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Road Tripping

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EXPLORING NAYARIT

Father’s Day

June 14 - 20, 2013 Free Issue 845

Road Tripping Through Nayarit


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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

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Welcome

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Welcome to Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Nayarit Here is some advice to make your trip a little easier and more enjoyable. TIME ZONE: The entire state of Jalisco is on Central Time, as is the southern part of the State of Nayarit starting from San Blas in the north.

Cover Photo

San Blas, Nayarit Madeline Milne PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Fernando Gonzalez Corona DIRECTOR Lic. Arturo Martinez Rojas EDITOR Lic. Madeline Milne mmilne@vallartatribune.com SALES ventastribuna7@yahoo.com EDITORIAL BOARD Marcia Blondin Raymond C. Beaty Lois Ellison John & Christie Forget Landon Hollander Nancy Van Landingham Robina Oliver DESIGNER Cynthia Estela Andrade G. cisandra@vallartatribune.com

Vallarta Tribune is an activity and entertainment guide and merely publishes information as it is provided by the advertiser or event host. We do not assume responsibility in errors or omissions other than to correct them as soon as they are made known to us regarding event schedules, locations and/or prices. In addition, we do not assume any responsibility for erroneous inclusion or exclusion of information except to take reasonable care to ensure accuracy, that permission has been obtained to use it, and to remove it as soon as is practical upon receiving your notification of error. We recommend you always confirm prior to attending or visiting an event or establishment. Weekly publication edited, printed and distributed by Ediciones y Publicaciones Siete Junio, SA de CV Grupo Editorial Tribuna Calle 21 de Marzo # 1174 Col. Lomas del Coapinole Del. El Pitillal, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco México CP 48290 Tel. (322) 226-0829, 226-0800 editor@vallartatribune.com

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BUSES: A system of urban buses with different routes can bring you from one end of the bay to the other and all the spots in between. Current fare is $6.50 pesos per ticket and passengers must purchase a new ticket every time they board another bus. There are no “transfers”. TAXIS: There are set rates within defined zones of town. Do not enter a taxi without agreeing on the price with the driver first. Price is per trip not person. MONEY EXCHANGE: Although you may have to wait in line for a few minutes, banks will give you a higher rate of exchange than the exchange booths (caja de cambio). You will need your passport. Better yet, use your bank card to withdraw funds from any ATM machine. Note that ATM’s in the banks are the safest to use and generally charge lower fees. DRINKING WATER: For the 17th year in a row, Puerto Vallarta’s water has been awarded a certification of purity for human consumption. The quality of the water tested at the purification plant varies greatly from what comes out of the tap at the other end. So do be careful. If you want to be doubly sure, you can pick up bottled water just about anywhere. EXPORTING PETS: Fall in love with the street dog outside your hotel or a puppy on the Malecon doesn’t mean they can’t come home with you. The process is fairly inexpensive and only takes a day or two. You need a certificate of health from a local vet among other things. The time of year that pets can travel in the cargo section of the plane may be your biggest challenge. For the most up-todate information contact the Puerto Vallarta SPCA at spcapv@gmail.com.

LEGAL SYSTEM: Not knowing the law is not an valid excuse in Mexico or anywhere. If you find yourself caught in a legal situation be aware that guilt is presumed until your innocence can be proven.

This is a very difficult lesson to learn if you are visiting from the United States or Canada in particular. Immediately contact your consulate for assistance.

Calling in Mexico

Calling phones in Mexico can be tricky as it is different than in the US or Canada. There are different codes you need to use depending if you are calling landlines or cellular phones and if they are local or long distance. Long-distance calls from within Mexico For national long-distance calls (within Mexico) the code is 01 plus the area code and phone number. For international long-distance calls, first dial 00, then the country code (for the U.S. and Canada the country code is 1, so you would dial 00 + 1 + area code + 7 digit number). Calling Cell Phones (from a land line) If you are calling from a landline within the area code of the Mexican cell phone number dial 044, then the 10 digit number including area code. Outside of the area code (but still within Mexico) dial 045 and then the 10 digit phone number. Cell phone to cell phone only requires the 10 digit number.

Emergencies: 060 Municipal and Transit Police: 322.290.0507 Fire Department: 322.223.9476 Red Cross - Ambulance: 322.222.1533 Consulates American Consulate Nuevo Vallarta: 322.222.0069 24 hrs Guadalajara: 333.268.2145

Phone Cards Phone cards (“tarjetas telefonicas”) for use in pay phones can be bought at newstands and in pharmacies in denominations of 30, 50 and 100 pesos. Pay phones do not accept coins. When buying a phone card for pay phone use, specify that you would like a “tarjeta LADA,” because pre-paid cell phone cards are also sold in the same establishments. Calling Toll-Free Numbers Some toll free numbers work from Mexico to the US and Canada, but many do not. You need to dial a different prefix. To call the following toll free prefixes, dial as follows: 800 numbers Dial 001-880-then the number 866 numbers Dial 001-883-then the number 877 numbers Dial 001-882-then the number 888 numbers Dial 001-881-then the number

Red Cross: 065 Immigration: 322.224.7719 Consumer Protection: 01.800.468.8722 Tourism Offices Jalisco: 322.221.2676 Nayarit: 322.297.1006 Canadian Consulate 322.293.2894 24 hrs: 1.800.706.2900

COMMON SENSE: Just as you wouldn’t walk around your hometown drunk and beligerent, it is not acceptable to do that here. While Mexicans are a forgiving bunch, basic politeness is appreciated. For the guys, peeing in public is a major faux pas and if you are caught, can get you tossed in jail or an expensive fine. Pay attention to your surroundings. Pay your bills. Be courteous. And have fun! DRINKING AND DRIVING: First off – just don’t. The consequences are not worth it. Taxis are cheap and plentiful. Fines are as much as 10,000 pesos. You can be taken to jail and your vehicle impounded. There are many checkstops on the weekends and you will be asked to blow if they suspect you have been drinking.

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A call for help this past weekend had me driving out to San Blas for the day. A total of 450 kilometers in one day would suggest I’m a very good friend. But I wanted to go. I’m not one to turn down a road trip. I love to drive my little Jetta too fast along the highway, with the wind destroying my already frizzy hair, slamming into one tope after another. Actually, I love the drive because there are so many little places to pull off and explore. Each time I make the trip I lament that I don’t have enough time to do the area justice. I truly feel like months along this coast still wouldn’t be long enough. In Guayabitos we ran smack into the Motorcycle Festival and all that entails, including plenty of ticket happy police officers. But, after explaining I was only

driving a little too fast to pass the slow moving truck with a family of 12 in the back, the police officer was very understanding and kindly let us go on our merry way. Los Ayala was a little different. Apparently I went through two red lights despite my insistence that there was only one. My pleas for leniency fell on deaf ears initially but, eventually we came to an understanding. Honestly, what I wouldn’t do for a Jalisco/Nayarit plated vehicle sometimes. More than half way to our destination we decided it was time to grab some lunch so we stopped in Playa Los Platinito for some very fresh seafood in the cutest little bay. There are a handful of typical beachfront seafood restaurants and a couple of hotels, some even with hot water! Plenty of Mexican families already out on the beach buried up to their necks in sand having a great time. Back on the road we go, stopping only to grab a dozen banana muffins, three loaves of banana bread and some fried bananas. Apparently famous for pan de platino, this little stop along the way (across from the Corona plant – you can’t miss it!) is a great place to grab a snack and conveniently they sell ice cold milk to accompany your fresh

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out of the oven breads. We also found time to do the Barco tour through the Mangroves, drive around the town of San Blas, deliver the package safely to our friend at his ranch and find our way back to Vallarta. 14 hours and 450 kms later I’m safely in my bed again. In this issue of the Vallarta Tribune we have a great road trip planned out from Nuevo Vallarta to San Blas but it’s spread over 5 days and encourages you to make camp at such great places as Playa Escondida outside of Sayulita, and Hotel Garza in San Blas. It’s similar to my trip – but different. Which is why this country is great;fFrom day trips to week long excursions there is so much to experience here. I have to just say, in closing, I received the most wonderful set of emails from a reader who described some spine tingling road trips through Jalisco that I can’t wait to experience. Hopefully this time with less police intervention. If you have any great places you want to share with the readers or with me over a coctel de Cameron, send me an email and let’s get together soon. Madeline

Vallarta Pride Committee to hold First Award and Fundraising Event

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he Vallarta Pride Committee will hold its first Award and Fundraising Event on June 14th at 10pm at Paco’s Ranch in Puerto Vallarta´s Romantic Zone. Armando Sanchez explained, “Although we are very happy with the outcome of the weekend, we misjudged the timing of events and were never able to announce the winners of the Parade Competition or the Raffle Prizes.” The committee feels it is very important to publicly thank the sponsors and the special people who went out of their way to make Pride an amazing weekend for all. The committee has created a fun event featuring Christian Serrano´s photos of the Pride Weekend as the backdrop for the Award Ceremony section of the program. Benito Aleman, Manager of Paco’s Ranch, told the committee, “Paco´s Ranch and I will do anything to help the Promote Your Next Event

committee for creating such a wonderful weekend.” Carla Fifi will be the host of the award and entertainment event. Bill Hevener explained that the Committee needs to raise money to round off the books. “We were expecting to make more money on alcohol sales. Who would have thought that the parade would turn out to be so well organized, that it was over in an hour, leaving almost an hour and a half before we could officially start selling liquor? A second pleasant surprise was that the ACTII performers spellbound the crowd. People sat under the afternoon sun not moving for hours, afraid they would miss the next act, cutting our chance to sell further.” The committee has been so encouraged by everyone’s willingness to help. Carla Fifi, Diva Divine and Daniel Gomez have all volunteered their time to wow the crowd during the entertain-

ment portion of the event. Poncho Davalos, who is running the 50p raffle with prizes from the Blue Chairs Resort, Rivera del Rio and Golds Gym, is “confident that the community will come out to support the event and make sure the committee is in the black. We will hopefully raise enough money to pay off the debts and start organizing Pride Vallarta 2014.” The event is from 10 to 12 pm on Friday, June 14th. Cover is a 50p donation which includes 2x1 drink prices during the event. Paco’s Ranch Ignacio L. Vallarta #237 Zona Romantica Puerto Vallarta Tel. (322) 222-8147 www.pacosranch.com/ For more information, please visit: http://gaypv.mx/

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Live Music at the Boutique Theater

The Boutique Theatre has an outstanding program coming up this Friday, Saturday and Sunday. June 14 and 15 at 8 pm and 5 pm Sunday. “Brothers in Song” presented by the Puerto Vallarta Men’s Choir will have you fondly remembering old tunes, humming along with others and at times laughing out loud with sheer enjoyment. For sure you will leave the theater smiling, knowing why founder / Director Bob Bruneau’s favorite song is called “Why We Sing”. Until next week, we’ll see you Saturday at the Paradise Community Center across the street from Coco’s Kitchen in the Romantic Zone.

