crime-fighters milling about while shooting Kick-Ass 2. And The F-Word, a romantic comedy starring Daniel Radcliffe (of Harry Potter fame), shot scenes inside the Royal two weeks prior to TIFF. In The F-Word, Toronto plays itself — a tough role for a city so used to pretending to be someone else. Like a character actor, the city has built its reputation on being able to transform into whatever a film demands. But whether it is posing as New York, Chicago, Baltimore or an alternate universe, a little bit of Toronto’s uniqueness always shines through. january/february 2013

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Mobi l e tec h revolut ion N a i r o b i ta k e s i t s p l a c e a m o n g t h e g lo b a l I . T . c o m m u n i t y .

cash has been disappearing at an alarming rate across the nation of Kenya. Workers in Nairobi and Mombasa have been commuting into town with surprisingly fewer shillings in their pockets than just a few years ago. The couriers who used to transport money from cities and towns to rural areas now travel empty-handed. Roadside vendors have started to advertise the fact that they would rather not accept paper currency. All of this is not the result of a financial crisis or political upheaval; rather, it stems from a revolution of a different sort: a technological one. Over the past half decade, Kenya has emerged — seemingly from nowhere — as a hotbed of innovation in the area of mobile money-transfer systems and for other types of software and services for mobile devices. Nearly 70 percent of Kenyan adults transfer money to each other via their mobile phones — the highest percentage of any country on earth — and more than US$320 million dollars are transferred via Kenyan mobile phones each month. According to The Economist, this adds up to a quarter of Kenya’s GNP. As a result, cash payments are rapidly being replaced by mobile-phone payments in virtually every sector of the nation’s economy. This emergence of a digital transaction culture has also sparked a creative renaissance in Nairobi’s software-development scene, and the city is attracting attention from prominent members of the global IT community. After a visit to the city in late 2010, influential tech blogger and Harvard researcher Ethan Zuckerman wrote on his blog that “Kenya matters because it’s one of the places where the future of technology is coming into focus, where a generation of creative people are building the future, one experiment at a time.” While Kenya’s rapid adoption of mobile technology was in many ways unexpected, it did not emerge by happenstance. Rather, it was the result of several factors working together throughout the past decade: telecom infrastructure development, unique social dynamics and an enabling regulatory environment. or several years now,

illustrations by matt pamer

B y A m a n u e l M e n g i s t u AND S a m u e l I m e n d e

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Mobile mone y mov eme nt

MOBILE PHONES IN AFRICA Non-smart phones Smart phones Source: Informa Telecoms & Media

2011

In 2011, there were 32 nonsmart phones for every one smart phone.

2015

In 2015, there will be 5.6 non-smart phones for every smart phone.

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s recently as 1999, Kenya’s telecommunications infrastructure was rudimentary at best. There were only 300,000 landline telephones, and mobile phone service had only just been introduced. Later that year, Kenya’s telecom sector was deregulated, and the state-owned behemoth — Kenya Posts and Telecommunications Corporation — was broken apart. The formerly state-owned wireless monopoly, Safaricom, soon grew to dominate the market for wireless services, even as several major international operators brought competition. The mobile payments revolution was birthed in 2007 by Safaricom, when an SMSbased money-transfer system was introduced (originally as a solution for microlending programs) and piloted in Nairobi. The application was dubbed M-Pesa (pesa is Swahili for “money”), and its usage as a simple method of money transfer spread like wildfire among Safaricom’s large user population. M-Pesa allows users to load money onto their phones (similar to how airtime is loaded onto pre-paid phones) and then send that money to another phone through a simple text message. The introduction of M-Pesa coincided with the explosive growth of mobile phone usage across many developing countries, including Kenya. By 2012, more than 17 million Kenyans (roughly 70 percent of Kenya’s adult population) were using M-Pesa to pay for everything from groceries to public utilities. A couple of sociological reasons have been cited for why Kenya took to mobile money transfers so quickly. For one, an extremely high proportion of Kenya’s urban population helps support family members in rural parts of the country. Over the years, hand delivery and sending bundles of cash through bus drivers were the main ways to transfer funds to the countryside. With security being an issue in many areas, the introduction of M-Pesa offered a safe, cheap and convenient alternative. Additionally, when the idea of mobile payments was introduced, the majority of Kenyans did not have access to formal financial services. With the advent of M-Pesa, any mobile phone could operate like a mini banking center. With Safaricom, users can bypass the formal banking sector — a point not lost on Kenya’s banking sector and government regulators. Although concerns were raised about whether M-Pesa should be legally viewed as a bank, a regulatory framework was set up with the Central Bank of Kenya; within this framework, Safaricom can operate efficiently without the burden of being regulated like a financial services provider. Safaricom’s chief competitors, including Zain (now Airtel) and Orange, soon developed their own versions of M-Pesa, significantly broadening the market.

A nourishi ng e n v ironme nt for tech nology oday, Kenya has become host to a flourishing ecosystem where numerous software applications, services and even social habits have emerged from the country’s aptitude, and appetite, for mobile transaction platforms. One of the most significant software innovations to emerge from Kenya is Ushahidi, an application that allows large groups of people to submit crisis-related information via email, social media or text message, which can then be visualized on an online map. The service was originally developed by Kenyan software developer David Kobia in response to the 2007 post-election crisis, when obtaining accurate, on-the-ground information became extremely difficult. Because it can be deployed quickly and allows first-responders to analyze incident reports through a digital dashboard of sophisticated tools, Ushahidi has since been used in crisis-relief operations around the globe, including earthquake relief efforts in Chile, Haiti and Japan. Ushahidi has received numerous international awards and grants for its work, and the organization’s founders have leveraged this growing acclaim and influence to stoke the flames of Kenya’s software community.


“Kenya is not hamstrung by rigid regulations, which are major obstacles In most other African countries.” Erik Hersma n

AFRICA LEADS THE WAY Adults who use mobile money % of total Source: World Bank, 2011

70 60 50 40 30 20 10

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CHINA

INDIA

PHILIP p INES

AFGHANISTAN

TANZANIA

SUDAN

0 KENYA

In 2010, using a grant from philanthropic investment firm Omidyar Network, the company established iHub, a co-working space and community center for Nairobi’s technology entrepreneurs and creative professionals. Located in a building off Ngong Road, iHub is a constant buzz of activity, hosting everything from business entrepreneurship competitions to all-night computer code-writing sessions. Sitting in the middle of all this commotion is Erik Hersman, one of Ushahidi’s cofounders and an American by birth who has spent most of his life in Kenya. He says that government support has been critical to allowing all of this innovation to flourish. “Kenya is not hamstrung by rigid regulations,” he says, “which are major obstacles in most other African countries.” Dozens of new companies have been birthed from iHub, and the center has attracted attention — and funding — from international investors, researchers and leading tech companies (including Google, Microsoft and Nokia). The Kenyan government’s Internet Communications Technology board has even partnered with iHub on several initiatives. The head of the ICT board, Paul Kukubo, is the former CEO of a local tech start-up. Kukubo had experienced firsthand the challenges of competing globally in the IT industry during the years when Internet connections were expensive and bandwidth was limited. Today, Kenyan businesses can access world-class fiber-optic links to the rest of the world, and fierce telecom competition has significantly lowered connectivity prices. Kenya’s government is determined to leverage this improved infrastructure to provide jobs and economic growth for Kenya’s next generation. In a 2010 interview with The Financial Times, Kukubo projected that if 1 million jobs could be created by Kenya’s IT sector, “the service economy should surpass agriculture in five years.” The emerging success of Kenya’s mobile tech sector has also spurred several other national initiatives to put the nation on the global IT map. The government’s policy roadmap, Vision 2030, is heavily focused on infrastructure to create the foundation for sustainable economic growth. New fiber-optic networks are also being planned to enhance the nation’s telecommunications capacity. Major global tech firms such as Siemens, HP, IBM and Samsung have already set up operations in Kenya, and the government hopes many more will follow. Additionally, plans for a new technology-focused city called Konza have been laid out on a 2,000-hectare (roughly 4,940-acre) plot outside Nairobi. Konza will include office parks for science and technology firms, a university, retail outlets and residential facilities. Private investment is being sought for the elaborate plan, estimated to be completed in phases over a 20-year period at a total cost of US$7 billion.

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“THE CRITICAL POINT IN KENYA NOW IS TO CONVERT ALL THESE I.T. INNOVATIONS INTO VIABLE BUSINESSES.” A LI HUSSEIN

MOBILE PHONES IN AFRICA Mobile services are becoming cheaper and more powerful, while networks are doubling in bandwidth roughly every 18 months and expanding into rural areas. projected Total terabytes per month (millions) Source: Cisco, 2012 12 10 8 6 4 2

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

0

Th e roa d a h e a d

in the IT sector, however, the industry is still young, and only a handful of Kenyan IT success stories currently exist. Some Nairobi tech businesses — like those in Silicon Valley — murmur about a talent shortage, lamenting that a handful of successful companies seem to have swept up the best developers and programmers in the nation. Others have complained that the large influence and budgets of Kenya’s NGOs have kept many skilled professionals out of the private sector. Obtaining financing is also a challenge for young companies whose only assets are often lines of computer code sitting on a hard drive. Ory Okolloh knows that well. She’s one of Ushahidi’s co-founders and is currently Google’s policy manager for Africa. “A scenario I come across far too often,” Okolloh wrote in the March 2012 issue of MIT’s Technology Review, “is that a young African technologist with a great product . . . gets a chance to demonstrate it, to wide acclaim. But to translate it into an actual business opportunity, the innovator is expected to hand over cash or a 40-percent stake in the business.” Yet with sights set on its world-changing potential, Kenya’s tech community is growing increasingly restless. No longer content with being known for mobile money transfers, the major players want to take their place alongside the world’s leading cities known for IT innovation. Ali Hussein, CEO of Nairobi web-development agency 3Mice, is a veteran tech entrepreneur with an interest in helping young technologies navigate their way in the business world. “The critical point in Kenya now,” he says, “is to convert all these IT innovations into viable businesses. Can we build the next IBM? Apple? Microsoft?” The jury is still out on that, he says, but with proper training, mentorship and access to capital, he and many of his peers see great opportunities ahead. But can Kenya’s emerging technology success be replicated in other African countries? Nations such as Ghana, Nigeria and South Africa have given birth to successful software ventures, and talented young programmers can be found all across the continent. Yet only Kenya has the unique combination of a large population of digital transaction platform users, strong public sector support and a growing global reputation for innovation. If these factors continue to grow, all eyes will be on Kenya as it fulfills its vision of becoming a leading global hub for software innovation. mid all the hype

—Amanuel Mengistu is Selamta’s executive editor. Samual Imende is a managing partner of a start-up African brand, ENZI Footwear. 46

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t p r a t e

h e o s o r

e t n w s

Combining the c u lt u r a l b e a u t y o f MALAYS IA with hopes f OR i t s f u t u r e . Standing at 452 meters tall, Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Towers hold the record as the world's tallest twin buildings.

By C a r l a S a p s f o r d N e w m a n

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at Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Towers today, you see a technological marvel — once the world’s tallest buildings. But what isn’t obvious to the naked eye is that the 452-meter* (roughly 1,480-foot) buildings almost didn’t get off the ground. The towers’ history is as dramatic as their outline. During the three years of their actual construction (1993–1996), numerous setbacks and challenges had Malaysians betting that the buildings would never rise. The towering structures were the vision of a former Malaysian prime minister, Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad, and the project of the national oil company, Petronas. Determined to not only see them built but also create some competition and reduce costs, Dr. Mahathir awarded the building contract to two different companies from two different countries: Samsung Engineering & Construction from Korea and Hazama Corporation from Japan. The companies entered a race against time — and each other — to see who could build the tower fastest. If either company fell behind the crazy two-year deadline, it would have to pay a delay cost of roughly US$700,000 per day. The pressure was immense, and the competition provided viewers with the ultimate reality show. Every day, the public watched with fascination the progress (or lack thereof) on what would become their national icons. The staff of each tower spied on its competition with

w

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hen you look

Kuala Lumpur’s city skyline at sunset.

The towers’ design embodies the malaysia that the country wants to portray to the world.

binoculars in either panic or relief, to see whether it was behind or ahead. Malaysians pored over photographs, shared gossip and generally followed every whiff of drama or disaster as a floor went up every four days — a record anywhere. Ultimately, the Korean company finished its tower one month earlier, despite the disadvantage of having started one month later than Hazama. Samsung had been secretly assembling its spire inside its tower, unseen; in the wee hours of one morning in 1996, they placed the completed spire atop the East tower and so won the race. Kuala Lumpur’s race to finish its mammoth towers would serve as a fitting symbol of the country’s race to establish itself as a powerful global force.

* This includes the height of each building plus its spire. With four floors of basement and a fivefloored parking garage beneath each building, the height of each tower is 494 meters.


SE RCI O D O R AN T E S / CO R B IS

Two different companies, each hired to complete one tower, raced to finish construction in the mid-1990s.

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Visitors cross the sky bridge adjoining the two towers, designed as a "portal to the infinite" by architect Cesar Pelli.

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One man’s vision

having risen from colonial rule in 1957. After the British pulled out, the country’s three main groups — Malay, Indian and Chinese — had to find a way forward without an external force pulling the strings. The country, then as now, is a predominantly Malay population with a Muslim majority. When Dr. Mahathir became prime minister in 1981, he wanted to put Malaysia on the map — not as a sleepy, primarily agricultural country producing palm oil and other products, but as an industrialized Asian tiger. To do this, he needed a landmark. Dr. Mahathir hadn’t initially set out to build the world’s tallest buildings. Back then, the tallest building in the federal capital was only 36 stories and the Sears Tower in Chicago (now known as the Willis Tower) held the world title. Yet as confidence in the project grew, it seemed that the entire country wanted to knock the United States off its perch. Dr. Mahathir wanted a design that was distinctly Malaysian — one that would reflect the country’s Islamic heritage. So the country staged a competition for the best design, from which emerged Cesar Pelli, an Argentinian-American architect. Pelli’s design, with a symbolic and elegant double-tower structure, embodied the Malaysia the country wanted to portray to the world. In the Lifestyle Network’s “Vertical City” series, the architect said, “One very key thing in my mind was that the building should not look as if it could have been built in the U.S. or anywhere in Europe.” The original design was considered a standout, according to Dr. Mahathir. “Together,” he said in his memoir, the two towers joined together by a sky bridge would “form a great arch that might suggest a gateway not just to Kuala Lumpur but to Malaysia’s proud, modern future.” After poring over dozens of books on Islamic architecture for inspiration, Pelli designed the towers’ bases to be shaped as eight-pointed stars, with each successive level tapering off slightly — evoking the many great historic buildings of the classical Islamic world. Dr. Mahathir wanted the buildings to create an arrow pointing skyward, depicting progress and the country’s path to growth. The inside of the buildings also reflect the country’s heritage. Intricately carved wooden panels inside the lobby windows were inspired by hardwood carvings from the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The swooping floor patterns emanating from a central point “are based on intricate patterns of pandan weaving and bertam palm wall matting,” Dr. Mahathir explained. Punctured-steel wall decorations even mimic traditional handicrafts. No detail was left out. Connecting the towers with a bridge 58.4 meters in the air “made them more clearly into a portal — a portal to the infinite,” Pelli told the Discovery Channel in an interview aired in 2006. But this “portal” seemed, at first, impossible to execute.

M alaysia is a young nation,

‘‘

Pelli quickly realized that the towers would sway with strong winds, so most bridges connecting them would shatter. The ingenious solution was to “float” the sky bridge on huge ball bearings using an arch, so that it might literally sway in the wind.   At their completion, and for many years after, the towers ranked as the world’s tallest skyscrapers. Today, they come in fifth at 452 meters, with 88 stories. (The current record holder is Dubai’s 828-meter Burj Khalifa.)

The

An icon for Kuala Lumpur

towers

At the opening ceremony in 1999, Dr. Mahathir told the gathered crowd: “When people are short, they need a soapbox in order to be seen and heard. We . . . were little known and figuratively we were short, not players of tall stature in the international game. “The towers were Malaysia’s soapbox, but they have since also become the country’s landmark, a part of our internationally recognized and admired brand image.” Kuala Lumpur’s identity seems divided into two parts: before and after the Petronas Towers. With their construction, a quiet city of low-rises became, virtually overnight, a global player. Had you looked out from the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in 1992, you would have seen a large expanse of green and just a few buildings. Today, the view consists of a modern metropolis full of grandiose skyscrapers. In effect, the towers showed Malaysia what was possible for itself. It was no accident that after construction was complete, the country declared its goal of reaching developed-nation status by 2020. If Malaysia could build the towers, it was reasoned, Malaysia could do anything. Indeed, Pelli and the teams who raced to construct the Petronas Towers have created an icon for Kuala Lumpur that combines the beauty of its culture with hopes for its future.

were Malaysia’s soapbox, but they have since also become the country’s landmark, a part of our internationally recognized and admired

‘‘

brand image.

Dr. Mahathir mohamad

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Shenzhen Airlines has joined Star Alliance. Giving you greater access to China, through Shenzhen, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. I would know , I helped build it. I’ve earned it.

Wang Shi, Chairman China Vanke Co Limited, the largest residential real estate developer in the People’s Republic of China and Star Alliance Gold Status.

staralliance.com


spotlight Faces 55 | Take 5 58 |

travel tools 59 | cuisine 60 | 24 hours 62 | 1,000 words 64

Faces

Neighborhood Block Party Musician Meklit Hadero opens minds and creates connections. | by kristen kimmel

M

eklit Hadero stands poised in the spotlight and breaks into a smile as she begins to sing, seamlessly moving from a cool crooning to a dramatic display of vocal acrobatics. Her mesmerizing sound manifests the diverse San Francisco arts scene, with hints of jazz, soul and folk plus a distinct splash of Ethiopian vibrato. Hadero is precise yet playful, commanding yet carefree — an intriguing blend that’s captured the attention of the audience not only here at the Hotel Café in Los Angeles, but also worldwide. Born in Addis Ababa and raised in the United States, Hadero called many places home while growing up, including Iowa, New York and Florida. Her parents, both physicians, cultivated an intellectual environment, teaching their daughters to think independently. “They were very clear with us that we could do what we wanted in the world,” Hadero says. “We could say whatever we wanted to say and make whatever impact we wanted to make.”

DAN K R AU SS

continued on page 56.

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s p ot l i gh t

Faces

in December 2009. Five months later, Hadero released her debut solo album, On a Day Like This…, which garnered international attention and solidified her status as a darling of the San Francisco arts scene — as well as the worldwide Ethiopian community. Last year, Hadero introduced two vastly different albums. In April 2012, she and Ethiopian-American hip-hop artists Gabriel Teodros and Burntface released a self-described “hip-hop space opera” under the name CopperWire. The group shot a music video for its first single, “Phone Home,” when touring in Gondar, Ethiopia, with the Arba Minch Collective in 2011. “CopperWire is a metaphor,” Hadero explains. “We’re aliens landing on Earth. In a way, when you’re from somewhere and you live somewhere else, you kind of feel like an alien everywhere you land. But it’s all home.” In September 2012, Hadero released an album with San Francisco-based musician and friend Quinn DeVeaux. Meklit & Quinn showcases Hadero’s voice on an eclectic mix of covers, from Stevie Wonder’s “I Was Made to Love Her” to indie-rock band Arcade Fire’s “Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels).” “I’ve never wanted to be pigeonholed into one particular type of sound,” Hadero says. “I find collaboration to be a way to tap into different parts of yourself,

Meklit Hadero displays her vocal acrobatics at the Hotel Café in Los Angeles, California (left). In addition to performing as a musician, Hadero serves as a TEDGlobal senior fellow and founder of both the Arba Minch Collective and The Nile Project.

