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CASE FOR SUPPORT


“Our vision is to unlock the true potential in humankind through investing in education.”

CONTENTS OUR MISSION

3

OUR STORY

4

OUR GOVERNANCE

6

OUR GOALS

8

OUR FUTURE

10

OUR FACTS

13

OUR PROJECTS

16

OUR PARTNERS

17

OUR BOARD

18

Seed Foundation Australia was established in 2015 to facilitate pathways to higher education and employment for young people in rural and remote Aboriginal & Torres Strait Island communities. Students from St Teresa’s College, Abergowrie


OUR MISSION Seed Foundation Australia provides high quality education and wraparound support services to improve the health and well-being of Australia’s First People. We work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Our work is designed to dramatically change youth from rural and remote communities, providing trajectories for each young person, whilst also pathways into higher education and employment. realising their potential for success the ultimate aim being to relieve the endemic poverty and destitution that pervades many remote Indigenous communities.

HOW WILL WE ACHIEVE THIS? Seed Foundation Australia’s first focus is on increasing Indigenous representation across the health sector through the creation of the First Peoples’ Health Program.

OUR AIMS The

First

1. Increase

Peoples’ the

Health

Indigenous

Program health

will:

workforce.

2. Offer opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to engage with a university and/or a training and employment pathway. 3. Provide students with health literacy that can be taken back to their home communities. WHAT DOES THE PROGRAM OFFER? The First Peoples’ Health Program is offered as a nationally recognised health qualification for students in their senior phase of schooling. The training provides entry level knowledge and skills for students to either pursue a career in health or gain health literacy which will have a lasting impact on their community.

Despite significant investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health programs over the past 40 years, progress towards closing the gap for Indigenous health has been slow. While interventions from Government and non-Government organisations have been developed based on best-practice research and learned experience, consideration for the complexity of issues and diversity of communities has often been missing. Seed Foundation Australia prioritises true community engagement and consultation as an integral component of program development, implementation and evaluation. While to some extent interventions have been based on good practice research and experience, consideration for the complexity and diversity amongst the target demographic is missing. Many assumptions regarding predicted response and theory of change are over simplified and unrealistic when placed into remote and very remote Indigenous communities.

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OUR STORY Seed Foundation Australia began through a nationally Registered Training Organisation (RTO), Connect ‘n’ Grow. Based in North Queensland, Connect ‘n’ Grow has been delivering nationally recognised health training to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary school students since 2012. The RTO has a proven track record of providing high quality, low cost, Indigenous-focused, vocational educational and training services. Connect ‘n’ Grow’s work has also included the project management of three remote based Health Trade Training Centres in schools in Northern Australia.

Through the training and programs offered, a higher proportion of Indigenous secondary students are now considering tertiary educational pathways and careers within the local healthcare industry.

Universities and health industry partners have also This training in health care has inspired a ground expressed a renewed commitment to providing swell of interest at a community level regarding students with medium to long-term career prospects. health issues and opportunities in health care. Seed Foundation Australia was therefore established to

Training programs delivered:

capitalise on and maximise this momentum, through the provision of wraparound support services, designed to increase further training and employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

• HLT20113 Certificate II in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care • HLT23215 Certificate II in Health Support Services • CHC22015 Certificate II in Community Services

THE ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE INCLUDE: • Winning The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) 2014 Partnership Award. • Facilitating community engagement initiatives, including a community consultation hosted by Griffith University. • Project managing the development of three Remote Health Trade Training Centres up to the value of $1.4 million in three schools in Northern Australia. • Supporting four students to enrol in a Bachelor of Public Health and Nursing and Midwifery at Griffith University, as a result of the Griffith University Project. • Supporting four students to become gainfully employed by the Townsville Aboriginal and Islander Health Service (TAIHS). • 160 students have completed the program since 2010.

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• Coordinating the Griffith University First People’s Aspirations and Pathways to Health Project in 2014 which brought together over 35 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from Northern Australia to experience a week in the life of a university student. • Coordinating the Griffith University First People’s Aspirations and Pathways to Health Project in 2014, 2015, and 2016 which brought together more than 40 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from Northern Australia to experience a week in the life of a university student. • Established a Health and Community Services Alliance in 2016. • Developed health promotion resources with students for use in rural & remote communities, health services and television advertisements. • Secured and

financial support from Northern Territory

the

Queensland governments.