“Fitch lifts Mexico rating on economy, reforms” Wall Street Journal, 05/08/2013. Fitch Ratings upgraded Mexico by a notch, citing the country’s strong economic fundamentals, stable oil production, progress in addressing drug-related violence and a greater-than-anticipated political commitment to pass structural reforms.

“Mexico is no longer an emerging country” El Clarín, 05/12/2013. Mexico is no longer an emerging country and has integrated directly to the frontier of advanced capitalism. Bilateral trade between the US and Mexico reached 511 billion dollars last year – 1.4 billion dollars a day; and the core of this link is shared manufacturing production, which is carried out within the transnational integrated production system, which accounts for two thirds of international trade and whose players are global companies.

“Investors boost direct investment in Mexico, cut stocks” Reuters, 05/24/2013 A healthy boost in FDI in the first quarter underscored confidence in Latin America’s No. 2 economy even as investment flows into the country’s stocks and bonds moderated, central bank data showed. FDI reached 4.99 billion dollars in the first quarter of 2013 after touching negative territory in the fourth quarter of 2012, the first time since the data collection began in 1995.

ABOGADO O PARTIDO SIN ABOGADO Mendocino County HHSA/Social service Family & Children´s Division PO Box 839 , Ukinh CA 95482 Teléfono 707-463-7990 Fax 707-463-7748 Superior Court Of California County of Mendocino 100 Nort State St. Ukiah CA 95482 NOMBRE DEL CASO: Isabella Leigh Rangel LA CITACION DE COMPARECER PUBLICADA POR EL DEPARTAMENTO DE BIENESTAR Y SUS INSTITUCIONES DEL CODIGO ARTICULA 294 (F) (7) (A) NUMERO DE CASO: SCUK-JVSQ-12-16505-01 1. Para Arturo Vargas Rangel y cualquier otra persona que esta reclamando ser el padre de Isabella Leigh Rangel, nacida el 8 de diciembre del 2004 en Santa Rosa, California, EEUU. 2. Habrá un junio de Departamento de Bienestar y sus Instituciones el 6 de agosto del 2013 a las 9:00 a.m. en el Departamento F localizado en la corte superior mencionada arriba. 3. En el juicio, las recomendaciones de la trabajadora social serán consideradas por la corte. 4. La trabajadora social va a recomendar que la niña este libre de la custodia legal de usted, para permitir que sea adoptada. si la corte sigue las recomendaciones, todos sus derechos paternales serán terminado. 5. Usted tiene derecho a estar presente en este juicio y presentar evidencia, y tiene el derecho de ser representado por un abogado. Si no tiene un abogado y no tiene manera de pagarlo, será nombrado por la corte para usted. 6. Si la corte termina sus derechos paternales, la orden podría ser final. 7. La corte procederá con este juicio este usted presente o no. Fecha: 5 de junio del 2013 CARYN A. DOWNING. Empleada Provisional por PEGGY MELLO. Diputado La Citación de Comparecer Publicada por el Departamento de Bienestar y sus Instituciones Del Código Articulo 366.26 será publicada en las Siguientes fechas: 10, 17 y 24 de junio y el 1 de Julio del 2013.

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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

News

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Nissan began producing the Note model in its Aguascalientes I plant, which will supply both the Mexican market and 20 other countries in the Americas. The Japanese automaker’s affiliate in Mexico will also Manufacture the Chevrolet City Express cargo vehicle for General Motors (GM) in its Morelos plant, for the US and Canadian markets. Between 200 and 300 auto parts suppliers will set up shop in Mexico between 2013 and 2014, increasinginvestmentsinthesec torto1.5billiondollarsandbringi ngjobsto30,000, informed the National Auto Parts Industry (INA). Acciona, through its foundation, will supply renewable energy to 800 communities with fewer than 100 Inhabitants in Oaxaca, by installing solar panels in their homes. Enova de México received the Social Entrepreneurs 2013 award during the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Latin America. This is in recognition of its Innovation and Learning Network (Redde Innovación y Aprendizaje, RIA) program, one of the largest computer networks in Mexico, which has benefited more than 450,000 low-income students in three years alone.

Between January and March 2013, tourism in Mexico earned 3.875 billion dollars, 7.7% more than in the same period in 2012, informed Banxico.

Ericsson opened a new industrial complex in Querétaro to complement the operation of its Global Services Center in Mexico City.

IENova could compete in the next phase of the largest natural gas pipeline network between Mexico and the US. The Mexican unit of the US Sempra Energy currently has investments for 1.5 billion dollars in projects in the country.

Banco Santander will acquire 20% of the Bank of Beijing Consumer Finance Company for close to 48 million dollars after approval from the Banking Regulating Commission of China.

Companies affiliated to the Mexican Mining Chamber (CAMIMEX) plan to invest approximately 8.145 billion dollars in 2013, 6.5% more than in 2012.

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Mexico received 4.988 billion dollars in Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) between January and March 2013, 14% more than in 2012. This is the highest number for a first quarter since 2007, and exceeds the average of preliminary numbers for every quarter in the last five years by 22%, according to preliminary estimates by the Ministry of Economy (SE).

Mexico’s retail sector is the 12th largest market in the world, with 365 billion dollars in sales, according to Accenture.

Mexico’s international reserves increased by 572 million dollars from May 20 to May 24, 2013, reaching a balance of 167.488 billion dollars, informed Banxico.

The Pacific Alliance, made up of Mexico, Colombia, Chile and Peru, became the eighth largest global economy and seventh economy in terms of FDI, with 4,286 projects and a 3.2% share in global investments, informed Proexport Colombia.

April 2013 saw the creation of 66,894 formal jobs in Mexico, bringing the total for the first four months of the year to 285,930 new positions, informed the Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare (STPS).

Mexican coffee exports increased by 4.4% in April 2013 compared to the same period in 2012, to 387,867 60-kilo bags, according to data by the Mexican Association of the Coffee Production Chain (AMECAFE).

Peru exonerated Mexican, Chilean and Colombian citizens from obtaining a business visa to stimulate the free flow of people between members of the Pacific Alliance.

The value of Mexican goods exports was 32.863 billion dollars in April 2013, and total exports increased by 6.4% annually, thanks to a 7.7% advance in non-oil shipments and a 1.7% decrease in oil shipments, according to INEGI.

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Lights, Cameras and Meeting planners invited to Vallarta Action: The Preview By Marcia Blondin

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hat a night! Last Saturday, June 8th, at their soon-to-be-completed venue, Act II Entertainment pulled out all the stops and invited hundreds of Vallartenses to preview their new digs. And the people came. And ate and drank and spent money to help build this performing arts complex in the middle of OldTown. The cameras did not stop snapping pics of so many talented singers that overcame the lack of proper acoustics and, if the sheer joy of entertaining an audience could have immediately transformed itself into dollars, the theater, cabaret and

wine bar would have been open for business that night. Star power this city has in spades and what distinguishes Vallarta (to me) from everywhere else in the world is the intimate accessibility of all our artists to the public generally. The hors’d oeuvres were plentiful and elegantly served by gorgeous waiters. No chips and salsa here, rather skewered shrimp with fresh blackberries and pinapple. Help me! The bartenders kept as busy as the entertainers. It will be wonderful to witness the exciting grand opening this coming November. For all of you who participated in producing The Preview: Bravo and take a bow. It’ll be a tough act to follow.

Vallarta Food Tours has Special Fathers Day discount

A 3-hour food tasting and walking tour offers a local’s view into Mexican culture through delicious and intricate cuisine, rich history and stunning architecture. Book your towur before Sunday to receive a 15% discount. Vallartafoodtours.com

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The Puerto Vallarta Tourism Board will be exhibiting at this year’s AIBTM Expo taking place at the McCormick Place in Chicago from June 11-13. The destination will be represented by a delegation of hoteliers, including Melia Vallarta , Westin For one night only on Wednesday, June 12th saw a steady flow of guests through Galerias Vallarta to preview the works of many renowned Mexican artists available for sale. A number of private pieces and collections were presented in a rare showing and available for purchase. The exhibit included such artists as Daniel Kent and his magnificent Los Procesos Sublimatorios, the playful The Monster by Manuel Adrian, a student of Salvador Dali and the iconic La Coqueta by esteemed Rufino Tamayo. A catalogue will be made available via email for those interested. If you have questions or are interested in a private viewing of the pieces available, contact Barbara at webartATprodigy.net.mx The next gallery event will be held on June 22nd at Galeria Vallarta, 187 Guerrero #110 Upstairs

Puerto Vallarta ,Velas Vallarta as well as Puerto Vallarta’s International Convention Center. Meetings held in Puerto Vallarta consistently bring 20% more attendees to events than at their previous meeting location. This year Vallarta will be

holding a hosted visit for Meeting Planners from July 9-12, a special educational trip where fifteen U.S. and Canadian meeting planners will experience the diverse infrastructure and services that are available in Puerto Vallarta.

Renowned Artists at Galeria Vallarta

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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

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By Erin Staley oldtownfm.com

Connections at PV’s Old Town Farmers’ MarketTianguis Cultural

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he success of the Old Town Farmers’ MarketTianguis Cultural has always been built on the relationships between the Vendors and market goers. They share a passion for “make it, bake it, grow it” products and services, and this week, we are featuring the stories of two – Organic SuperFoods and Chelow. Yael Sanchez and Manuel Murillo – both athletes and healthy lifestyle advocates – were disappointed by the lack of delicious, healthy food they found in Vallarta. They knew they were not alone in their search for high quality products made without flour, sugar, additives, flavorings, or artificial colorants and sweeteners. In response, the duo opened the first organic store in Vallarta, Organic SuperFoods. They offer the same locally grown produce and homemade vegan foods they serve their own family, and customers have responded with rave reviews. Since joining the Old Town Farmers’ Market five years ago, they have been offering tasty samples of their most popular good-for-you products: • Almond Butter – oil-free, sugar-free, salt-free • Peanut Butter • Vegan Hummus – chipotle, cilantro, red pepper and natural • Flaxseed Tostadas – flour-free • Salad Dressings – sugar-free and vinegar-free “Not only do our customers come to us for healthy foods, but they want advice when it comes to food selection,” says Sanchez. “They even come to us with some pretty interesting requests.” She continues: “A man approached our stand on Market day, demanding that we throw

By Sue Keevil pvseadive.com out his container of hummus. We were concerned that something terrible had happened with one of our products in production until we learned that he had purchased it at a local chain store. After trying ours, he couldn’t eat the old standby anymore. He told us there was no comparison and has been a fan of Organic SuperFoods ever since.” You, too, can become a fan by visiting Organic SuperFoods at Venustiano Carranza 517 in Colonia Emiliano Zapata or online at Facebook. As you make your way through the Old Town Farmers’ Market, be sure to visit Consuelo Zepeda Núñez, owner and designer of Chelow. She has worked with renowned designers in Mexico, learning from their masterful techniques to establish her own line of original jewelry, leather goods, belts and bags. Each piece is handcrafted with natural stones, metal and leather for a creative, feminine touch. “My designs are inspired by various cultures in Mexico,” says Núñez, “but my pieces are fashioned with my clients in mind.” While Núñez takes the time to understand the tastes of her clients, she admits that she may

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not always realize the sentimental affect her pieces have on others. “In my first season as a Market Vendor, a kind American woman bought my gypsy bracelets for all of her granddaughters as Christmas gifts,” says Núñez. “This past February, one of the granddaughters contacted me on Facebook asking how to find me at the Market. The following Saturday, the granddaughter came to my stand and told me that my gypsy bracelet, which she was still wearing, was the last gift her grandmother had given her before passing away. It’s for moments like this that keep me doing what I do for my clients.” To find a memorable piece for you or your loved ones, visit Chelow at Orca # 129, Fraccionamiento Los Delfines, in Puerto Vallarta or visit Facebook. Join us this Saturday for an unforgettable shopping adventure at the Old Town Farmer’s Market–Tianguis Cultural. Located along Basilio Badillo between Olas Altas and Pino Suarez, the summer Market is open 9:30 am to 2 pm until the last Saturday in July. For more information, visit www.oldtownfm.com or “like” us on Facebook.