( AL L ) DAN K R AU SS

Shortly after earning a degree in political science from Yale in 2002, Hadero moved to San Francisco. It was there she realized just how she could use her voice to make the impact her parents had encouraged. “I grew up singing here and there,” she recalls, “but it changed for me in San Francisco. I started meeting different kinds of artists — musicians, visual artists, sculptors — who were thinking about art in a way that asked questions. They were thinking about art and community, and how to connect those two things and strengthen them. That I could sink my teeth into.” Hadero dove into arts administration, first as an organizer for a street-level festival and then as resident artist at the Red Poppy Art House, where she ran shows and eventually started performing. Her impressive list of residencies and involvement in local arts initiatives would only grow over the years. In 2009, Hadero became a TEDGlobal Fellow and founded the Arba Minch Collective, a group of Ethiopian musicians, filmmakers, photographers and writers living in North America. “I had learned about this network of Ethiopian artists in the States, and I thought, maybe we need to start having experiences together, so we’re staying connected as a generation to what’s happening in Ethiopia.” The group took its first trip to Ethiopia


“Maybe we need to start having experiences together, so we’re staying connected as a generation to what’s happening in Ethiopia.”

because people bring out different sides of you.” As if touring for two new albums wasn’t enough for 2012, Hadero was selected to continue working with TED as a senior fellow. She also took her interest in the arts and community to a global level, starting the Nile Project, inspired by Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Project. For the Nile Project, Hadero and Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis are bringing together musicians from countries along the Nile River in a unique cross-cultural collaboration. “I’m interested in creating a language of music that’s relevant to the whole region,” Hadero explains. “What does it

sound like when an Ethiopian scale meets Ugandan percussion, or when a Sudanese singer sings with a Kenyan bass player? We have a neighborhood defined by an ecological relationship, so what does a neighborhood block party sound like? And how does that relate to the ways that we are with each other outside of music?” In May 2012, Hadero and Girgis took a scouting trip for the Nile Project, selecting musicians and researching the musical traditions and instruments of each country. In January 2013, the group will meet at the FEKRA Cultural Center in southern Egypt to write music. They will perform around the United States in August 2013 and are planning a tour down

the Nile and its source lakes in 2014. Watching Hadero on stage, it’s hard to imagine that this innovator has anything else on her mind but the pure joy of music. As she closes her eyes and reaches her hands in the air, relishing the first moments of a new song, she creates a sense of awe and connection among the diverse crowd at this Hollywood club. When the Nile becomes her stage, those connections will grow even more meaningful. We suspect it’s a performance you won’t want to miss.

—Kristen Kimmel is a writer and avid concertgoer living in Nashville, Tennessee (USA). january/february 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

Take 5

Free Traditions in London BY Candace Rose R ardon

London may have a reputation for being expensive, but that doesn’t have to stop you from experiencing its history. Check out these centuries-old traditions in the U.K. capital that don’t cost a pence.

OLD BAILEY PUBLIC GALLERIES

EVENSONG AT WESTMINSTER ABBEY

Experience a millennium of history inside one of London’s most recognized buildings. Construction didn’t begin until 1245, but the church’s traditional evening choral service dates back to the arrival of Benedictine monks in the 10th century. selamta.co/ westminsterabbey 58

selamtamagazine.com

debates in the house of parliament Curious about what exactly takes place inside Westminster Palace? This iconic building along the Thames is the seat of U.K. Parliament, comprising two houses: the House of Commons and the House of Lords. Debates in both houses are open to the public, giving you an interesting look at the government as well as a sneak peek at the palace’s beautiful, historic interior — from the detailed mosaics in the Central Lobby to the vaulted ceiling and statues of St. Stephen’s Hall. selamta.co/parliament

CHANGING OF THE GUARD AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE

When the royal residence was moved to Buckingham Palace in 1837, the sovereign’s household troops stayed behind at St. James Palace. Since then, they have continued to march down the Mall every morning to relieve the old guard. Snag a prime spot outside the palace’s gilded gates and see how many bearskin hats you can count as the guards file in. selamta.co/buckingham

Key Ceremony at the tower of london

Catch the phrase “Halt! Who goes there?” in action. With a red-cloaked yeoman warder (also known as a Beefeater) as your guide, discover what happens to Queen Elizabeth’s keys each night as the tower is locked. This nightly ceremony has taken place without fail for more than 700 years — even during the worst bombing raids of World War II. While tickets are free, be sure to request yours at least two months in advance. selamta.co/londontower

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) BASP H OTO / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , O L AVS / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , SAM OT / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , SVE R LOVA MAR IYA / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , SAM OT / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M

Witness the British justice system at work inside the Central Criminal Court of Old Bailey. Here, the open public galleries give visitors a bird’s–eye view of legal proceedings rooted in the original medieval court of 1585. After listening to solicitors in their black robes and wigs for a couple of hours, you might even start addressing friends as “My Lord” or “My Lady” for the rest of the day. selamta.co/oldbailey


s p ot l ig h t

Travel Tools

Big Pictures from Small Cameras Competition from both sides sparks a digital camera revolution. |

by ron lond E n

Fujifilm X-Pro1

( C W F RO M TO P ) CO U RT E SY O F F U J I F I L M , CO U RT E SY O F F U J I F I L M , CO U RT E SY O F SO NY, CO U RT E SY O F N I KO N

F

or years, compact digital cameras fit into a comfortable niche in photography’s food chain, producing really good pictures from a device that fit in your pocket. Other products couldn’t match that combination. Then came smartphones. These days, most people walk around with a gadget that takes high-quality photos and videos — and can actually place phone calls as well. To survive in a suddenly crowded market, small cameras had to upgrade. The past few years have seen a revolution in compact digital cameras with interchangeable lenses. The ability to change lenses offers higher quality and greater “speed” — enabling the user to shoot in lower light — than conventional compact cameras. These so-called “mirrorless” cameras tend to cost more than a typical point-and-shoot and are also somewhat larger. Virtually all digital cameras offer a screen on the back of the camera for reviewing photos. And for most mirrorless cameras, this is also how you shoot the picture: looking at arm’s length at the back of the camera.

I’m showing my prejudice as a professional photographer, but I hate operating a camera as if I’m reading a newspaper. So in addition to the standard screen on the back, we’ll look at cameras that allow the user to shoot with the camera held next to the face. When you shoot that way, the quality of the viewfinder is paramount. Giving special attention to the viewfinder experience, here are three good choices in this market space, at three different cost levels.*

Nikon 1 V1 (US$497; 10-30mm lens)

Nikon entered late into the mirrorless market, but the Nikon 1 is a good option. The V1 is the smallest of the three models, and its eye-level viewfinder is better than most on the market. Nikon is also one of the most respected lens manufacturers out there, making this a very good choice for the price. Sony Alpha NEX-7 (US$1,348; 18-55mm lens)

The NEX-7 sits near the higher end of Sony’s broad “Alpha” line of cameras. Its electronic viewfinder uses OLED

technology, which offers a spectacularly crisp image. (The next generation of TVs will likely be OLED-based, but it’s currently too expensive for television screens.) The viewfinder has to be seen to be believed. Fujifilm X-Pro1 (US$2,298; 35mm f/1.4 lens)

The X-Pro1 calls to mind a classic Leica rangefinder, with large analog controls and ultra-sharp lenses for the serious photographer. The electronic viewfinder is good but not great. The real advantage is an optical viewfinder, available with the touch of a button through the same small lens. (With an optical viewfinder, there’s no electronic screen; you look straight through glass at the subject.) Offering both through a single viewfinder is a technical tour-de-force. This is more than a hypothetical comparison. After years of carrying heavy digital single-lens reflex cameras around, I recently added a mirrorless to my collection. For me? I bought the Fujifilm. * Prices listed are from a major online photo retailer. january/february 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

Cuisine

The Island of Spice Learning to cook, Zanzibar-style. |

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F

or centuries, Zanzibar’s famed spices have lured visitors to the shores of the archipelago. Today, tourists can wander the spice market in ancient Stone Town or visit a local farm in the lush inland hills to learn how the island’s tropical climate makes it ideal for growing spices. Located 40 kilometers (roughly 25 miles) off the coast of Tanzania, the island was formerly a trading hub for Europeans, Arabs and Indians, and the current culture reflects elements of all three. The food, from fish masala to pepper steak, takes as much from Swahili culture as it does from any of its influences. On a recent trip to the island, I participated in a local cooking class, desiring to not only smell the surrounding spices and food but also experience them. Whether taking place in a hotel kitchen or a resident’s backyard, classes can easily be arranged through hotels or local travel agents. And so I found myself joining sisters-in-law Mankiwa and Ester mid-morning as they began preparing lunch for a group of tourists. The women were surrounded by raw ingredients — onions, tomatoes, bananas and the like — in the small courtyard behind their house, but they started with my favorite: the coconut. Ester broke open the small fruit with a few whacks from a stick, emptied the water into a bowl and passed half to Mankiwa, who brought over a special stool designed just for scraping coconut. Called an mbuzi ya nazi, or just mbuzi, the seat has a serrated metal tool built into one end, which Mankiwa used to scrape the inside of the coconut. The

( AL L ) T E D WI LCOX

Mankiwa’s quick brown fingers were soon flicking between bowls of star fruit, fresh tomato and coconut milk, creating separate dishes with delicate differences.

by becky thomton


Zanzibar's vibrant tourist and fishing industries build up hearty appetites. Mankiwa Emanuel Enkwabi (above) uses local coconut as well as red onion, garlic and ginger to create a feast. Zanzibar's spices also make fragrant soaps (below left).

women would later make coconut milk by blending the coconut flakes with water. Mankiwa let me try my hand at scraping, which presented a fun challenge to not scrape too much or too little of the white flesh at a time, and to stop before getting to the brown outer shell. Meanwhile, the women started a few small fires with coconut fibers and began cooking separate bowls of bananas and potatoes in coconut oil, adding turmeric, garlic, salt and grated tomato. A kingfish, caught in the clear blue waters off the coast, had been cut into small pieces and was waiting in a bowl of water. Ester crushed ginger with garlic and salt, to tame some of the ginger’s hot flavor, before adding it to the fish about to be fried in sunflower oil. Mankiwa’s quick brown fingers were soon flicking between bowls of star fruit, fresh tomato and coconut milk, creating

separate dishes with delicate differences. She added garlic and onions to a bowl of smashed leaves from the cassava plant — a starchy staple of the Zanzibarian diet. This traditional dish is known as sukuma wiki, which means “to push or stretch the week,” because the cassava leaves — or any leafy substitute — are an inexpensive addition often used to help fill out meals. When it came time to cook the rice, Ester added packets of cumin and cardamom from Stone Town’s spice market to a huge pot, already simmering with a large cinnamon stick, garlic, onion, salt and pepper. The rice smoldered over the fire, releasing warm, earthy spice scents. The women covered the pot and let it sit for about 20 minutes. “Pole, pole,” my translator explained — or, “Slowly, slowly” — is the way to cook in Zanzibar. About two hours after we’d first begun scraping coconut, it finally came time to

eat. We sat on plastic mats and dished up each of the flavorful entrées. I tried to single out specific spice flavors, but instead they had all blended to create an entirely new taste. Maybe this meal was a little like Zanzibar itself: Through the years, the islands slowly, slowly have become a blend of cultures, and the foods of those cultures have likewise combined to create something new and delicious. I ate until I was full and later bought spices from a nearby farm, ready to try out the recipes in my own kitchen. If only I had room for an mbuzi in my suitcase.

—Becky Thomton is a writer based in Orlando, Florida (USA). Her first overseas experience was to Ethiopia in 2000, when she fell in love with Africa, and she has since visited the continent eight times. january/february 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

24 Hours

Delhi

How to get there » Ethiopian Airlines flies daily from Addis Ababa to Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport.

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By L ekhika nair

t is impossible to see all of a city in which 13th– century forts coexist with 21st–century highways. But give Delhi a day, and within those 24 hours you will notice ancient history squabbling, murmuring and, finally, coexisting with its contemporary ambitions. 9 a.m. Begin your morning by hailing a taxi or auto rickshaw. (Warning: These yellow-and-green threewheel vehicles are a cheap way to get around. However, their drivers are often looking to make a quick buck from unsuspecting tourists, so insist they switch on the meter.) Then head to Saravana Bhavan on Janpath for a tasty breakfast of vegetarian south Indian food at a reasonable price. Order the rice flour-based dosa or uttapam, served with a spicy lentil curry and colorful condiments. Craving coffee? Saravana Bhavan serves what’s called filter coffee — prepared from a thick coffee concentrate and boiling milk, then served in a steel glass placed in a steel bowl. To look like a pro, pour the drink from a

height back-and-forth from glass to bowl, allowing the sugar to mix and the drink to “breathe.” 10 a.m. Just a few steps from Saravana Bhavan stands Cottage Emporium. This government-run shopping complex offers some of the finest Indian handicrafts under one roof. Revel in the intricacies of the textiles, the extravagance of the jewelry and the splendor of the carpets. Or, if you prefer the windy outdoors to air-conditioned comforts and bargaining to price tags, browse the stalls of Janpath Market. Haggle with good humor and you’ll be sure to leave with frightening masks, silk stoles and maybe even a bronze Indian god — all at a good price. 11:30 a.m. Pile your bags into another

illustration by owen gatley

Many a splendid thing. |


Humayun's Tomb (left), built in the late 16th century, is said to have inspired design of the Taj Mahal. Hindu spiritual leaders known as yogis, such as the one below, and cycle rickshaws (at bottom) are frequently seen across the city.

( C W F RO M TO P L E F T ) AN G E LO G IAM P I CCO LO / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , D H OX A X / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M , J O RG HACK E MAN N / SH U T T E RSTO CK . CO M

In Old Delhi, you’ll find yourself jostling with cycle rickshaws, cows and cars, skipping over puddles and avoiding alms seekers. auto rickshaw or cab and take a short ride for a look-see at the most famous Delhi landmarks: India Gate, Parliament and the President’s House. A simple driveby of these monuments will give you a chance to marvel at these immense colonial structures built by the British. Then head to Jantar Mantar, an astronomical observatory, to get a sense of India’s scientific achievements 300 years ago. 1 p.m. Don’t forget a dose of luxury. From Jantar Mantar, cross the road to the Park Hotel on Parliament Street for a session at its decadent Aura Spa. Afterward, decide if you want to continue splurging with a fine meal at the hotel’s Indian restaurant, Fire, or whether you’re game for some madness. If so … 2:30 p.m. … take the Metro from Central Secretariat to Chawri Bazar on the yellow line. Here in North (or Old) Delhi, you’ll find yourself in snaking gullies, jostling with cycle rickshaws, cows and cars, skipping over puddles and avoiding alms seekers. This is the India of stereotypes, where chaos reigns. If you are steely of nerve and hardy of stomach, try the unlimited street food options. A good gauge of the best street seller is the crowd at his cart. In these lanes, you can get the finest kababs and naan breads in the city. 3:30 p.m. From Chawri Bazaar, make

your way by cycle rickshaw or cab to the imposing Jama Masjid, one of the most important Indian mosques. The courtyard alone holds up to 25,000 people; if that doesn’t instantly impress, its sandstone-and-marble facade and throng of worshipers will. Red Fort — a 17th– century fort created by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan — is also just a 20-minute trip away by foot. 5 p.m. Take an auto rickshaw or cab to Humayun’s Tomb. The tomb is said to have inspired the Taj Mahal, and it will appear as an oasis of peace after the flurry of Old Delhi. Birds chirp, children play catch and residents of the neighborhood take their evening walk around this magnificent red sandstone mausoleum. Just five kilometers (about three miles) from there stand the Lodi Gardens, with tree-lined avenues, bursting flowerbeds and welltended lawns. As the skies darken, the birds make a terrific racket in the treetops. But Lodi Gardens is still one of the most serene places in Delhi, where 16th–century ruins are offset by vistas of green and rivulets of water, making it a favorite for lovers and picnicking families alike. 7:30 p.m. At night, Delhi stays awake in pockets. Khan Market, a short drive from Humayun’s Tomb, has traditionally been the favorite hangout. But Hauz

Khas Village, farther south, is rapidly edging it out with a host of galleries, shops, bars and cafés. Head to the Living Room for a quick, relaxed drink; Yeti for its Tibetan and Nepalese meat dishes; or Elma’s Bakery and Tea Room for its famous sandwiches, scones and cakes. 11 p.m. Delhi hotels like the exclusive Aman and the statuesque Imperial Hotel offer unparalleled luxury and comfort. But if your night ends at Hauz Khas Village, try the nearby Amarya Haveli, reputed for its attention to detail. After 24 hours in Delhi, slumber will quickly embrace you, but dreams of the city will linger long after. —Lekhika Nair is a Delhi-based journalist with a partiality for sad novels, dark chocolates and happy music.

january/february 2013

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s p ot l i gh t

1,000 Words

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque Pascal D eloche

Thousands of rare and semiprecious stones, encrusted in marble, were used to create the flower-patterned mosaic inside this mosque in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

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fly ethiopian t r ave l t i ps 67 | f l e e t 70 | rou t e maps 72 | Sal e s ag e n ts an d off ice s 76

Travel Tips

seated exercises These gentle exercises, which you can carry out easily during your flight, will help blood circulation and reduce any tiredness or stiffness that may result from sitting in one place for several hours. Check with your doctor first if you have any health conditions that might be adversely affected by exercise. Shoulder roll

Ankle circles

Hunch shoulders forward, then upward, then backward, then downward, using a gentle, circular motion.

Lift feet off the floor and draw a circle with the toes, simultaneously moving one foot clockwise and the other foot counterclockwise. Reverse circles. Do each direction for 15 seconds. Repeat if desired.

Arm curl

Foot pumps

Start with arms held at a 90-degree angle: elbows down, hands out in front. Raise hands up to chest and back down, alternating hands. Do this exercise in 30-second intervals.

Start with both heels on the floor and point feet upward as high as you can. Then put both feet flat on the floor. Then lift heels high, keeping the balls of your feet on the floor. Continue cycle in 30-second intervals.

Forward flex

Knee to chest

With both feet on the floor and stomach held in, slowly bend forward and walk your hands down the front of your legs toward your ankles. Hold the stretch for 15 seconds and slowly sit back up.

Bend forward slightly. Clasp hands around the right knee and hug it to your chest. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Keeping hands around knee, slowly let it down. Alternate legs. Repeat 10 times.

Overhead stretch

Knee lifts

Raise both hands straight up over your head. With one hand, grasp the elbow of the opposite hand and gently pull to one side. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

Lift leg with knees bent while contracting your thigh muscles. Alternate legs. Repeat 20 to 30 times for each leg.

illustrations by todd detwiler

Shoulder stretch

Other Tips for a Comfortable Flight

Reach right hand over left shoulder. Place left hand behind right elbow and gently press elbow toward shoulder. Hold stretch for 15 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

> For your own comfort, try to travel light.

> Avoid heavy meals during the flight.

> Wear loose clothing and elasticated stockings made of natural fiber.

> Take short walks once every two hours to improve circulation.

> Increase your normal intake of water and only drink alcohol in moderation.

> Try to touch your toes when waiting in the aisle, to stretch your hamstrings.

Neck roll

> Use moisturizing cream to keep your skin from drying out.

> Upon arrival at your destination, take a quick jog, brisk walk or a vigorous scrub to help stimulate circulation. Then, take a hot shower or a relaxing bath.

With shoulders relaxed, drop ear to shoulder and gently roll neck forward and to the other side, holding each position for about five seconds. Repeat five times.

> Take off shoes while on the plane to prevent your feet from swelling up, or wear shoes that will cope with expanding ankles.

january/february 2013

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fly ethiopian

| Travel Tips

Traveling in Ethiopia Land » Ethiopia covers an area of 1.14 million square kilometers (944,000 square miles). Climate » There are two seasons: The dry season, October–May, and the wet season, June–September.

