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Climate Leadership For America EDUCATION AND INNOVATION FOR PROSPERIT Y


AT A G L A N C E The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) is making a tremendous impact on the nation and the climate. As of December 31, 2009, 665 schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia have made the Commitment, representing 5.6 million students – more than one third of the higher education student population in the United States. The schools’ current and planned emissions reductions represent a cut of more than 33 million metric tons of CO2e per year.

Signatory schools are showing the rest of society how to work quickly toward climate neutrality. They are dramatically reducing operating costs, training clean energy workers, and spurring innovation in energy efficiency, transportation, and renewable power. They are teaching tomorrow’s architects, business leaders, policy-makers, engineers, economists, and product designers how to operate society sustainably. As you will see through the stories they share, ACUPCC schools’ impact is reaching well beyond their campus gates. Babson College MBA students are working with Oregon Institute of Technology’s brightest engineers to develop new green technologies. University of Maine researchers are working with groups from across the state to solve problems related to urbanization, forest management, and climate. With support from major corporations, NGOs, and public agencies, the University of Arkansas and Arizona State University have launched the Sustainability Consortium, which may completely change the way companies and consumers are able to rate the sustainability performance of products. And this is just the beginning. I N J O I N I N G T H E A C U P C C , S I G N AT O R I E S A R E C O M M I T T I N G T O : t Conducting an annual inventory of all greenhouse gas emissions; t Implementing two or more short-term ‘tangible actions’ to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; t Developing a customized Climate Action Plan to reach climate neutrality in operations; t Making sustainability a part of the educational experience for all students; t Making the action plan, inventory, and periodic progress reports publicly available to facilitate and accelerate progress for fellow institutions and society. In addition to improving climate conditions and training workers for clean energy jobs, ACUPCC signatories are generating significant benefits for their institutions, including recruitment of top faculty, students, and staff; increased community, funder, and government support; lower operating costs; and a boost to educational and research opportunities.

More information at www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

Cover: The back of the Wendy and Malcolm McLean Environmental Living and Learning Center at Northland College includes photovoltaic arrays, a wind turbine, and a solar water heating system. Photo courtesy of Northland College

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L E T T E R F RO M T H E AC U P C C C H A I R S Dear Colleagues,

STEERIN G COM MIT TEE Michael M. Crow, Co-Chair

Colleges and universities are developing the knowledge and strategies needed for renewed American prosperity, global leadership, and a safer climate. We are proud to be championing this effort through the work of the ACUPCC. The leadership of the higher education sector has never been more important. During this past year of severe economic hardship, we learned that the adverse effects of global warming are more serious and happening faster than the world’s scientific community predicted even a year before. Both the US Congress and the international community took initial steps to address the challenge but fell far short of the action and timetable necessary to avert unmanageable climate disruption. It is clear that the individual and collective action of the 665 and growing ACUPCC colleges and universities is needed now more than ever to deal with these dual economic and climate crises. By signing the ACUPCC, we are eliminating net greenhouse gas emissions today and training all students to operate a sustainable society tomorrow. We believe that our efforts are a model for the kind of international commitments that the world’s leaders will have to make in 2010 and beyond. ACUPCC schools are making investments that are saving substantial amounts of money and expanding their research and teaching opportunities. The initiative gained a great deal of public momentum, visibility, and accolades this past year. We are pleased to praise and learn from one another’s innovations. However, we cannot rest on our laurels. Former President Bill Clinton reminded us at our annual Climate Leadership Summit how much farther we have to go and enjoined us to move strongly and quickly. In 2010 we will redouble our efforts to help all of the members of the ACUPCC network fulfill the Commitment and encourage all of our colleagues across the country to join the effort. Shifting to a more sustainable relationship with our natural environment is arguably the biggest and most important challenge modern civilization has ever faced. Collective action in the higher education sector is essential. We look forward to working with you to the take our efforts to another critical level.

President, Arizona State University David Shi, Co-Chair

President, Furman University Mary Spangler, Co-Chair

Chancellor, Houston Community College C. Edward Balog

President, Aquinas College Esther L. Barazzone

President, Chatham University Mark A. Emmert

President, University of Washington Verna Fowler

President, College of the Menominee Nation Herlinda M. Glasscock

President, North Lake College David Hales

President, College of the Atlantic Jaqueline Johnson

Chancellor, University of Minnesota – Morris William Merriman

President, Southwestern College – Kansas Horace Mitchell

President, California State University – Bakersfield G.P. “Bud” Peterson

President, Georgia Institute of Technology William S. Pfeiffer

President, Warren Wilson College Thomas L. Purce

President, The Evergreen State College Judith Ramaley

President, Winona State University Rosalind Reichard

Sincerely,

President, Emory & Henry College Martha Saunders

President, University of Southern Mississippi

Michael M. Crow, President Arizona State University

David E. Shi, President Furman University

Mary S. Spangler, Chancellor Houston Community College

Kathleen Schatzberg

President, Cape Cod Community College Mary Spilde

President, Lane Community College Mitchell S. Thomashow

President, Unity College Timothy P. White

Chancellor, University California – Riverside

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2009 HIGHLIGH TS The ACUPCC grew in impact, stature, and size in 2009. With 665 ACUPCC signatory schools by the end of 2009 and a 5400% growth since the launch of the program, the higher education sector is now the first in society to substantially commit to achieving carbon neutrality. Notably, 195 Community Colleges, where thousands of students are being trained for clean energy jobs, are now a part of the ACUPCC, with 29 having joined in 2009.

TIME Magazine named the top 10 college and university presidents of 2009, and seven were signatories to the ACUPCC.

After completing their greenhouse gas inventories in 2008, the first cohort of signatories reached their next major milestone in 2009: the creation and public release of Climate Action Plans. The Plans, available online at the ACUPCC Reporting System, illustrate the specific steps schools are taking to reduce their emissions through strategies including: using renewable energy, improving energy efficiency, reducing waste, and improving public transportation options. Schools also outline in their Plans innovative ways

AC U P C C I N T H E N E W S Right: Macalester College President Brian Rosenberg with former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan outside of LEED platinum Markim Hall Below, Left: Ithaca College’s Gateway facility designed to achieve LEED Platinum

A Deadline Day in the Presidents’ Climate Commitment

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

Photo courtesy of Adam Baker/Ithaca College

Photo courtesy of Macalester College

Giving Sustainability The Old College Try

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2009 HIGHLIGH TS they are re-orienting their educational offerings to prepare the approximately three million students who graduate each year from

Thirteen of the 15 schools on the Princeton Review’s 2009 Green Honor Roll were signatory schools.

their institutions to meet the massive challenge of climate change. The National Association of Environmental Law Societies and the ACUPCC announced a new partnership in 2009 to offer free climate action planning assistance to 10 signatory schools.

Similarly, the ACUPCC and the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI) are offering pro bono assistance to 10 ACUPCC schools as part of a program to reduce campus energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency building retrofits. Lee College, an ACUPCC signatory in Baytown, Texas, recently completed a retrofit of its entire 35 building campus as part of this program. This project is expected to reduce the college’s annual energy costs by 32% and will reduce CO2 emissions by 4,434 tons per year.

Photo courtesy of University of California, Davis

Left: Bike riding is the norm at University of California, Davis Below, Right: Alternative Transportation Fair at Foothill College

Colleges Go Carbon Neutral

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Drive for Geothermal Power Heats Up on College Campuses

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Photo courtesy of Foothill College


2009 HIGHLIGH TS Sixty-six percent of the nearly 16,000 college applicants and parents surveyed by the Princeton Review last year said they would value having information about a college’s commitment to the environment in making their decision.

Former President Bill Clinton presented a rousing keynote address at the 2009 ACUPCC Climate Leadership Summit in Chicago, IL at which he congratulated the higher education sector for taking the lead in fighting climate change and emphasized that there is so much more that we should be doing to help society join the effort. Other inspiring speakers at the Summit included: Martha Kanter, Under Secretary of Education of the US Department of Education; Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and Founding Chairman of the US Green Building Council; Michael M. Crow, President of Arizona State University and Co-chair of the ACUPCC Steering Committee; and Joseph Grasso, Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration at Cornell University and Chair of the Sustainability Advisory Panel of the National Association of College and University Business Officers.