“The program inspired me to go to university, to gain skills that I could take back to my people in my community.” - Vernon Armstrong Bachelor of Nursing, Griffith University Gold Coast

MEET VERNON ARMSTRONG Born in Mount Isa, the Certificate II in is currently enrolled

Vernon studied at St Teresa’s College (Abergowrie) and completed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care. Vernon in a Bachelor of Nursing at Griffith University, Gold Coast. SEED FOUNDATION AUSTRALIA

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OUR STRUCTURE AND GOVERNANCE Seed Foundation Australia has been established to leverage this momentum. Becoming a not-for-profit has allowed our services to be nimble and responsive to the highly complex needs of this community, and to operate across multiple sectors. Seed Foundation Australia is classified as an Australian Public Company with the Australian Charity Not-ForProfit Commission under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 (Cth). The charity is endorsed as a Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR Item 1 - DGR1) and is eligible for certain tax concessions (charity tax concession) with registration as a Public Benevolent Institution.

Connect ‘n’ Grow is a nationally registered RTO and has a proven track record of providing high quality, low cost, Indigenous-focused, vocational educational and training services. Connect ‘n’ Grow is regulated by the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) under the VET Quality Framework which includes:

The operation of Seed Foundation Australia is overseen by a Board of Directors which consists of prominent • leaders in the business, education and Indigenous health sectors. The Board was officially inducted in May 2016. •

The Standards for Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) 2015. The Australian Qualifications Framework.

Organisational Chart:

• The Fit and Proper Person Requirements. Under the Board of Directors it is envisaged that an Executive Officer will manage the operations of Seed • The Financial Viability Risk Assessment Requirements. Foundation with Project Officers providing students with • The Data Provision Requirements. wraparound pathways support and an Administration Assistant in charge of the daily administration duties. The Standards for Registered Training Organisations 2015 outlines in Standard 7 that RTOs must have BOARD OF DIRECTORS effective governance and administration arrangements in place. Connect ‘n’ Grow maintains compliance through: FINANCE

FUNDRAISING, RESEARCH, MARKETING & IT

(OUTSOUCED)

Ensuring authorised executive officers are in place (Clause 7.1).

Assess financial viability risk.

Protect prepaid fees by learners.

Hold public liability insurance.

Provide accurate information about performance and governance.

(OUTSOURCED)

EXECUTIVE OFFICER

ADMINISTRATION OFFICER

PROJECT OFFICER 1

PROJECT OFFICER 2

PROJECT OFFICER 3

(PATHWAYS SUPPORT)

(PATHWAYS SUPPORT) 2018

(PATHWAYS SUPPORT) 2019

Strategic partners:

The training component of the Health Program is Through a good track record, Connect ‘n’ Grow delivered by a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) is recognised as a ‘Low Risk’ RTO according called Connect ‘n’ Grow. This company was established to the ASQA’s provider risk rating guide. in 2012 by Michael and Naomi Gleadow. The journey began when Michael (former school teacher) and Naomi (Medical Doctor) identified an opportunity to combine their education and health backgrounds to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through a multidisciplinary approach.

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Seed Foundation Australia is classified as an Australian Public Company which delivers relief and assitance to members of remote Indigenous communities in Australia. The operation of Seed Foundation Australia is overseen by a Board of Directors.

WRAPAROUND SUPPORT SERVICES

Families and Communities Students

Industry and Education Providers

REGISTERED TRAINING ORGANISATION

FIRST PEOPLES HEALTH PROGRAM | CONSULTING | HEALTH TRAINING FOR SCHOOLS

Connect’n’Grow is a Nationally Registered Training Organisation (RT0) that has a proven track record of providing effective, low cost, Indigenous focused, high quality vocational education and training services. Connect’n’Grow is regulated by the Australian Skills Quality Authority under the VET Quality Framework.

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OUR GOALS It is expected that the First Peoples Health Program graduates will return to work in their home communities. This will boost long-term health outcomes for Indigenous communities across Northern Australia through improved health literacy and awareness of basic practices. This will ultimately reduce the risk of preventative communicable diseases.

Our long-term plan is to expand Seed Foundation Australia to support the development of services for mental health, family violence, substance misuse and involvement in the justice system. We want to be leaders in this field and to disrupt the existing systems and conditions which have maintained the status quo for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing outcomes.

3 YEAR PLAN (2016-2019) GOAL

ACTIVITY

INCREASE HEALTH LITERACY IN REMOTE COMMUNITIES.