What a wonderful 24 hours

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esterday afternoon, three wonderful men came to my pool for some scuba instruction. Twenty-four hours later, they left my boat as very happy friends. Though they arrived yesterday full of apprehension, I knew the day would be a fun one. Firstly, they told me scuba diving was on the top of their bucket list, and secondly, they were too funny. We had a chat about what we would do in the pool, and then we went underwater and did it. One of the four skills we teach new divers is how to safely take the regulator out of your mouth and put it back in. No one likes to do this, but, if you are going to have your photo taken underwater, it is better to not have a lump of rubber stuck in your face, as this flatters no one! By the time they had swum around the pool a few times, they were taking their regulators out and smiling at me for fun, kicks and giggles. So today, we went to Los Arcos and Mismaloya for a couple of relaxing and easy dives. Our first dive was in the Aquarium at Los Arcos. I was there yesterday with a couple of students training to take their open water certification. While I am teaching this course, I am not allowed to use a camera as I have to concentrate on my students. For the first time in two years, I saw a frogfish,

which is something I hadn´t seen before diving here. I had to go back today with my camera and capture this lovely little creature. As they are lazy, I knew it would be in the same place, and sure enough, it was. I had told my divers that I was going to look for it, so they knew what I was going to be showing them. I had also told them that it is something that many experienced divers never gets to see, so these guys were super lucky. A frogfish is a peculiar creature. It swims by perpetual motion, and looks very strange doing so. On the top of its head, it has a fishing lure with something resembling a worm at the end of it. As fish swim past and try to eat the “worm”, the frogfish opens its huge mouth, and the force of the water created by this, sucks the unsuspecting fish inside. I used to see frogfish every day when I lived in Borneo, but this is the first one I have seen here, and I am super excited about this find. They blend into their surroundings perfectly, making them hard to spot, but their feet stick out a mile. These little critters are smart and can change their colors to match their surroundings. I think I will keep this hidden secret of Vallarta for my divers! It is at Los Acros, and that is all I am saying. What will I find next week?

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Happy Father’s Day

By Aaron Fisher royalclubrealestate.com

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exico hosts some of the largest ex-pat retirement communities outside of the US. With theBoomer generation embarking on retirement it is clear that Mexico will continue to see more retirees, suitcases in hand, moving to the warmth and generosity of Mexico. For many retiring in the US doesn’t make sense any longer. US law indicate you cannot spend more than 4 months a year in the US without being considered a US resident for tax purposes. The cost of medical care continues to rise while much of the economy continues to decline it’s easy to see why more and more Canadians and Americans are choosing retiring to Mexico and specifically in our beautiful Bay of Banderas. Offering some of the best year round climate, Puerto Vallarta and its neighbouring towns are a welcome change from the typical resort retirement communities. From the old world charm of Puerto Vallarta’s Old Town, to the comfortable lifestyle offered in Nuevo Vallarta or the charm of the small towns of Bucerias and La Cruz, there are many different types of communities, properties and lifestyles to suit just about everyone. With over 330 days of interrupted sunshine the Bay can’t be beat when it comes to weather; an average day during the winter months is typically, 25C / 77F. The cost of living is half or less of most North American cities, with direct flight to many major Canadian and US cities all makes retiring here quick and affordable to reach. The Bay of Banderas is a wonderful destination, with one of the largest protected Bays in Mexico. During the winter months pods of Humpback whales inhabit the bay and use its nutrient rich waters to feed while birthing their calves. Sheltered from storms and teeming with dolphins making it an ideal place to take in a local

Parenting and Paradise activity or water sports such as, snorkeling, fishing, surfing, whale watching, boating and more. Modernity has not overlooked this area and nearly everything you could want can be found within a short distance. Services and amenities similar to those of North America, such as shopping at Walmart, Sams Club, Costco, Home Depot and Office Depot are readily available. International healthcare services are available both locally in the Bay and a short distance away in Guadalajara are some of the most respected hospitals and surgeons in the world. With a strong focus on servicing the tourism market, Vallarta understand hospitality and most locals speak a great deal of English making it easy to communicate while at the same time it’s great environment to learn another language. Getting around is easy with great main roads and well-built highway system; excellent bus and taxi transport as well as easy driving conditions. Mexico also has a very stable government, a very foreign friendly VISA program and is the world 9th largest economy. With ongoing social and cultural events happening all the time and a thriving ex-pat community, it’s easy to see why so many tourists have taken the plunge and made the Bay of Banderas their home.

The only English paper in the Airport

By Leza Warkentin rhythm2rain@gmail.com

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unday is officially Father’s Day in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. It definitely doesn’t get the same air time as Mother’s Day around here. Being a mother, this has made me smug and difficult to live with. However, to be perfectly frank, and listen up because I will never say this more than once, my children survived their first months of life only because they have the father that they do. I know a great deal about early childhood and I can tell you when it’s best for a child to begin learning to read, but I cannot understand why you need to daily shampoo a virtually bald, dangerously unstable head. Not only do I not have a “mother’s intuition” for babyhood, I become incapacitated when deprived of sleep. My husband caught me giving my month-old daughter her ear drops orally. Twice. He managed to stop me the third time, but I believe I’ve made my point. To me, each cry our babies made sounded exactly the same,

which was not unlike the sound a mind must make on its downward spiral into madness. But my husband would take a moment to listen to each one, then jump up and begin heating up a bottle, or run for a new diaper and a certain brand of wet wipes, and would include the diaper cream if the cry code indicated a slight rash. My children’s father is the nurturer and fixer of our family. When my kids hurt themselves, my children have grown used to my look of horror at the blood, unconvincingly masked by a fake, queasy grin meant for reassurance. They invariably head, sniffling, to their dad, who is ready with a full first-aid kit and a certain Spanish song that seems to be part of the healing process (sana, sana cola de rana…). They also don’t bother coming to me when some bicycle part or shirt button needs fixing, because they know that I will either just not have a clue or will fumble around until they roll their eyes and call in dad. My

mother has threatened to die of shame because my husband is the only one who knows where the sewing kit is. I always thought I would want my children’s father to be just like my own dad, with whom I have a close relationship. I love that he was always funny and creative, and did crazy stuff to embarrass us in restaurants. There was nothing like Halloween at our house, with my dad’s spooky stories about the monstrous garbage disposal unit in our very own kitchen. But then I realized (once my children were past the lolling head stage) that they already had that parent. And somehow, my heart had chosen the gentle, patient father who would care for them like the precious treasures they were, who would do all of that everyday, essential stuff that speaks of a deep, unconditional love. So this one is for all of you dads out there who take one look at their sleep-deprived, weeping partners and gently but firmly remove the screaming babies from their arms and say “Let me”. It’s for the dads who send their wives back to bed for another hour of sleep after a 5am wake up call. It’s for all of you who will enter a room shouting “I’ve got this” the minute they hear the 2-year-old shrieking “I said PURPLE” to a wild-eyed mother holding an entire year’s worth of pink dresses. This is for you. Happy Father’s Day.

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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

Locals

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This is Paradise...

Diary of an Intern

By Marcia Blondin

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allarta’s summer heat provides a great excuse for not cooking and the Wednesday Co-op Market at the Paradise Community Center provides tasty edible answers. Whether it’s a pool / beach / BBQ or cocktail party be sure you will find what you want to

take to the celebration (and do not forget to take all the credit for creating such magical morsels!). Pony up this Saturday and chat up Mama Vallarta. If she does not have precisely what you want - buy it! She chops chicken livers, builds blintzes and plans a different pasta salad every week. Two of my personal faves are antipasto pasta (really!) and tuna sprinkled with white cheddar cheese. Try her chinese chicken with sweet and sour sesame dressing served on crispy wonton croutons, all purchases come with a liter of fresh fruit-flavored tea sun. Always remember: sampling is required - indeed mandatory - and all guilt is lovingly given freely by Jewish Mama Vallarta aka Gloria Sue! If you need some fresh veggies and herbs, do stop by and visit with Gustavo who - in my opinion - grows, among other things, the most succulent spinach in Vallarta. Let us not forget desserts or something sweet to go with morning coffee.

This Saturday stop by one of the busiest tables at Market run by Todd and Lolita who bake outrageously delish offerings. Cakes and huge cookies, and do take home some raisin scones dripping with icing. Birthdays, anniversaries and weekends require special cakes -

ask, order and your job is done except to indulge. Extra calories are winter’s worries! Say hello to Alejandra who knits (seriously!) a good deal of her interesting jewelry embellishments. Benita makes sandals. No, not those! Benitas sandals sparkle with jewels, some with a single color, some in blazing technicolor! Ask her to match your favorite dress.

FOR UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION

By Alexander Sternberg Investours Intern

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opies, coffee, and nauseating boredom are some of the adjectives normally associated with a summer internship. Yet here I am, drenched in sweat, finding my way around Bucerias, searching for an open taco stand, feeling as if I’ve been wandering the desert for 40 years. It was a very warm introduction to a very different summer internship than I have been accustomed to. I am interning, along with fourteen others, at Investours. Investours is a socially responsible tourism company that promotes cross-cultural interaction and utilizes tour fees to

support members of the local communities in advancing their small businesses, which include artisan food and products. A thrilling aspect of the internship is that we have the opportunity to make a difference with a growing company and an exciting mission within the Mexican community. It’s a pleasure for me to be back in a Spanish speaking country. I spent the last year living and working in Chile before returning to the US in January to begin my master’s degree. Bucerias presents an interesting challenge as my attempts to speak Spanish are often met with

“Hey You, Don’t Be One of Those” Myles Wallingford, Investours Intern

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itting on this padded seat, drinking a Corona, listening to the familiar sounds of a distant electric guitar, let me explain what I mean. As creatures of instinct, we seek comfort. And this Corona Zone seems pretty nice for the time being. However, it was not long ago that I was in a region of complete physical and cultural opposition. The Vietnamese countryside is not a forgiving place for creatures of comfort. Waking up on a dirt floor in the middle of a rural village with a stomach absent of food for 24 hours is not the ideal way to start the day. Sometimes I prefer the Corona. Wiping mud from the sleep still present in my eyes did serve a purpose in hindsight though (pun intended).