AC U P C C I N T H E N E W S

Photo courtesy of Aurora Winslade/UCSC

Right: Farm Apprenticeship Program at University of California, Santa Cruz Below: Babson College conference on clean energy innovation

Bill Clinton: Make College Campuses Greener ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

Photo courtesy of Babson College.

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2009 HIGHLIGH TS In the summer of 2009, the Boston-based nonprofit Second Nature became the lead supporting organization of the ACUPCC, with key additional support provided by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). Second Nature, AASHE, and ecoAmerica (the third founding supporting organization) were honored for their ACUPCC efforts in the fall of 2009 with the prestigious US Green Building Council Leadership Award for nonprofits. The award ceremony took place at the annual Greenbuild Conference with an estimated 28,000 people in attendance.

Seventy-eight percent of businesses surveyed by the National Environmental Education Foundation said the value of environmental and sustainability knowledge as a hiring factor will increase over the next five years.

Photo courtesy of Wilson Community College

Guide Helps Colleges, Universities Cut GHG Emissions How a Pioneering University Hopes to Cut its Carbon Footprint by Half Above: Cisterns store rainwater from roof of Wilson Community College’s LEED Gold Student Services building Left: Northland College students install solar panels on roof of Dexter Library

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Photo courtesy of Bob Gross/Northland College


SAC UC UCP E CSCS SSCTH OO RO I ELS I N N OVAT I O N S On the following pages are but a few examples of innovative ways schools are applying their Climate Action Plans to areas such as curriculum, transportation, renewable energy, and partnerships within and outside the campus gates. Please see the ACUPCC online Reporting System for the comprehensive Plans of these and many other schools.

Transportation U N I V E R S I T Y O F A L B A N Y, A L B A N Y, N Y President: George M. PhiliptImplementation Liaison: Mary Ellen Mallia, Director of Environmental Sustainability

At the University at Albany, we believe it is our responsibility to model environmentally conscious behavior and provide options for our campus community to promote and advance sustainability. We are especially proud of our work in developing a synergistic approach to sustainable transportation that incorporates research, public/private collaborations, and practical applications of mass transit, all aimed at reducing carbon emissions. Our alternative transportation options include hybrid buses, Global Electric Motorcars (GEM), public bus systems, carpooling, and bike-sharing programs. New 30 to 36-seat passenger hybrid buses are being integrated into the University’s mass transit fleet. Through grant-funded research, we are studying coordination of traffic signals to reduce wait time at lights, transportation patterns to identify carpooling possibilities, and access to bus routes in order to reduce emissions. The goals are to minimize car engine idling times, forge new carpooling connections, and more effectively communicate alternative transportation options to our community. One of the highlights of our program occurred during “Destination Green,” a day focused on encouraging sustainable transportation, when SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher and I toured the UAlbany campus on bicycles from our bike share program.

U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A L I F O R N I A , DAV I S, DAV I S, C A Chancellor: Linda KatehitImplementation Liaison: Sid England, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

At UC Davis, the reach for sustainability spans all academic and administrative departments and involves students, faculty, and staff at work and in their home. Transportation presents one of the biggest sustainability challenges for society, and by extension, the university. UC Davis programs help transform “alternative” modes of transportation from the exception to the norm in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Most recently, our Transportation & Parking Services (TAPS) launched goClub. This program broadens the awareness of the commute options available to the UC Davis community and provides incentives to encourage people to choose options with lower emissions. Incentives include discounted transit passes, use of showers and lockers, discounts on bicycle storage lockers, emergency rides home, eligibility for prizes, and complimentary parking permits (when it is necessary to drive alone). TAPS’ partnerships with multiple campus units and outside agencies like the car-share program Zipcar and the ride share program Zimride translate into increased sustainability efforts that benefit the campus. The program already reduces CO2 emissions by an estimated 20,000 tons per year.

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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University of Albany President George Philip and Chancellor Nancy Zimpher taking a ride on bikes from the school’s bike share program. Photo courtesy of University of Albany

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Santa Fe Community College offers a solar energy certificate program through which students acquire the skills they need to find jobs in the solar and green building sectors.

Photo courtesy of Santa Fe

Community College

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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Sustainability in the Curriculum G R E E N FI E L D C O M M U N I T Y C O L L E G E , G R E E N FI E L D, M A President: Robert L. PuratImplementation Liaison: Brian Adams, Professor of Environmental Studies

As colleges and universities, our largest “footprint” is the education that our students receive. While continuing to focus on carbon reduction through infrastructure measures, ACUPCC signatories cannot forget to “preach what we practice.” At Greenfield Community College in Greenfield, Massachusetts, we have leapt into the energy education field by offering a 28 credit Certificate in Renewable Energy/Energy Efficiency (RE/EE) and a 60 credit Associates of Liberal Arts in RE/EE. Taught in part by dedicated practitioners (architects, engineers, business owners, etc.), we have successfully launched 20 new energy courses. An innovative credit/non-credit format has drawn employed and unemployed workers along with “traditional” students into these over enrolled classes making for eclectic, diverse, and exciting teaching and learning opportunities. We have partnered with businesses, employment and training organizations, vocational high schools, and non-profits to get essential feedback on jobs and curriculum. We have helped place numerous students in “green collar” jobs, such as energy auditing and photovoltaic and solar hot water installation. An informed student body and an educated workforce are essential in meeting the challenging energy and environmental demands confronting us.

V I L L A N OVA U N I V E R S I T Y, V I L L A N OVA , PA President: Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSAtImplementation Liaison: John Olson, Associate Professor of Biology

Our Catholic Augustinian tradition—which emphasizes service to and care for one’s community—serves as the cornerstone of our environmental commitment. Villanova launched a Year of Sustainability in 2008–09, which involved the entire campus community in embracing a new era of environmental responsibility. Through curricular development, research, and service initiatives, the year highlighted our shared responsibility to care for the earth. The year culminated in Villanova’s International SustainAbility Conference featuring Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Our students encounter sustainability issues in many disciplines across the five colleges at the university. For example, in the College of Engineering, students are working on applied renewable energy and water resource projects. Through international volunteer experiences, students are designing and constructing schools, water supply systems, and small-scale electrification projects using renewable resources, together with partners including: Engineers Without Borders for projects in Kenya and Thailand, the Water for Waslala project in Nicaragua, and the Amigos de Jesús project in Honduras. Additionally, business students learn sustainable practices in programs associated with the Center for Global Leadership, and students in Arts & Sciences are exposed through courses in a variety of departments.

S A N TA FE C O M M U N I T Y C O L L E G E , S A N TA FE , N M President: Sheila OrtegotImplementation Liaison: Amy Tilley, Assistant Vice President for Finance and Administration

At Santa Fe Community College, students receive the education and job training they need to obtain high-wage green collar jobs within the rapidly expanding industry of renewable energy. The college offers associate’s degrees and certificate programs in Environmental Technologies, Biofuels, Green Construction, Solar Energy, and Sustainability Practices. Specialized courses are offered to professionals who seek to upgrade skills and expand knowledge in green building. Inspectors, home builders, realtors, lenders, and homeowners are all taking advantage of practical programs developed and delivered by community practitioners who also serve as SFCC faculty. The new Sustainable Technologies Center will not only serve as much-needed classroom space but as a learning laboratory with interactive design features that include rainwater catchment; solar systems for hot water, electricity, heating, and air conditioning; wind for electricity; and a presentation space for business demonstrations and training sessions. The 45,000 square foot facility will aim for LEED Gold certification and is slated to open in the fall 2010. 9

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SUCCE SS STOR I E S AC U P C C S C H O O L I N N OVAT I O N S

Green Building and Renovation I T H AC A C O L L E G E , I T H AC A , N Y President: Thomas R. RochontImplementation Liaison: Carl Sgrecci, Vice President of Finance and Administration

Ithaca College recently dedicated our new Peggy Ryan Williams Center. This 58,000 square foot building features a large atrium overlooking Cayuga Lake and a multipurpose auditorium for admissions presentations. This spectacular facility was designed to achieve platinum LEED certification. Over 50% of the building’s energy comes from renewable sources, including a geothermal system to provide heating and cooling. Other sustainable features include: nearly 6,500 square feet of vegetated roof area; natural convection ventilation that draws cooled night air across a shade garden and relieves it out the four-story light monitor; lighting controlled by daylight and occupancy sensors and mechanical ventilation systems that reduce energy by automatically responding to ambient conditions; and a 12,000-gallon tank that collects rainwater for toilet flushing, meeting over 85% of the building’s yearly water needs. The building is located adjacent to the LEED Platinum-certified Park Center for Business and Sustainable Enterprise, which opened in 2008.