1.

ACTION

Establish and deliver the First Peoples Health Program at 10 sites across Australia by 2019.

Have delivered the First Peoples Health Program to over 1000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth by 2019.

GOAL Facilitate Employment and Education Pathways for our Students. ACTION Ensure 50% of our graduating students progress into training, tertiary education or employment by 2019.

GOAL Sustainable Growth and Development of First Peoples Health Program.

ACTIVITIES 1.

Establish a Work Experience and Discovery Days program by 2017.

2.

Have set up school-based traineeships with the following enrolments: 5 students – 2017; 7 students – 2018; 10 students – 2019.

3.

Increase the number of students attending the “Griffith University First Peoples Aspirations and Pathways to Health Project” to the following: 25 students in 2016; 30 students by 2017, 35 students by 2018, 40 students by 2019.

4.

Have developed a Certificate III health program by 2018.

ACTIVITIES 1. Establish a fundraising plan by June 2016. 2. Place at least 10 applications for private funding by September 2016.

ACTION 1. Be 60% privately funded by 2019.

GOAL Research and development. ACTION Have evidence based data for the First Peoples Health Program. to influence national policy by 2019.

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CASE FOR SUPPORT

ACTIVITIES 1. Set up a research framework with Griffith University. 2. Complete a social return on invest/evaluation study with a reputable consulting firm.


REDESIGNING EDUCATIONAL PATHWAYS Our model recognises that there are gaps between the transition from school to training, school to university, training to employment, and university to employment leading to poorer training and employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. Seed Foundation’s model provides wraparound support from school to training to university and ultimately employment by recruiting, placing and supporting completions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the Health and Community Services industries.


OUR FUTURE Seed Foundation Australia offers a holistic, community-driven, wraparound service that will produce sustainable improvements for health, education and employment outcomes in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Northern Australia.

We invite you to be a part of this exciting journey, changing the possibilities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth and their communities. Together we can leverage our skills, build on our successes and deliver real outcomes for Indigenous Australia.

Palm Island Pathway into health Jeriah Coutts is a First Peoples Health Program student from Palm Island. As of January 2017, Jeriah commenced employment at Ferdy’s Haven working as a health worker whilst furthering her education through a Certificate III in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care qualification. Upon the completion of her current training she is aiming to one day go to University and study Nursing.

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CASE FOR SUPPORT


“We aim to dramatically change trajectories for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, whilst realising their potential for success.�


CASE FOR SUPPORT Our model has been tested for the past 5 years. We have built this model based on the successes and challenges of previous versions of this program and we have found a model that is:

FORWARD-THINKING There is almost no employment gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous university graduates.

CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE Delivering health care via locums to remote Indigenous communities is inefficient, expensive, and does little to develop the communities’ sustainability. A review of the Australian Government’s health workforce programs has recognised the need to address the disproportionately low number of Indigenous workers throughout the health sector. Research shows people are more inclined to use and respond better to services where there is cultural concordance between patients and their health care professionals.

ENGAGING MULTIPLE SECTORS TO WORK TOGETHER “The inter-relationships between health and social determinants such as education, employment status, overcrowding and income are well established in the national and international literature11. In turn, health influences educational participation and attainment. For example, the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children has found 83 per cent of Indigenous children with better health attended school at least 80 per cent of the time compared with 65 per cent of the time for children with poorer health. Similarly, poor health adversely affects employment.”

DRIVEN BY PARTNERSHIPS “In order for policies and programs to deliver desired outcomes, they must not only be built on evidence, but be developed in partnership with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities who will benefit from them.” - Prime Minister, Closing the Gap Prime Minister’s Report 2016.

FOCUSED ON LONG-TERM WELLBEING OUTCOMES “The data linking educational attainment with successful employment is unequivocal. Employment not only brings financial independence and choice, it is also fundamental to a sense of self-worth and pride.” - Prime Minister, Closing the Gap Prime Minister’s Report 2016.

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THE FACTS Selected health risk factors

Daily fruit intake

Tobacco smoking

• In 2012–13, just over three-quarters (78.4%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 2–14 years met the guidelines for daily fruit intake.

• ln 2012–13, two in five (41.6%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over smoked on a daily basis. • Rates of daily smoking for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have come down from 48.6% in 2002 and 44.6% in 2008. • In 2012–13, current daily smoking was more prevalent among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than non-Indigenous people in every age group. • Based on age standardised proportions, the gap between the daily smoking rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 18 years and over and non-Indigenous adults was 26.7 percentage points in 2001 and 26.1 percentage points in 2012–13.