There is far more to learn from being in a space beyond the Corona Zone. That is the value of being a Traveler. Right now, I’m simply a Tourist, and I have the clear glass bottle with lime to prove it. No matter where you find yourself, it’s always possible to live with the mindset of a Traveler. This is what I suggest: 1. Learn the local language: Even if it’s only a dozen words, it will serve you well to use them. People love to see that you are making the effort to understand their world. Not knowing basics such as “hello” and “goodbye,” is the equivalent of going over to your friend’s house for dinner and occupying the Master Bedroom.

replies in English, especially if I’m walking down the street with fellow female interns. I recently asked a local about a nearby café only to be met with questions (in English) about how many of the American girls I was dating, and if any of them were available for this particular gentlemen. While it is mostly in jest, and often leads to the promise of reduced rates in car rentals and other discounts, it doesn’t help me to improve my Spanish. Since arriving in Mexico, I have eaten as many tacos as I can get my hands on, explored Bucerias, and taken trips to Sayulita and Punta de Mita. Some might see the proximity to the beach, authentic food and travel opportunities as major distractions to the work we are here to undertake. I find there is something peaceful, and conducive to my productivity, about opening my laptop in a café or bar in the middle of the blazing hot day. If anything it provides greater motivation to work hard on a project, so that you can still have time to enjoy all that Bucerias and the locals have to offer. And so begins my internship. 2. Take a different way home: It’s true you know that one sidewalk leads directly to your hotel, but try to find a different route to explore. You never know what you’ll find when you merge left instead of right. Not all who wander are lost. 3. Ditch the concierge: The money that could be spent on zip lines and gift shops could buy you something far greater than anything measured in pesos. Rent a bicycle and roam around, ask a local where their favorite spot is, maybe even just visit the town market and people-watch. If you’re a little too preoccupied to make beatnik plans like these, there are many local organizations that would be willing to help you out; give “Investours” a Google the next time you are on your computer. The world is much too big and beautiful of a place with far too many experiences to be had. Don’t spend all your days by the pool with an umbrella in your drink. Get out there and don’t be just another one of those.

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Education

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June 14 - 20, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 845

By Leza Warkentin

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imagine that there are many expat parents out there who have found the search for the right school in Puerto Vallarta to be very challenging. There are many choices, and some parents do move to Mexico expecting to use the public school system, since that is the system they used in their home countries, and come away confused and discouraged. Most expats and many Mexicans use the private school system for a number of reasons. One of them is that the public school system differs greatly from the system in Canada and the U.S. The public system in Mexico is not afforded nearly the same level of funding as the U.S. or Canada. Schools are overpopulated. In Puerto Vallarta at least, most public schools run in two shifts, the morning and the afternoon, for four hours each, so that all students can receive an education. The curriculum framework itself, mandated by SEP (Secretary of Public Education) is national and comprehensive, and contains components that have been adopted in some American states. But there are still major challenges in public education, including issues with a very strong teacher’s union that seem to hold back the system from being what it really should be for the children of Mexico. These challenges have sent many Mexican citizens and most expatriates to the private system. Keep in mind that in public schools, children are taught almost exclusively in Spanish, and any special English classes will most likely be taught by nonnative English speakers. You may consider this an opportunity for an immersion experience for your child, but you also should remember that if you are just moving to Mexico, your child is also dealing with culture shock and missing what was once familiar. Getting put into an entirely new system with very little support offered for non-native speakers would be on the same scale as being throw into the middle of a pool without first learning to dog paddle. There are many schools in Puerto Vallarta within the private system. In the next few issues of the Tribune, we will talk about what you should be looking out for to find the right fit for your family. I will list them in order of priority, and also list

Choosing the right school for your child in Vallarta some schools you can call to ask for more information (using this handy guide, of course!), and most definitely a tour. Some of the most critical areas to consider when choosing a school are: school accreditation, teacher quality, philosophy and goals, academic results, and the actual physical building and surrounding facilities. This week we will focus on the first area, school accreditation. Schools in Mexico must be accredited by the SEP, so any private school you choose will almost certainly have evidence of this. However, any other accreditation they hold will be voluntary. This is very important to know, because this accreditation will tell you if they are held to U.S. or Canadian standards or not. If they are accredited by an agency such as SACS (Southern Associaton of Colleges and Schools) or CASI (Connecticut Association of Independent Schools) among others, they are visited regularly and examined closely to be sure they are meeting the minimum standards for a quality education. They set degree requirements for teachers and specify such things as

The only English paper in the Airport

standardized testing and class size limits. A school accredited by such agencies as SACS or CASI is considered an American school, even though it is not physically in the U.S., because

it meets U.S. standards. If your child graduates from a school with this type of accreditation, they will receive an American high school diploma and a Mexican diploma.

Stay tuned for next week, when we will continue our look into choosing the best school for your child. Up next, the importance of teacher quality.

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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

Food

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Traditional Mexican Food and Drink

By Gary R. Beck

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n old adage is that true Mexican meals must contain corn tortillas, beans, chilies and lime. This is the ultimate measure, dating back millenniums during which indigenous civilizations subsided by the grace of corn and beans. Corn is the basis for tortillas [circular flat breads, not chips] which are served with meals like other cultures serve breads. Beans are often a side dish. Flavors favored by Mexican cooks are cilantro and onions, but the two most common additions are chile and limón [lime]. From jalapeño to fiery habañero, chipotle to mild poblano, Mexico’s chilies are tasted everywhere, in anything from main dishes to salsas, even in chocolate bars. Assess whether the particular chile is too warm for your taste buds. Limón refers to the small green fruit well-known as lime. A bowl of cut wedges may be presented for use on any dish. The migration of people with their cultures include French, Arabic, Japanese, Chinese, South and Central Americas and of course Spanish. The resulting melding of cuisines has created a contemporary cuisine recognized as one of the most complex world-wide with UNESCO naming Mexican food “Cultural Heritage to the World” for its ingredients, culture and history contributing to the world’s gastronomy. Breakfast in Mexico features eggs [huevos] served with tortillas, corn or wheat, beans and salsa. Popular are eggs revuelto [scrambled] or frito [fried]. Three other creations are often offered:Huevos rancheros with a fried tortilla base covered with a fried egg and tomato salsa; Huevos divorciados [divorced]

two fried eggs served creatively separated by a wall of refried beans with one half covered in red salsa and the other in green; Huevos a la Mexicana, named for the colors of the Mexican flag: white onion, red tomato and green chile, which are added to scrambled eggs. Two very popular breakfast items are chilaquiles and tamales. The former features corn tortillas cut into quarters and lightly fried before added to rojo [red] or verde [green] salsa. The mixture is often served with chicken, fried or scrambled eggs, then topped with queso fresco [shredded white cheese], crema [sweet Mexican cream] and onion. Tamales may be served sweet or savory, made from masa [corn dough] that is wrapped in either a corn husk or a banana leaf, then steamed. Fillings may be pork, beef, chicken cooked in red or green salsa or rajas con queso, strips of mild poblano mixed with creamy cheese. Raisins, dried fruit and/or sugar are added to make sweet tamales. Antojitos [snacks and street food] please the budget traveler. Order several dishes to make a satisfying lunch, snack or dinner. Quesadillas [quekas] are comprised of large tortillas filled with meats or vegetables. Cheese is always added before the tortilla is folded and cooked, usually grilled. Stuffing include chicharrón [pork rind], tinga de pollo [chicken in tomato chipotle sauce] or champiñones [mushrooms]. Sopes, huaraches and tlayudas are made from the same

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dough as tamales. Sopes are topped with refried beans, lettuce, onion, salsa, cheese and often meat. They are small, while huaraches are typically bigger and oblong-shaped, and tlayudas, native to Oaxaca, have a base of a very large fried tortilla. Tortas are an oblong white sandwich roll filled with meat [chicken, ham or pork], cheese and vegetables [cabbage, avocado, tomato, lettuce]. Torta Ahogada means literally “drowned sandwich” with the bun filled with shredded pork and covered in a chile tomato sauce, then topped with avoca-

do, onion and radish. Originally from Guadalajara, popularity has spread throughout the state of Jalisco. Like other countries, Mexican food has many regional variations with dishes as tacos differing greatly from one place or town to the next. They are one of the most popular foods available in Mexico. Not the Tex-Mex version with the hard shells stuffed with chili con carne, Mexican tacos are small, soft tortillas filled with meat [chicken, pork, beef or chorizo], shrimp or fish, then garnished with onion, cilantro, lime, salsa and/or guacamole. The fillings and garnishes vary among

taco stands. “Al pastor” is pork cooked on a large skewer, pressed into an inverted cone, marinated, sliced off as it becomes done, then topped with shaved pineapple. Mexican enchiladas are tortillas rolled around fillings covered in salsa or mole. Birria is a broth-based soup made from goat, sheep or beef meat and is often served with cilantro, onion and lime. This soup and menudo are considered beneficial for hangovers. Pozole is another traditional soup, made with pork, hominy [dried corn treated with alkali] and chile. The soup is thicker than broth and is garnished with lettuce, onion, cilantro and lime. Mole dishes are popular at celebrations as weddings, birthdays and Christmas. The sauce is a complex blend of at least 20 ingredients including chile, cumin, garlic, tomato, cloves, anise and nuts. It comes in various colors as black [mole negro], green, red, pink and yellow, and are particularly native to the states of Oaxaca and Puebla, where it is thought to have originated. An unusual ingredient is unsweetened chocolate [cacao] added at the end of cooking. Mole is served over chicken and rice, poblano chilies or enchiladas or inside tamales. For something sweet, gelato or helado [ice cream] is popular and cooling. Flan is similar to crème caramel, comprised of custard topped with a soft layer of caramel. Tres Leche Cake [pastel de tres leches, “three milks cake”] is a sponge cake soaked in three kinds of

milk: evaporated, condensed and whole. When butter is not used, the cake is very light with many air bubbles. This distinct texture is why it does not have a soggy consistency despite being soaked in the milk mixture. Arroz con leche, rice pudding, is a milkbased dessert usually sprinkled with cinnamon. Churros aroma springs from the doughnut-like batter frying in hot oil. They are long, thin and often sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. The range of tropical fruits is impressive: mango, strawberry, guava, pineapple, jack fruit, guayaba, many citruses, banana, melon and papaya, commonly sprinkled with lime, squirted with tomato salsa and sprinkled with chile powder. The Mexican drinks menu is simple. In addition to international brands like Coke, aguas frescas are one of the most popular drinks. Made from steeping fruit, seeds and/or cereals in water, these drinks are available on nearly every plaza corner. Particularly popular are Jamaica, which is made from hibiscus flowers and is dark red, horchata, made from rice with a hint of cinnamon, tuna, a fruit, not the fish, often offered at the town’s main square, served over chopped fruit and nuts. Mexico is one of the world’s largest coffee producers having some excellent Arabica. It is grown in Jalisco, Chiapas, Veracruz and other states. Alcoholic beverages feature tequilas of Jalisco and the country’s wide selection of cervezas [beers]. Baja California is known as one of Mexico’s top regions for grapegrowing and wine-making. Sangrita, a chaser for sipping tequila, contains lime and/or orange juice, hot sauce, tomato juice and pomegranate juice [or grenadine].