Topography » Ethiopia has an elevated central plateau varying in height between 2,000 and 3,000 meters. In the north and center of the country, there are some 25 mountains whose peaks rise above 4,000 meters. The most famous Ethiopian river is the Blue Nile (or Abbay), which flows north a distance of 1,450 kilometers from its source in Lake Tana to join the White Nile at Khartoum, Sudan.

People » The population is estimated at 78 million.

Economy » About 90 percent of the population earns a living from the land, mainly as subsistence farmers. Agriculture is the backbone of the national economy, and the principal exports from this sector are coffee, oil seeds, pulses, flowers, vegetables, sugar and foodstuffs for animals. There is also a thriving livestock sector, exporting cattle, hides and skins. Language » Ethiopia is a multiethnic state with 83 languages and 200 dialects. Amharic is the working language of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, while Oromiffa, Tigrigna and Guragina are widely spoken.

Courier & Money TransfeRS » Money transfers can be made through Western Union and MoneyGram. Both have representative branches in Addis Ababa and also make their services available from private and national banks. For courier services, DHL, Fedex, UPS, TNT and EMS have offices in Addis Ababa.

Communications » Telephones, fax machines and Internet access are available in Addis Ababa in most hotels and at private Internet service centers around the city. Working Hours » Government office hours are 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 1:30–5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Working hours on Friday are 8:30–11:30 a.m. and 1:30– 5:30 p.m. Private and public businesses are often open on Saturdays. Public Holidays » Public holidays are celebrated according to the Ethiopian (Julian) Calendar (see “Time”). The calendar is seven years behind the Western or Gregorian Calendar, with the New Year falling in the month of September. January 7: Ethiopian Christmas (Genna)

volts 50 cycles AC. Plugs are European two-pin.

Immigration Requirements » Visas are required for all foreign visitors to Ethiopia, with the exception of nationals of Kenya and Sudan. Visa applications may be obtained at Ethiopia’s diplomatic missions overseas. Nationals of 37 countries are now allowed to receive their tourist visas on arrival in Ethiopia. The list includes: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, North Korea, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and United States.

Bole International Airport »

March 2: Victory of Adwa (1896) May 1: International Labor Day May 3: Ethiopian Orthodox Good Friday

May 5: Ethiopian Patriots (1941) Victory Day May 28: Fall of the Dergue (1991) Day

It follows the Julian calendar, which consists of 12 months of 30 days each and a 13th month of five or six days (on a leap year).

September 27: The Finding of the True Cross (Meskal)

Currency » The units of currency are

*These holidays are subject to moon sighting.

the birr and cents. Notes are 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1 birr. The 1 birr coin is also in circulation. ATMs (Automatic Teller Machines) are found in major Addis Ababa hotels, shopping malls and at the Bole International Airport. It is important to retain currency exchange receipts.

Health Requirements » A yellow fever certificate is required for some African destinations. Vaccination against cholera is also required for any person who has visited or transited a cholera-infected area within six days prior to arrival in Ethiopia.

ethiopianairlines.com

b) You must declare to customs officials at point of entry any cash in excess of US$3,000 (or the equivalent). If you have more than US$3,000 on departing, you must present a receipt from the purchasing bank.

The airport is about 5 kilometers from Meskel Square and Addis Ababa’s central business district. Passengers entering and departing Ethiopia must fill in entry and exit cards. Free luggage carts and paid porters are available in the baggage hall. All bags must go through X-ray check before you exit. When flying out of Bole International Airport, please note: Terminal 1 — all domestic flights and flights to Burundi, Djibouti, Rwanda, Somaliland, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen. Terminal 2 — all other international flights. Taxis are readily available and may be ordered inside the terminal. Privately owned taxis are not metered, nor do they have fixed rates. Agree upon the fare in advance.

September 11: Ethiopian New Year

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a) It is illegal to carry more than 200 birr when entering or departing Ethiopia.

January 24: Birth of Prophet Mohammed PBUH (Mauwlid)*

Time » Ethiopia is in the GMT +3 time zone.

Banking Hours » Banking hours are usually 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Monday to Friday and 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturdays. Most banks work through lunchtime; however, foreign exchange services are closed during lunch hours (noon–1 p.m.).

When it comes to currency:

January 19: Ethiopian Epiphany (Timkat)

May 5: Ethiopian Orthodox Easter Sunday

Electric Supply » Ethiopia uses 220

d) souvenirs (by visitors) with a value not exceeding 500 birr

October 15: Id ul Ahda (Sacrifice)*

Customs » Duty-free imports are permitted for up to: a) 200 cigarettes, 100 cigars or 250 grams of tobacco b) 2 liters of alcoholic beverages c) half a liter of perfume

Security » Security at the airport is tight, and travelers need to produce their air ticket and passport to enter the terminal. All other visitors are required to pay a fee of 10 birr in the car park and may be required to show identification.


Travel Tips |

learn amharic English-Amharic (phonetic) Learn some basic Amharic so that you can interact with the locals and enjoy your stay in Ethiopia by experiencing the rich culture of the Ethiopian people.

U seful Words Today Tomorrow Yesterday Now Quickly Slowly Mr Mrs Miss I

pronunciation guide

You He, She We

a as the a in father e as the e in set i as the i in ship o as the o in go u as the oo in boot gn as the gn in compagne (French) (M) Masculine; (F) Feminine; (P) Plural

They What? Who? When? How? Why? Which? Yes (all right) No Excuse me I am sorry Good Bad

fly ethiopian

N umbers Zare Nege Tilant Ahun Tolo Kes Ato Weyzero Weyzerit Ene Ersewo Essu, Essoa Egna Ennessu Min? Man? Metche? Endet? Lemin? Yetignaw? Eshi Aydelem /Ayhonem Yikirta Aznallehu Tiru / melkam Metfo

One

And

Two

Hulet

Three

Sost

Four

Arat

Five

Amist

Six

Sidist

Seven

Sebat

Eight

Semmint

Nine

Zetegn

Ten

Asser

Eleven

Asra-and

Twelve

Asra-hulet

Thirteen, etc.

Asra-sost, etc.

Twenty

Haya

Twenty-one, etc.

Haya-and, etc.

Thirty

Selasa

Thirty-one, etc.

Selasa-and, etc.

Forty

Arba

Fifty

Amsa

One hundred

And meto

One thousand

And shi  

D irections / E mergencies

M eeting and G reeting Hello

Halo

Good morning

Endemn adderu/ k(M)/sh(F)

Good afternoon Good evening

Endemn walu/k(M)/ sh(F)

Commerce

Where? (Place)

Yet?

Where is it?

Yet no?

Where? (Direction)

Wodet?

Street/road

Menged

Airport

Awiroplan marefeya

Where is the hotel?

Hotelu yet no?

Where are you going?

Yet iyehedu no? eh (M)/esh(F)

I am going to . . .

Wede... iyehedku no

Turn right

Wede kegn yitatefu/ tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Turn left

Wede gra yitatefu tatef(M)/tatefi(F)

Go straight

Ketita yihidu/hid(M)/ higi(F)

Please stop here

Ezih Yikumu/kum(M)/ kumi(F)

Endemn ameshu/ eh(M)/esh(F)

Hotel

Hotel

Dehna hunu/ hun(M)/ hugne(F)

Room

Kifil

Bed

Alga

How are you?

Tenayistillign / endemen not? eh(M)/ esh(F)

To sleep

Metegnat

To bathe

Galan metateb

I am well, thank you (very much)

Dehna negn (Betam) amesegenallehu

Where is the toilet?

Metatebiya betu yet new?

You’re welcome

Minim aydel

Please come in

Yigbu/giba(M)/ gibi(F)

Where may I get something to drink?

Yemiteta neger yet agengalehu?

Coffee

Buna

Please sit down

Yikemetu/ tekemet(M)/ tekemechi(F)

One (cup of) coffee

And (sini) buna

Come

Na(M)/Ney(F)/Nu(P)

Beer

Birra

Go

Hid(M)/Higi(F)/Hidu(P)

Cold

Kezkaza

Stop

Kum(M)/Kumi(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Help

Irdagn(M)/irgegn(F)/ Irdugn(P)

Hospital

Hakem bet

Police

Polis

Goodbye

What is your name?

Simewo man no?h(M)/sh(F)

Hot

Muk

Tea

Shay

My name is . . .

Sime . . . no

Food

Migib

Where do you come from?

Keyet Metu? ah(M)/ ash(F) Hagero yet no?eh(M)/esh(F)

Meat

Siga

Fish

Assa

I come from . . .

Ke . . . metahu

Bread

Dabo

My country is . . .

Hagere . . . no

Butter

Kebe

Can you speak Amharic?

Amaregna yenageralu? tenageraleh(M)/ tenageriyalesh(F)

Sugar

Sikuar

Salt

Chow

Pepper

Berbere

Shop

Suk

To buy

Megzat

Sunday

Ihud

To sell

Meshet

Monday

Segno

Money

Genzeb

Tuesday

Maksegno

Cent

Santime

Wednesday

Erob

How much does this cost?

Wagaw sint no?

Thursday

Hamus

Friday

Arb

That is quite expensive

Betam wood no

Saturday

Kedame

Only a little

Tinish

I want to learn more

Yebelete memar ifelegalehu

How do you find Ethiopia?

Itiyopiyan endet agegnuat? hat(M)/ shat(F)

I like it here

Itiyopiya Tesmamtognal

Days of the Week

january/february 2013

69


fly ethiopian Length 0

| Fleet

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20m

30m

40m

50m

60m

70m

Bombardier Q400 Data (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC, ET-AQD, ET-ADE, ET-AQF) Seat Capacity: 78 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 29,574 kg; Landing, 28,123 kgs; Zero Fuel, 26,308 kg Operating Empty Weight:17.684 kg Total Cargo Volume: 14.3 cu.ft Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 102. Total: 118 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 70,080 kg; Landing, 58,604 kgs; Zero Fuel, 55,202 kg Operating Empty Weight: 41,015 kg Total Cargo Volume: 966 cu.ft

Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL, ET-APM, ET-APO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 138. Total: 154 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 79,010 kg Landing, 66,330kgs; Zero Fuel, 62,730 kg Operating Empty Weight: 43,545 kg Total Cargo Volume: 1,555 cu.ft

Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 154. Total: 170 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,699 kg, Landing, 89,812 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,485 kg Operating Empty Weight: 60,942 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 cu.ft Boeing 757-200 ER Cargo (ET-AJS) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kg; Landing, 95,254 kg; Zero Fuel, 90,718 kg Operating Weight: 53,010 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,829 cu.ft

(ET-AMK) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 159. Total: 175. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,852 kgs. Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 61,072 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft. (ET-AJX) Cargo Capacity: 15 (88” x 125“) pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 109,316 kg; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kg Operating Weight: 54,176 kg Cargo Volume Main: 6,600 cu.ft Lower: 1,762 cu.ft

Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS, ET-AOP) A super-efficient airplane with new passenger-pleasing features. It will bring the economics of large jet transports to the middle of the market, using 20 percent less fuel than any other airplane of its size. Seat Capacity: 210 to 250 passengers Length: 186 ft Range: 8,000 to 8,500 nautical miles Height: 56 ft Configuration: Twin aisle Cruise Speed: Mach 0.85 Cross Section: 226 in Cargo Capacity: 5 pallets + 5 LD3s Wing Span: 197 ft Maximum Take Off Weight: 476,000 lb

MD-11CF Cargo (ET-AML, ET-AND) Cargo Capacity: Upper deck: 26 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower FWD Bay: 6 Pallets (96”x125”); Lower AFT Bay: 14 LD3 Containers Max Take Off. WT.: 630, 500 lb

Max Landing: 491,500 lb Zero fuel wt.: 461,500 lb Engine: GE CF6-80C201F Pallet: 26 pallets – Upper Volume – 86 ton

Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALL) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,879 kg; Landing, 145, 149 kg; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kg Operating Empty Weight: 91,367 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

(ET-ALC) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine, 24; Economy Class, 210. Total: 234 Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 185,065 kg; Landing, 145,149 kg; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kg Operating Empty Weight: 90,416 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 cu.ft

Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ET-ANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 34, Economy Class 287. Total: 321 Max Gross Weight: Take Off, 347,450 kg; Landing, 223,160 kg; Zero Fuel, 209,100 kg Operating Empty Weight: 160,856 kg Total Cargo Volume: 5,330 cu.ft Engines: GE90

Boeing 777-200LRF Cargo (ET-APU, ET-APS) Cargo Capacity: 27 (96" x 125") pallets Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 766,800 lbs; Landing, 575,000 lbs; Zero Fuel, 547,000 lbs Cargo Volume: Main, 18,630 cu.ft.; Lower, 4,700 cu.ft. Length 0 70

10 m

20m

ethiopianairlines.com

30m

40m

50m

60m

70m


Fleet |

current commercial fleet Long Range Passenger Services 3 Boeing 787-8 (ET-AOQ, ET-AOR, ET-AOS) 5 Boeing 777-200LR (ET-ANN, ETANO, ET-ANP, ET-ANQ, ET-ANR) 12 Boeing 767-300 ER (ET-ALC, ETALH, ET-ALJ, ET-ALL, ET-ALO, ET-ALP, ET-AME, ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-AMQ, ET ANU, ET-AQG)

5 Boeing 737-700 (ET-ALK, ET-ALM, ET-ALN, ET-ALQ, ET-ALU)

Medium Range Passenger Services 4 Boeing 757-200 ER (ET-ALZ, ET-AMK, ET-AMT, ET-AMU) 8 Boeing 737-800 (ET-APK, ET-ANZ, ET-AOA, ET-AOB, ET-APF, ET-APL , ET-APM, ET-APO)

Cargo and Non-Scheduled Services 2 Boeing 777-200LRF (ET-APU, ET-APS) 1 Boeing 757-260 Freighter (ET-AJS) 1 Boeing 757-200 PCF (ET-AJX) 2 MD-11CF (ET-AML, ET-AND)

fly ethiopian

ABAY MINCH MINCH ABAY LODGE LODGE Where you can feel the real beauty of nature Where you can feel the real beauty of nature

Domestic and Regional Passenger Services 13 Bombardier Q400 (ET-ANI, ET-ANJ, ET-ANK, ET-ANL, ET-ANV, ET-ANW, ET-ANX, ET-ANY, ET-AQB, ET-AQC)

Boeing 757-200 ER continued (ET-AMT, ET-AMU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 16, Economy Class 155. Total: 171. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 115,892 kgs; Landing, 89,811 kgs; Zero Fuel, 83,460 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 60,023 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 1,794 Cu.ft.

If you are really looking for naturally rich If you with are really looking for naturally rich place abundant vegetation and exotic place with abundant vegetation and exotic terrain, better consider the Abay Minch terrain,It better consider thebreathe Abay Minch Lodge. is where you can the cool Lodge. It is where you can breathe the cool and fresh air which emanates from the various and fresh air which emanates from the various species of trees all around. species of trees all around. When you open your windows, you hear the When you open your windows, you hear the euphemenous sounds of birds which are truly euphemenous of birds which areenjoy truly the hallmarksounds of our lodge. Come and the hallmark of our lodge. Come and enjoy the glamorous green area filled with seasonal the glamorous green filled with seasonal fruits andarea exotic trees. fruits and exotic trees.

FOR RESERVATIONS FOR RESERVATIONS

Boeing 767-300 ER continued (ET-ALH) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 213. Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,058 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALJ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 208. Total: 232. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 148,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,277 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-AME) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 190. Total: 220. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-AMQ) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 30, Economy Class 195. Total: 225. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 90,426 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-AMF, ET-AMG, ET-ANU) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine: 24, Economy Class: 213, Total: 237. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 87,419 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

(ET-ALO) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 211. Total: 235. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 186,880 kgs; Landing, 145,149 kgs; Zero Fuel, 133,809 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 93,499 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft. (ET-ALP)

(ET-AQG) Seat Capacity: Cloud Nine 24, Economy Class 190. Total: 214. Max. Gross Weight: Take Off, 181,436 kgs; Landing, 137,892 kgs; Zero Fuel Weight, 130,634 kgs. Operating Empty Weight: 92,087 kgs. Total Cargo Volume: 5,200 Cu.ft.

Addis Ababa: Addis Ababa: Tel: 0115531879 Tel: 0115531879 Fax: 0115508903 Fax: 0115508903 Email: info@abaymichlodge.com Email: info@abaymichlodge.com Web: www.abayminchlodge.com Web: www.abayminchlodge.com

Abayminch Selamta 1_3 ad.indd 1 Abayminch Selamta 1_3 ad.indd 1

Bahir Dar: Bahir Dar: Tel: 0582181039 Tel: Fax:0582181039 0582180811 Fax: 0582180811 Email: sandmp@ethionet.et Email: sandmp@ethionet.et

12/12/12 MP 52: 5

12/12/12 2:5


fly ethiopian

| International Route Map

ethiopian airlines international service Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire) Abuja (Nigeria) Accra (Ghana) Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) Bahir Dar (Ethiopia) Bamako (Mali) Bangkok (Thailand) Beijing (China) Beirut (Lebanon) Berbera (Somalia) Brazzaville (Congo) Brussels (Belgium) Bujumbura (Burundi) Cairo (Egypt) Cotonou (Benin) Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) Dakar (Senegal) Dammam (Saudi Arabia) Dire Dawa (Ethiopia) Djibouti (Rep. of Djibouti) Douala (Cameroun) Dubai (UAE) Entebbe (Uganda) Frankfurt (Germany) Guangzhou (China) Harare (Zimbabwe) Hangzhou (China) Hong Kong (China) Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) Johannesburg (South Africa) Juba (Southern Sudan) Khartoum (Sudan) Kigali (Rwanda)

Kilimanjaro (Tanzania) Kinshasa (D. R. of Congo) Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) Kuwait City(Kuwait) Lagos (Nigeria) Libreville (Gabon) Lilongwe (Malawi) Lomé (Togo) London (United Kingdom) Luanda (Angola) Lubumbashi (Congo) Lusaka (Zambia) Malabo (Equitorial Guinea) Maputo (Mozambique) Mekelle (Ethiopia) Milan (Italy) Mombasa (Kenya) Mumbai (India) Muscat (Oman) Nairobi (Kenya) N’Djamena (Chad) New Delhi (India) Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso) Pointe Noire (Congo) Paris (France) Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Rome (Italy) Stockholm (Sweden) Tel Aviv (Israel) Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Victoria (Seychelles) Washington, D.C. (U.S.) Zanzibar (Tanzania)

Vancouver Seattle Portland

Minneapolis Chicago

Omaha Salt Lake City San Francisco San Jose Los Angeles Santa Ana San Diego

Denver

Las Vegas

Montréal Ottawa

Quebec

Syracuse Portland Toronto Rochester Boston Dayton Cleveland New York Philadelphia Cincinnati

Detroit

Kansas City Indianapolis Colorado Springs Washington, D.C. St. Louis

Albuquerqe

Phoenix Tucson

Memphis Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock Columbia Atlanta Dallas

Houston San Antonio

New Orleans Tampa Miami

north atlantic ocean

Jacksonville Orlando Fort Lauderdale

Destinations with special agreements Cape Town (South Africa) Montréal, Quebec (Canada) Gaborone (Botswana) Helsinki (Finland) Jakarta (Indonesia) Kolkata (India) Manila (Philippines) Oslo (Norway) Ottawa, Ontario (Canada) Palermo (Italy) Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Windhoek (Namibia) United States of America: Albuquerque, New Mexico Atlanta, Georgia Boston, Massachusetts Chicago, Illinois Cincinnati, Ohio Cleveland, Ohio Colorado Springs, Colorado Columbia, South Carolina Columbus, Ohio Dallas, Texas Dayton, Ohio Denver, Colorado Detroit, Michigan Fort Lauderdale, Florida Houston, Texas Indianapolis, Indiana Jacksonville, Florida Kansas City, Missouri