U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A RY L A N D E A S T E R N S H O R E , P R I N C E S S A N N E , M D President: Thelma B. Thompson Implementation Liaison: Maurice Ngwaba, Assistant to the Vice President of Administration and Facilities

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), Maryland’s only Historically Black Land Grant University, has prioritized green building and renovation. By the spring of 2010, UMES will construct a 20-acre photovoltaic solar farm on our campus that will generate about 2.2 megawatts of clean electricity. This SunEdison construction will be the largest renewable energy project in Maryland and will provide UMES with long-term, predictably priced solar-generated energy. UMES’ ten-year plan will reduce the amount of energy used across the campus by more than 20 percent per year from 2005 levels. We are committed to a minimum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Rating for our major capital projects. In the renovation of two campus buildings, the university used a geothermal system to generate heating and cooling in a residence hall and began a separate $7.2M project designed and constructed to meet LEED Silver Rating. To achieve this goal, facilities staff members have become certified as LEED Accredited Professionals and are working with other professionals across the University System to ensure that required LEED rated facilities are constructed. To connect sustainable building with sustainability education, we’re developing new courses in green building concepts in the Construction Management Technology department.

U TA H S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y, L O GA N , U T President: Stan L. AlbrechttImplementation Liaison: Nat Frazer, Dean of the College of Natural Resources

In June 2009, our Wetland Discovery Point building at the Utah Botanical Center was awarded Platinum LEED certification. Its roof functions as both a rainwater collector and a tool to provide shade or allow winter sunlight into the building to warm it and provide abundant natural light. Harvested precipitation is stored in a cistern and used to irrigate part of the landscape and to flush low-flow toilets. Much of the power used in the building is solar generated, and solar-heated water flows through the building’s heating system. Extensive use of windows connects visitors with the landscape and improves ventilation. Not only is the building’s design sustainable, but the facility is also used as an educational site where adults and thousands of school children come to learn about the importance of conservation and wetland ecosystems, and about how they can implement green practices into their homes and lifestyles.

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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Utah State University’s Wetland Discovery Point building at the Utah Botanical Center (UBC) was awarded Platinum LEED certification in June, 2009. The UBC practices sustainability through recycled materials, wetland restoration, habitat creation, and water quality enhancement. Photo courtesy of Gary Neuenswander/ Utah State University

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SUCCE SS STOR I E S SUCCE SS STOR I E S The Black Hills Power Renewable Energy Facility at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology includes two turbines and three photovoltaic panels for renewable energy research. Photo courtesy of the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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New Partnerships B A B S O N C O L L E G E , B A B S O N PA R K , M A President: Leonard A. Schlesinger Implementation Liaison: Shelley Kaplan, Associate Vice President, Facilities Management and Planning

For most business schools, the challenges of realigning what we do with the realities of today’s marketplace have never been greater, particularly in the arena of creating sustainable societies. Babson’s partnership with the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) establishes a new model of how we must educate our students to build a better world. Babson MBA students, firmly rooted in the business and leadership skills that transform entrepreneurial thought into action, are working with OIT’s brightest engineers to begin solving the world’s most important problems. Students will conduct market analyses, explore product costing, and lay the foundation for a technology incubator. Projects focused on renewable energy, services, and systems, will ultimately result in new commercialized green technologies. This unique collaboration brings entrepreneurship and innovation to the next level.

U N I V E R S I T Y O F A R K A N S A S, FAY E T T E V I L L E , A R Chancellor: G. David Gearhart tImplementation Liaison: Mike Johnson, Associate Vice Chancellor for Facilities Management

There are significant environmental and social impacts associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of the products and services we buy. Understanding these environmental impacts is difficult for buyers and consumers. The University of Arkansas has partnered with Arizona State University to launch the Sustainability Consortium. The Consortium’s goal is to support the measurement of product sustainability through systems, education, and research. With funding from more than 20 organizations, including major manufacturers and retailers, the Consortium will provide a foundation that will enable reporting of the sustainability performance of consumer goods in a consistent, scientifically grounded way. The consortium is bringing together leading academic, corporate, government and NGO partners, leveraging the strengths of each organization to drive meaningful change. This initiative will provide opportunities for interdisciplinary research with real world impacts, and will allow our students to gain valuable experience at the leading edge of corporate sustainability. The University of Arkansas is excited to be involved in this ground breaking work that will change the way business is done around the world.

UNIVERSIT Y OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ, SANTA CRUZ, CA Chancellor: George BlumenthaltImplementation Liaisons: Daniel Press, Professor and Chair, Environmental Studies and Aurora Winslade, Sustainability Manager

At the University of California, Santa Cruz — home to one of the first PhD programs in environmental studies in the US — reducing our environmental footprint is increasingly reflected in our academic vision. In this tradition, last spring we announced an exciting partnership with other institutions to establish a sustainable community for education and research in Silicon Valley. UC Santa Cruz and Foothill-De Anza Community College District have formed a nonprofit entity, “University Associates – Silicon Valley,” which has signed a lease with NASA to develop the educational community on 75 acres of land in the NASA Research Park at Moffett Field. Work on the site could begin in 2013, with initial occupancy as early as 2015. Students attending the new campus will provide a source of future employees to strengthen NASA’s workforce and help the agency achieve its exploration objectives. Our vision is to seed innovation, entrepreneurship, and sustainability through the creative reuse of this property. Not only will this project contribute to the region’s economic vitality by delivering innovative education and research, we will be creating a prototype for an environmentally sustainable community.

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AC U P C C S C H O O L I N N OVAT I O N S (New Partnerships Continued) U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A I N E , O R O N O, M E President: Robert A. KennedytImplementation Liaison: Misa Saros, Conservation & Energy Compliance Specialist

The University of Maine has made significant strides in fulfilling its commitment to sustainability. Last summer, UMaine – leading a partnership involving numerous research, educational, and business partners statewide – received a $20 million National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) grant for a new project called the Sustainability Solutions Initiative (SSI). SSI is an interdisciplinary research and outreach program, led by UMaine’s Senator George Mitchell Center, which will dramatically affect our state’s future. University researchers will work with diverse stakeholder groups from across the state to address problems related to urbanization, forest management, and climate change. This work will complement our internationally known research efforts in the areas of climate science and renewable energy, including work in wind energy technology and biofuels. At UMaine, we are also proud of our sustainability-focused campus master plan and ongoing outreach efforts through Cooperative Extension. With these exciting programs and initiatives in place, we are most enthusiastic about our future as a land-grant institution rising to the challenge of the ACUPCC in significant and innovative ways.

Renewable Energy B A L L S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y, M U N C I E , I N President: Jo Ann M. GoratImplementation Liaison: Robert Koester, Professor of Architecture

Our first major step at Ball State University to meet our commitment to the ACUPCC is now under construction. Phase I of our geothermal district heating and cooling system – which will allow us to shut down at least two of our four coal-fired boilers and eliminate fifty percent of our 85,000 tons of annual greenhouse gas emissions – will come on line in mid-2011. This is the largest project of its kind in the nation. Our investment of $42.5 million in Phase I will yield a net $1 million in annual savings at current fuel prices. Phase II of the program, which will allow us to shut down our remaining coal-fired boilers, will continue at a pace determined by available finances. This project has significantly shaped the development of our Climate Action Plan as we work to achieve climate neutrality. That Plan includes an academic integration of the ACUPCC commitment to be found in graduate and undergraduate courses throughout the university as well as what we call “immersive learning.” For example, students recently explored a new model for sustainable neighborhood renewal in Indianapolis. This Smart Growth Renewal District has been selected as one of five pilot projects in the nation to be supported by the Office of Sustainable Communities, a new collaboration among the federal Departments of Environmental Protection, Housing & Urban Development, and Transportation.