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Shopping & Restaurant Guide

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June 14 - 20, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 845

多PLEASURE OR BUSINESS?

RESERVACIONES 293.09.00 / ZONA HOTELERA NORTE, PUERTO VALLARTA / WWW.LALECHERESTAURANT.COM

Francisco I Madero # 202, corner Pino Suarez, Emiliano Zapata Olas Altas Reservations 222 6593 www.latiavallarta.com e-mail latiavallarta@hotmail.com


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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

{

{

Puerto Vallarta Restaurant Guide

BECK’S BEST

NOW UPDATED FOR

2013!

BUY YOURS TODAY!

Vallarta Tribune 845

To download Puerto Vallarta Restaurant Guide Beck’s Best, Kindle e-book: www.amazon.com/dp/B004NEVX7I Apple iPad: http://itunes.apple.com/us/book/becks- best- puerto-vallarta/id429588300 B & N Nook: www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1106980846 2013 Bound print: www.cafepress.com / vallartaguide

June 14-20, 2013

390 Restaurant Reviews in over 130 pages. The largest restaurant guide in Puerto Vallarta by long-time resident and dining connoisseuer Gary R. Beck.


India Gate

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Vallarta Tribune 845

13 MONDAY Main Courses

$99 pesos from 6-11pm

WEDNESDAY Martinis & Appies

Restaurant Bar

2x1

Allende #124 Col. Centro Puerto Vallarta Tel.223.2424

from 6-11pm

FRIDAY

House wine

2x1

from 6-11pm indiagatepv India Gate Puerto Vallarta

Vancouver ● Puerto Vallarta

2012-2013

Vallarta Tribune 845

trip

June 14-20, 2013

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“The authentic tasteJune of 14India” - 20, 2013


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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

Fun on the Riviera Nayarit By Cat Morgan www.rivieranayaritfun.com

The quiet allure of Chacala

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hen it starts getting hot and you feel the need to get out of the city for the weekend, Chacala could be the place you’re craving! Only about an hour and 45 minutes north along Highway 200 from Puerto Vallarta makes it far enough away, but not so far that you need to spend the entire day driving. Chacala is a small fishing and tourist village with a lovely white sandy beach that is great for swimming and fishing off of the rocks at the end of the cove. Surfing is huge here, and surfers come from all over to catch a wave. In fact, I have heard from a good surfer buddy that you just may have one of the best rides in your life in Chacala. If you need to rent a board, or want lessons, Mike and Lindy are at the Chacala Surf Shop, ready to go. The Panga boats ferry surfers out to the waves, or you may

book a ride to a beautiful private sandy beach for a few hours where you lounge and swim to your heart’s content. The Panga boat picks you up later, bringing you back to the main beach and if you are so lucky to have your own, the marina has a boat ramp available. There are many different kinds of property rentals in town that will meet your needs. There are amazing beachfront rentals, as well as cute bungalows and hotels with swimming pools for the kids. There are also beautiful grand villas overlooking the ocean that are perfect for a family reunion or luxury vacation. Chacala is a very small town, which makes it perfect for the folks that are looking for a more private atmosphere. Along the pristine beach there many palapa style restaurants that serve up breakfast, lunch and dinner, with some of the best margaritas in Mexico! The fishermen go out fishing every morning, bringing back the fish for these very restaurants. Can

WANT THE NEWS IN PUERTO VALLARTA?

you say, “Fresh Catch of the Day?” There are a lot of fun things to do while staying in Chacala. Visiting the petroglyphs, fishing from the point or right off of the beach, surfing the nearby breaks, snorkeling in the local reefs, and whale watching. Hiking to the top of a volcano crater, or a bicycle ride to a nearby lake may be your cup of tea. Or, you may feel like relaxing on the beautiful white sandy “certified clean” beach and swim with the aweso-

me sea turtles, whales and dolphins. Chacala also has a library that was built six years ago by Rotary US and Rotary International. Both private individuals and Rotary Members, as well as many expats have dedicated their time, energy and money to keep the doors open and programs evolving. If you are a Rotarian, the meetings are every Wednesday in La Penita, which is only 20 minutes away from Chacala.

A small town with authentic Mexican color and fresh flavorful food, with plenty of fun activities and town tours and more, Chacala is great for a family getaway, or a romantic vacation. And, hey, let’s not forget about the incredible surfing. See you on the Beach! Cat Morgan owns the RivieraNayaritFun.com Regional Network. Find out more about Chacala and visit their town website allChacala.com

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{RivieraNayarit{ Sayulita Life

By Riley Hunter Originally Published By Sayulita Life

The “Sandboni”: Sayulita’s New Beach Clean Machine

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ith sprawling Semana Santa crowds, an almost year-round flow of visitors, and of course Sayulita’s dear dog population; our beloved beach is indeed at times in need of a little spring cleaning! In mid-May, the “Sandboni” made its big debut on the beach, and has been out a number of times to clean since. Much like the famed Zamboni ice resurfacers of hockey, the “Sandboni” is a drivable machine that filters and picks up trash on Sayulita Beach and lays down a nice, clean, layer of sand with the pattern of a freshly raked Zen garden. The machine was bought with ZOFEMAT funds. According to the ZOFEMAT website their purpose is as follows:“The Federal Office for the Protection of the Environment, through the Natural Resources of the Assistant Attorney General and their

Vallarta Tribune

State delegations, are responsible to monitor, inspect and verify compliance with the norms that govern these national assets. As this municipality is a popular tourist destination with a beach, so arises the need to establish a unit to regulate activities locally that are carried out in the Federal Maritime Terrestrial zone.” And their vision to, “Achieve a balance in tourism development and ecological sustainability in beach activities.” As Sayulita is an ecologically minded community and a popular tourist destination, it sounds like a wonderful resource for the town; however some residents have voiced concerns of the invasiveness of the machine and its danger to Sayulita’s beachdwelling crabs. But, after seeing the recent video of their yearly migration, it seems that at least that particular species has managed to stay away from harm thus far. However, it is always a good point to be raised. We have found a few informative answers to the benefits and concerns online. Santos, a “Sandboni” operator says, “The machines were bought by ZOFEMAT and asked for by Municipal President Rafael Cervantes Padilla. Me and another worker come and clean regularly and I think the machines are doing a really good job.” Thanks to ZOFEMAT and the “Sandboni”, Sayulita Beach will now be clean and safe for humans and animals to enjoy for years to come, and we are truly proud that we have such a conscious community to monitor and care for us all here in Sayulita. Reprinted with Permission

June 14 - 20, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 845

Banderas Bay Initiative By Maria Zamora www.bbini.org

El Foco

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growing city must tackle infrastructure problems, provide social assistance for at risk populations, ensure prosperous growth for its inhabitants, preserve its natural resources and provide access to culture

and educational opportunities. We invite you to join us every Monday at 4:00 pm through your radios at “El Foco” to learn about ways in which members of our community are tackling these issues. The show airs on 91.9 FM on Jalisco state’s radio station C7 Radio. Be warned, the show is in Spanish, but we include an English summary at the end which can help you check your understanding. Work on your Spanish and learn about some exciting ways people are taking action to make the Banderas Bay a better place to live and visit. “El Foco” is a space dedicated to civil society in all its shapes. Formally organized and unorganized groups can use this space to promote events, talk about their work, build ties to one another and discuss what problems they face in their work. The Banderas Bay, as any community, faces many challenges

on its path forward. Join me and Minerva Zamora from the Banderas Bay Initiative and Sergio Haro, Executive Director of the Punta de Mita Foundation every week for an hour of English-language music and getting to know the characters in your community. Learning to do radio has

been a challenge and a joy. We hope you enjoy sharing some time with us as we get to know some parts of the Banderas Bay community which may remain hidden to the casual visitor and

even to many of us who have lived here for years. Hearing about the work of a biologist working to save the reefs, a kindergarten principal helping to create good citizens, or a proactive mother taking care of special needs children can open your eyes to an entirely new Banderas Bay. What has been the most gratifying for me in this first month of the show has been hearing how contagious taking action for good can be. “Angeles en Libertad, A.C.” started out as a group of friends sitting around a kitchen table deciding to renovate their neighborhood park. Since then they have partnered with various associations for toy drives for special needs children and plastic top drives to raise funds for cancer treatments. We have heard from a principal willing to take a stand against the felling of trees which bring joy and shade to her school. It seems like people are just waiting for a chance to get involved. If you, or someone you know, work to better our community and they have events to promote, have them get in touch with us at maria.zamora@bbini.org

Your best source for English news in the Bay of Banderas


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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

Father’s Day in Puerto Vallarta

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other’s day reigns supreme in Mexico but that doesn’t mean that Papa doesn’t deserve a little extra recognition and love for his contributions to the family. Puerto Vallarta has plenty of great shops and while it’s easy to head to one of the many (air-conditioned) box stores in the city, we thought we’d show you some great options available at some of the many small businesses in Puerto Vallarta. These businesses not only support local families but they give flavor to the different enclaves and are a good reason to get out and explore.

Protect that bald spot! A new fedora and complimentary Guayabera will make a dashing figure out of dad. TONALLI Calle Basilio Badillo, 342 Old Town, Vallarta 322-223-3013

Sharpen up his space A carved avocado wood Jaguar head covered in milagros or a ferocious Tastoanes Mask will liven up any office wall. COLIBRI DESIGN Calle Aldama, 190 Centro, Vallarta 322-222-1383

He shoots, he scores!

From sports balls to fishing and camping equipment, sports is a great way to bond with Dad. Guayabera

Gutierrez Rizo Sports Insurgentes at Aquiles Serdan Old Town, Vallarta

I’m hungry. How much longer? Provecho Cards contains 52 great discounts for local restaurants, spas, shops and more. A great way to experience Vallarta every week of the year. PROVECHO VALLARTA $300 pesos (2013 packs on sale for $200 pesos now) ProvechoVallarta.com

Dress to Impress Personalize with a custom t-shirt. Or go with one of the 100’s of available designs. 15% discount with a mention of the Vallarta Tribune. BANG-ON T-SHIRTS Avenida Mexico, 1193 5 de Diciembre, Vallarta 322-181-7196

Provecho Cards

For more great shopping and to support the local small businesses visit http://vallartashoppingdirectory.blogspot.com

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et comfortable, grab something cool to drink. We have combined two months worth of clinics. Low season? No such thing! We like to call it Summer Season. There are so many advantages of being here in the summer and we hope that you have a very relaxed and healthy one, wherever you are!

Scheduled Clinics All of our clinics are “screening clinics”. They are economically priced. No procedures are performed (nor included in the price of the clinic). If you would like an appointment for any of them, please email me with your name, the clinic and date (which month), your phone number and your preferred time of appointment.