• In 2012–13, less than half (42.0%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over met the guidelines for daily fruit intake. • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were significantly less likely than non-Indigenous people to be meeting the guidelines for daily fruit intake (rate ratio of 0.9).

Daily vegetable intake

Overweight and obesity

• In 2012–13, around one in six (15.7%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 2–14 years met the guidelines for daily vegetable intake.

• In 2012–13, almost one-third (29.7%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 2–14 years were overweight (19.6%) or obese (10.2%) according to their BMI.

• In 2012–13, around one in twenty (4.8%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over met the guidelines for daily vegetable intake.

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 2–14 years were significantly more likely than non-Indigenous children to be obese (10.2% compared with 6.5%).

• Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were significantly less likely than non-Indigenous people to be meeting the guidelines for daily vegetable intake (rate ratio of 0.8).

• In 2012–13, two-thirds (66.0%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were overweight (28.6%) or obese (37.4%), according to their BMI. • Obesity rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males and females were significantly higher than the comparable rates for non-Indigenous people in almost every age group.

Measured blood pressure • In 2012–13, one in five (20.4%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults had measured high blood pressure (systolic or diastolic blood pressure equal to or greater than 140/90 mmHg). • In 2012–13, four in five (79.4%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults with measured high blood pressure did not report high blood pressure as a long-term health condition. • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults were more likely than non-Indigenous adults to have measured high blood pressure (rate ratio of 1.2). Statistics taken from the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (AATSIHS) core sample of around 12,900 people (a combined data file of both the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Survey (NATSIHS) and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NATSINPAS) for people aged 2 years and over)


THE FACTS Key Indigenous Health Statistics

Key areas of progress

• 670,000 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Australia in 2011, representing 3% of the Australian population.

Education

• 43.8% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people live in regional areas, 21.4% live in remote or very remote areas of Australia. • Average life expectancy 10 years less than that of non-Indigenous Australians. • Leading causes of death included heart disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and cancer. • In 2012–13, around two in five (39.3%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over rated their health as excellent or very good, while 6.9% rated their health as poor. • Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over were around half as likely as non-Indigenous people to have reported excellent or very good health (rate ratio of 0.6). • 52.2% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged between 15 and 64 years were not employed in 2012-2013. • In 2012–13, the proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 2 years and over with the following long-term health conditions were: diabetes/high sugar levels — 8.6% hypertensive disease — 5.8% heart, stroke and vascular diseases — 3.9% kidney disease —1.8%.

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• In 2014–15, the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over who had completed Year 12 or equivalent was 25.7%, up from 20.4% in 2008 and 16.9% in 2002. • The proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15 years and over who had attained a non-school qualification (such as a Certificate or Diploma) was 46.5%, up from 32.3% in 2008 and 26.1% in 2002.


Selected Socioeconomic Characteristics Labour force characteristics • In 2012–13, just under half (47.5%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–64 years were employed — 29.7% working full-time and 17.8% working part-time.

• Based on age standardised proportions, the unemployment rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–64 years was four times as high as the unemployment rate for non-Indigenous people (rate ratio of 4.2).

Highest educational attainment

• In 2012–13, the unemployment rate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–64 years was 20.9%.

• In 2012–13, just under half (45.7%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 20 years and over had completed Year 12 or a Certificate III or above.

• Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 15–64 years were around half as likely as non-Indigenous people to be employed (rate ratio of 0.6).

• Based on age standardised proportions, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 20 years and over were around half as likely as non-Indigenous people to have completed Year 12 or a Certificate III or above (rate ratio of 0.6).


OUR PROJECTS

View the Xaiver College Health Promotion Clip: https://vimeo.com/196518038

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OUR PARTNERS Seed Foundation Australia works closely with several key partner organisations in Northern Australia. These partnerships are critical to ensuring the success of Seed Foundation Australia’s programs. Our partners include:

FOUNDATIONS

EDUCATION

HEALTH INDUSTRY AND PEAK BODIES

CORPORATE

Proud sponsors of the 2016 NAIDOC Events

OTHER PARTNER

Proud sponsors of the North Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student of the Year.