72

ethiopianairlines.com

Las Vegas, Nevada Little Rock, Arkansas Los Angeles, California Memphis, Tennessee Miami, Florida Minneapolis, Minnesota Nashville, Tennessee New Orleans, Louisiana New York City, New York Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Omaha, Nebraska Ontario, California Orlando, Florida Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Phoenix, Arizona Portland, Oregon Portland, Maine Rochester, New York Saint Louis, Missouri Salt Lake City, Utah San Antonio, Texas San Diego, California San Francisco, California San Jose, California Santa Ana, California Seattle, Washington Syracuse, New York Tampa, Florida Tucson, Arizona

south pacific ocean

I N T E R NAT I O NAL ROU T E M A P key

Ethiopian destinations Destinations with special agreements Code share flights Future destinations One-way nonstop ASKY routes

São Paulo


International Route Map |

fly ethiopian

Helsinki Stockholm

Oslo

Moscow

Gothenburg

Aberdeen

Copenhagen

Belfast

Edinburgh Manchester

Dublin

London Brussels Paris

Warsaw Amsterdam

Dusseldorf

Frankfurt

Zurich Geneva Lyon

Toulouse

Prague Vienna Budapest

Munich

Marselle

Madrid

Berlin

Bucharest

Milan Sofia

Rome

Barcelona

Istanbul

Beijing

Lisbon

Palermo

Korea Larnaca

Beirut Tel Aviv

Damascus

Kuwait City

Cairo

Dammam Riyadh

Hangzhou

Dubai

New Delhi Guangzhou (Canton) Kolkata (Calcutta)

Muscat

Jeddah

Hong Kong

Mumbai Dakar

Khartoum Bamako

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown

N’Djamena

Monrovia

Abidjan

Djibouti Berbera

Abuja Cotonou

Lagos

Accra LoméMalabo

Juba

Yaounde

Dire Dawa

ADDIS ABABA

Douala

Kuala Lumpur Singapore

Libreville

Entebbe Nairobi Kigali Mombasa Brazzaville Bujumbura Kilimanjaro Zanzibar Pointe Noire Kinshasa Dar es Salaam Luanda

Manila

Bangkok

Mekelle

Bahir Dar

Jakarta Victoria

Lubumbashi

indian ocean

Lilongwe

Lusaka Harare

ASKY N E T WO R K

south atlantic ocean Windhoeck

Gaborone

Maputo

Johannesburg

Bamako Durban Cape Town

Conakry

Niamey

Ouagadougou

Freetown

N’Djamena Abuja

Cotonou

Monrovia

Abidjan

Accra

Lomé

Lagos

Malabo

Yaounde Douala Libreville Brazzaville Kinshasa

january/february 2013

73


fly ethiopian

| Domestic Route Map

red sea

Shire

Axum

Mekelle

Humera

Denakil Depression

ras dashan (4,620m) simien mountains

Gondar gulf of aden

Lalibela

tana

Bahir Dar

choke mountains

Asosa Dire Dawa Jijiga Ahmar mountains

Addis Ababa

dembidollo gore

koka

Gambella

zwai abiata

langano

Jimma

ogaden region shala

Mizan teferi

Arba Minch Jinka

ADDIS ABABA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755 Tel: 251-11-5517000 Fax: 251-11-5513047/5513593

ARBA MINCH Tel: 251-46-8810649 (CTO)

ASOSA Tel: 251-057-7750574/75 (CTO) 251-091-1255674 (CELL)

AXUM Tel: 251-34-7752300 (CTO) 251-34-7753544 (APT) 251-91-1255682 (CELL) Email: AXUTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM 74

ethiopianairlines.com

mendebo mountains

Kabri Dar

abaya

shamo

BAHIR DAR

Gode

GONDAR

Tel: 251-58-2200020 (CTO) 251-58-2260036 (APT) 251-91-1255675 (CELL) Email: BJRTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

Tel: 251-58-1117688 (CTO) 251-58-1140735 (APT) 251-91-1255676 (CELL) Email: GDQTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

DIRE DAWA

Humera

Tel: 251-25-1111147 (CTO) 251-25-1114425 (APT) 251-91-5320405 (Cell) Email: DIRAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

GAMBELLA Tel: 251-47-5510099 (CTO) 251-91-1255677 (CELL)

GODE Tel: 251-25-7760015 (CTO) 251-25-7760030 (APT)

Tel: 251 - 34 4480556 251 - 911 255437

JIJIGA Tel: 251-25-7752030 (CTO) 251-25-7754300 (APT)

JIMMA Tel: 251-47-1110030 (CTO) 251-47-1110207 (APT) 251-91-1255678 (CELL) Email: JIMTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

LALIBELA Tel: 251-33-3360046 (CTO) 251-91-1255679 (CELL) Email: LLITAM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

MEKELLE

Tel: 251-400055 (CTO) 251-34-4420437 (APT) 251-91-1255680 (CELL) Email: MQXTSM@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM

SHIRE Tel: 251-34-4442224 (CTO) 251-91-1255681 (CELL) CTO – City Ticket Office APT – Airport Office CGO – Cargo Office CELL – Cell phone


Addis Ababa Map |

fly ethiopian

kennedy library

The main library at Addis Ababa University.

National Museum of ethiopia

Highlighting the history of Ethiopia from prehistoric times to the modern day. Kennedy Library

St.GEorge’s cathedral

A small octagonal Ethiopian Orthodox church built in 1896 as a token to St. George.

piazza district

russian

Another name for the historic district.

st

adwa

megabit 28 square/Arat kilo

st

st. george's cathedral

Inside this square stands a monument erected in memory of those patriots who defeated the Italian invading forces.

national museum

Piazza district

ring rd

anwar mosque

The main religious center for Muslims in and around the capital.

megabit 28 square/arat kilo anwar mosque taitu hotel

taitu hotel

parliAment building lorenzo

Opened in 1898 as Addis Ababa’s first hotel, established by Empress Taitu Betul.

tiezaz

st

colson

st

N iger

parliament building

Built during the reign of Emperor Haile Selassie I and still serving as the seat of Parliament today.

ave

st

zewditu hospital

sahara

The hospital in central Addis Ababa.

menelik

zewditu hospital

ethiopian national theatre

Founded in the 1940s when the government recruited a band to play Ethiopian songs accompanied by a modern orchestra.

african hall & ECA conference center

ethiopian national theatre ydnekachew tesema stadium

jomo kenyatta

africa hall and EcA conf. center

A fully integrated and secured complex with state-ofthe-art facilities. st

meskel square

ydnekachew tesema stadium

cameroon

chamber of commerce

d

r. .a.

A multi-use stadium in Addis Ababa used mostly for football matches as well as housing athletic facilities. st

chamber of commerce

AF

Established in 1947, providing technical and advocacy services to help businesses.

RIC

sierra leone st

meskel square

A site for public gathering or demonstrations and festivals — notably the Meskel Festival.

A ave ( bole

millennium exhibition hall

rd )

A modern building holding various-sized events including concerts, sport matches, exhibitions and trade shows.

Millennium Exhibition Hall

Bole International Airport

ring

rd

january/february 2013

75


fly ethiopian

| Sales Offices

ethiopian airlines

sales offices ANGOLA Largo 4 De Fevereiro Hotel Meridien Presidente Luanda, Angola Tel: 2442 310328/310615 Fax: 2442 310328 APT Mobile: 914 526675 BELGIUM Park Hill J. E. Mommaertslaan 16B 1831 Diegem Tel: 0032 2 712 05 86 Fax: 0032 2 725 83 92 Email: bruadmn@ethiopianairlines.com BURKINA FASO Avenue Kwame N`krumah mmb. Bati 01 BP 4883 Ouaga 01 Tel Office: 22650301024/25 Email: OUAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com DanielW@ethiopianairlines.com BURUNDI Avenue De La Victorie No. 09 PO Box 573, Bujumbura Tel : 257 226820/226038 APT: 257 229842 Mobile: 257 78841844 Email: henokm@ethiopianairlines.com CAMEROON Rue Tobie Kuoh Bonanjo, B.P 1326 Douala Telephone – reservation desk: 00237 33 43 02 46; Area Manager direct line: 00237 33 43 02 64; Fax line: 00237 33 43 01 67; Mobile Area Manager for Cameroon: 00237 77 93 79 29; AIRPORT OFFICE Tel: 00237 33 43 37 30; Cell: 00237 77 11 77 29 canada 1027 Yonge Street, Suite 106, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 2K9, Canada Tel: 416 922 9989 Fax: 416 922 1731 sales@ethiopiancanada.com Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : +1 (416) 922 9989 Fax : +1 (416) 922 1371 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : gsa@ethiopiancanada.com CHAD Avenue Charles De Gaule PO Box 989, N’djamena CTO Tel: 235 2523143/2523027 Tel: 235 523143/523027 ATO Tel: 235 2522599 APT: 235 522599 Mobile: 235 6 6896226 CHINA L203 China World Tower 2, China World Trade Centre No.1 Jianguomenwai Ave. Beijing (100004) Tel: 8610 65050314/5/65069692 Fax: 8610 65054120 APT Tel: 8610 64591156 APT Fax: 8610 64599445 Email: KonjitT@ethiopianairlines.com Guangzhou World Trade Centre Complex 13th Floor, Room No. 1303-1305 Huan Shi Dong Road, China CTO Tel: 8620-87621101/0120/0836 Fax: 8620 87620837 APT Tel/Fax: 8620 36067405 Email: Yaredb@ethiopianairlines.com

CONGO, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC Boulevard du 30 Juin No. 1525 Aforia Building-1st Floor Gombe, Kinshasa CTO Tel: 243 817 006 585/810 884 000 APT Mobile: 243 817 006 589 Email: fihres@ethiopianairlines.com fihapt@ethiopianairlines.com YinnesuF@ethiopianairlines.com

GABON Quartier London Rue Ogouarouwe Plaque No. 14 PO Box 12802, Libreville Tel: 241 760144/45 APT Tel: 05316666 Fax: 241 760146 CTO Tel: 741315 CTO Tel: 241 741315

CONGO, REPUBLIC Avenue Foch, Brazzaville PO Box 14125 Tel: 242-22 281 0766 Email: Negaw@ethiopianairlines.com

GERMANY KaiserStrasse 77, 60329 Frankfurt Am Main CTO Tel: 49-69-770673052 CTO Fax: 49-69-7706732018 CTO Email: info@ethiopianairlines.de reservationsET.Germany@aviareps.com APT: Frankfurt Flughafen, PO Box 750254 APT Tel: 49-(0)69 6976 9790 APT Fax: 49-(0)69691945 APT Email: fraapt@ethiopianairlines.com

COTE D’IVOIRE Avenue Chardy Immeuble Le Paris PO Box 01 BP 5897 ABJ 01,Abidjan CTO Tel: 00 225 20219332 20215538/20219430 Fax: 00 225 20219025 CTO Mobile: 225 05061583 APT Tel: 225 21278819 APT Mobile: 225 05063294 CTO Email: GashawM@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: abjapt@ethiopianairlines.com DJIBOUTI Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Republique de Djibouti Tel: 00 253 35 42 35 Mobile 815512 Republique de Djibouti Email: DagmawiG@ethiopianairlines.com Website: www.ethiopianairlines.com Rue De Marseilles PO Box 90, Djibouti Tel: (253) 341216 Mobile: 815479 Fax: (253)350599 Email: JIBAP@ethiopianairlines.com EGYPT 3ARifat Saleh Tawfik off Farid Semeika Higaz-Al Nozha Helipolis PO Box 807, Ataba, Cairo Tel: 0800 0000 411(Reservations 24 hours) Tel: 202-2621 4934 (Admin) Fax: 202 2621 4934 APT: 202 2265 4398 Cargo: 20 10 6698255 Email: cairest@ethiopianairlines.com APT: caiapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: etcargo@aviatrans-eg.com EQUITORIAL GUINEA Equatorial Guinea, Malabo Independence Avenue Admin Tel: 00240222657390 Email: ssgadmin@Ethiopianairlines.com CTO Tel: 00240333090588 Fax: 00240333090593 Email: ssgcto@ethiopianairlines.com Area Manager Email: TeshomeGb@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Email: ssgapt@ethiopianairlines.com ETHIOPIA Main City Ticket Office Churchill Road PO Box 1755, Addis Ababa Tel: 251 11 5517000/511931 251 11 6656666 (Reservation) APT Tel: 251 11 5178320 Fax: 251 11 6611474 FRANCE Ethiopian Airlines area office 66 Avenue des champs-Elysées 75008 Paris - France Phone: 33 1 53 892102 and 0 825 826 135 (ticketing) Fax: 33 1 53 771303 Email: Ethiopian-airlines.paris@wanadoo.fr Ethiopian Airlines CDG Airport office Roissy Charles de Gaulle Airport – Terminal 2 Phone: +33 1 74 37 04 80 MAS: +33 6 70 81 90 24 Email: parapt@ethiopianairlines.com

Ghana Kwame Nkrumah Avenue, Cocoa House, Ground Floor PO Box 3600, Accra CTO: Tel 233 302 664856/57/58 Fax: 233 302 673938 Mobile: 233 20 2011132 Email: MichaelY@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 233 302 775168/778993/ 233 302 776171 ext. 1322/1324 Mobile: 233 20 2013588 Email: accapt@ethiopianairlines.com HONG KONG Rm 1102 Lippo Sun Plaza 28 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Tel: 852 2117 0233 Fax: 852 2117 1811 APT: 852 31508122 APT Fax: 852 31508125 SITA: HKGKKET, HKGAPET Email: DanielG@ethiopianairlines.com Shop no. 2 – 5 , Chintamani Plaza, Ground Floor, Andheri Kurla Road Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400 099 Toll Free : 1800 103 9933 / 0124- 4845900 Admin : 022-22163797 Sales : 022- 22162150 Accounts : 022- 22155667 Email : bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Ticket Office: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Sales: bomsls@ethiopianairlines.com Accounts: bomfin@ethiopianairlines.com Admin: bomadm@ethiopianairlines.com New Delhi (APT) Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933 Tel: 91 11 2331202/0091 11 2331203 CTO: 91 11 2331204 ATO: 91 11 25654872 Fax: 91 11 25655710 Email: Delapt@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com ISRAEL 1 Ben Yehuda Street Room 2016, Tel Aviv CTO Tel: 972 3 797 1405 Fax: 972 3 516 0574 Email: TLVRES@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM APT Tel: 972 3 9754096 APT Fax: 972 3 9754097 Email: TLVAPT@ETHIOPIANAIRLINES.COM Opensky-Cargo CGO Tel: 972-3-9724332 CGO Fax: 972-3-9731082 Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il ITALY Piazza Barberini 52 00187 Rome, Italy CTO Tel: 39 06 42011199 Call center access Tel No: 06 45230459 Tel: 3906 4200 9220 Fax: 3906 481 9377 APT: 3906 6501 0621 APT Fax: 3906 6501 0621 CGO: 3906 65954113 Email: info.roma@ethiopianairlines.it romres@ethiopianairlines.it Milan Address Via Albricci, 9 20122 Milan Tel: +39 02 8056562 Fax: +39 02 72010638 Email: milres@ethiopianairlines.com

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KENYA Bruce House Muindi Mbingu Street PO Box 42901-00100, Nairobi Tel: Res: +254 20311507/544; +254 723786649/734 666066 APT: 254 20 822236/822311 Fax: 254 20 2219007 Email: nbores@ethiopianairlines.com nboadm@ethiopianairlines.com Airport: nboapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: Freight In Time JKIA Cargo village, 2nd Avenue Box 41852-00100 Nairobi, Kenya Tel: 254 20-827480/827044/827248 Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com etoperations@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com TSS Tower, Nkrumah Road PO Box 94600-80115, Mombasa, Kenya Tel: Res: +254 41 2319977/78/79 APT: +254 41 2011199 Cel: +254 714 618989 Email: MBATSM@ethiopianairlines.com MBARES@ethiopianairlines.com MBAAPT@ethiopianairlines.com LEBANON Beirut Gefinor Center Bloc-B, Clemenceau St. Tel: 961 1 752846/7 Fax: 961 1 752846/7 Email: BruckA@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 961 1 629814 Email: beyapt@ethiopianairlines.com MALAWI Kenyatta Drive, Bisnowaty Centre Tel: 00265 1771002/1308/6003/6001/20 31/6004 Fax: 01 772 013 ATO Fax: 01 700 782 Email: LLWCTO@ethiopianairlines.com LLWAPT@ethiopianairlines.com GodfreyL@ethiopianairlines.com W.Gondwe@sdvmalawi.com MALI Square Patrice Lumumba PO Box 1841, Bamako Tel: 00 223 20 22 2088 Fax: 00 223 20 22 6036 APT Mobile: 00 223 66 799 208 Email: DagnewM@ethiopianairlines.com MOZAMBIQUE Av. 25 de Setembro No. 1211 Tel: 258 21 308067/9, 21 325736 Fax: 258 21 303 596 NIGERIA CVC Building 3, Idowu Taylor, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria PO Box 1602 Tel: 234 1 7744711/2 Fax: 234 1 4616297 APT: 234 1 7744710/7751921/3 Email: SolomonY@ethaiopianairlines.com lossales@ethiopianairlines.com lossr@ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office, Aviation House Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja Lagos Tel: 234 1 7744710 Fax: 234 1 2711655 Email: losapt@ethiopianairlines.com Sheraton Abuja Hotel No. 1 Ladi Kwali Way, Maitema, Abuja Federal Capital Territory Suite No 173 Tel: 234 92906844/234 92904941 Email: ABVRES@Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVCTO@ Ethiopianairlines.com; ABVADMN@ Ethiopianairlines.com Airport Office -ABV: Ethiopian Airlines, Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja-Nigeria Tel: 234 92903852, 234 92902761 Email: abvapt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvagt@ethiopianairlines.com; abvbag@ethiopianairlines.com www.ethiopianairlines.com Ethiopian Cargo LOS-office Nahco Cargo Complex MMIA Ikeja Lagos Tel Mobile: 234 7034065669


Sales Offices and General Sales Agents | oman Muscat, Ruwi, MBD Area, PO BOX 962, Muscat, Postal code 100 Sultanate of Oman Cell: +968 93891448 Tel: +968 24816565 Fax: +968 24815815 Email: samim@ethiopianairlines.com

Juba South Sudan AirportMinistry Road, Panorama Building Cel: +211 956212301/ +211 955060355 Fax: 249 811 823600 Email: JUBCTO@ethiopianairlines.com JUBTSM@ethiopianairlines.com

Airport Office: Room 238, East Wing Terminal 3 London Heathrow, Airport Middlesex, TW6 1JT Tel: 44-208 745 4234/35 Fax: 44-208 745 7936 Email: lonapt@ethiopianairlines.com

RWANDA Union trade center (UTC) building First floor, office No. 25 CTO Tel: 250252570440/42, 2502525755045 Fax: 252570441 Mobile: 250788562469 (Area Manager) Email: BrukE@ethiopianairlines.com kglsm@ethiopianairlines.com APT Tel: 2502525100000 Mobile: 250-788595536/788426164/ 788517905/788828865 Email: kglapt@ethiopianairlines.com kglagt@ethiopianairlines.com

Malakal Ethiopian Airlines South Sudan Hotel Room No 02 Malkal Tel: 00249(0)955722506 Vivacell Fax: 00249(0)920698951 MTN

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Airport Office Dulles International Airport PO Box 16855 Washington, DC 20041 Toll Free No: 800 4452733 Tel: 703 572 6809, 703 572 8740 Fax: 703 572 8738 Email: wasapt@ethiopianairlines.com