S O U T H DA KO TA S C H O O L O F M I N E S A N D T E C H N O L O GY, R A P I D C I T Y, S D President: Robert A. WhartontImplementation Liaisons: Duane Hrncir, Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs and Jerilyn C. Roberts, Campus Environmental Health and Safety Manager

The knowledge of renewable energy principles will be an increasingly important skill for students as they compete for technology jobs in the future. The best way to incorporate these principles is by practicing sustainability as a campus. In addition to our commitment to building LEED certified buildings, purchasing Energy Star appliances, and other recycling and green initiatives, we recently unveiled the Black Hills Power Renewable Energy Research Facility. The facility, funded through a $90,000 donation from Black Hills Power, consists of two wind turbines and three photovoltaic panels, providing modern technology for researching wind and solar energy opportunities. Through this partnership with Black Hills Power, there is an unprecedented opportunity to provide meaningful research experiences for our engineering and science students and to establish collaborative outreach activities for the community and K-12 teachers and students.

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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Ball State University President Jo Ann Gora and Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN) stand behind one of the university’s six hybrid electric buses. Photo courtesy of Ball State University

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AC U P C C I M PAC T “Furman decided to be a charter signatory of the ACUPCC because we believe the movement toward carbon neutrality is both an essential manifestation of the liberal arts tradition and a necessary step to ensure the sustainability of the university for generations to come.” David E. Shi, President, Furman University

There are more than five and half million students attending ACUPCC institutions – more than one third of the nation’s total student population . Climate and sustainability issues are being integrated into the educational experience for all of these future engineers, business leaders, teachers, architects, technicians, artists, lawyers, politicians, product designers, etc. The ACUPCC network has the critical mass needed for business, government, and civil society to take notice and engage in the kind of crosssector collaboration that will revitalize our economy and ensure a safer future. I M PA C T O N C A R B O N E M I S S I O N S As of December 31, 2009, the number of institutions that had submitted GHG emissions inventories totaled 462. Average gross emissions reported from the sources covered per institution were: t Associate’s and Tribal Colleges: 18,422 metric tons CO2e t Baccalaureate Colleges: 16,683 metric tons CO2e t Master’s Colleges and Universities: 27,116 metric tons CO2e t Doctorate Granting Universities: 175,147 metric tons CO2e t Special Focus Institutions:1 53,178 metric tons CO2e

Extrapolating these averages across the entire signatory group, when the 665 ACU P C C institutions to date achieve climate neutrality, they will eliminate an estimated 33,129,710 metric tons of CO2e emissions per year.2 The bold example of the higher education sector to pursue climate neutrality is showing the way for other sectors of society to move towards what the science shows is necessary to avoid the most dangerous impacts of climate disruption.

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

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Institutions awarding baccalaureate or higher-level degrees where a high concentration of degrees is in a single field or set of related fields. Does not include tribal colleges.

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ACUPCC institutions agree to inventory emissions from the following sources: Scope 1 (direct emissions from on campus activities); Scope 2 (indirect emissions from purchased energy); and two Scope 3 sources (regular commuting and air travel paid for or through the institution). Many institutions also inventory other Scope 3 emissions such as those from solid waste, emissions embodied in purchased goods, and other custom sources.

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President Bill Clinton spoke at the 2009 ACUPCC Climate Leadership Summit in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Second Nature

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TA N G I B L E AC T I O N S “It is absolutely crucial that the ACUPCC…succeeds—if colleges and universities fail to point the way to a sustainable future, we should not be surprised but we will long regret that wider society failed to act in a substantial and timely manner on the matter of climate change.”

The framework of the ACUPCC facilitates the process of establishing a vision for a climate neutral, sustainable future while at the same time taking immediate, tangible actions. ACUPCC institutions agree to take at least two of the following actions within two years of signing the Commitment:

Richard J. Cook, President Emeritus, Allegheny College

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Establish a policy that all new campus construction will be built to at least the US Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard or equivalent.

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Adopt an energy-efficient appliance purchasing policy, requiring purchase of ENERGY STAR certified products in all areas for which such ratings exist.

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Establish a policy of offsetting all greenhouse gas emissions generated by air travel paid for by our institution.

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Encourage use of and provide access to public transportation for all faculty, staff, students, and visitors at our institution.

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Within one year of signing the Commitment, begin purchasing or producing at least 15% of our institution’s electricity consumption from renewable sources.

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Establish a policy or a committee that supports climate and sustainability shareholder proposals at companies where our institution’s endowment is invested.

7

Participate in the Waste Minimization component of the national RecycleMania competition, and adopt three or more associated measures to reduce waste.

N U M B E R O F S C H O O L S C O M M I T T I N G T O E A C H TA N G I B L E A C T I O N

LEED Silver

425

ENERGY STAR

471

Air Travel

53

Public Transportation

370

Renewable Electricity

201 57

Endowment Policy Waste Minimization

340 0

100

200

300

400

500

The 15 schools that will take all seven actions are: Antioch University New England, Bowie State University, Eastern University, Gloucester County College, Grand Rapids Community College, Loyola University New Orleans, Manhattanville College, Morgan State University, Penn State Berks, Shasta College, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, University of Massachusetts Boston, University of Washington Tacoma, Victor Valley College, and Western Technical College. ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

18


G R E E N HOU S E G A S E M I S S ION S R E P ORT S By the end of the year, 462 institutions had submitted greenhouse gas inventory reports. This critical first step of establishing an emissions baseline helps institutions paint a clearer picture of their campuses’ greenhouse gas profiles and identifies the major challenges and opportunities ahead. For the first time, this searchable database brings together hundreds of greenhouse gas inventories from the higher education sector in the same place, enabling institutions to benchmark their emissions and learn from others’ reports. The reports are available to the public at www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org/reportingsystem.

“The pride and sense of larger purpose that this experience conveys will help us in our efforts to become a truly engaged 21st century university. The climate commitment work offers an extraordinary focus for shared responsibility and the creation of a different kind of campus community.” Judith A. Ramaley, President, Winona State University

A C U P C C S I G N AT O R I E S B Y S TAT E / T E R R I T O RY

32

15

5

2

26

6

15 2

15

3

56

1

14

11

18 22 3 2

16

7

21

4

3

13

68

4

10

2

14

16

5

17

6 14

2 4

26

49

11 3

28

13

1

4

10

2

14

3

1 2

12

19

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT

1


C L I M AT E AC T I O N P L A N S “In the coming years, the University – and our culture as a whole – will have exciting opportunities to affect changes in behavior, choices, and direction. The intent of Penn’s Climate Action Plan, and the goal of this overall effort, is to make the sustainable choices the default choices for the campus community.” University of Pennsylvania’s 2009 Climate Action Plan

Each ACUPCC signatory agrees to develop a Climate Action Plan within two years of its start date. By the end of 2009, over 130 Climate Action Plans had been submitted by ACUPCC institutions to the online Reporting System (www.presidentsclimatecommitment. org/reportingsystem), representing a great diversity of creative and innovative approaches to promoting education and research on climate and sustainability, and the pursuit of climate neutrality in campus operations. Never before has such an extensive collection of comprehensive Climate Action Plans been publicly available in one place. These initial plans, which will be revised and updated as progress is made and circumstances change, are the result of hard work and creativity from hundreds of committees, comprised of thousands of people on campuses nationwide. E D U C AT I O N , R E S E A R C H , A N D C O M M U N I T Y E N G A G E M E N T Central to the ACUPCC and to the Climate Action Plans is ensuring that all students understand the basic science of climate change and sustainability, and graduates are equipped to help society overcome these challenges in their personal and professional lives. In 2009, the ACUPCC produced a guide with hundreds of examples of programs that incorporate sustainability into student education. Wilson Community College in North Carolina now includes a module on sustainability in a

required orientation class, which features a carbon footprint calculator for students to determine and reduce their emissions. The pursuit of climate neutrality by 2011 at Green Mountain College in Vermont has inspired a new certificate program that will provide students with experience in green building and renewable energy technology and prepare them for the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) exam. A group of GMC faculty and students will research potential sites for solar, hydroelectric, wind, and geothermal energy in Poultney, Vermont, with the intent of creating a community energy plan for the town. Reaching outside the campus is another key component of Climate Action Plans that creates opportunities for ‘town-gown’ partnerships. The University of South Carolina Columbia has partnered with the City of Columbia, two local counties, and the Climate Protection Action Campaign. Last year they started a Farmer’s Market that educates the public about the impact of food choices on climate change. They also brought the National Hydrogen Association Convention to the city and established additional fuel cell technology applications for Columbia’s growing fuel cell program.

