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SEDBERGH

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Max Wilkinson (H/12) The idea of having a Sedbergh School shoot syndicate was presented to us before we broke up for summer in 2011 and a huge number of students threw themselves at the prospect of it happening. Mr Hattam’s past experience with organising, putting Photo Credit : David Wright together and running a game shoot came in handy this September when me moved into a barn on the Whelprigg Estate merely ten minutes out of Sedbergh as a number of us were complete novices to the game keeping side of shooting and to shooting as a whole. We began by putting down five hundred pheasants and one hundred and twenty ducks. Next came hours of building duck butts, pheasant pens, feeders and weeks on end of getting up at the crack of dawn to go and feed the birds before breakfast. This was demanding work but it shortly paid off as six months on we have had three duck flights and three pheasant days which I believe with my limited game keeping knowledge were very successful. The aim of this season wasn’t so much preparing to go out and kill hundreds of birds but putting down a foundation to work up from. With sixteen syndicate members ranging in age and shooting knowledge, it is very interesting working with people with skills you hadn’t seen before and shooting with people you felt like hiding behind a wall from. A large part of the shoot syndicate is also based back at School. We have to make accounts and direct our money to make sure we have enough for bird feed, wood, quad bikes and all sorts of expenses. We also organised shoot socks being made. George Renwick (P/12) took charge of designing them and then negotiated with numerous retailers for a good price. We needed shoot cards to make the day more formal and organised which, with the help and ideas of everyone, I designed and printed in DT. The skills we have learnt through the shoot go way beyond shooting and game keeping. They employ us to put ourselves forward to try new things and accomplish tasks socially and academically for the success of the syndicate. Through the shoot we have been doing conservation to prepare the land for the shoot and tidy up the area. The game that we have at the end of every shoot has been plucked, gutted and sold by syndicate members to staff to put some money back into the shoot for next season.

Outside of the shoot we’ve had people taking an interest such as Alex Wootton (SH/13) who is basing his A-level DT on shooting and building a ‘game cart’ for the back of the quad bike. Also, Scott Wilson (W/13) came down to see the pheasants and the shoot as he is producing a game book for his Art A-level project. Of out three duck flights, only one gained us a decent number of ducks (13 in all). One of shots that night, Ralph Chamberlain (P/12), was on fine form as he managed to shoot down four ducks with only two shots ending up with seven ducks himself. Saturday 14th February was the final shoot day of this season and Mr Fleck was kind enough to let us out of morning lessons. We began at School House after chapel and made our way to the shoot. Mr Arnold, Mr Kellett and Mr Sands (who have helped out in their free time throughout the entire shooting season) worked as beaters. A few students who aren’t involved in the syndicate came along, too: Fred Renwick (P/10); Alex Wooton; and Barney Spratt (P/13) who also brought his dog. Some of our parents helped with loading and picking up shot birds between each drive. The Junior School Shooting Team of four even made an appearance lead by Mr Carnochan to take a peg for the day and show a few of us up. By lunch we had made a great start with the bag being just over twenty birds. This may not seem like much but we were pleased. Jazmine Williams (L/13), a newcomer to shooting, was found shouting and jeering, gun in hand, at the fact she had just shot her very first pheasant. Harry Halsall (W/10) also made an accomplishment on the second drive of shooting two woodcock which is a record for this season and always good to see on the game rack. Lunch came with the surprise of Robbie Harnby (SH/12), George Renwick, Ralph Chamberlain and Matt Hawley (W/11) pulling up in a taxi after their rugby and hockey games were cancelled. They were dressed for the occasion and ready to make up for the morning they’d missed out on. By the end of the day we had all had a shot and had ramped the total bag to 46 birds, this being 43 pheasant, 2 woodcock and 1 sparrow shot by Tom Brice (W/12), there was nothing left but a foot and a pile of feathers but every bird counts! Next week we have the teachers’ shoot day as a thank you to all the staff who have helped out on the shoot this season. Without them a lot of what we have done wouldn’t have been possible so we hope they have a fantastic day and get a fair share of pheasants. Photo Credit : David Wright

Coconut water, the low sugar antioxidant product, is the new superdrink of celebrities who have been splashing out on it to ‘replenish’ themselves after exercise. So should we take note from the likes of Rihanna or is this just, in fact, another faddy trend? Coconut water has been popular for thousands of years in the Caribbean, Asia and India. It is the fat-free, low sugar liquid taken from the inside of an unripe coconut (not coconut milk made from grinding up coconut flesh). Recent marketing claims have suggested that it attributes tremendous health benefits due to its mineral content; it contains high levels of potassium and sodium, but with these claims seemingly unfounded is coconut water really any better for you than say…good old water? The most revered property of coconut water seems to be its potassium content, with a cup full containing more than that of a banana. Now we all know that potassium is good for us, with its irreplaceable role in many bodily functions such as muscle performance. However, it seems ridiculous to me that we should even contemplate spending ludicrous amounts on a drink that surely only does the same job as eating a balanced diet full of fruit and vegetables. In conclusion, yes, coconut water does have health benefits and could make you look like Rihanna (or maybe not) but I suggest a balanced diet is just as worthwhile and a lot better for your wallet. www.squidoo.com


SEDBERGH

VINDICATOR, .