SAUDI ARABIA Medina Road, Adham Center PO Box 8913, Jeddah 21492 Tel: 9662 6512365/6614/9609 Fax: 9662 6516670 APT: 9662 6853064/196 APT Fax: 9662-685316 CGO Tel/Fax: 9662 6851041 Email: Jedcto@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Airport Fax: 966 2 6853196 Mobile: 966 504301358 Email: jedapt@ethiopianairlines.com Jeddah Cargo Office Tel: 966 2 6850756 / 6851041 Fax: 966 2 6851041 Email: jedcgo@ethiopianairlines.com Riyadh Ticket or Town Office Email: ruhcto@ethiopianairlines.com Mobile: 966 505217168 Dammam, Silver Tower Building, King Abdul Aziz Street, Al Khobar Tel: 966 (3) 8984696, Fax: 966 (3) 8991539 Cell: 966 0559540076 Email: YohannesB@ethiopianairlines.com SENEGAL Immeuble La Rotonde, Rue Dr. Theze PO Box 50800, CP 18524 DKR RP Tel: 221 33 823 5552/54 Fax: 221 33 823 5541 Apt Tel: 221 33 820 9396/5077 Email: Dkrres@ethiopianairlines.com SOMALI LAND CI Maarat al Khayr Building Tel: 252 2 520681/528445 Mobile: 252 2 4427575 Email: hgaet@hotmail.com SOUTH AFRICA 156 BRAM FISCHER DRIVE 2nd Floor Holiday House – Randburg CTO Tel: 27 11 7815950 CTO Fax: 27 11 7816040 APT Tel: 27 11 3903819 APT Fax: 27 11 3943438 CTO Email: YohannesTK@ethiopianairlines. com ATO jnbapt@ethiopianairliness.com SWEDEN Kungsgatan 37, SE-11156 Stockholm Tel: 46 0 8 440 0060/ 46 0 8 440 2900 ATO: 46 8 59360170 CTO: 46 8 4402900/4400060 Fax: 46 0 8 206622 Cell: 0046 709556073 APT: 46 859360170 Email: res.ethiopian@telia.com info.ethiopian@telia.com SUDAN 2 Square 2b Khartoum east Parlaman street, El Sheikh Mustefa El Amin Bldg Khartoum, Sudan Tel: 249 1 83762063/88 Fax: 2491 83788428 APT: 2491 8790991 Email: krtres@ethiopianairlines.com krtsm@ethiopianairlines.com

TANZANIA T.D.F.L Building Ohio Street PO Box 3187, Dar-es-Salaam Tel: 255 22 2117063 65/2125443 Fax: 255 22 2115875 Mobile: 255 754 285 899 786 110 066 Area Manager: 255 786 285 899 Email: Milatm@ethiopianairlines.com darres@ethiopianairlines.com Dar APT Tel: 255-22 2844243 Mobile: 255 786285898 Email: darapt@ethiopianairlines.com Boma Road, PO Box 93 Arusha, Tanzania CTO: 255 27 2506167 - 2504231, 2509904 TSM Mobile: 255-782-450224 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkres@ethiopianairlines.com Kilimanjaro Airport: 255 27 2554159 Email: jroapt@ethiopianairlines.com THAILAND 140 One Pacific Bldg, Unit 1807 18th Floor, Sukhumvit Road Klongtoey, Bangkok CTO Tel: 66 0 26534366/7 Fax: 66 0 26534370 Email: bkkcto@ethiopianairlines.com bkkres@ethiopianairlines.com bkksm@ethiopianairlines.com Suvarnabhumi Airport 2nd Flr, Unit Z2-016, Airlines Operation Bldg (Airport Office) APT Tel: 66 0 21343062/3/4 APT Fax: 66 0 21343060 Email: bkkapt@ethiopianairlines.com General Sales Agent (Cargo Only) Tel: 66 0 22379207/8/9 Fax: 66 0 22379200 Email: bkkgsa@csloxinfo.com TOGO Hotel Palm Beach, 1 Rue Komore PO Box 12923 CTO Tel: 228 22 21 70 74/ 22 21 87 38 CTO Fax: 228 22 22 18 32 APT Tel: 228 22 26 30 39/22822361240 Ext. 4313/4517 Email: SeblewA@ethiopianairlines.com lfwcto@ethiopianairlines.com lfwapt@ethiopianairlines.com UGANDA Plot 1 Kimathi Avenue, PO Box 3591 Kampala Tel: 4254796, 4345577, 4345577/8, 4345118 Fax: 4231455 Entebbe Tel: 4320570, 4321130 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Flat 202, Pearl Bldg, Beniyas Street PO Box 7140, Dubai Tel: 9714 2237963/87 Fax: 9714 2273306 APT: 9714 2166833/1833/2161833 APT Fax: 9714 2244841/2822655 CGO: 9714 2822880/2163813 CGO Fax: 9714 2822655 CTO Email: dxbcto@ethiopianairlines.com APT Email: dxbapt@ethiopianairlines.com CGO Email: dxbcgo@ethiopianair-lines.com UNITED KINGDOM City office: 1 Dukes Gate, Action Lane London, W4 5DX Tel: 44-208 987 9086 (admin) 44-0800 635 0644 (reservations) Fax: 44-208 747 9339 Email: loners@ethiopianairlines.com

Reservation, Ticketing and Customer Relations 277 South Washington St. Suite 120 Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll Free No: 800 445 2733 Tel: 703 682 0569 Fax: 703 682 0573 Email: etusa@ethiopianairlines.com ZAMBIA Lusaka CTO Address Indo Zambia Bank Building Off Cairo Road, Plot No. 6907, PO Box 38392, Lusaka Direct Tel: 260 211 236401/02/03 Fax: 260 211 235644 Mobile: 260 955 236401/260 979 821971 Email: SenaitN@ethiopianairlines.com LUNRES@ethiopianairlines.com LUNCTO@ethiopianairlines.com APT Address Lusaka International Airport PO Box 38392, Lusaka Zambia Tel: 260 211 271141 Email: LUNAPT@ethiopianairlines.com ZANZIBAR Malindi opposite Ijimaa Mosque Tel: 255 774417070, 777667665 Email: znzapt@ethiopianairlines.com znzstation@ethiopianairlines.com ZIMBABWE Cabs Center, 4th Floor CNR Jason Moyo Avenue 2nd St. PO Box 1332, Harare Tel: 263 4790705/6/700735 Fax: 263 4795216, APT: 263 4575191 Email: FitsimtD@mweb.co.zw hreres@ethiopianairlines.com Country Name Call Center Numbers Bahrain 973-16199205 Belgium 32 28948303 Egypt 800 000 0411/202-21600-006 France 0800901031 Germany 8001818982 Hong Kong 800905629 India 18001039933/0124-4845900 Israel 972 3763 1052 Italy 39-0645230459 Lebanon 00961 142 7627 code 6247 North China 108007141635/864001589689 Saudi Arabia 800 814 0018 South Africa 0800984023 South China 108001401619/86-4001589689 Sweden 46-850513549 Thailand 18001562069708 United Arab Emirates (UAE) 8 000 3570 2401 United Kingdom 08006350644 United States of America 1800 445 2733

fly ethiopian

ethiopian airlines

general sales Agents

ANGOLA Reino Comercio Geral, Rue Marques Das Minas No.4, Luanda Angola Tel: 00244 222 445 713, Fax: 00244 222 335 713, Email: tchukombe@yahoo.com ARGENTINA Aviareps Tel: 54 1148933003, Fax: 54 114893005 AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND World Aviation System Mezannine Level, 403 George Street, Sydney NSW 2000 Australia Tel: (02) 9244 2096, Fax: (02) 9290 3441 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: MCH Holding Australia Pty Ltd. Unit 6, MIAC Building, 1international Drive, Tullamarine, Vic. 3040. Fax: 03 9093 1377, Tel: 03 9093 1355 Email: hiran@mchholding.com.au AUSTRIA & HUNGARY Aviareps AG, Landsberger Str.155, 80687 Munich, Germany Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: ATC Aviation ACC, Bldg. 262, Entr. 08, 3rd Fl, AT-1300 Vienna Tel: 43 1 7007 388 54, Fax: 43 1 7007 388 53 Email: vie@atc-aviation.com BAHRAIN Chamber of Commerce Building Tel: 973 17208504/17223315 Fax: 973 17210175 Email: bitgsa@Bahraintravel.com SITA: BAHTOET BANGLADESH MAAS Travels & Tours Ltd., Maas Travels & Tours, R.M Centre, 101 Gulshan Avenue, Gulshan, Dhaka-1212, Bangladesh Tel: 8802 9559852/9568388/9565380 Fax: 8802 956 5378, Email: mass@agni.com Globe Travel Tel: 253 354848 BELGIUM, LUXEMBOURG & NETHERLANDS Brussels RTO Tel: 0032 2712 0586 RTO Fax: 0032 2725 8392 Tel: 32 0 22750175/32 0 24034476 Fax: 32 0 24034479 Aviareps, Landsberg Str.155, 6087 Munchen, Germany Tel: 31 020 655 3680, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: Mgaebler@aviareps.com Cargo: Kales Group B.V. Triport Building 1, 6th Floor Evert Van de beekstraat 46 1118 CL Schiphol, The Netherlands Tel: 31 20 653 4886, Fax: 31 20 653 4717 Email: danny.vanthienen@kales.com Niels.verhaest@kales.com, Danielle.meyers@kales.com BENIN Vitesse Voyage M/S ABD Vitesse Voyages, Rue de Ouidah, Immeuble Toxi Labo Carre 404, Cotonou, Benin Tel: 22921320167/22964054232, Fax: 229 21320170, Email: abdvitesse@yahoo.fr BRAZIL Aviareps Tel: 5511 3123 1800, Fax: 5511 3259 8440 BURKINA FASO EUROWORLD SARL, EURO WORLD (Burkina Faso), 01BP4883 OUAGADOUGOU, KWAME N'NKRUMAH, Ouagadougou-Burkina Faso Tel: 226 50 30 16 52/16 85, Fax: 226 50 30 18 86, Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com

Continued on next page » january/february 2013

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| General Sales Agents

CANADA Euro link Ltd., Address : 1027 Yonge Street, 1st Floor, Toronto, ON , M4W 2K9, Canada Phone : +1 (416) 922 9989 Fax : +1 (416) 922 1371 Toll Free : 1 855 269 0362 Email : gsa@ethiopiancanada.com Cargo: Airlines Service International (ASI), 5160 Explorer Drive, Unit 4, Suite F, Mississauga, Ontario 4W 4T7 Tel: 905629 4522, Fax: 905 629 4651 Email: asi@airlineservices.com CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Africa Discovery, Avenue B. Boganda, PO Box 1182, Bangui, Central African Republic Tel: 236752511117 Fax: 49-69-26952940 Email: felicite@africa-discovery.net CHILE Aviareps Tel: 562 2362748/2362749, Fax: 562 2362750 CHINA Suite 702, Central Plaza, 227 Huang Pi North Road, Shanghai Tel: 86-21-63758388, Fax: 86-021-63758611 Email: cshi@hungnkit.com Hangzhou A-903 World Trade Center, No. 122 Shuguang Road, Hangzhou. P.C. 310007 Tel: 057187960600, Fax: 057187960677 East China, Hung & Kit Operational office, Suite 702, Central Plaza Tel: 86 21 63758388, Fax: 86 21 63758611 Email: royye@hungnkit.com North East China, Harbin Yuechheng Tourism Consulting Service Co., LTD Room 1604, Yengtze River Tel: 045182651966/0866/0366, Fax: 45182657678 Email: Zhou-fj@hotmail.com Southwest China, East Plaza 1-2-902, No.229 Zhiquan, section, East avenue, Chengdu, China Tel: 0086-28-84701460/80/90 Fax: 0086-28-84701470 Email: everlasting_riyue@126.com, www.riyuehangfu.com Cargo: SHA, BJS, HGH & CAN Megacap Logistics International Ltd; Room G 11/F, Shanghai Zhaofeng Universal Building, 1800 Zhongshan Road West Shanghai 200235 China Tel: 86 21 6440 0907, Fax: 86 21 6440 3435 Email: kevinchen@megacap.com.cn allantam@megacap.com.cn COLOMBIA Aviareps Tel: 571 317 2805/257 1818, Fax: 571 317 2890 Comoros Matembezi Travel & Tourism, Itsambouni, Moroni Tel: 2697730422/330400, Fax: 2697730075 Email: agence.matembezi@comorestelecom.com CONGO REPUBLIC Euro World Sarl, Immeuble Arc-En face chambre de Commerce, 1st floor-Centre Ville, Brazzaville Tel: 242 6712020/6713037 Cel: 971505589504, Fax: 31 020 655 3686 Email: a_chandirani@yahoo.com CONGO DRC Alamdar Tour & Travels, PO Box: 2976 Lubumbashi Tel: 243 818113377, Fax : 243 1801751933 Email: vazir@jefferytravels.com CYPRUS Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd., Orthodoxou Aviation Ltd, United Nations Street 44, 6042, Larmaca, Cyprus Tel: 357 24 841 150, Fax: 357 24 841 005 Email: aorthodoxou@orthodoxou.com.cy CZECH & SLOVAK REPUBLICS, POLAND UL Ujazdowskie, 20 Street, 00478 Warsaw Tel: 48-22-6253146, Fax: 48-22-6250467 Email: rgrabski&tal.pl

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Tal Aviation Poland Ltd. Tel: 48 22 627 2259, Fax: 48 22 625 3146 Email: ethiopian@tal.pl DENMARK, NORWAY, LITHUANIA & LATVIA Khyber International Khyber International, ester Farimagsagade 3, DK-1606 Copenhagen V Denmark Tel: 45 33121188, Fax: 4533933799 Email: Khan@khyber.dk, SITA: CPHZZET Cargo: Kales Airline Services DK - 7190 Billund Denmark Tel: 45 75354511, Fax: 45 75354569 DJIBOUTI Globe Travel, Bld Administrateur Bernard Djibouti Bld, PO Box 1161,Republique de DJIBOUTI Tel: 00253 354235/00253 351007, Fax: 00253 350599 Email: globe_ethiopian@intnet.com EGYPT Aviatrans Egyptian Air Service Co. Ltd PO Box 24 Orman Cairo Egypt Tel: 202 37484473, Fax: 202 37608959 Email: Aviatrans@aviatrans.com.eg FINLAND & ESTONIA Matkantekijat Oy-Tourplanners Ltd, Annankatu 16 B 29, 3 Krs 00120, Helsinki, Finland Tel: 358 9 687 78911, Fax: 358 9687 78910 Email: tuomas.mantysaari@matkantekijat.fi Cargo: Kales Airline Services oy Perintötie 2D, 01510 Vantaa, Finland Tel: 358 9 8700 350, Fax: 358 9 8700 3515 FRANCE Air promotion group (APG) 66 Avenue des Champs-Elysées75008 Paris - France Tel: 33 153 771316, Fax: 33 1 53 77 13 05 Email: s.de-saint-sauveur@apg.fr Cargo: Paris Cargo World France SARL PO Box 69003 Roissy CDG Cedex France Tel: 33 1 49 38 90 57, Fax: 33 1 49.38 90 63 Email: cecile@cargoworld.fr, Jhon.sloot@etcargo.fr, paul@cargoworld.fr GERMANY Ethiopian Airlines – AVIAREPS AG Hessenring 32 64546 Moerfelden-Walldorf Germany Tel: 49 0 6105 206 053, Fax: 49 0 6105 206 235 ReservationsET.Germany@aviareps.com; SalesET.Germany@aviareps.com; Tel: 49 0 69690 51921; 49 0 1764 0251387 Fax: 49 0 69691945, Email: fraapt@ethiopianairlines.com Cargo: ATC Aviation, Cargo City Süd, Geb.641, 60549 Frankfurt/Germany Tel: 49 0 69 698053 47, Fax: 49 0 69 698053 20 Email: fra@atc-aviation.com

INDIA 30-B World Trade, Ground Floor, World Trade Centre, Mumbai 400 005 Email: bomres@ethiopianairlines.com Tel: Admin: 22163797 Fax: 22153725, Sales: 22162150, Res: 1800 103 9933 Toll free Supvr: 22166069, Accounts: 22155667 ATO: 66859410/66859411, Fax:66859412, 28366700 Ext: 3514 Cargo Tel: 26828415/26828416 Fax: 26828417, TSV: 26828128 Sabre: BOMCTET, BOMAMET, BOMSMET, BOMAPET, BOMCGET STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD RZQ Alps Building, 1st Floor, 14381496 56 Janpath, New Delhi 110 001 Tel: Admin: (011) 23312304 CTO: (011) 23312302/303 Cargo: (011) 25653739/25653740 APT: (011) 25654872 (011) 25652350 Ext 1284 Fax: (011) 25655710 Sabre: DELCTET, DELSMET, DELAPET Email: Solomony@ethiopianairlines.com etsales@sticgroup.com Sandeep Kumar Meena 9910061099 etreservations@sticgroup.com Kalpana Ganju Cargo: Rajiv Maini: 9871409345 Email: rajivmaini@sticgroup.com Bombay Airport Address: 14000125 Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport Terminal 2B, 2nd Floor Sahar, Mumbai 400 099 Toll Free No: 1800 103 9933, STIC Travels Bombay Contact Tel: 22182628 or 22182831 GURANS TRAVEL & TOURS P LTD Thapathali, Tripureswor ECU 14900115 PO Box 2727, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: (9771) 4216818, Fax: (9771) 4212736 Email: imel@wlink.com.np Mr. Anil Amatya 9851049052 Mr. T. Joshi: 9851049731 New Delhi, Stic Travels PVT LTD, Stic House, R-907, New Rajinder Nagar,New Delhi-110 060, Tel: 110 060,28745569,28742485, Fax: 0091 11 28741491 Email: chairman@sticgroup.com, md@sticgroup.com, Kalpana Ganju Cargo: Rajiv Maini: 9871409345, rajivmaini@sticgroup.com BENZY HOLIDAYS PVT LTD, 14389141 101 Crystal Arcade, C. G. Road, Navrangpura Ahmedabad, 380 006 OVQ Tel: (079) 26403525, 30013430/32 Fax: 26403414 Email: sandeep@benzyethiopian.com accounts.amd@benzyethiopian.com Shoba Kokate 9920213661, shobha@akbartravels.in

AVIAREPS AG Landsberger str.155,80687 Munich Tel: 49 89 55 25 33 73, Fax: 49 89 54 50 68 42 Email: info@aviareps.com

LEONARD TRAVELS PVT LTD WJX, Taj House, 5 Mahatama Ghandi Road, Pune-411001 India Tel: (020) 26056461, Fax: (020) 26130782 Email: bhojwanis@et.net

GREECE Gold Star Ltd. Tel: 30 210 3246706, Fax: 30 210 3246723 Email: ethiopian@goldstar.gr

Sharaf Cargo PVT LTD, MSC House Andheri East Mumbai 400 059 Tel: 91 226731 3001, Fax: 91 226731 3010 Email: oza@in.sharafcargo.com

GUINEA GUINEE-VOYAGES Rue KA 011 BP 5842 Almamya, Conakry Tel: 224-30451992/30412435, Mobile: 00 224-60260554/ 60340144/60212320 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr

MAAS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD WEV 42380391 Namazi, Chamber, 16 Motijheel Comm Area Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh Tel: (8802) 7170517/9568388/9565380 Fax: (8802) 9565378 Email: amin.maas@gmail.com Resi: Azad: 8821569 Mobile: 0171524097 Azad Direct: (8802) 9887711 Resi: Amin: (8802) 9338548 (M) +8801819257221, Afzal Hossain: +8801711635146, 88028835802 Qayyum: 8801819220198

EI CISSE Amacif Bldg Conakrey Guinea Tel: 22460212320/340144 Fax: 224-30478063/22430012611 Email: guineevoyages@yahoo.fr HONG KONG Cargo: Pacific Air (HK) Limited Tel: 852 2759 4578, Fax: 852 2759 4316 Email: cargoeth@pacificair.com.hk

STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000114 No 3-5874/A, Grnd Flr, Vipanchi Estate Hyderguda, WKG Hyderabad 500 029, Andhra Pradesh Contact: Sandeep Menon Email: SANDEEP.MENON@sticgroup.com Tel: (040) 66618755 or 23231451, 6612955 Fax: (040) 66612966 Email: stichyd@sticgroup.com

Passengers and Cargo: STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000243 WIG G-5 Imperial Court, 33/1 Cunningham Road Bangalore 560 052, Karnataka Contact: Douglas Rozario (Passengers) Krishnan Balasamy (Cargo) Tel: (080) 22267613/22202408/22256194/ 22256195/22269189/22269180/81/82/83/ 86/87, Fax: (080) 22202409 Email: blr@sticgroup.com Email: Douglas.drozario@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 140002210 2nd Floor Sriniket WIW Old Thevera Road, Cochin 682 016, Kerala Contact: Mrs. Meenakshi Sethuram Tel: (0484) 2367476/477/478 Fax: (0484) 2367476 Email: cochin@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 2nd Floor, 301 Alfa Estate Bldg G.T.Road. Jallandhar 144001 , Punjab Contact: Mr. Amit Sharma Tel: (0181) 2232056/58 Fax: (0181)2230961 Email: sticqju@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000151 Camac Towers, Grnd Flr, 3C Camac Street Kolkata 700016, West Bengal WHQ Contact: Mr. Sirshendu Nag Tel: Tel: (033) 22174913/17 22292092, 294464/222265989 Fax: (033) 22266588 Email: sticccu@sticgroup.com Email: sirshendu.nag@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD Corporate Office Only STIC Travel Group 2nd Floor, Tower C, Cyber Greens DLF, Phase III Gurgaon, Haryana 122 002 Tel: 0124 4595300, Fax: 0124 4114197 Email: corporateoffice@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD, SCO 42-43-44 Sector 17A Chandigarh 160017, Punjab Contact: Mr. Satinder Sharma Tel: (0172) 2706562/67/2721336/337 Fax: (0172) 2702770 Email: sticixc@sticgroup.com STIC TRAVELS PVT LTD 14000136 Temple Tower, 672 Anna Salai Nandanam Chennai 600 035 WER Contact: Mr L Nagraj Email: nagaraj@sticgroup.com Mobile: 9884027050 Tel: (044) 24330211/24351829 24330659/24330098 Fax: (044) 24330170 Email: sticmaa@sticgroup.com INDONESIA PT Ayubenga, Menara Imperium, JI.H.R.Rasima Saidn Kav.1, Jakarta 12980, Indonesia Tel: 62 021 8356214 Fax: 62 021 8363937 Email: Ayubjkt@ayaberga.co.id IRAN Iran National Airlines Corp. Tel: 9821 6002010, Fax: 9821 6012941 IRELAND PremAir Marketing services Tel: 353-1-663-3938, Fax: 353-1-661-0752 Email: ethiopian@premair.ie Cargo: Heavyweight Air Express Ltd Tel: 353 -1-811-8693, Fax: 353-1-811-8901 Email: hae.ie@heavy-weight.ie ISRAEL Opensky Cargo Ltd Tel: 972 3 972 4338 CTO Tel: 972 3 7971405 Central Reservation Office Tel: 972 3 7971400/1403/1404 Reservation Agent Tel: 972 3 7971407, ShebaMiles & Group desk Email: david@opensky-cargo.co.il


General Sales Agents | ITALY Cargo: ATC Tel: 39 02 506791, Fax: 39 02 55400116 Email: INFO@ATCMIL.IT, SITA: MILGSET/ CRT/CMIZZET, Tel: 39 06 65010715, Fax: 39 06 65010242, Email: INFO@ATCFCO.IT, SITA: ROMGSET JAPAN Air System Inc., Toranomon TBL Building 8F 1-19-9, Toranomon Minato-Ku, Tokyo 1050001 Tel: 03-3593-6608, Fax: 03-3593-6534 Email: Asipaxtyo@airsystem.ip Cargo: U-Transport Global Inc Tel: 81 3 3522 2286, Fax: 81 3 3522 2280 Email: minako-aso@utijapan.co.jp JORDAN Passenger & Cargo: Al Karmel Travel & Tourism Trading, Jabal Ei Hussin Khaleed Bin Waleed St. PO Box 926497 Tel: 962 6 5688301 Fax: 962 6 5688302 Email: alkarmel@alkarmel.com.jo KENYA Cargo: Freight In Time PO Box 41852-00100, Nairobi, Kenya Email: etmanager@ethiopiancargo-kenya.com Tel: 254 020-827044/827248/9 /827480 Ext: 132, Fax: 254 020-822709 Cell: 254 721 217141 Wireless: 254 020-3560579 KUWAIT Al-Sawan Co. W.L.L., M/S Al-Sawan Company W.L.L, Al Ghazali St (Al Rai), Kuwait Tel: 00965-4745190; Fax: 00965-4765661, Email: ceo@alsawan.com MALAYSIA Plancongan Abadi, Suite 13.O1A, 13th floor, Central Plaza, 50250 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Tel: 603 2141 2190, Fax: 603 2143 3272 Email: etkul@abadi.com.my MALTA Discover Momentum, L.L.C, 14350 North 87th Street Suite 265, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260 USA Tel: 480 707 5566, Fax: 480 707 5575 Email: Jenny-Adams@discovertheworld.com/ www.discovertheworld.com MAURITANIA Agence Megrebine de Voyages, IRELAND BLYTH LTD, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082 Fax: 230-212-4050 Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com MAURITIUS & MADAGASCAR Ireland Blyth Ltd, Aviation Pole, 5th floor, IBL House, Caudan, Port Louis Mauritius Tel: 230-203-2000/2082, Fax: 230-2124050, Email: Ivedwards@iblgroup.com MEXICO Aviareps Tel: 5255-5212-1193, Toll free: 01800-5108212 (MEX), Fax: 5255-5553-5867 NEPAL Gurans Travel & Tours PVT LTD, Thapathali, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: 00977 1 4216818, Fax: 00977 1 4212736, Email: imel@wlink.com.np NETHERLANDS Cargo: Global Airlines Services BV Amsterdam Airport Columbus Gebouw 1 Folkstoneweg 34 NL-1118 LM Amsterdam Airport Tel: 0031 20 653 71 00 Fax: 0031 20 653 55 04 Email: info@globalairline.nl OMAN National Travel & Tourism, Postal Code 113, Muscat, Oman Tel: 00968-24566046, Fax: 968 24566125 Email: nttoman@omantel.net.om

PAKISTAN Trade Winds Associates Pvt. Ltd., 33-Hotel Metropole, MerewetherRoad, Islamabad Tel: 009221-5661712-14 Fax: 009221-5661715 Email: aviation@tradewind.com.pk

SOUTH AFRICA Holiday Holdings International (Pty)Ltd, 156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27 11 289 8264, Fax: 27 11 289 8164 Email: g.simpson@holodayholdings.co.za

Karachi Tel: 9221 3566 1712-13-14 & 16 Fax: 9221 3566 1715

Cargo: Aero-Link Consulting Warehouse 34, Cargo, Section, P.O Box 1307, O.R. Tambo International Airport, Gauteng, 1627 Tel: +27 11 390 3132/3366, Fax: +27 11 390 3139/3149 Email: jeremy@aero-link.co.za

Lahore Tel: 9242-3630-5229, 9242-3636-5165 Fax: 9242-3631-4051 Tel: 2823040/2823350, Fax: 2824030 Tel: 6305229/6365165, Fax: 6314051 PERU Aviareps Tel: 511-2418289/2416767, Fax: 511-8278 PHILIPPINES Travel Wide Assoc. Sales Phils., Inc 8/F, Unit 817 Peninsula Court Bldg, 8735 Paseo de Roxas Ave, Makati City 1226,Philippines Tel: 63-2-5198789, Fax: 63-2-5195014 Web: www.twasp.com QATAR Fahd Travels, Doha, Qatar Tel: 00974-4432233, Fax: 00974-4432266 Email: fahd-travels@qatar.net.qa RUSSIA Aviareps, Olympic Plaza, 39, Prospect Mira Bldg.2, 129110 Moscow Russia Tel: 7 495 937 59 50, Fax: 7 495 937 59 51 Email: info@aviareps.com Cargo: GSA Russia Global Services Ltd. Amathuntos Avenue 8, Marina Complex Block A, No. 2, 4531 Limassol Cyprus Tel: 7 495 7953838, Mobile: 7 905 7801893 Email: Olga.Polyanskaya@aircargopro.com RWANDA Euro World Sarl, Kigali, Satguru International Tel: 250 570440/570442, Fax: 250 570441 Email: a_chandirani@satgurutravel.com Cargo: S.A.R.L SDV PO Box 1338, avenue de la douane, Kigali, Rwanda Email: rodolphe.kembukuswa@bollore.com SAUDI ARABIA Al Zouman Aviation, Jeddah Tel: 966 2 6531222, Fax: 966 2 6517501 Email: aviation@alzouman.com.sa

156 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg, 2194, South Africa Tel: 27112898264, Fax: 27112898164 Email: g.simpson@holidayholdings.co.2a SOUTH KOREA Sharp Aviation K Inc Tel: 82 2 722156, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: jclee@sharp.co.kr Cargo: Sharp Inc Tel: 82 2 7221567, Fax: 82 2 7342813 Email: sspaik@sharp.co.kr SPAIN & PORTUGAL AirTravel Management Calle Diego de leone, 69 40A-28006, Madrid, Spain Tel: 34 91 4022718, Fax: 34 91 4015239 Email: ethiopian@airlinesairmat.com Cargo: CRS Airline’s Representatives Conchita Supervia, 15–Local 08028 BARCELONA (SPAIN) Tel: 34 931888690, Fax: 34 93409251 SRI LANKA VMS Aviation Air Services PVT LTD #164 Galle Road, Colombo 04, Sri Lanka Hussien: 0094 777590100 Tel: 0094 11 2502139 / 0094 11 4377815 6 Fax: 0094 11 2502190 Email: vikky@eureka.lk hussein@vmstravels.net SWEDEN Khyber International Tel: 46-8 4111826, Fax: 46-8 4111826 Email: ethiopianairlies@khyberise Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 40 36 38 10 Fax 46 40 36 38 19

Alkhobar Tel: 966 3 8649000, Fax: 966 3 8941205

Cargo: Kales Airline Services Tel: 46 8 594 411 90, Fax: 46 8 594 42244

SERBIA CAT Aviation, Knez Mihajlova 30 Tel: 381 641135735 Email: qat@yubc.net

SWITZERLAND Airline center/AVIAREPS, AIRLINECENTER, Badenerstresse, Zurich,Switzerland Tel: 4122 91 98999 Fax: 4122 91 98900 Email: twelti@aviareps.com

SEYCHELLES Mason’s Travel Pty. Ltd. PO Box 459 Victoria Mahe Seychelles Tel: 0024 4288888 Fax: 248 4225273/248 4288820 Email: amason@masonstravel.com SIERRA LEONE IPC TRAVEL 22 Siaka Stevens Street Freetown Tel: 00 232-221481, Email: ipc@sierratel.si Email: info@ipctravel.com SINGAPORE CitiAir & Holidays Pte.Ltd.48 Serangoon Road, 01-10 Little India Arcade Singapore 217950 Tel: 6562971213, Fax: 6562971884 Email: citiair@pacific.net.sq Orient Air Pte. Ltd, 05-22,Cargo Agt Bldg D 9 Airline road, Changi Airfreight Center Singapore 819827 Tel: 65 6214 2193/6 or 65 6214 2192, Fax: 65 6214 2199 SOMALILAND Nobel Travel Agency, 26 Jun Main Road, Emarat Alkhayrm Building, 1st floor office No. 14, Hargiessa, Somaliland Tel: 252 2 528445/4 427575 Email: ntahga@hotmail.com

AIRNAUTIC AG, Peter Merian Str.2 CH-4002, Cargo: Basel Switzerland Basel Tel: 41 61 227 9797 Fax: 41 61 227 9780 Email: info@airnautic.ch

fly ethiopian

THAILAND Cargo: Oriole Travel & Tour Tel: 662 2379201 9, Fax: 662 2379200 Email: ealbkket@loxinfo.co.th TUNISIA Atlantis International LTD, S.A., 29, Ave Du Japon, Immueble Fatma, 1073 Montplaisir, Tunis, Tunisia Tel: 216 71 908 999/216 906 000 Fax: 216 71 904 110 Email: atlantis@atlantis.tn TURKEY Panorama Havacilik Ve Turizm Ltd., Cumhuriyet Cad. Apt. 185/1, Harbiye 34373, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 2315919, Fax: 90 212 2344999 Email: Ethiopian@arartur.com.tr Cargo: Airmark GSA Tas. Ltd. Sti.Omar Avni mah, Dumen Sok., No: 11/4 34437, Taksim, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: 90 212 444 1 472, Fax: 90 212 249 474 8 Email: management@air-mark.com UGANDA Cargo: Freight In Time Ltd., PO Box 70942 Kampala, Uganda Tel: 256 0774 898075, Fax: 256 414 223996 Email: amit@freight-in-time.com UNITED KINGDOM Cargo: Air Liaison Ltd - Heavyweight Air Express Group Tel: 44-1753 210 008, Fax: 44-208 831 9309, Email: ethiopianops@air-liaison.net UNITED ARAB EMIRATES ABU DHABI Salem Travel Agency, bun Dhabi, UAE Tel: 97126273333/6218000, Fax: 009712-6211155, Email: info@salemtravelagency.com DUBAI Passenger & Cargo: Asian Air Travel & Tour Agency, N.R.L Group bldg.AlGharhoud, Dubai, UAE Tel: 009714 2826322, Fax: 009714 2825727, Email: hnrml@nrlgroup.ae UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Cargo: Heavy Weight Air Express (HW) Toll Free No: 800 445 2733, Tel: 630 595 2323/571 480 5200, Fax: 630 595 3232, Email: hea.us@heavy-uweight.com VENEZUELA Aviareps Tel: 58 212 2866951, Fax: 58 212 2866951 VIETNAM Hai Au Building (11th Floor) 39b Truong Son Str., Tan Banh Dist Ho Chi Monh City Vietnam Tel: 84835472487, Fax: 84835472481-86 Email: guangdx@vector-aviation.com Vector Aviation Co. Ltd Hai Au Building (11th Floor), 39B Truong Son Str.,Tan Binh Dist,HO CHI MINH City,Veitnam Tel: 848 3547 2487, Fax: 848 3547 2481-86

SYRIA Passenger & Cargo: Al Tarek Travel & Tourism Fardous St, PO Box 30185 Tel: 963 11 2216265 / 2211941 Fax: 963 11 2235225

YEMEN Marib Travel & Tourism, Ali Abdul Mughni Street, Sanaa,Yemen Tel: 9671-274199, Fax: 9671-271803 Email: manager@marib-tours.com

TAIWAN Apex Travel Services Ltd., 6F-3 No. 57, Fi Shin N. Rd Taipei, Taiwan Tel: 886 2 2740 7722, Fax: 886 2 2740 5570 Email: tpetorg@1b.hinet.net

ZAMBIA Cargo: EAS Zambia Ltd Bid Air Cargo, Kenneth Kaunda International Airport, PO Box 37287 Lusaka Tel: 27 11230460021, Fax: 27865910066

Cargo: Global Aviation Service (Taiwan) Inc. Tel: 886 2 2658 0255, Fax: 886 2 2659 7610 Email: cgo@gastwn.com gastwn@ms12.hinet.et

ZANZIBAR Passenger & Cargo: MARHABA HOTELS TRAVELS & TOURS LTD Tel: 255 24 2231527-28 Email: marhaba@zanzinet.com

TANZANIA Arusha, Boma Road Tel: 255 2 72504231/6167 255 2 72509904-TSM Kilimanjaro Airport Tel: 255 2 72554159 Email: jrocto@ethiopianairlines.com arkapt@ethiopianairlines.com

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A warm southern Ethiopian welcome awaits you at Haile Resort, a low-rise resort-style hotel encompassing 7.5 acres of tropical beauty. Just a walk away from Lake Hawassa, our Resort features a variety of activities whether you are coming for a business meeting or a family vacation. Make yourself comfortable and relax in the peaceful surrounding of our spacious guest rooms. Little extras such as refrigerator, 26� flat panel HD LCD TVs and in-room Sidama Coffee, will ensure your stay has all the comforts of home. Our spacious pool area, complete with a waterfall, is a great place to relax. We also offer a complimentary fitness center so you can keep up with your workout routine while away from home. After a long day, try our Spa featuring massage and body treatment. Stay connected with our free Wireless Internet Access located in our hotel lobby. Enjoy fresh seafood and continental cuisine in the contemporary ambience of Shola Grill. Or gather with friends and colleagues for a cocktail, light meal and great entertainment at the Lobby Lounge. We look forward to welcoming you to Haile Resort, and sharing all the wonderful things we have to offer!

Tel. +251-116-630155 Fax: +251-116-630690 Head Office: Bole Road, Alem Building, 8th Floor Email: reservation@haileresort.com.et Email: mkt@haileresort.com.et Website: www.haileresort.com.et


entertainment Boeing 777/787 movies 82 | boeing 777/787 TV 85 | non-777/787 international 86 | non-777/787 regional 87 | audio 88

Wreck-It Ralph

R

alph is tired of being overshadowed by FixIt Felix, the "good guy" star of their game who always gets to save the day. But after decades doing the same thing and seeing all the glory go to Felix, Ralph decides he's tired of playing the role of a bad guy. He takes matters into his own massive hands and sets off on a gamehopping journey across the arcade through every generation of video games to prove he's got what it takes to be a hero. PG / 101 minutes / John C. Reilly, Jack McBrayer, Jane Lynch

january/february 2013

81


entertainment

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

?

january Movies blockbusters

classic movies

Taken 2 Liam Neeson returns as Bryan Mills, the retired CIA agent with a "particular set of skills" who stopped at nothing to save his daughter Kim from kidnappers. When the father of one of the villains Bryan killed swears revenge, and takes Bryan and his wife hostage in Istanbul, Bryan enlists Kim to help them escape. Bryan then employs his unique tactics to get his family to safety and systematically take out the kidnappers, one by one. PG-13 / 92 minutes / Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen, Maggie Grace

ice age: continental drift Scrat's nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which he's been after since the dawn of time, has world-changing consequences - a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. In the wake of these upheavals, Sid reunites with his cantankerous Granny, and the herd encounters a ragtag menagerie of seafaring pirates determined to stop them from returning home. PG / 92 minutes / Ray Romano, Denis Leary, John Leguizamo

Ruby Sparks Calvin is a young novelist who achieved phenomenal success early in his career but is now struggling with his writing - as well as his romantic life. Finally, he makes a breakthrough and creates a character named Ruby who inspires him. When Calvin finds Ruby in the flesh, sitting on his couch about a week later, he is completely flabbergasted that his words have turned into a living, breathing person. R / 104 minutes / Paul Dano, Zoe Kazan, Annette Bening

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days During his summer vacation, "Wimpy Kid" Greg Heffley, the hero of the phenomenally successful book series, hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club which fails to keep him away from the season's dog days, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong. PG / 94 minutes / Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron, Devon Bostick

The Campaign When congressman Cam Brady commits a gaffe before an upcoming election, a pair of wealthy CEOs plot to put up a rival candidate and gain influence over their district. Their man: naïve Marty Huggins, director of the local Tourism Center. At first, Marty appears to be an unlikely choice but, with the help of his new benefactors' support, a cutthroat campaign manager and his family's political connections, he soon becomes a contender who gives Cam plenty to worry about. R / 85 minutes / Will Ferrell, Zach Galifianakis, Jason Sudeikis 

82

selamtamagazine.com

Bernie In the tiny, rural town of Carthage, TX, assistant funeral director Bernie Tiede was one of the town's most beloved residents. Everyone loved and appreciated Bernie, so it came as no surprise when he befriended Marjorie Nugent, a widow who was as well known for her sour attitude as her fortune. Marjorie quickly became dependent on Bernie's generosity, and he struggled to meet her demands. The people of Carthage were shocked when it was reported that Marjorie had been dead for some time, and Bernie was being charged with the murder. PG-13 / 104 minutes / Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine, Matthew McConaughey

love me tender Clint Reno stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War for the Confederate army. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley

Like Mike A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials "M.J." inside. PG / 99 mins / Bow Wow,  Jonathan Lipnicki, Morris Chestnut Trouble with the Curve Gus Lobel has been one of the best scouts in baseball for decades, but, despite his efforts to hide it, age is starting to catch up with him. Nevertheless, Gus - who can tell a pitch just by the crack of the bat - refuses to be benched for what may be the final innings of his career. He may not have a choice. The front office of the Atlanta Braves is starting to question his judgment, especially with the country's hottest batting phenom on deck for the draft. PG-13 / 111 minutes / Clint Eastwood, Amy Adams, John Goodman

asian movies

Agent Vinod The story begins with a series of seemingly unconnected events all over the globe. In Uzbekistan, Anex KGB Officer is tortured and murdered. In Cape Town, a group of international business tycoons discuss a rumor that the dead KGB officer had a nuclear suitcase bomb hidden away. In Moscow, an Indian secret agent is exposed. The Agent is shot dead while trying to send a code red message to India. In India, the RAW sees the incomplete message. All it contains is the number 242. Enter Agent Vinod. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

nigerian MOVIES

Destined King For a long time Umene village has existed peacefully without a king. With the recent atrocities that have taken place in the community, the oracle reveals that for peace to reign again there must be a change of leadership. One of the elders learns from the chief priest that the man who presents a Decanter of Hope in the village will be crowned king. PG / 110 minutes / Kenneth Okonkwo, Amaechi Muonagor, Chika Ike

perfect relationship They were seen as perfect couple from heaven and the troubles of a relationship didn’t bother them until this strange woman came in. Who will save this tragedy? R / 58 minutes / Monalisa Chinda, Jim Lawson, Mary Remmy


?