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

20


C L I M AT E AC T I O N P L A N S E M I S S I O N S R E D U C T I O N S T R AT E G I E S Climate Action Plans include target dates for achieving specific emissions reductions milestones and climate neutrality. To date, the following number of institutions have set target dates for climate neutrality in or before:

2020:

14%

2030:

15%

2040:

7%

2050:

30%

After 2050:

5%

Dickinson College in Pennsylvania will become climate neutral in 2020 through a 25 percent

reduction in emissions from 2008 levels and 75 percent offsets. By 2025, it will reduce emissions to 50 percent of 2008 levels and 50 percent offsets. By 2030, emissions will be reduced to 75 percent below 2008 levels with only 25 percent offsets. Relative to its 2005 baseline, the University of Florida expects to reduce emissions 3% by 2012, 17% by 2020, 42% by 2030, and 83% by 2050. The University plans to achieve climate neutrality in 2025 using carbon offsets, while continuing to reduce its own emissions each year thereafter.

“As more and more campuses sign on to the ACUPCC, higher education itself is becoming more relevant. Moreover, as college and universities challenge themselves to show leadership in pursing climate neutrality, advancing appropriate research, and graduating environmentally aware students, we can expect to see a ripple effect throughout society – providing a sense of hope that maybe, just maybe, we are smart enough, care enough, and are committed enough to address this problem.” Walter Simpson, Former Director of UB Green Office, University of Buffalo SUNY

The University of Wyoming’s Plan is divided into three phases: (1) reducing emissions to 15% by 2015; (2) 25% by 2020; and (3) achieving climate neutrality by 2050. Phase 1 provides specific goals and action steps focused on education, behavior change, and facility upgrades. Phase 2 is more aggressive, with attention to long-term infrastructure and alternative energy projects in line with Wyoming’s prominent position as an energy-producing state. Phase 3 action steps are more general due to unknown advancements in technology and uncertainty in cost and funding components. At the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry students, faculty, staff, and administration have united to craft a unique and creative plan for reducing campus greenhouse gas emissions. This plan organizes projects into five major categories: Energy Conservation, Alternative Energy, Green Building Energy Systems, Campus Action Plans, and Forest Carbon Sequestration. In total, there are 40 projects across those areas for a 13,000+ metric tons of carbon dioxide per year offset by 2015. Approximately half of the reduction will come from carbon sequestration from management of a portion of the institution’s forest properties. Wilson Community College has developed a Weatherization Specialist Certificate program to train technicians in weatherization of residential homes. Photo courtesy of Wilson Community College

21


S U P P O R T A N D R E S O U R C E S F O R P RO S P E C T I V E A N D C U R R E N T AC U P C C M E M B E R S Students in the Delta College Water Environment Technology program study stream water for potential environmental impact on aquatic organisms. Photo courtesy of Delta College

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

22


AC U P C C R E S O U R C E S The ACUPCC supporting organizations have developed a comprehensive program to help signatories meet their ambitious goals. The sophisticated ACUPCC online Reporting System (www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org/reportingsystem) allows for public submission and analysis of Climate Action Plans, greenhouse gas inventories, and more, and the now more user-friendly ACUPCC web site provides a plethora of other resources. A robust training and education program (www.presidentsclimatecommitment. org/resources/training-events) provides signatories with webinars and workshops on greenhouse gas measurement and mitigation strategies. Programs developed in partnership with the Clinton Climate Initiative and the National Association of Environmental Law Societies have aided many schools with free services related to climate action planning and energy performance contracting. The full-time program team at Second Nature engages in regular communication with the signatories, including the publication of the free monthly ACUPCC Implementer e-newsletter and direct oneon-one contact with signatories to answer questions and assist with reporting deadlines.

“If our core mission of learning, discovery, and engagement results in a more sustainable world, then we will have succeeded. That’s why this effort is a priority for Cornell University.” David Skorton, President of Cornell University

In coordination with national experts, the ACUPCC program team has developed the publications and resources highlighted below to help signatories implement the Commitment. All of these and more can be found in the Resources & Events section of the ACUPCC website: Leading Profound Change: A Resource for Presidents and Chancellors Provides support to all ACUPCC presidents and chancellors in taking an active leadership role in the ongoing process of developing and implementing the Climate Action Plan. Education for Climate Neutrality and Sustainability: Academic Guidance for ACUPCC Institutions Provides guidance on various approaches to the academic component of the ACUPCC, including hundreds of links to examples of education for sustainability. Cool Campus! How-To Guide for College and University Climate Action Planning A publication summarizing common approaches to greenhouse gas inventories and other climate action planning efforts in the higher education sector. Voluntary Offset Protocol The formal voluntary protocol that guides ACUPCC institutions and others through the process of evaluating and investing

ACUPCC Energy Performance Contracting Best Practices Toolkit Best practices toolkit created by the ACUPCC and Clinton Climate Initiative. ACUPCC Implementation Guide The “handbook” of the ACUPCC Climate Action Planning Wiki An online collaboration tool that allows multiple users to post and discuss approaches to greenhouse gas inventories and other climate action efforts for the higher education sector. Climate Neutral Campus Report The Climate Neutral Campus Report is a thought-provoking collection of essays about sustainability by leaders in higher education and business. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Brief A summary of common greenhouse gas inventory tools and resources.

in the voluntary carbon offset market.

23

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


2009 BU DGET 2009 FINANCIAL OVERVIEW The 2009 ACUPCC financial overview includes the results of the operations of the program across the three supporting organizations: Second Nature, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), and ecoAmerica. FUNDING In the fiscal year 2009, ACUPCC revenues totaled $1,231,423, with 49 percent coming from signatory dues. Foundations and corporations provided grants totaling $547,375. Major foundation grants were awarded by The Kresge Foundation, The John Merck Fund, the Surdna Foundation, and the Wege Foundation. Fundraising in 2009 fell short of expenses by $390,282, which was covered by Second Nature and will be repaid in 2010.

2009 REVENUE

Private Sector Support

Signatory Dues

21%

49% 24% Foundation Support

6% Event Income

2009 EXPENSE Fundraising

Conferences & Events

11%

General & Administrative Travel

6% 3%

17% 2%

Office Expenses

26% 35%

Program Personnel

Direct Expenses

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

24


2009 BU DGET PROGRAMS The 2009 ACUPCC program expenses totaled $1,621,705 in support of the following program activities: t Implementation Support, including: direct telephone support for ACUPCC signatories; identification and development of climate action planning resources; management of the online reporting system; and development and moderation of AASHE’s climate action planning wiki and climate discussion forum. t Organizing of the annual Climate Leadership Summit as well as workshops, Implementation Liaison networking events, and webinars throughout the year. t Outreach to Presidents and other senior leaders with resources and opportunities to help them advance sustainability. t Provision of administrative support to the Steering Committee. t Development and distribution of resource guides (in partnership with dozens of key experts), including a voluntary carbon offsets protocol, academic guidance document with hundreds of examples of successful sustainability education efforts, and a document to help presidents understand and develop the skills to lead profound change initiatives such as the ACUPCC. t Communications, including: media outreach to publicize the power of the network and activities of member schools; management of the ACUPCC web site; development and dissemination of the monthly Implementer newsletter; and creation and distribution of the annual report. S U P P O RT S E R V I C E S General, administrative, and fundraising expenses, which directly support the ACUPCC, totaled only 17 percent of total expenses for 2009.