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Alex Branton (L/13) At the end of Lent term, ‘Cabaret’ takes to the intimate John Arden stage with only a small cast of eleven. Set in 1931 Berlin as the Nazi party are coming into full force. It focuses on life at the seedy ‘Kit Kat Club’. Lucy Steven (R/13) takes on the pivotal role of 19 year old, English cabaret Flickr.com performer Sally Bowles and Sam Duffield (S/13) plays Clifford Bradshaw, an American writer travelling through Berlin. The chilling Emcee of the promiscuous club is played by Jeremy Cowan (H/11). The sub-plot revolves around a blossoming romance between a Jewish fruit vender, Herr Schultz played by Roger Strachan (H/11) and boarding house owner Fräuline Schneider played by Anna Batty (R/11). Trickster Earnest Ludwig (Jan Feist (W/13)) adds another dimension to this story. ‘Practice makes perfect’. A successful performance requires planning and lots of hard work; many people think that because someone has been known to act on one occasion, they can automatically take on any role. This is not the case. The amount of time running and re-running scenes during rehearsal can feel tedious although the finished performance always reflects this. With ‘Twelve Angry Men’ back in November, the entire cast (bar our guard) were on stage throughout the play which meant rehearsals involved everyone. They consisted of reading through scenes, staging them and then practicing them sometimes over and over again until we got it right. It was both time consuming and tiresome at points but worth it in the end when our lines and characters became almost subconscious. Lots of rehearsal time had its benefits: we all knew the progression of the plot and what should be happening at what time. This meant

we could, if necessary, recover one another’s mistakes. The worst feeling whilst on stage is when you know you’ve made a mistake and panic – but that is the last thing a performer must do as the audience is very unlikely to notice so it is best to just carry on and pull through. With ‘Cabaret’ being a musical, rehearsal slots are set aside for each scene, certain songs or dancing for the Kit Kat club girls (Lily Qualtrough (R/12), Victoria Johnston (R/12), Alex Johnston (R/12) and Ugne Dagilyte (L/9)). Specific rehearsals make better use of our time; we read through the scene, actively run it, polish it and then go away to learn our lines. People have lots of strategies to learning lines although there is no right or wrong way. For me the only way is repetition aloud. Acting is not just learning to repeat words of a script. The performer must think about body language, dress code, accent...the list goes on. For me, an actor or actress who can take on a role and still make it his or her own has achieved a successful performance. When establishing how to portray a character the director and the cast usually discuss everyone’s roles within the plot. Usually, I try and research my character and the context in which the play belongs (time period, social opinions, and views of class and gender). The first time I read through the whole plot I follow stage directions and language which usually give me hints. Taking note how others talk to or about my character also helps. Nerves are always a barrier which performers must cross; they say with

Nine members of the School went on an overnight caving adventure this past weekend. Ellie Winstanley (R/12), Henry Wray (H/12), Sam Wray (H/12), Sophia Zhong (L/12), Photo Credit : Mr Cooling Mr Cooling, Mr Cooper-Colliander, Mr Fisher, Mr Hartley, and Mrs Sullivan descended into Lancaster Hole Saturday evening, camped overnight at Main Line Terminus, made their way through Wretched Rabbit Passage and emerged Sunday morning.

Nicola Fleck (L/9)

experience they go. For me I’ve learnt to work with them and not let them impede my performance. When I am on stage I am Fräuline Kost. I am Juror 4. I am not a girl standing on the stage for a school play.

1500 - Vicente Yáñez Pinzón discovered Brazil 1556 - An earthquake in Shanxi Province, China, was thought to have killed about 830,000 people 1807 - London's Pall Mall became the first street lit by gaslight 1880 - Thomas Edison patented the electric incandescent lamp 1908 - In England, the first Boy Scout troop was organized by Robert BadenPowell 1924 - The 1st Winter Olympic Games were inaugurated in Chamonix

in

the

French

Alps.

Image of 1924 winter Olympics— theskichannel.com

Starting next week (after he gets through exams this week), OS Alex Elletson will share some of his experiences of living and studying in Alexandria, Egypt. Alex came to Sedbergh in 2001 and left in 2009. He was a member of Sedgwick House from 2004-2009. After Sedbergh, Alex got a place at SOAS (the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies) to read Arabic and Persian. “I am currently in my third year of university, doing the ‘year abroad’ in an Arabic speaking country. Egypt was my choice after Syria became unavailable as a result of the ongoing revolution. I arrived in September and have been here since then, and I will be returning to the UK in June. The aim here is having as much contact time with Egyptians as possible to try and improve our spoken Arabic.” If you have questions for Alex which you’d like him to address in his articles, let Mrs C-C know and she’ll put you in touch.

Ben Lawry (E/11) It was a dark stormy night and a couple were in a car racing madly through a foreign city. The car broke down and the husband had to go get help from someone who spoke his language. He was afraid to leave his wife alone in the car so he pulled up the windows and locked the car before leaving. When he came back, the car was in the same state as he had left it but his wife was dead, there was blood on the floor and there was a stranger in the car. How?

Charlie Smith (S/11) The man had climbed up a block of ice.

www.destination360.com

Layout for this issue was done by: George Parkinson (E/11).

Sedbergh Vindicator 23rd January 2012  

Sedbergh Vindicator 23rd January 2012

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