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

february Movies blockbusters

classic movies

taken 2 Liam Neeson returns as Bryan Mills, the retired CIA agent with a "particular set of skills" who stopped at nothing to save his daughter Kim from kidnappers. When the father of one of the villains Bryan killed swears revenge, and takes Bryan and his wife hostage in Istanbul, Bryan enlists Kim to help them escape. Bryan then employs his unique tactics to get his family to safety and systematically take out the kidnappers, one by one. PG-13 / 92 minutes / Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen, Maggie Grace

Wreck-It Ralph

That Thing You Do Guy Patterson works as a salesman and plays the drums in his spare time. One day, a buddy of Guy's tells him a local rock band is in need of a drummer. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it's time to play their best original, a love ballad called "That Thing You Do," Guy lays in a sharp, driving beat that turns the tune into an up tempo pop-rocker. PG / 108 minutes / Tom Hanks, Liv Tyler, Charlize Theron

Ralph is tired of being overshadowed by Fix-It Felix, the "good guy" star of their game who always gets to save the day. But after decades doing the same thing and seeing all the glory go to Felix, Ralph decides he's tired of playing the role of a bad guy. He takes matters into his own massive hands and sets off on a game-hopping journey across the arcade through every generation of video games to prove he's got what it takes to be a hero. PG / 101 minutes / John C. Reilly, Jack McBrayer, Jane Lynch

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days During his summer vacation, "Wimpy Kid" Greg Heffley, the hero of the phenomenally successful book series, hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club which fails to keep him away from the season's dog days, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong. PG / 94 minutes / Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron, Devon Bostick

Ruby Sparks Calvin is a young novelist who achieved phenomenal success early in his career but is now struggling with his writing - as well as his romantic life. Finally, he makes a breakthrough and creates a character named Ruby who inspires him. When Calvin finds Ruby in the flesh, sitting on his couch about a week later, he is completely flabbergasted that his words have turned into a living, breathing person. R / 104 minutes / Paul Dano, Zoe Kazan, Annette Bening

Won’t Back Down Maggie Gyllenhaal and Viola Davis play two mothers, one a teacher who will stop at nothing to transform their children's failing school. Facing a powerful and entrenched bureaucracy, they risk everything to make a difference in the education and future of their children. This powerful story of parenthood, friendship and courage mirrors events that are making headlines daily. PG / 121 minutes / Viola Davis, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Holly Hunter

Killing Them Softly Three dumb guys, who think they're smart, rob a Mob-protected card game, causing the local criminal economy to collapse. Brad Pitt plays the enforcer hired to track them down and restore order. R / 97 minutes / Brad Pitt, Ray Liotta, Richard Jenkins

Searching for Sugar Man Searching for Sugar Man tells the true story of Rodriguez, the greatest '70s rock icon who never was. Discovered in a bar in the late '60s by two producers, they recorded an album which they believed would secure his reputation as the greatest recording artist of his generation. The album bombed and the singer disappeared amid rumors of an onstage suicide. But a bootleg recording found its way into South Africa and he became a phenomenon. The film follows the story of two fans who set out to find out what happened to their hero. Their investigation leads them to a story more extraordinary than any of the myths about Rodriguez. PG-13 / 86 minutes / Rodriguez, Steve Segerman, Dennis Coffey asian movies

Housefull 2 Four fathers, four daughters and four prospective sons-in-law live in the same house. Each father wants his daughter to marry the richest son-in-law; each daughter thinks she is marrying the richest son-in-law while each son-in-law pretends to be the richest. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

Cheaper By The Dozen With his wife doing a book tour, a father of 12 must handle a new job and his unstable brood. PG / 98 minutes / Steve Martin,  Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff

nigerian MOVIES

daniella Daniella is an aspiring rapper who has toiled for years in the studio with the support of her overenthusiastic and loyal manager. She dreams of superstardom, but to no avail, until one of her friends makes her an offer she cannot refuse. R / 110 minutes / Mercy Johnson, Angela Okorie, Walter Anga

Dangerous Emotion He’s in trouble with the woman who brought him out of the slum; will she concede and allow him to continue with her daughter? R / 125 minutes / Clarion Chukwura, Desmond Elliot, Silvia Eguakhide january/february 2013

83


entertainment

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? Is the screen in front of you a touch screen? Then, yes.

| Boeing 777/787 Flights

?

january-february Movies KIDS CLASSICS

HOLLYWOOD CLASSIC MOVIEs

THAT THING YOU DO

Guy Patterson works as a salesman at his father's appliance store and plays the drums in his spare time, fancying himself a jazz musician. One day, a buddy of Guy's tells him a local rock band, The One-Ders (pronounced “wonders”), is in need of a drummer - they have Battle of the Bands coming up and their usual timekeeper has broken his arm. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it's time to play their best original, a love ballad called “That Thing You Do,” Guy lays in a sharp, driving beat that turns the tune into an up tempo pop-rocker. PG / 108 mins / Tom Hanks, Liv Tyler, Charlize Theron

Big At a magic wish machine, a boy wishes to big. When he wakes up the next morning, he finds himself in an adult body literally overnight. PG / 104 minutes / Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins, Robert Loggia

Agent Vinod The story begins with a series of seemingly unconnected events all over the globe. Enter Agent Vinod. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

Home Alone The highly successful and beloved family comedy about a young boy named Kevin who is accidentally left behind when his family takes off for a vacation over the holiday season. PG / 103 minutes / Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern

agneepath In a small Indian villiage, Mandwa, Vijay Dinanath Chauchan is taught by his principled father about the path of fire R / 156 minutes / Shah Rukh Khan, Kareena Kapoor, Arjun Rampal

Housefull 2 Four fathers, four daughters and four prospective sons-in-law live in the same house. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

Edward Scissorhands Edward has all the essentials for a standard body, with the exception of a pair of hands. For what is initially thought to be a temporary period, he is fitted with long, scissorlike extremities that are hardly conducive to day-to-day life. PG13 / 105 minutes / Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder, Dianne Wiest

The Poseidon Adventure The Poseidon is charting its course on New Year's Eve. Just after midnight, Captain Harrison spots the mother of all tidal waves. It is the last thing that Harrison sees before drowning—the Poseidon is turned upside down, with only a handful of survivors. PG / 117 minutes / Gene Hackman, Ernest Borgnine, Shelley Winters

Volcano Disaster visits L.A. in the form of an underground volcano, not the big earthquake all the citizens expect. Mike Roark, a by-the-book emergency management director, is spending the weekend with his daughter when the volcano blows. PG-13 / 104 minutes / Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche, Gaby Hoffmann

Like Mike A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials "M.J." inside. PG / 99 mins / Bow Wow,  Jonathan Lipnicki, Morris Chestnut

Love Me Tender Clint Reno stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War for the Confederate army. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley

The Jewel of the Nile The Jewel of the Nile takes up where Romancing the Stone left off, with romance novelist Joan Wilder traveling around the world with her boyfriend, Jack Colton. Invited by Omar, a wealthy Arabian potentate, to travel with him to his homeland, Joan readily accepts. It turns out that Omar wants to usurp the role of an Arab holy man known as "The Jewel of the Nile", and Joan finds herself thrown in prison with the hapless spiritual leader. PG / 106 minutes / Michael Douglas, Kathleen Turner, Danny DeVito

My Cousin Vinny When sweet Northern college kid Bill and his buddy Stan are picked up and thrown into the slammer in a hick Southern town, at first it looks like no big deal. Then they are informed that they are accused of murder. Penniless and without a single friend in the area, Bill decides to call his goofy cousin Vinny, who has somehow recently become a lawyer. Vinny, who has never tried a criminal case in his short life as a lawyer, rides south to defend his trusting relative. R / 120 minutes / Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei, Ralph Macchio

Cheaper By The Dozen With his wife doing a book tour, a father of 12 must handle a new job and his unstable brood. PG / 98 minutes / Steve Martin,  Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff

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nigerian MOVIES Dangerous Emotion He’s in trouble with the woman who brought him out of the slum; will she concede and allow him to continue with her daughter? R / 125 minutes / Clarion Chukwura, Desmond Elliot, Silvia Eguakhide daniella Daniella is an aspiring rapper who has toiled for years in the studio with the support of her overenthusiastic and loyal manager. She dreams of superstardom, but to no avail, until one of her friends makes her an offer she cannot refuse. R / 110 minutes / Mercy Johnson, Angela Okorie, Walter Anga Destined King For a long time Umene village has existed peacefully without a king. With the atrocities that have taken place in the community, the oracle reveals that for peace to reign again there must be a change. One of the elders learns from the chief priest that the man who presents a Decanter of Hope in the village will be king. PG / 110 minutes / Kenneth Okonkwo, Amaechi Muonagor, Chika Ike


?

Am I on a Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is not a touch screen, please see p. 86-87.

Boeing 777/787 Flights |

entertainment

january-february Television lifestyle

discovery

destination guides

Cake Boss Episode: Ice-ing on the Cake 30 minutes Buddy and his kids go on a tour of Blue Sky Studios, home to the creators of Ice Age, for a sneak peak of their latest movie. But the fun has just begun as he must also sculpt a frosty cake inspired by the movie, complete with a pirate ship that floats.

World’s Toughest Expeditions with James Cracknell Episode: The Lost City of Z 60 minutes James Cracknell investigates the mysterious disappearance of one of the world’s most famous Amazonian jungle explorers, Colonel Percy Fawcett. In 1925, Fawcett vanished in the remote Xingu region of the largest tropical rainforest on Earth. 

Pilot Globe Guides Episode: My Trips From Paris and Brussels / 30 minutes Paris isn’t only a city of great food, great wine and great romance; it also offers some great day trips. We first stop off at the Palace of Versailles, famously built by France’s unforgettable ruler Louis XIV and where Marie Antoinette lived until her arrest and final execution.

Blais Off Episode: Blaisin Pizza / 30 minutes Richard Blais brings his revolutionary pizza creation to Patsy’s pizzeria in New York City.

Going Ape Episode: Battlefront / 30 minutes What does the future hold for a troop of orphaned apes in Cameroon that are hunted for their meat?

Treks in a Wild World Episode: Trekking in Gabon 30 minutes Holly Morris travels to the West African country of Gabon, one of the best places in the world to go trekking in the rainforest. Gabon is mostly rainforest, and uniquely in Africa, 13 national parks were created simultaneously in 2002, protecting over 10 percent of the land. Holly visits two of the national parks.

Africa Business Report Episode: Kenya / 30 minutes Pirates in the Indian Ocean have been plaguing the region’s shipping lanes. What has this meant for trade through East Africa’s biggest port, Mombasa? Egon Cossou tours the port, speaks to the general manager and gets the views of a leading analyst.

Dolphin Days Episode: 1 / 30 minutes Follows two pods of dolphins; one in the clear waters of the Bahamas and the other in the captive environment of a research center in Florida.

All Star Dealers Episode: Selling Dennis Rodman 30 minutes Richie Russek sits down with Dennis Rodman to get his blessing.

Animal Battlegrounds Episode: Coast / 30 minutes From the open oceans to the grasslands, “Animal Battlegrounds” features breathtaking cinematography, providing a unique insight into how animals utilize their environment to ensure their survival.

Tech Toys 360 Episode: 9 / 30 minutes Explore Maserati’s GranTurismo, a sporty vehicle that combines captivating design and prestigious materials.

Pilot Globe Guides Episode: East African Islands 30 minutes Follow our presenters through this mesmerizing show that will take you on a trip to some of the best islands the east coast of Africa has to offer. From Zanzibar, Ian Wright unfolds the true history of the slave trade and samples some of the area’s culinary delicacies.

Globe Trekker Episode: South Africa and Lesotho 30 minutes Destination Guides begins its journey in the cosmopolitan city of Cape Town on the West Coast of South Africa. The townships in Cape Town are the scene of much history and political strife. We explore a Cape Town township and visit a Sangoma – a South African faith healer.

drama

Lie to Me Episode: Moral Waiver / 60 minutes Lightman’s team investigates cases involving a staff sergeant accused of raping a soldier and a star college basketball player accused of taking a bribe from a wealthy booster.

COMEDY

New Girl Episode: Pilot / 30 minutes Jess Day is a young woman who, after discovering her long-term boyfriend is cheating on her, moves into a loft apartment with three male roommates — prickly bartender Nick, womanizer Schmidt and intense personal trainer Coach. The guys try to help Jess get back on her feet and into the dating world.

Last Man Standing Episode: Last Baby Proof Standing 30 minutes Mike is outnumbered by his wife and daughters when they all agree that baby-proofing the house is a good idea. But soon Vanessa has second thoughts when she finds herself home by herself babysitting Boyd and can’t release the toilet seat’s complicated childproof latch. Meanwhile, Mike thinks it’s time for Mandy to earn her own money and gets her a job delivering pizzas — without first consulting Vanessa. 

Raising Hope Episode: Dead Tooth / 30 minutes When Jimmy returns to work, he hires Sabrina's cousin Shelley — a.k.a. “Dead Tooth” — to babysit Hope. Meanwhile, Burt tries to get Virginia to quit smoking.

Bones Episode: The Couple in the Cave 60 minutes When the remains of a couple are discovered in a cave at National Park, the team must piece together the identity of the man and the woman as well as solve the crime.

kids

Barney and Friends Episode: Caring Hearts / 30 minutes In their school project, the kids attach hearts with names of people they care about, on a bare tree. Barney helps the kids get a wide view of all the people who care about them.

Bob the Builder Episode: Scoop the Artist / 10 mins. The eternal philosophy of Bob, the ever friendly and helpful builder, is “Can we fix it? Yes, we can!”

Thomas and Friends Episode: A Blooming Mess / 10 mins. When Mavis does not say hello, Emily assumes she is sad and chuffs to the quarry to cheer her up with some new flowers.

Pingu Episode: Pingu and the Apprentice Magician & Pingu’s Birthday / 10 mins. Pingu is a cheeky, charming, young penguin who spends all his time playing with his friends and family. january/february 2013

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entertainment

Am I on a Non-Boeing 777/787? If the screen in front of you is a touch screen, please instead see p. 82-85.

| Non-Boeing 777/787 / International Flights

Addis Ababa to EU, Middle East, Asia (Outbound)

?

EU, Middle East, Asia to Addis Ababa (Inbound)

january Movies

february Movies

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days During his summer vacation, “Wimpy Kid” Greg Heffley hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club — which fails, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong. PG / 94 minutes / Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron, Devon Bostick

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days During his summer vacation, “Wimpy Kid” Greg Heffley hatches a plan to pretend he has a job at a ritzy country club — which fails, including embarrassing mishaps at a public pool and a camping trip that goes horribly wrong. PG / 94 minutes / Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron, Devon Bostick

Ice Age: Continental Drift Scrat’s nutty pursuit of the cursed acorn, which he’s been after since the dawn of time, has world-changing consequences — a continental cataclysm that triggers the greatest adventure of all for Manny, Diego and Sid. PG / 92 minutes / Ray Romano, Denis Leary, John Leguizamo

Ice Age: Continental Drift (FRENCH)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (FRENCH)

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (FRENCH)

classic movies Love Me Tender Clint stayed home while his brother went to fight in the Civil War. When his brother Vance comes back from the war, he finds that his old girlfriend, Cathy, has married Clint. PG / 104 minutes / Richard Egan, Debra Paget, Elvis Presley asian movies Agent Vinod In Uzbekistan, Anex KGB Officer is murdered. In Cape Town, a group of business tycoons discuss a rumor that the dead KGB officer had a nuclear bomb hidden away. In Moscow, an Indian secret agent is shot dead while trying to send a code red message. All it contains is the number 242. Enter Agent Vinod. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

classic movies

january Movies

claSsic movies

asian movies Housefull 2 Four fathers, four daughters and four prospective sons-in-law live in the same house. Each father wants his daughter to marry the richest son-in-law; each daughter thinks she is marrying the richest sonin-law; and each son-in-law pretends to be the richest. R / 120 minutes / Akshay Kumar, Asin, John Abraham

Like Mike A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials "M.J." inside. PG / 99 minutes / Bow Wow,  Jonathan Lipnicki, Morris Chestnut

WRECK-IT RALPH (French) classic movies

Cheaper By The Dozen With his wife doing a book tour, a father of 12 must handle a new job and his unstable brood. PG / 98 minutes / Steve Martin,  Bonnie Hunt, Hilary Duff

january-february TV

New Girl Episode: Pilot / 30 minutes Jess Day is a young woman who, after discovering her long-term boyfriend is cheating on her, moves into a loft apartment with three male roommates who try to help Jess get back on her feet and into the dating world.

Blais Off Episode: Blaisin Pizza / 30 minutes Richard Blais brings his revolutionary pizza creation to Patsy’s pizzeria in New York City.

Lie to Me Episode: Moral Waiver / 60 minutes Lightman’s team investigates cases involving a staff sergeant accused of raping a soldier and a star college basketball player accused of taking a bribe from a wealthy booster.

Dolphin Days Episode: 1 / 30minutes Follows two pods of dolphins; one in the clear waters of the Bahamas and the other in the captive environment of a research center in Florida.

All Star Dealers Episode: Selling Dennis Rodman / 30 minutes Richie Russek sits down with Dennis Rodman to get his blessing.