C O N S O L I D AT E D S TAT E M E N T O F A C T I V I T I E S For the Year Ended December 31, 2009

REVENUE

EXPENSE

Contributions from signatory schools Contributions from foundations Contributions from corporations Event income

$ $ $ $

608,062 293,875 253,500 75,986

Total revenue

$ 1,231,423

Program Expenses Conferences and events Office expenses Personnel Direct expenses Travel Support Services Fundraising General and administrative Total expense

25

Net Assets

$ $ $ $ $

270,029 35,608 415,807 575,454 56,513

$ $

174,391 93,903

$ 1,621,705 $ (390,282)

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


AC C CO R I E S S I GUNPAT AC U P C C S I G N A T O R I E S

▲ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Completed

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Climate Action Plan Completed

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Adams State College

Yes

Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute

Agnes Scott College

▲ ■

Yes

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

▲ ■ ◆

No

California State University, Bakersfield

Yes

California State University, Chico

No

California State University, Monterey Bay

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Cape Cod Community College

Yes

No

Carleton College

Yes

Yes

Carolinas College of Health Sciences

Yes

Carteret Community College

Anaheim University

Yes

Cascadia Community College

Ancilla College

No

Case Western Reserve University

Yes

Castleton State College

No

Catawba College

Yes

Alaska Pacific University Albion College Alfred University Allegheny College Alliant International University American Public University System

American University

◆ ●

No Yes Yes

Yes

No Yes

No

Yes Yes

Anna Maria College

Antioch University Los Angeles

Antioch University New England

Yes

Cedar Valley College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Antioch University Seattle

Yes

Central College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Appalachian State University

Yes

Central Connecticut State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Aquinas College

Yes

Central New Mexico Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Arizona State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Central Washington University

Yes

No

Auburn University

Yes

Centralia College

Augsburg College

Yes

Centre College

▲ ■

Austin College

Yes

Century College

Yes

Yes

Chabot College

Yes

Yes

Chaffey College

Yes

Chandler, Gilbert Community College

Yes

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science

Yes

Chatham University

Yes

Chicago State University

No

Cincinnati State Technical and Community College

Bemidji State University

Yes

Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology

No

Austin Community College District Babson College

Bainbridge Graduate Institute

Ball State University

Bard College

Bates College

Bellevue College

Yes

Yes ▲

No ▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Claremont McKenna College

Yes

Clark University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Clemson University

Yes

No

Bentley College

Berea College

Yes

Coastline Community College

Bergen Community College

Yes

Coconino County Community College

Yes

Coe College

◆ ◆

Berkeley College Berkshire Community College

Berry College

Bethany College

Yes

No No Yes Yes

Yes

Colby College

Yes

Colby–Sawyer College

Yes

Colgate University

Yes

No

College of Alameda

No

Birmingham–Southern College Black Hills State University

▲ ■

Yes

College of Charleston

Boise State University

Yes

College of Lake County

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

College of Marin

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Bowdoin College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

College of Menominee Nation

Yes

Bowie State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

College of Saint Benedict

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Brandeis University

▲ ■

Yes

College of Saint Rose

Yes

Boston Architectural College

Yes

College of the Atlantic

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Bridgewater State College

Yes

College of the Holy Cross

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Bristol Community College

Yes

College of the Sequoias

Yes

Colorado College

Yes

Bridgemont Community and Technical College

Brookhaven College

No ▲

Broome Community College

Yes

Colorado Mountain College

Bryn Mawr College

Yes

Colorado State University

Bucknell University

Yes

Columbia Basin College

Yes

Bunker Hill Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Columbia College Chicago

Yes

Butte College

Yes

Columbia Gorge Community College

Cabrillo College

Yes

Columbus State Community College

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

Yes ▲

Yes

Yes ▲ ■ ◆

Yes

26


◆ Membership Dues Paid for AY2009–10

Membership Dues Pledged for AY2009–10

INSTITUTION

Community College of Denver

AC U P C C S I G N AT O R I E S

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

Yes

Gaia University

Concordia College, New York

No

Gainesville State College

Yes

Concordia University, Nebraska

No

Gateway Community College

Yes

Concordia University, Portland

Yes

No

Gateway Technical College

Confederation College

Yes

George Mason University

Connecticut College

Yes

George Washington University

▲ ▲ ■ ◆

Coppin State University

Yes

Georgia Institute of Technology

Cornell University

▲ ■

Yes

Georgia Southern University

County College of Morris

Yes

Georgian Court University

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

No

Yes

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes Yes

No

Gettysburg College

Dakota County Technical College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Gloucester County College

Davidson College

Yes

Goddard College

▲ ■ ◆

De Anza College

Yes

Golden West College

No

Yes

Goshen College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Crafton Hills College

Delaware State University Delta College

Yes

Goucher College

DePauw University

Yes

Governors State University

Des Moines Area Community College

Yes

Grand Rapids Community College

Dickinson College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Grand Valley State University

No

Granite State College

Yes

Green Mountain College

Dillard University Drake University

No

Yes No

◆ ▲

Yes

No

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Drew University

Yes

Greenfield Community College

Drury University

Yes

Guilford College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Duke University

▲ ■

Yes

Gustavus Adolphus College

Durham Technical Community College

Yes

Hamilton College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Hampshire College

Yes

East Los Angeles College

No

Harford Community College

Yes

Eastern Connecticut State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Harrisburg Area Community College

Yes

Eastern Iowa Community College District

Yes

Hartnell College

Yes

Harvey Mudd College

Yes

Dutchess Community College

Eastern Oregon University

Yes No

No

No

Haverford College

Yes

no

Haywood Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Heartland Community College

No

Eckerd College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Hibbing Community College

Yes

Edmonds Community College

Yes

Hillsborough Community College

Yes

Yes

Hiram College

Yes

Yes

Hiwassee College

Eastern University Eastern Washington University

Eastfield College

El Centro College

No

Emerson College

▲ ■

Emory & Henry College

Yes

Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Everett Community College

Yes

Hocking Technical College

Fairfield University

Yes

Hollins University

▲ ■

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fayetteville Technical Community College

Yes

Holyoke Community College

Ferrum College

No

Houghton College

Yes

Houston Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Howard Community College

▲ ■

Yes

Yes

Huston–Tillotson University

No

Illinois Central College

Yes

Illinois College

Finger Lakes Community College

Fitchburg State College

Yes

Florida Atlantic University

Florida Gulf Coast University

Florida International University

▲ ■

Foothill College

Yes

Illinois State University

Fort Lewis College

Yes

Indiana State University

Framingham State College

▲ ■

Yes

Inst. of American Indian & Alaska Native Culture & Arts Dev.

Franklin & Marshall College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Interdenominational Theological Center

Franklin College of Indiana

Yes

Inver Hills Community College

Franklin Pierce University

Yes

Iowa Lakes Community College

▲ ■

Frostburg State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Ithaca College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Furman University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Jackson Community College

Yes

◆ ◆

Yes

No

Yes Yes Yes

Yes No ●

Yes Yes

This list of signatories is generated with the information from the signatory profiles in the ACUPCC Reporting System. Implementation Liaisons are responsible for keeping their profiles up-to-date.

27

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


AC U P C C S I G N A T O R I E S

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

James Madison University

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Marymount Manhattan College

▲ ■

Massachusetts Bay Community College

No

No

Massachusetts College of Art & Design

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

▲ ■

Yes

Yes

Massachusetts Maritime Academy

No

Massasoit Community College

Jewish Theological Seminary of America ▲

Climate Action Plan Completed

Yes

Joliet Junior College

Yes

Jamestown Community College Johnson County Community College

▲ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Completed

Yes

No

Yes

Juniata College

Kalamazoo College

Yes

McDaniel College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Kankakee Community College

Yes

McLennan Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Medical University of South Carolina

Yes

Yes

Mercer County Community College

No

Yes

Mercyhurst College

Yes

Merritt College

Kansas Wesleyan University Keene State College

Kennebec Valley Community College

No

Kennesaw State University

Kent State University Stark Campus

Yes

Mesa Community College

Keystone College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Messiah College