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OUR BOARD MICHAEL GLEADOW Connect ‘n’ Grow, Chief Executive Officer | Seed Foundation Australia, Board Chair Michael founded Seed Foundation Australia in 2016 after he identified a need to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth into further training and employment pathways within the health and community services sectors. His main interests are in training, employment and change management. He is also the CEO of Connect ‘n’ Grow, a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) delivering health and community services training to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in Northern Australia. Michael has a strong background in teaching and has successfully developed regional training programs to better engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in education. He also has extensive expertise working with government departments, educational institutions, health and conservation organisations and the business community to redesign educational pathways in health.

PROFESSOR ADRIAN MILLER Indigenous Research, Griffith University, Professor | Seed Foundation Australia, Deputy Chair Adrian is of the Jirrbal people of North Queensland and is the Professor of Indigenous Research at Griffith University leading the Indigenous Research Unit and Network. During the past 20 years in higher education, Adrian’s experience has been in management, leadership, academic program development, teaching and research. He has made significant contributions to Indigenous health and education, and has undertaken leadership roles in community-based and government committees to advocate the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. Research capacity development has been a primary focus in his research activities and has led to positive outcomes for Indigenous community members and organisations. The highly collaborative manner in which Adrian has undertaken research has contributed to intellectual and methodological developments in health and education fields. He has a strong interest in applied and translational research and has twice been awarded the Australian College of Educators Teaching Award. Since 2008, Adrian has been awarded close to $9 million of competitive grant funding, and published nationally and internationally.

MICHAEL KELLY McMillan Kelly Thomas Lawyers, Partner | Seed Foundation Australia, Secretary Michael Kelly has been a partner of McMillan KellyThomas Lawyers since 2004 and holds a Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Law. Michael has been involved with the Ipswich District Law Association and a founding board member of Swich On Inc. Swich On Inc is an unincorporated association that’s primary objectives are to raise awareness of men’s health issues and to raise funds for associated causes.

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PROFESSOR ROIANNE WEST First Peoples Health Unit, Griffith University, Director | Seed Foundation Australia, Board Member Born and raised in Kalkadoon on her mother’s country in Northwest, Queensland, Professor West has over 20 years of experience in Indigenous health. Professor West is a university trained Registered Nurse who completed a PhD, which explored the participation rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australian Universities as well as the strategies critical to increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nursing students’ success in Queensland Universities. Professor West is currently the Professor of First Peoples Health in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Griffith University and a Director on the Council of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives. Professor West Chair’s the Connect ‘n’ Grow Advisory Group, providing a strategic direction to the First Peoples Health Program. Professor West’s work influences the National agenda on Indigenous health workforce development.

ANDREW MORELLO Yellow Brick Road, Head of Business Development | Seed Foundation Australia, Board Member Andrew Morello, winner of the first season of The Apprentice Australia, credits his strong work ethic as the catalyst for his success. Morello’s lifelong exposure to the property and finance industry, natural enthusiasm and outstanding sales skills means he is adept at providing people with the service and outcome they are seeking. A natural leader from his days at St Bernard’s College, Morello founded his own business at the age of fifteen and never looked back. Morello is now Head of Business Development at Yellow Brick Road, and is working closely with Executive Chairman Mark Bouris to further grow Yellow Brick Road’s expanding branch network. Morello is also the co-founder of online jewelry company Bellagio and Co. and a founding member of The Entourage, Australia’s largest educator and community of entrepreneurs with over 85,000 members around the world. Morello’s number one mantra is that relationships are the key to a lifetime of success.

BRAD BULOW Sammut Bulow Accountants and Advisors, Partner | Seed Foundation Australia, Board Member As partner of Sammut Bulow Accountants and Advisors, Brad is a driving force in its expansion of its service delivery. Ipswich boy born and bred, Brad is actively involved in the Ipswich Community, he is a founding member of Swich On, and as a member of a number of advisory boards Brad provides advice and direction in relation to organisation’s strategies and how best to achieve them. Brad joined Sammut Bulow in 2005 and became Partner in 2007; he has inspired the company through a period of significant growth and change. Current founding board member ofSwich On, promoting awareness of men’s health issues and raising money for men’s health causes. Brad is also the Treasurer of the Jets Leagues Club / Ipswich Jets Rugby League Football Club Inc. The club is a hive of restaurants, bars, children’s areas and gaming machines. Formed in 1982 the Football club has been instrumental in establishing the careers of many players who went and played for NRL clubs and above.


Students from Bwgcolman Community School, Palm Island

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