Mammogram Clinic July 18, 2013 This is one of the most important appointments ladies can make! Our Mammogram Clinic is very popular in that we have a breast specialist/radiologist and as well, the clinic includes a manual exam along with a complete explanation of your mammogram. Price includes ultrasound if deemed necessary as well. Price: 920 pesos (PLUS Members pay 820 pesos)

Foot Clinic July 19, 2013 Our feet take a beating, especially here in the area! Between the humidity and the cobblestone streets – yowza! Ouch! Your feet, toes, balance and pulses will be reviewed by our podiatrist. As well, be sure and check out Christina. She is the star that performs the “medical pedicures” at this office. (Not included in the price of the clinic). Amazing! Price: 300 pesos (PLUS members pay 250 pesos)

Eye Clinic June 17, 2013 July 22, 2013 A complete vision exam and check for glaucoma/pressure exam. Performed by an eye doctor. Note: This physician will soon be doing Lasik surgery here in the area and you can speak with him regarding this as well, if you are interested! Price: 400 pesos (PLUS members pay 350 pesos)

Skin Clinic July 10, 2013 Have your body checked from the top of your head/scalp to the bottoms of your feet. This

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is performed by an oncologist (not a dermatologist). This is most definitely one of our most popular clinics! Price: 300 pesos (PLUS members pay 250 pesos)

Ear Clinic July 17, 2013 The amount of “gunk” that builds up in our ears, especially here with the humidity, is embarrassing! Have your ears checked completely by our star ENT physician, using his stateof-the-art equipment. Cleaning performed if necessary. **Important** This is NOT a hearing test. Our audiologist who comes monthly from the US will not be returning until September. Price: 375 pesos (PLUS members pay 325 pesos)

THIS MONTH! Women’s Bone Density Clinic June 18, 2013 Women, especially pre, post and menopausal women run the risk of “weak bones”. We will have a special company here on this date to check bone densities, along with Dra. Laura Garcia. Price: 450 pesos (PLUS members pay 400 pesos)

Vascular Clinic

June 19, 2013 July 16, 2013 Includes an evaluation by a vascular specialist, checking the blood flow in your body. Pulses in your legs and carotid arteries evaluated. Price: 400 pesos (PLUS members pay 350 pesos)

Women’s Clinic June 20, 2013 July 23, 2013 A complete GYN exam including consult, pap smear and pelvic exam performed by a wonderful, bi-lingual GYN. Price: 775 pesos (PLUS members pay 690 pesos)

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Cardiology Clinic

June 21, 2013 July 24, 2013 Complete cardiac evaluation including an EKG. This is an excellent “baseline” evaluation to see how your heart is working! Price: 550 pesos (PLUS members pay 500 pesos)

Men’s Urology Clinic June 25, 2013 July 30, 2013 Includes Consult/Interview, ultrasound of kidneys, bladder and prostate, measurement of residual urine. Special priced lab package available. Price: 700 pesos (PLUS members pay 650 pesos)


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Travel

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Pack your bags! We’re going on a roadtrip!

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aking a drive down the Pacific Motorway, Nayarit’s coastal route, is much like California’s Pacific Coast Highway – but, with exotic twists and turns that only a Mexican setting can provide. With nearly 200 miles of pristine and inviting beaches framed by the Sierra Madre Mountains, Nayarit offers the perfect combination of luxury and adventure making it ideal for a long weekend getaway or a leisurely extended stay. Rent a car to drive along Nayarit’s main highway along the coast to explore seaside villages, pristine beaches, local restaurants and colonial history. Following is a suggested route for a five day trip. If you want to do a little off the map exploring a jeep or SUV would be a better option on the dirt roads and with the many topes you will need to traverse.

Day 1: Beautiful Beginnings Less than fifteen minutes from the Puerto Vallarta Airport, Nuevo Vallarta - Flamingos is the gateway to Riviera Nayarit. Worldclass golf courses, a wide variety of all-inclusive and luxury resorts, state-of-the art spas and of course, beaches galore make Nuevo Vallarta an ideal place to spend a complete vacation or to kick off your exploration. This modern corridor is located on the spectacular Banderas Bay, the largest natural bay in Mexico. Each year this tranquil Pacific haven welcomes hundreds of humpback whales from November through April who come to mate and give birth. Enjoy a half day trip on Banderas Bay with Vallarta Adventures, whose guides are marine biologists and oceanographers, to enjoy this incredible whale watching experience. And as if that weren’t enough, true nature lovers will rejoice with the arrival year after year of hawksbill, Olive Ridley and leatherback turtles on the shores of Nuevo Vallarta - Flamingos between June and December. Ten minutes north of Nayarit´s tourist development epicenter brings you to the charming Mexican town of Bucerias,

situated at the north tip of Banderas Bay. It has several fine restaurants, luxury residences and two renowned boutique hotels. Those seeking more intimate luxuries can stop by the trendy Hotel Cinco and grab a drink at the infinity rooftop pool (a definite must) or take advantage of as much yoga and stand-up paddle boarding that they can handle. Drive even further up north and stretch your legs at the breathtaking cliff side Imanta Resort while you open your mind, body and spirit to the life-enhancing benefits of the property’s pristine environment.

with its traditional town square, brightly colored homes and artisan market that meanders through the narrow cobblestone streets. Enjoy a refreshing drink and lunch at one of the seaside restaurants where you can dine with your toes in the sand. At night, the bars are lively and international. After a cruise on Banderas Bay and an afternoon shopping in Bucerias, treat yourself to one of the many wonderful high-end restaurants along Lazaro Cardenas. You can choose from international cuisine including Italian, Mediterranean, Steak and Seafood and Mexican. This mixture of luxury hotels, restaurants and activities makes Nuevo Vallarta - Flamingos and Bucerias a perfect combination gateway. For some, this is the main appeal of the region, but for the discerning traveler this is just one side of the spectrum that the area can offer.

Day 2: From Glitz, Glam, and Glorious Islands A fishing village for generations, La Cruz de Huanacaxtle has been recently modernized thanks to the construction of the Marina Riviera Nayarit, the largest and most modern on the Mexico Pacific with 400 slips measuring between 30 and 400 feet. The Marina has created a destination that harmoniously combines the

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traditional life of a Mexican pueblo with the sophistication of this development. When visiting La Cruz - as the locals call it - you experience picturesque scenes of fishermen on the pier bringing in their boats loaded with fish, or children playing in the surf at the protected Playa Manzanilla, all while savoring a margarita in the Marina’s Sky Bar. A quick 20 minute drive north from La Cruz will take you to the elite, low key and utterly luxurious Punta Mita. The exclusive gated resort and residential community including the Four Seasons and St. Regis hotels, spectacular luxury residences and two 18-hole Jack Nicklaus championship golf courses. Punta Mita is no stranger to highstatus celebrities. Its exquisite homes, world-class spa and golf courses and pristine beaches make this a prime example as to how Riviera Nayarit is becoming the A-Listers’ favorite home away from home.

vernment and UNESCO natural protected nature reserve. This is one of the best places to bird watch in all of Mexico. Formed by volcanic activity, visitors can swim through a cave to a cove and spend the day relaxing at the “hidden beach.” Here and around this area, marine life is flourishing and visitors must be accompanied by a certified tour provider. Come at the right time of the year and you’ll likely run into a family of whales migrating for the season. There is an incredible variety of lodging experience here from the opulent St. Regis and Four Seasons inside the gated Punta Mita to the charming boutique hotels located in the neighboring town of Punta de Mita. Historically significant as the site of the ancient Huichol Indians’ annual spring festival, Punta de Mita is

Day 3: Hippie Chic Hot Spots

From Punta de Mita, it’s only a half hour drive to Sayulita, an eclectic bohemian town that has

Setting foot in Punta Mita, you stand in the white sands on the tip of the peninsula and look out over the immense ocean. Imagine taking in the open ocean as you read a satisfying book, walking through the resort grounds seemingly surrounded by Babylonian gardens, or pampering yourself as you are enthralled by the sun’s descent below the horizon. You will be one with tranquility. Only a short boat ride away are the Marietas Islands, a goVisit vallartatribune.com


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trees, historic ruins, local architecture and a busy port bring San Blas to life. One of the most enjoyable experiences is a boat journey through La Tovara National Park. Take a small motorboat with guide into the waterways of the park through the mangroves.

become an internationally recognized surfing destination. Surf on waves that are perfect for any level, particularly from December through March. There’s also snorkeling, fishing and irresistible beaches, casual beachfront restaurants and a collection of art galleries and boutiques to satisfy any vacation shopping urge. Here you can also purchase indi-

ty oriented spirit that is as welcoming as the long beaches and persistent waves. San Pancho is a refreshing alternative to the more commercialized vacation typical of resort areas. Home to cultural centers, galleries, cozy restaurants, traditional bakeries and stores selling colorful art, many visitors are surprised to find that San Pancho is the home of the impressive La Patrona Polo Club with competitions weekly from November through May. The dinner and polo match on Saturday nights is a local hot spot. A happy combination of comfort and style, the centrally located Hotel Cielo Rojo sports a quirky collection of antique fixtures and artwork in an intimate nine-room setting.

Day 4: Calling all Nature Lovers

genous Huichol art in the town plaza or at Galeria Tanana. In the hills and jungles surrounding the village, active travelers take their pick of hiking, mountain biking or horseback riding. And, when the action slows, yoga, massage and other refreshing pursuits at local day spas and retreats provide the perfect relaxation. Opt to embody the laid-back healthy living of a Pacific getaway with a yoga retreat at the Haramara Resort or in a jungle-beach hideaway at Playa Escondida. The neighboring beach town of San Francisco is lovingly referred to as San Pancho by the locals. Rich with tradition passed down from the indigenous Tatuan de Nayares people, the town carries a strong communiPromote Your Next Event

Enjoy the 90 minute drive along the coastal highway to San Blas, taking a left from time to time to explore a small village with a seaside restaurant on a deserted beach like Lo de Marcos or La Peñita de Jaltemba. Have a sweet snack and take some pictures at the candy cooperative along the roadside which sells candies made in the region from local fruits such as tamarind, coconut, bananas and jackfruit.

Where fresh water from the mountains meets the salt water from the sea, tall swaying reeds line your route. At any time of the year, be prepared to encounter the roseate spoonbill, the black-bellied tree duck and the bumblebee hummingbird among many other winged creatures. At the end of the journey, you can visit the Crocodile Reserve to see hundreds of crocodiles from lively newborns to huge, sleepy older ones. From January through March, this area welcomes 80% of North America’s migratory birds, and becomes a haven for birdwatchers with well over 500 species recorded. Spend the night at Hotel Garza Canela and experience one of Nayarit’s most famous restaurants – El Delfin Restaurant, whose chef, Betty Vazquez, studied at The Cordon Bleu School of Culinary Arts in Paris and with Chef Arzak in Spain. Nayarit´s gastronomy ambassador blends fresh Mexican food including fish and vegetables with international recipes to create her own

matchless culinary style. She and her sisters who own the hotel provide a particularly warm welcome to visitors from around the world.