No

Metropolitan State College of Denver

Yes

Labette Community College Lafayette College LaGrange College

▲ ■ ◆

Lake Land College

Metropolitan State University

Yes

Middlebury College

▲ ■

Yes

Yes

Middlesex Community College

No

Yes

Midwestern State University Mills College

Yes

Yes

Lake Superior College

Yes No

Minneapolis Community and Technical College

Lakeshore Technical College

Yes

Minnesota State Community and Technical College

Lane Community College

No

Minot State University

Laney College

Yes

No

Lake Washington Technical College

Yes

Lake Michigan College

No Yes

No

No

Yes

No

Mississippi State University

Lansing Community College

Yes

Mississippi Valley State University

No

Las Positas College

Yes

Missouri University of Science & Technology

Yes No

No

Monroe Community College

Lee College

No

Montana State University, Bozeman

Lesley University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Montana Tech of The University of Montana

Lewis & Clark College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Montclair State University

Lewis and Clark Community College

Yes

Monterey Institute of International Studies

Life University

Lasell College

Lincoln Land Community College

No

Montgomery County Community College

Yes

Morgan State University

Yes

Morrisville State College

Yes

Mount Mercy College

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Linfield College

Lorain County Community College

Loras College

Yes

Mount St. Mary’s University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Los Angeles City College

No

Mount Union College

Yes

Los Angeles Harbor College

No

Mount Wachusett Community College

Yes

Los Angeles Mission College

No

Mountain View College

Los Angeles Pierce College

No

Naropa University

Los Angeles Southwest College

No

Nashua Community College

Los Angeles Trade–Technical College

No

Nassau Community College

Yes

Los Angeles Valley College

Loyola Marymount University

Loyola University New Orleans

New College of Florida

Yes

Yes

Yes

New Mexico State University at Alamogordo

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

New Mexico State University at Carlsbad

Lynchburg College

Yes

New Mexico State University Dona Ana Branch

Macalester College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Madison Area Technical College

Maharishi University of Management

▲ ■

Manchester Community College (CT)

Manchester Community College (NH)

Mary Baldwin College

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

No

New England Institute of Technology

Yes

Manhattanville College

Yes

No

▲ ■ ◆

No

Yes

Luther College

Macomb Community College

No

New Mexico State University Grants Branch

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

New Mexico State University Main Campus

Yes

Yes

New York University

No

Yes

Norfolk State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

No

North Arkansas College

Yes

North Carolina State University

Yes

North Central Michigan College

No

North Iowa Area Community College

No No

Yes

28


◆ Membership Dues Paid for AY2009–10

Membership Dues Pledged for AY2009–10

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

North Lake College

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Yes

Rochester Community and Technical College

Yes

Rochester Institute of Technology

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Roger Williams University

Yes

Rose–Hulman Institute of Technology

North Seattle Community College North Shore Community College

AC U P C C S I G N AT O R I E S

Northeast Lakeview College

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Northeastern University

Yes

Rosemont College

Yes

Northern Arizona University

Yes

Rowan University

▲ ■

Yes

Northern Essex Community College

Yes

Roxbury Community College

Northern Kentucky University

Yes

Saint John’s University

No

Saint Joseph’s College of Maine

Yes

Saint Norbert College

Yes

Northern New Mexico College Northland College

◆ ▲

No Yes

Yes

Northland Pioneer College

Yes

Saint Peter’s College

Yes

Northwest Vista College

Yes

Saint Xavier University

Yes

Yes

Salem Community College

Yes

Salem State College

▲ ▲

Norwalk Community College

Oberlin College

Ocean County College

Ohio University

Ohlone College

No

Yes

Salisbury University

Yes

San Antonio College

No

San Bernardino Valley College

Yes

San Francisco State University

Yes

Yes Yes No

Yes

Olympic College

Onondaga Community College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

San Joaquin Delta College

Yes

Orange Coast College

No

Santa Clara University

Yes

No

Santa Fe Community College (NM)

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Santa Monica College

Yes

Yes

Sarah Lawrence College

Yes

School for International Training

Yes

Oregon College of Art and Craft Oregon Institute of Technology

Oregon State University

▲ ■

Pacific Lutheran University

Yes

No

School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Palo Alto College

Yes

Scottsdale Community College

Yes

Palo Verde College

No

Seattle Pacific University

Yes

Paine College

Park University

No

Seattle University

Yes

Yes

Sewanee: The University of the South

Yes

No

Shasta College

Yes

Shenandoah University

Yes

Shoreline Community College

Parkland College

Pasadena City College Paul Smith’s College of Arts and Sciences

Peninsula College Penn State Berks

Yes No ▲

Yes

Yes

Simmons College

Yes

No

Simpson College

Yes

▲ ■

Pine Manor College

Yes

Pitzer College

Yes

Skagit Valley College

Plymouth State University

Yes

Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

Point Loma Nazarene University

Yes

Smith College

No

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

▲ ■

Yes

Polytechnic University

Yes Yes Yes

Pomona College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

South Puget Sound Community College

Portland Community College

▲ ■

Yes

South Suburban College

Yes

Portland State University

Yes

Southern Connecticut State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Pratt Institute

▲ ■

Yes

Southern New Hampshire University

Prescott College

Yes

Southern Oregon University

No

Southern Polytechnic State University

Yes

Southwestern College, Kansas

Yes

Southwestern University

Yes

Springfield College

Yes

Springfield Technical Community College

No No

◆ ◆

Presidio Graduate School Purchase College, State University of New York

Quinsigamond Community College

▲ ■

Radford University Ramapo College of New Jersey

Randolph College

Yes

St. Augustine’s College

Rhodes College

▲ ■

Yes

St. Catherine University

Rice University

Yes

St. Clair County Community College

Richland College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

St. Cloud State University

Rider University

Yes

St. Lawrence University

Rio Salado College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley

Yes

St. Louis Community College at Meramec

Robert Morris University

No

No No No Yes ●

Yes Yes

No Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

◆ ●

Yes

This list of signatories is generated with the information from the signatory profiles in the ACUPCC Reporting System. Implementation Liaisons are responsible for keeping their profiles up-to-date.

29

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


AC U P C C S I G N A T O R I E S

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

St. Mary’s College of Maryland

▲ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Completed

St. Philip’s College

Climate Action Plan Completed

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Yes

University of Arizona

Yes

University of Arkansas Main Campus

▲ ■ ◆

Yes Yes Yes

State University of New York at Albany

Yes

University of Baltimore

State University of New York at Binghamton

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of California, Berkeley

▲ ■

State University of New York at Buffalo

▲ ■

Yes

University of California, Davis

State University of New York at Fredonia

Yes

University of California, Irvine

▲ ■

Yes

State University of New York at New Paltz

Yes

University of California, Los Angeles

▲ ■

Yes

State University of New York at Stony Brook

Yes

University of California, Merced

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

University of California, Riverside

Yes

State University of New York College at Cortland

Yes Yes

State University of New York College at Geneseo

Yes

University of California, San Diego

No

State University of New York College at Oswego

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of California, San Francisco

Yes

State University of New York College at Potsdam

No

University of California, Santa Barbara

▲ ■

State Univ. of N.Y. College of Envir. Science & Forestry ▲ ■

Yes

University of California, Santa Cruz

Yes

State University of New York Empire State College

Yes

University of Central Florida

Yes

State Univ. of New York Upstate Medical University

Yes

University of Central Missouri

Yes

No

University of Central Oklahoma

No

No

University of Cincinnati

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

University of Colorado at Boulder

▲ ■

No

University of Colorado at Colorado Springs

Yes

University of Colorado Denver

Yes

University of Connecticut

Stetson University

Sullivan County Community College SUNY Canton–College of Technology SUNY Orange SUNY Rockland Community College

◆ ▲

Sussex County Community College

Yes

Sweet Briar College

Yes

University of Delaware

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of Denver

▲ ■ ◆

No

University of Florida

▲ ■ ◆

University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Temple University

Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Syracuse University Tech University of America

Yes

Yes Yes Yes

Yes

Texas Christian University

Yes

University of Houston – Downtown

The City College of New York

Yes

University of Houston, Victoria

▲ ■

The College of New Jersey

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of Idaho

Yes

The Community College of Baltimore County

Yes

University of Illinois at Chicago

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

The Evergreen State College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

Yes

The Nat’l Graduate School of Quality Management

Yes

University of LaVerne

The New School

Yes

University of Louisville

The Ohio State University Main Campus

Yes

University of Maine

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Yes

University of Maine at Augusta

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

University of Maine at Farmington

▲ ■

Yes

Yes

University of Maine at Fort Kent

Yes

No

University of Maine at Machias

Yes

Yes

University of Maine at Presque Isle

Yes Yes

The Universities at Shady Grove The University of Memphis

The University of Montana – Helena College of Tech.