Animal Battlegrounds Episode: Coast / 30 minutes From the open oceans to the grasslands, “Animal Battlegrounds” features breathtaking cinematography, providing a unique insight into how animals utilize their environment to ensure their survival.

selamtamagazine.com

Searching for Sugar Man Searching for Sugar Man tells the true story of Rodriguez, the greatest '70s rock icon who never was. The film follows the story of two fans who set out to find out what happened to their hero. Their investigation leads them to a story more extraordinary than any of the myths about Rodriguez. PG-13 / 86 minutes / Rodriguez, Steve Segerman, Dennis Coffey

THAT THING YOU DO Guy is told a local rock band is in need of a drummer. Guy agrees to sit in, but when it's time to play their best original, a ballad called "That Thing You Do," Guy lays in a beat that turns the tune into a pop-rocker. PG / 108 mins / Tom Hanks, Liv Tyler, Charlize Theron

january-february TV

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february Movies

Raising Hope Episode: Dead Tooth / 30 minutes When Jimmy returns to work, he hires Sabrina's cousin Shelley — a.k.a. “Dead Tooth” — to babysit Hope. Meanwhile, Burt tries to get Virginia to quit smoking.


Non-Boeing 777/787 / Regional Flights |

Addis Ababa to Africa (Outbound)

Africa to Addis Ababa (Inbound)

january Movies

february Movies

BERNIE Bernie was one of the town's most beloved residents. It came as no surprise when he befriended Marjorie, a widow who was as well known for her sour attitude as her fortune. People were shocked when it was reported that Marjorie had died and Bernie was being charged with the murder. PG-13 / 104 minutes / Jack Black, Shirley MacLaine, Matthew McConaughey

Wreck-It Ralph Ralph is tired of being overshadowed by Fix-It Felix, the star of their game who always gets to save the day. But after decades of seeing all the glory go to Felix, Ralph decides he's tired of playing the role of a bad guy. He takes matters into his own hands and sets off on a journey across the arcade to prove he's got what it takes to be a hero. PG / 101 minutes / John C. Reilly, Jack McBrayer, Jane Lynch

nigerian MOVIES Destined King For a long time Umene village has existed peacefully without a king. With the recent atrocities that have taken place in the community, the oracle reveals that for peace to reign again there must be a change of leadership. . One of the elders learns from the chief priest that the man who presents a Decanter of Hope in the village will be crowned king. PG / 110 minutes / Kenneth Okonkwo, Amaechi Muonagor, Chika Ike

nigerian MOVIES daniella Daniella is an aspiring rapper who has toiled for years in the studio with the support of her overenthusiastic and loyal manager. She dreams of superstardom, but to no avail, until one of her friends makes her an offer she cannot refuse. R / 110 minutes / Mercy Johnson, Angela Okorie, Walter Anga

january-february TV

Bones Episode: The Couple in the Cave / 60 minutes When the remains of a couple are discovered in a cave at National Park, the team must piece together the identity of the man and the woman as well as solve the crime. After interrogating two viable suspects, the team identifies the woman as a marketing executive who also served as her partner’s AA sponsor, providing clues that lead them to expose the truth. Meanwhile, Booth’s girlfriend and Afghanistan war correspondent, Hannah Burley, makes a surprise visit. After meeting Burley and sensing the couple’s genuine happiness, Brennan re-evaluates her own relationship with Booth, and he tries to teach her that love is not always logical.

entertainment

january Movies

Trouble with the Curve Gus has been one of the best scouts in baseball for decades, but age is starting to catch up with him. Nevertheless, Gus refuses to be benched for the final innings of his career. The front office of the Atlanta Braves is starting to question his judgment, especially with the country's hottest batting phenom on deck for the draft. PG-13 / 111 minutes / Clint Eastwood, Amy Adams, John Goodman nigerian MOVIES perfect relationship They were seen as perfect couple from heaven and the troubles of a relationship didn’t bother them until this strange woman came in. Who will save this tragedy? R / 58 minutes / Monalisa Chinda, Jim Lawson, Mary Remmy

february Movies

Won’t Back Down Two mothers will stop at nothing to transform their children's failing school. Facing a powerful and entrenched bureaucracy, they risk everything to make a difference in the education and future of their children. This powerful story of parenthood, friendship and courage mirrors events that are making headlines daily. PG / 121 minutes / Viola Davis, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Holly Hunter nigerian MOVIES Dangerous Emotion He’s in trouble with the woman who brought him out of the slum; will she concede and allow him continue with her daughter? R / 125 minutes / Clarion Chukwura, Desmond Elliot, Silvia Eguakhide

january-february TV

Going Ape Episode: Battlefront / 30 minutes What does the future hold for a troop of orphaned ape in Cameroon that are hunted for their meat and face the threat of habitat loss? Witness their fight for survival in ‘Going Ape’.

Cake Boss Episode: Ice-ing on the Cake / 30 minutes Buddy and his kids go on a tour of Blue Sky Studios, home to the creators of Ice Age, for a sneak peak of their latest movie. But the fun has just begun as he must also sculpt a frosty cake inspired by the movie, complete with a pirate ship that floats!

Last Man Standing Episode: Last Baby Proof Standing / 30 minutes Mike is outnumbered by his wife and daughters when they all agree that babyproofing the house is a good idea. But soon Vanessa has second thoughts when she finds herself home by herself babysitting Boyd and can't release the toilet seat’s complicated childproof latch. Meanwhile, Mike thinks it’s time for Mandy to earn her own money and gets her a job delivering pizzas — without first consulting Vanessa. 

World’s Toughest Expeditions with James Cracknell Episode: The Lost City of Z / 60 minutes James Cracknell investigates the mysterious disappearance of one of the world’s most famous Amazonian jungle explorers, Colonel Percy Fawcett. In 1925, Fawcett vanished in the remote Xingu region of the largest tropical rainforest on Earth. 

Africa Business Report Episode: Kenya / 30 minutes Pirates in the Indian Ocean have been plaguing the region’s shipping lanes. What has this meant for trade through East Africa’s biggest port, Mombasa? Egon Cossou tours the port, speaks to the general manager and gets the views of a leading analyst.

january/february 2013

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entertainment

| Audio for All Flights

jan-feb Broadcast Channels Music From Ethiopia Enjoy a channel alive with only the best songs from Ethiopia. Artists such as Haile Roots, Nati Haile and Reshad Kedir perform a collection of satisfying sounds epitomizing the harmonious talents of Ethiopia today.

jan-feb Album Compilations Ethiopian African Enjoy a selection of albums brimming with sounds from the heart of Africa. Listen to collections from Yabba Funk, Victor Deme, Angelique Kidjo and many more.

Ethiopian Traditional Music (Music From Ethiopia)

Ethiopian Instrumental Ethiopian Instrumental is an elaborate and expressive collection of instrumental pieces. Theodros Mitiku, Tilaye Gebre and The Express Band, among others, will soothe you completely through a mixture of their delicate and energetic sounds.

All That Jazz All That Jazz is a concoction of every character within jazz. A handful of artists, such as Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole and Donald Byrd, give warming performances in this mix. From old classics to smooth contemporary, All That Jazz is sure to cover all corners of this nonchalant musical style. Easy Listening Easy Listening allows you to switch off and recline, as a very laid-back medley of tunes sing you into total serenity. Coldplay, Ed Sheeran and Lisa Hannigan perform their most soothing songs to help you completely repose.

Enjoy collections from some of the greatest artists in Ethiopia today. Artist like Jamboo Joote, Tikue Weldu and Mohammed Tawil. Sit back and appreciate.

Ethiopian Classic Here, enjoy albums full of world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of history’s greatest composers; Bach, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and many more.

Ethiopian Country Here, a fusion of Country albums for you to enjoy. A range of artists, from Buddy Miller to Sara Evans, are here to share a collection of their hits with you.

Ethiopian Hip Hop/R&B A melodic mix of Hip Hop tunes and R&B hits, with a large selection of albums for you to listen to. This includes artists such as Snoop Dogg, Tinie Tempah and Jennifer Hudson.

Chart Hits Chart Hits is a channel solely dedicated to the latest chart-toppers in pop and rock. If you want to be up-to-speed with the most current hits in music today, then tune into Chart Hits, where Gotye, Lana Del Rey and Beyoncé will definitely activate your musical taste buds. Country This channel offers a blend of cooling Country sounds. With hits from both classic and modern artists, you are sure to experience the refreshing flavors of authentic country music. Jeff Bridges, Emmylou Harris and Lady Antebellum perform some of their best works for you today.

Ethiopian Instrumental Here, we offer an expressive and inspiring collection of Instrumental albums for you to enjoy.

Ethiopian Jazz From old classics to smooth contemporary, here you will find an excellent collection of Jazz albums. You’ll find every great Jazz musician here, from Miles Davis to Billie Holiday to Louis Armstrong.

Ethiopian Kids World Hits World Hits is an eclectic collection of music from all over the globe. This channel allows you to experience all ranges of talent in all ranges of music. Artists such as Salah Al Zadjali, Destra and Axelle Red take this opportunity to introduce to you their own personal worlds, through the medium of music. Classical Collection Classical Collection showcases world-renowned performers, orchestras and soloists, performing major works from some of the best composers in history. The London Symphony Orchestra with Josef Krips, Walter Klien and the Württemberg Chamber Orchestra provide a classical assortment. Classic Rock Rife with roaring riffs and smooth bass lines, Classic Rock is a channel wholly dedicated to true rock n’ roll. Here, Pink Floyd, T. Rex and Jimi Hendrix play a handful of the greatest rock songs in history.

Here, a cheerful compilation of albums, full of upbeat songs for all your little ones to enjoy.

Ethiopian Oldies Enjoy taking a trip down memory lane, through this extensive collection of nostalgic albums. This includes some of the greats, such as Al Green, Elvis Presley and Fleetwood Mac.

Ethiopian Pop If you’re looking for the latest hits, then enjoy this medley of the most current Pop albums out now. This includes albums from Beyonce, Lady Gaga and David Guetta.

Ethiopian Rock Relish in a sea of Rock, with albums from legendary rock n’ rollers to the latest stars of 2012; Bob Dylan, The Strokes and The Black Keys.

Golden Oldies Take a walk down memory lane with a compilation of nostalgic hits. Golden Oldies presents R.E.M., Tina Turner and Duran Duran, who lead the way with a string of classics, taking you right back to when they were No. 1.

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Ethiopian World Here, enjoy a diverse collection of hit albums from all over the globe! Amplify your cultural consciousness through sounds from Ely Guerra, Ocean Hai and Oliver Haidt.


CELEBRATING ONE YEAR CELEBRATING ONE YEAR AMONGST THE THE STARS. AMONGST STARS. www.ethiopianairlines.com

www.ethiopianairlines.com


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shortened 38 Musical Yoko 40 Initial stake

musically 76 Rice wine 77 Take a powder

80 Smart Rounded, in botany Belgian river Catch sight of Wax producer Flag Big city atmosphere prediction Kind of support Flout Author Zola Hollow Opposite of 59 Across Bowl over Sharif of film Water carrier Heidi’s home Strong cleaner Short punch Eskimo knife Camera type, briefly 111 Prevent 112 Triumphant cry 113 Jeu de mots

86 Wax producer 50 Dairy case item 15 Actress ___ Dawn team, possibly? 45 Hearty92 Flag entree 98 Unforeseen crisis 83 Chong11 Elders 51 Expels 115 Magnetism 16 Toward12 the stern feeder Data 101 Skirt feature 93 Big city atmosphere84 52 Skirmish 48 Mississippi 116 Math subj. 17 Judicious 58 Beach souvenir 117 Shack 49 Aircraft prediction 13 Garage contents 102 Soft shoe 85 94 Kind of support 20 Trashed 61 Bubbly drink 118 Frozen dessert compartment 14 Hot time in Haiti 103 Kind of jacket 86 95 Flout 22 Engine need 63 Fencing swords 119 Incinerates 50 Dairy case item 15 Actress ___ Dawn 104 Milky white gem 92 98 Author Zola 23 Alliance acronym 64 Heartbreak House 120 King, in Cádiz 51 Expels99 Hollow 108 Theyour kinship 93 writer 24 Standard Chong 121 “Take pick” of a sports 100 Opposite of 59 Across or 16 Toward the66 Lethargy stern 52 Skirmish team, possibly? 29 Actor Grant 122 Very, in Versailles Jackman Bowl over were ___ good 58 Beach 101 souvenir 115 Magnetism 17 Judicious 67 “They 94 friends.” 30 Darns 104 Sharif of film Down 61 Bubbly drink 20 Trashed 116 Math subj. 95 68 Layers 31 La Scala highlight 105 Water carrier 1 Ancient colonnade 63 Fencing swords 22 Engine need 117 Shack 98 69 The best of times 33 Frightens 106 Heidi’s home 2 Impoverished 71 Belfast grp. 64 Heartbreak 34 Songbird House 118 Frozen dessert 23 Alliance acronym 99 107 Strong cleaner 3 Golden rule word 35 Clothing 24joints Standard 73 Tennis’s Sampras writer 108 Short punch 100 119 Incinerates 4 Viña ___ Mar, Chile 74 Fill with joy 36 For all to hear 109 Eskimo knife 5 Man of morals 120 King, in Cádiz 29 Actor Grant75 A or single note,66 Lethargy 37 Dolphinfishes, 110 Camera type, briefly 6 ___-de-France were ___ 121 “Take your pick” 101 musically 67 “They 111 Prevent shortened Jackman 7 Argentine aunt 76 Rice wine 38 Musical Yoko good friends.” 30 Darns 122 Very, in Versailles 112 Triumphant cry 104 8 Sashays 77 Take a powder 40 Initial stake 68 Layers113 Jeu de mots 31 La Scala highlight 105 9 Coffee shops 42 Skin problem 114 It’s often left hanging 33 Frightens 78 Battery type69 The best of times Down 106 10 One ___ million 79 Herringlike fish 43 Motel employee around 11 Elders 71 Belfast grp. 1 Ancient colonnade44 Bury 34 Songbird 80 Smart 107 12 Data 73 Tennis’s Sampras Clothing joints 2 Impoverished 108 83 Rounded, in botany 45 Hearty35 entree Answers on page 94. 13 Garage contents 84 Belgian river74 Fill with joy 48 Mississippi feeder 36 For all to hear 3 Golden rule word 109 14 Hot time in Haiti 85 Catch sight of 49 Aircraft 75 A single note, 37compartment Dolphinfishes, 4 Viña ___ Mar, Chile 110

Caterpillar hairs One ___ time 92 selamtamagazine.com Joker, e.g. British gun

5 Man of morals 6 ___-de-France 7 Argentine aunt

Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

entertainment


S T A Y

W I T H

E X C I T E M E N T

www.boleambassadorhotel.com

Bole Ambassador Hotel is located in a walking distance from Bole International Airport and door step from millennium hall. Our newly opened expansion increase our capacity to 123 luxuriously appointed deluxe rooms and suites that feature high speed WI-FI internet access, satellite TV and amenities to present you with the perfect balance of comfort and convenience. The new restaurant is a prefect place to enjoy the traditional & international dining cousins. Our different size meeting-halls are an ideal venue of choice for your meeting schedule.

i n

a s s o c i a t i o n

w i t h

www.boleambassadorhotel.com

Stay with us and earn your miles! FOR YOUR ENQUERIES PLEASE CONTACT US VIA

Tel: +251 116 18 82 84 Fax: +251 116 18 70 96 P.O.Box: 1130 Code 1110 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia reservation@boleambassadorhotel.com


must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com Sudoku Solution

3 38 8

7

8 3

Solutions to Sudoku from page 91.

4 2 8

1

4 2 5 6 1 7 9 7 9 2 8 1 3 6 5 4 1 6 5 9 4 7 3 2 8 8 1 3 5 6 9 7 4 2 2 5 6 7 8 4 9 1 3 9 4 7 3 2 1 8 6 5 4 3 9 6 7 5 2 8 1 5 7 8 1 9 2 4 3 6 6 2 1 4 3 8 5 9 7 Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com

5 9 4

5

5

8 2

Sudoku Solution

easy

6

4 9 5 8 7 1 6 2 3

1 6 3 9 4 2 7 8 5

2 7 8 5 3 6 1 4 9

8 5 1 6 9 3 2 7 4

7 2 6 4 5 8 9 3 1

9 3 4 2 1 7 5 6 8

5 1 2 3 6 4 8 9 7

6 4 9 7 8 5 3 1 2

3 8 7 1 2 9 4 5 6

medium

Selamta Magazine

3 1 9 6 5 4 8 2 7

4 6 8 1 7 2 3 9 5

5 7 2 3 8 9 1 6 4

1 9 7 4 2 8 6 5 3

2 3 4 7 6 5 9 1 8

6 8 5 9 1 3 4 7 2

9 2 3 5 4 6 7 8 1

7 5 6 8 3 1 2 4 9

8 4 1 2 9 7 5 3 6

difficult

Selamta Magazine

Solution 3 4 5 7 9 Answers to puzzle from page 92. 4 7 9 3 5S P U D 7 A I T 8S C E L I I A A T O N E S 1/13 Medium Sudoku F O O T L O O S E A N D F 8 3 5 9 B I O A L E T A R O 5 E row, L column P M 1 A To solve the Sudoku puzzle,Heach andTboxE S must contain theAnumbers M O 1Uto 9.R E R O S 9 3 1M I8 N I S C L A N G Y O H O H O A N D A B O T 6 5 5 4 3 1 H I T S A L E S U I 5 6 T 7D S1 2S I 3D E Y E A C H O R E S 2 5 P H9 I O K 3 1S H4 O 3E 1/13 Hard Sudoku Copyright ©2012 PuzzleJunction.com S E A R1 S S 5T E6 L 4 L A C R Y A L L T H E W A Y T 7 R A D K E A6 S S I To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box C A R D S T E N A T A must contain the numbers 1 to 9. 1 8 M A Y O L E E M E9 R G S L I T M O C 3 7 J U S T O N E B I G H A P A2 L G A L L9 U R E 1 4H U 1 R E Y A N B U R N S 8 9 5 9 4 5 1

Sudoku Solution

I D I C E N S O N A T PuzzleJunction.com A N C Y F R E O R E O R A N S T A M P S C H N A P A R T L E O F R U E D U R E S S A S H S S T Y O P U S E M PuzzleJunction.com P E C L O O T H E B A N R E S E T A S P E E D E N C Y M A O O P A P Y F A M I L T F R A P P Y T R E S

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L Y E


Image Ethiopia provides the following services: - Individual and group travel - Trekking - Bird watching - Photographic tours - Off-the beaten-track expeditions - Visits of development projects

Phone: +251-(0)11-5549265/66/67 Fax: +251-(0)11-5519268 E-mail: info@imageethiopia.com Office: Bole Road, Mega Building, 4th floor Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Image Selamta ad.indd 1

12/7/12 10:29 PM

FAMILY RESTAURANT

Known for Burritos, Enchiladas, Tacos, Fajitas, Quesadillas and much, much more, including special desserts. Open from 7am-10pm every day, all day including holidays.

Address: Bambis Olympia Area, Addis Ababa familyrestaurant@gmail.com Phone: 0930-00-02-45 or 0118-50-02-79

ሺንጂንሽን የጉዞዞወኪል

Facilitate Visa to:

Tour Packaging to

Phone: Mobile: Fax: Email:

+251-115543706 / 7 +251-911516434 +251-115543708 abebewubneh@gmail.com xinjingshen2009@gmail.com Getu Commercial Bldg., 4th Floor, No. 412 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia


fly ethiopian

| Vintage

Ethiopian Airlines flight crew, circa 1960.

96

selamtamagazine.com


የኢትዮጵያ ቢራ ከ

ጀምሮ

THE BEER OF ETHIOPIA SINCE 1922 ከ18 ዓመት በታች ለሆኑ የተከለከለ


Enjoy 3G - High Speed Mobile Internet

Upgrade your mobile service to 3G and get free 200 MB Internet access with only birr 250

www.ethiotelecom.et

Tariff - birr 0.6/MB for Internet and the existing mobile service tariff applies for voice & SMS. The service works only in Addis and out of Addis you will get all the usual services .All Prices are VAT inclusive.


Selamta January–February 2013