Day 5: A Trip Back in Time Get an early start from San Blas and take a daytrip to Mexcaltitan, known as the birthplace of the Aztec civilization and the ‘Venice of Nayarit” for the many canals throughout the island. Mexcaltitan may be reached from la Batanga pier north of the village of Santiago Ixcuintla. The visit begins with a refreshing boat ride through estuaries, islets, coves and mangroves from the mainland – either 25 minutes by open motorboat or longer by dugout canoes whose designs

remain unchanged for centuries. Time is in no hurry here so put away your watches as there is no urgent schedule to follow. With no means of public or private transportation in Mexcaltitan, the only way to get around is by foot and visitors will be surprised to find the sidewalks are reserved for drying shrimp! Shrimping and harvesting other delicacies from the sea, is the primary occupation in Mexcaltitan, and dried shrimp is made into a zesty, mouthwatering variety of dishes, some dating back to pre-Hispanic times. Have lunch at La Alberca, the best restaurant on the island with a gorgeous lagoon view and a menu completely devoted to shrimp.

Time your trip just right and you will catch the sunset illuminate the historic town with its ruins of a colonial cathedral and La Contaduria Fort, the departure point for Father Junipero Serra, who founded the California Missions. A hub from the early Spanish colonization days, San Blas has preserved much of its old-world charm and hospitality, making this a journey back in time. Feel like a local and stroll through the main plaza and the stone streets of San Blas. Palm Free calendar listings in the Vallarta Tribune


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By Matt Krupnick SAN BARTOLO COYOTEPEC, Mexico — In this tiny town just south of Oaxaca’s state capital, some of Mexico’s most talented young baseball players are taking their first real steps toward the big leagues. Pitchers practice their motions step by step as a coach yells: “Uno! Dos! Tres! Cuatro!” Typical baseball sounds — bats hitting balls, balls hitting leather — compete with the drone of cicadas. The billionaire Alfredo Harp Helú opened this baseball academy, La Academia de Béisbol Alfredo Harp Helú, in 2009, and the sparkling school has seven baseball fields, a weight room, trainers, dormitories, even custom-made artwork by local potters. Harp’s plan, in part, was to prepare Oaxacan boys for major league careers. But this school in the heart of Oaxaca, bordered by cornfields and wilderness, is missing one glaring element: Oaxacans. Of the 45 or so students, none are from this mountainous, impoverished state. Only two Oaxacans, Vinny Castilla and Geronimo Gil, had made it to the big leagues before the academy opened. Most of the teenage boys from this state have failed to meet the academy’s talent requirements. “Yes, that’s why we put it here,” said Eduardo de la Cerda, the school’s director, while boys sprinted down the right-field line of a field behind him. “But they need to have certain qualities.” Nearly two-thirds of the school’s athletes are from the northern states of Sinaloa and Sonora, baseball hotbeds that also account for 60 percent of the players in the Mexican League, the country’s primary professional circuit. In contrast, the league has only four Oaxacan players this season, less than 1 percent of the total. Oaxaca’s 3.8 million residents account for about 3 percent of the country’s population. “Oaxaca never was a place for baseball,” said Castilla, a former third baseman who grew up in Oaxaca, the capital. “The schools never had baseball teams. If you wanted to play baseball, you had to go through a league outside of school.” Castilla hit 320 home runs during a 15-plus-year career in the majors and works in the Colorado Rockies’ front office. Gil,

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A Baseball Academy in a Talent-Poor Part of Mexico who spent six years as a major league catcher, plays for Harp’s Mexico City team. Other Oaxacans tended to show little interest in their major league careers when they would return home during the off-season, Gil said. The atmosphere here is far different from the one most of the academy’s boys grew up in. Ernesto Alonzo Cazarez Arias, for one, endured a 24-hour bus ride to go to the academy. Cazarez, a 17-year-old lefthander from Sinaloa, hopes to pitch for his favorite team, the Boston Red Sox. He said he would have made sure Oaxacans knew about their state’s major league accomplishments if he had grown up here. “I think people don’t see the things Vinny Castilla did and aren’t that interested,” said Cazarez, who has a long scar on his throwing elbow, a result of surgery that sidelined him for two years. “If I was from here, I’d see this and tell other people who he is. He did amazing things in the major leagues.” The sprawling state of Oaxaca is known for its spiced chocolate, spectacular beaches and colorful Day of the Dead celebrations. With one of Mexico’s largest indigenous populations, Oaxaca’s populace is relatively short in stature, which has perhaps contributed to residents’ lack of success in baseball and other sports. Harp, who made his fortune in 2001 when Citigroup bought his bank, Banamex, has singlehandedly shoehorned baseball into the Oaxacan consciousness. He brought Oaxaca a professional team, the Guerreros, in 1996. The team won the Mexican League championship in 1998 and attracts about 12,000 fans a week to its downtown stadium. He also owns Mexico City’s Diablos Rojos, the country’s most successful baseball team, and part of the San Diego Padres. Harp, whose cousin Carlos Slim Helú holds a minority stake in The New York Times Company, said that he attends about 50 baseball games a year. He said having the academy near his Oaxaca home allowed him to deal with the off-season more easily. “I like to stay involved in baseball all year,” Harp, 69, said

REACH LOCALS AND VACTIONERS

during an interview in the restored 400-year-old convent that houses his foundation’s office in downtown Oaxaca. “Out of season, I go to the academy.” It may be impossible to overstate Harp’s enthusiasm for baseball. His stamp museum in the city of Oaxaca opened a baseball-related exhibition in May, with stamps borrowed from Peter O’Malley, also a Padres owner and a former Los Angeles Dodgers owner. Harp’s face lit up as he recalled checking box scores in the newspaper each morning as a child and seeing Mickey Mantle and Sandy Koufax play in a Mexico City exhibition game in the 1960s. He rattled off names of his favorite players: Mantle, Joe Morgan and Josh Gibson, the Negro Leagues slugger who also played in Mexico. The academy mixes Harp’s love of baseball and his affinity for Oaxaca. Its two-story building is decorated with the black pottery specific to this town. Agaves and cactuses dot the campus, or at least those parts not covered by baseball fields. The school sends players primarily to Harp’s two Mexican teams and the Mexican League’s academy near Monterrey, but major league teams have taken

note. One alumnus, Roberto Osuna, is a pitching prospect in the Toronto Blue Jays’ organization, and several others are training at major league academies in the Dominican Republic. “I think what he has built there is the No. 1 academy in Latin America,” Omar Minaya, a senior vice president with the Padres, said of Harp. “Traditionally, Oaxaca has not been a hotbed of baseball activity. I think it’s going to improve the level of baseball kids play in Oaxaca.” So far, however, that improvement has not translated into Oaxacan baseball success. Many blame the sport’s lack of television exposure for its failure to catch on in Mexico’s southern regions and nationally, as soccer has; others say Oaxaca’s youth leagues are not instilling enough of a work ethic in their players. Oaxacan boys “can do it, but they need discipline,” said Guillermo Spindola, general manager of the Guerreros, whose only local player, Jaime Brena, is sometimes announced as El Oaxaqueño when he comes to bat. The academy scouts about 2,000 players a year throughout Mexico, Harp said. It is rare for a boy to enroll without being recruited, but a handful of Oaxacans try out every year. None

of them have ever gained a coveted spot, said de la Cerda, the academy’s director. Students, who live in the dormitories and pay nothing, can choose to take high school classes in the afternoons. But most bet it all on baseball, splitting their time among the weight room, the baseball diamonds and the batting cages or bullpens. The experience has been more fun than expected for José Orlando Garza, a 17-year-old pitcher from Monterrey who was recruited by an academy scout last year. “Before, I practiced very little,” said Garza, a 6-foot-3 right-hander. “I was more about Facebook and going out with my friends. But now I’m very focused.” Harp and the academy’s leaders dream of a day when Oaxaca produces talented baseball players, but they appear far from concerned. “I knew it would be difficult to find players from Oaxaca who meet the requirements,” de la Cerda said. “But if that were the main reason for the academy, we would have put it in Sinaloa or Sonora.” Originally published on nytimes.com

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{ If you would like to have your music or cultural event added to this calendar please email editor@vallartatribune.com The Tribune is published on Fridays and all events need to be submitted by the preceding Wednesday. June 14: MUSICAL Brothers in Song by the PV Men’s Choir 8pm $250p at the Boutique Theater, Naranjo 330, Old Town www.boutiquetheater.ca June 15: MUSICAL Brothers in Song by the PV Men’s Choir 8pm $250p at the Boutique Theater, Naranjo 330, Old Town www.boutiquetheater.ca June 16: MUSICAL Brothers in Song by the PV Men’s Choir 5pm $250p at the Boutique Theater, Naranjo 330, Old Town www.boutiquetheater.ca June 19: VALLARTA EN BICI 100’s of bicyclists ride from the Whale sculpture at the Marina to the Malecon. 9 pm. Bike rentals are available in Marina and around Puerto Vallarta June 20: LADIES NIGHT 10pm 2am $50 pesos all you can drink $20 pesos with a short skirt - La Ingrata, Mariano Abasolo 169, Puerto Vallarta www.facebook.com/laingratapv

Calendar Events

Inaugural Tequila Tasting at No Way Jose Join “Tu Casa in Vallarta” and learn more about the world of Mexico’s most-famous beverage while mingling with the Banderas Bay Chapter of Democrats Abroad. This fascinating and fun look into tequila will take place on Tuesday, June 18 from 7pm – 9pm. For only $275 pesos perperson for members of Democrats Abroad (or those that signup that evening) or $300 pesos per-person for non-members you will enjoy an educational look into the production of tequila, including tastings, snacks and some take home souvenirs. Reservations for this event are recommended, but not necessary. Reservations can be made by calling 223-2853 or by e-mailingreservations@nowwayjosemx. com. Local tequilero expert Patrick Harrison, will be on hand discussing the production process and giving insightful tips on tasting and what to look for when selecting tequilas. Guests will also

enjoy other drink and food. This event will be the first “Summer Spirits for Spirit Event” for Democrats Abroad. Look for other mix and mingle, meet & greet events to be announced throughout the season. Come be a part of a fun and educational evening while meeting other like-minded friends. No Way José! is on the south side of downtown at 5 de Febrero 260, just over the Vallarta street bridge on your left heading south from the Malecón. We hope to see you there!

2nd Annual Shakespeare Festival Produced by the Harkness Institute Marival Resort and Suites Theater SATURDAY JUNE 15th, 2013 at 16:00 By donation $50.00 Pesos Program “To be or not to be” Hamlet´s monologue “Tomorrow and tomo-

Student Art Auction Benefits Manos de Amor Spring time every year, the students at Harkness Institute work on an acrylic painting for their art classes. The paintings are almost complete and we are preparing for our annual Art Auction. Paintings range from Realism to Impressionism to Graphic Art. The opening bid on each painting is $150 pesos. There will be about 45 paintings to choose from and the proceeds will go to purchase the monthly grocery needs for Manos de Amor. You may have a spot in your home that could use an extra artful touch. Please join us and maybe you will find a treasure that will be perfect for your home or office.