Yes Yes

No

◆ ●

Yes Yes

The University of Montana, Missoula

The University of Montana – Western

Yes

University of Maryland Baltimore

▲ ■ ◆

The University of South Dakota

No

University of Maryland Baltimore County

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Univ. of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Yes

No

University of Maryland College Park

▲ ■

No

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Yes

University of Maryland University College

Yes

University of Massachusetts Amherst

The University of the Arts Tiffin University

Toccoa Falls College Tompkins Cortland Community College

Towson University

▲ ■

Transylvania University

Trident Technical College

Yes Yes Yes Yes

No

University of Massachusetts Boston

▲ ■

Yes

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Yes

Yes

University of Massachusetts Lowell

No Yes

Yes

Trinity College

Trinity University

Yes

University of Massachusetts Medical School

▲ ■

Truckee Meadows Community College

Yes

University of Miami

Yes

Tulane University

Yes

University of Minnesota, Crookston

Yes

Union College

No

University of Minnesota, Duluth

Yes

No

University of Minnesota, Morris

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

University of Minnesota, Rochester

Yes

Yes

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Yes

Union Theological Seminary Unity College

University of Alaska Anchorage

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

30


◆ Membership Dues Paid for AY2009–10

Membership Dues Pledged for AY2009–10

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

University of Mississippi

University of Missouri, Columbia

AC U P C C S I G N AT O R I E S

Yes

University of Wyoming

Yes

Urbana University

Yes

Ursinus College

Yes

Utah State University

University of Missouri, Kansas City

University of Missouri, Saint Louis

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Yes

Valdosta State University

University of Nevada, Reno

▲ ■

Yes

Valencia Community College

I N G O O D S TA N D I N G A S O F 12 . 31. 0 9

INSTITUTION

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes

◆ ●

Yes

Vermilion Community College

University of New Hampshire

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Victor Valley College

▲ ■

University of New Mexico Main Campus

▲ ■

University of New England

Yes

▲ ■

Yes Yes

Yes

Yes

Villanova University

Yes

University of New Mexico, Gallup

No

Virginia Commonwealth University

Yes

University of New Mexico, Los Alamos

No

Virginia Wesleyan College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of New Mexico, Taos

No

Wagner College

University of New Mexico, Valencia

No

Warren Wilson College

Yes

Washington and Jefferson College

Yes

Washington and Lee University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

▲ ■ ◆

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

No

▲ ■ ◆

Yes ●

No Yes

University of North Dakota

Yes

Washington College

Yes

University of North Texas

Yes

Washington State University Pullman

Yes

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Washington State University, Spokane

Yes

University of Oregon

Yes

Washington State University, Tri–Cities

Yes

University of Pennsylvania

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Washington State University, Vancouver

No

Washtenaw Community College

Yes

Yes

Weber State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

No

Webster University

Yes

University of Pittsburgh at Titusville University of Portland

University of Puget Sound

No

University of Redlands

Yes

Wells College

University of Rhode Island

Yes

Wentworth Institute of Technology

University of Richmond

Yes

Wesley College

University of Saint Thomas

Yes

Wesleyan College

University of South Carolina Aiken

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Wesleyan University

University of South Carolina Beaufort

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

West Los Angeles College

University of South Carolina Columbia

▲ ■

Yes

West Valley College

No

Westchester Community College

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Yes

Yes

Yes Yes Yes

No No No No

University of South Carolina Salkehatchie

▲ ■

Yes

Western Connecticut State University

University of South Carolina Sumter

▲ ■

Yes

Western Iowa Tech Community College

No

University of South Carolina Union

▲ ■

Yes

Western Michigan University

Yes

University of South Carolina Upstate

University of South Florida

Yes

University of Southern Maine University of Southern Mississippi

◆ ◆

University of St. Francis University of Tennessee at Chattanooga University of Tennessee, Knoxville

◆ ▲

No

Western Nevada Community College

Yes

Western Oregon University

No

No

Western State College of Colorado

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Western Technical College

Yes

No

Western Washington University

Yes

Yes

Westfield State College

Yes

Westminster College, Utah

Yes

Whatcom Community College

Yes

Wheelock College

No Yes

No

Yes

Whitworth University

No

Yes

Wilkes University

Yes

Willamette University

Yes

Yes

William Paterson University of New Jersey

▲ ■

Yes

Wilson College

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Wilson Community College

▲ ■

Yes

Winona State University

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

Yes

Wofford College

Yes

Yes

Worcester State College

No

No

Xavier University

Yes

No

Yeshiva University

Yes

University of Toledo – Main Campus University of Utah

University of Vermont

Yes

Whittier College

University of Washington Bothell

▲ ■ ◆

Yes

University of Washington Seattle

▲ ■ ◆

University of Washington Tacoma

▲ ■ ◆

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh University of Wisconsin, River Falls

University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point

University of Wisconsin, Stout

▲ ■ ◆

University of Wisconsin, Superior University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

No No Yes

Yes Yes

This list of signatories is generated with the information from the signatory profiles in the ACUPCC Reporting System. Implementation Liaisons are responsible for keeping their profiles up-to-date.

31

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


SPONSORS & EN DORSERS We are grateful to the numerous foundations, nonprofits, corporations, schools, and individuals

F O U N D AT I O N S P O N S O R S

Anonymous

Anonymous

Foundation

Individual

ENDORSERS American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) American Association of State Colleges & Universities (AASCU) American Forests Association of College & University Housing Officers International (ACUHO-I) Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Association of Governing Boards of Universities & Colleges (AGB) Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers (APPA) Campaign for Environmental Literacy Higher Education Associations Sustainability Consortium (HEASC) National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) National Association of College & University Business Officers (NACUBO) National Association of Educational Procurement (NAEP)

National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) National Wildlife Federation Restoring Eden Society for College & University Planning (SCUP) Sustainable Endowments Institute The Conservation Fund The Wilderness Society Treehugger.com Trust for Public Land Union of Concerned Scientists Will Steger Foundation

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA)

ACUPCC 2009 ANNUAL REPORT

32


SPONSORS & EN DORSERS whose generous financial support in 2009 has helped make the ACUPCC a success.

C O R P O R AT E P R O G R A M S P O N S O R S D I A M O N D PA RT N E R

P L AT I N U M PA RT N E R S

G O L D PA RT N E R S

D E S I G N : C R E AT I V E M I N T. C O M

S I LV E R PA RT N E R S

GLACIAL ENERGY

For information about how you can support the American College & University Presidents’ Climate commitment, please contact Second Nature at 617.722.0036, or donate online at: http://www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org/supporters 33

A C U P C C 2 0 0 9 A N N U A L R E P O RT


Cornell University’s Frank Perry (left), Combined Heat and Power Plant Associate Project Manager, meets with Sierra Club’s Bruce Nilles at the new plant, opened in 2009. Turbines fired by natural gas and waste heat from the turbines generate electricity. Exhaust from steam turbines circulates through underground tunnels and warm radiators all over campus. The result: a 28% cut in emissions.

Photo Courtesy of Cornell University

www.presidentsclimatecommitment.org Second Nature is the lead supporting organization of the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. Additional support is provided by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) and ecoAmerica.

617.722.0036

859.258.2551

202.457.1900

www.secondnature.org

www.aashe.org

www.ecoamerica.org

This annual report is printed with soy-based ink on process chlorine-free Mohawk Options Smooth 100% PC White, which is made with 100% post consumer recycled fiber and is Green Seal certified. Mohawk Fine Papers purchases enough Green-E certified renewable energy certificates (RECs) to match 100% of the electricity used in their operations. The paper selection for 2,800 copies of the report prevented 3,260 lbs net greenhouse gas emissions, preserves 35 trees for the future, averted 14,966 gallons of wastewater flow, and saved 24,956,000 BTUs of energy.

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2009 ACUPCC Annual Report