Friday, June 21st 4 PM to 5 PM: Silent Auction Los Arroyos Verdes, Bucerias

LIVE MUSIC VENUES Please be sure to contact the venue to confirm all events. La Bodeguita Del Medio Paseo Diaz Ordaz 858, Malecon” 322.223.1583 Tues-Sun 9:30 2:00 am El Jardin del Pulpo Coral 66, La Cruz de Huanacaxtle” 329.295.5071 10:30 am 12.30 pm La Palapa Pulpito#103, Playa los Muertos” 322.222.5225 Mon-Sun 8:00am 1:00pm Benito’s Paninoteca Bar Nima Bay, Local 12, Marina Vallarta” 322.209.0287 El Patio de mi Casa Guerrero 311 esq. Matamoros 322.222.0743 Encore Lazaro Cardenas51, Bucerias 329.298.0140 Wed-Mon 9:00 am 10:00 pm The River Café Isla del Rio Cuale Local4 Centro 322.223.0788 Vitea Libertad Edificio Malecon 2, Centro” 322.222.8703

PVSPCA ADORABLE DOG IN THE SPOTLIGHT...LADY

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VALLARTA BOTANICAL GARDENS

June Events The Summer Solstice 11-4pm with a Ritual Ceremony at 12:30 Enjoy the gardens and your fortune told in the Hacienda de Oro By Donation

rrow and tomorrow” MacBeth´s monologue “Romeo and Juliet” parody And the play: “A Midsummer night´s dream”

Harkness Institute Art Auction

June 27: Ladies Night 10pm - 2am $50 pesos all you can drink $20 pesos with a short skirt - La Ingrata, Mariano Abasolo 169, Puerto Vallarta www.facebook.com/laingratapv

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Upcoming Events

June 26: VALLARTA EN BICI 100’s of bicyclists ride from the Whale sculpture at the Marina to the Malecon. 9 pm. Bike rentals are available in Marina and around Puerto Vallarta

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SUNDAY JUNE 23rd

Ladies that Lunch… 1pm-5pm After the success of our first lunch we are back again! Wear your best hat! $350 pesos per person (gratuity not included) Includes entrance to gardens

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SUMMER SPECIAL

Wine & cheese reception Tour of the gardens Sit down lunch Invite a friend and it´s 2 for $600 pesos For more information Call Steve at 322-223-6182 or stephenclay@vbgardens.org

veryone has fallen in love with this gorgeous white lab. We think she is probably about a year old and weighs 22 kilos. She’s a pretty smart lady too, showing up on our doorstep knowing if she hung around long enough we would take her in and give her a home. She is a sweet dog and very grateful to be rescued. She is so proud of her new home she has taken it upon herself to patrol the Sanctuary to make sure she protects it and all of us. She will make some lucky owner a beautiful and loyal pet. She is good with all the other dogs. Please contact us at spcapv@gmail.com.

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Non-Profit and Charitable Organizations For visitors to Puerto Vallarta who wish to do a good deed for the less privileged in our paradise, this is a list of some of the many organizations that could benefit from such kind gestures. If you would like your organization recognized here, please email details to editor @vallartatribune.com

Centro Comunitario SETAC-GLBT - provides essential services to the GLBT community, including physical & mental health treatment and referrals, education & recreation, free AA meetings, English classes, HIV testing and counseling. Paco Arjona 224-1974 or paco@setac.com.mx

American Legion Post 14: contributes to the community through fund raising and providing resources and manpower to improve Day Cares, Senior Homes, Schools for the Disabled and Deaf, Public Schools in rural areas and other private institutions needing building maintenance www.americanlegion14.org

Clinica de Rehabilitación Santa Barbara - Rehabilitation of the handicapped. Contact: Laura Lopez Portillo Rodriguez at 224-2754.

Asilo San Juan Diego home for the elderly - Contact: Lupita Sanchez Covarrubias Tel. 222-1257 or malupita88@hotmail.com or visit the website www.mexonline.com\asilosanjuandiego.htm Asociación Down - The Foundation for assistance to persons with Down’s Syndrome – Contact: Ana Catalina Eisenring at 224-9577. Banderas Bay Women’s Shelter Safe shelter for women & children victims of domestic violence. Enables women to become financially independent through jobs, education and non-interest micro loans, professional counseling for them & their children. www.compassionforthefamily.org Becas Vallarta, A.C. – provides scholarships to approximately 300 high school and university students. Donations are tax-deductible in Mexico and the USA. Polly Vicars at (322) 223-1371 or Buri Gray at (322) 221-5285. www.puerto-vallarta.com/amf Bucerias Bilingual Community Center Support local families in Bucerias. 16 de Septiembre at calle Matamoros www. buceriasbilingualcommunitycenter.org Casa Hogar - a shelter dedicated to improving the lives of orphaned, abandoned, disadvantaged or vulnerable children.- Contact: Luz Aurora Arredondo at 221-1908, Rita Millan (322) 141-6974. casamaximocornejo@gmail.com

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CompassionNet Impact - forms strategic partnerships & initiates programs that provide opportunities for people living in chronic poverty to transform their own lives. Bookmobile, homes, jobs creation, loans, English & computer classes, emergency food, medicine & clothing, etc. Taxdeductible in Canada & the U.S. Cell: (322) 133-7263. ric@4compassion.org Cruz Roja (Red Cross) - handles hospital and emergency service in Vallarta. It is the only facility that is authorized to offer assistance to injured people on the street, transport them to their facility or other ones indicated by the injured person. Contact: 222-1533, 222-4973 Desarrollo Integral de la Familia (DIF) A municipal service, part of the federal System of Family Services that assists not only in times of emergency, but also with ongoing education, health, and training programs for the whole family. Contact City Hall 222-0058 Discapacitados de Vallarta, A.C. (DIVAC) association of handicapped individuals dedicated to helping one another. Contact: Ivan Applegate at 221-5153. GrupoEcològico de Puerto Vallarta – Contact: R.C. Walker at 222-0897, rc_ walkermx@yahoo.com.mx

Navy League - Meets and greets visiting Naval vessels from all nations, assists in the transportation of donated medical supplies from the U.S., organizes work groups to paint and repair schools and other public/charitable facilities, and operates the local Toys for Tots program. Contacts: Bill Clark at 222 3616 or Jerry Lafferty at 221 6156. www.vallartanavyleague.org. New Life Mexico - a British Charity working in Mexico. Challenging Child Poverty with Health and Education Programmes. Contact: Philippa.VernonPowell@facebook.com Pasitos de Luz (Mamas Unidas por la Rehabilitación de sus Hijos) - substitute home for low income children with any type of handicap, offers rehabilitation services and special support to their families. 299-4146. www.pasitosdeluz.org Pro Biblioteca de Vallarta - raises fundsfor Los Mangos Public Library. Taxdeductible receipts for Mexico and USA. Contacts: Ricardo Murrieta at 224-9966 or Jimmie Ellis at 222-1478. Proyecto Pitillal, “Busca un Amigo” - association created by underprivileged mothers of paralyzed children who need society’s help. Contact: 299-4495. Puerto Vallarta Garden Club: Beautify and protecting the environment. Open to all: Mtgs held at Paradise Community Center, third Thursday every month at 11am from October to May. www.vallartagardenclub.com PuRR Project - a no-kill cat shelter with approx. 250 resident felines living in a natural environment, un-caged, kittens in the Kitten Nursery, on-site clinic with daily veterinarian services. www.purrproject.com

Refugio Infantil Santa Esperanza Shelter for children. Donations are taxdeductible in Canada and the U.S. Contact: Madre Mari at 222-7857 or Sudy Coy at 222-5765. www.ccshf.ca Roma’s Kids - educate the children of the Volcanes and surrounding area, to provide them with the skills necessary to become employable by the major industry here in Puerto Vallarta – tourism: math, English and computer programs a priority. 100% goes to the kids. www.kids.romamexico.com Toys for Tots Vallarta - is a non-profit organization that is celebrating 15 years in Puerto Vallarta. Distributes toys and constructs playgrounds for less-advantaged kids in the Puerto Vallarta area during the Christmas holiday period. Contact: Jerry Lafferty 322 221 6156 or Lourdes Bizarro lourdes.bizarro@marriotthotels.com. SPCA PV – provides private vet costs for rescued animals, volunteers to create & maintain a data base of adoptions, to walk dogs at the foster home, Casita de Guadalupe, foster homes for dogs & cats, trap & release program for feral cats, etc. www.spcapv.com Un MañanaBrillante (A Brighter Tomorrow) - partnership of Americans and Canadians to support the ColegioMexicoAmericano. Contact: Margi Baughman mach1@prodigy.net.mx or David Bender dbender@prodigy.net.mx Vallarta Botanical Gardens - To build Mexico’s greatest botanical, rwesearch & education of plant life, city beautification programs, bird watching, etc. Donations to the Vallarta Botanical Gardens are tax deductible in the USA. Contact: 223-6182 or info@vallartabotanicalgardensac.org.

The International Friendship Club (IFC) - a registered charitable organization in Mexico listed as Club Internacional de la Amistad de Puerto Vallarta A.C. The IFC supports the Cleft Palate Surgery Program & families in need. Funds are raised through Membership & Home Tours. - Contact:322-222-5466. www.ifcvallarta. com. ifcvallarta@gmail.com.

Reach more tourists with the Vallarta Tribune


{Brain Teasers{ SUDOKU easy

June 14 - 20, 2013

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Vallarta Tribune 845

Challenge your brain! Sudoku is easy to play and the rules are simple. Fill in the blanks so that each row, each column, and each of the nine 3x3 grids contain only one of each of the numbers 1 through 9.

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HUB-WORDS How many words can you make from the letters in the wheel? Each word must contain the hub letter N. Can you find a 9-letter word and at least 20 other words of five letters or more avoiding proper nouns? LABYRINTH Some other words of four letters or more containing the hub letter N: anil, anti, ayin, barn, bran, hint, lain, lint, nail, nary, rain, rani, rant, tarn, than, thin, tiny, yarn, bairn (Scot), blain, brain, brant, briny, inlay, rainy, riant, train, binary, brainy, in-tray, litany, ratlin, rhinal, thinly. How many words can you make from the letters in the wheel? Each word must contain the hub letter R. Can you find a 9-letter word and at least 20 other words of five letters or more avoiding proper nouns?

hard

Freezing

Can you find the hidden words? They may be horizontal, Vertical, diagonal, forwards or backwards. Antarctic, arctic, arctic circle, arctic fox, blizzard, Freezing, frosty, frozen, gelid, glacier, husky, ice, Iceberg, icebreaker, ice field, ice floe, ice shelf, Icicle, igloo, north pole, penguin, permafrost, Polar bear, sled, sleet, snow, snowshoe, Snowstorm, south pole, whiteout.

GLADIATOR Some other words of five letters or more containing the hub letter R: agora, altar, aorta, argal, argot, aroid, artal, atria, goral, grail, griot, groat, laird (Scot), largo, radio, raita, ratio, riata, taira, tiara, trail, triad, trial, adroit, aortal, argali, atrial, lariat, latria, radial, tailor.


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June 14 - 20, 2013 Vallarta Tribune 845

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