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NEWBOOKS

JANUARY–DECEMBER 2016

NUS Press

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Award Winners Islamisation and Its Opponents in Java: A Political, Social, Cultural and Religious History, c. 1930 to Present M.C. Ricklefs Winner, 2015 George McT. Kahin Prize of the Association for Asian Studies Mobilizing Gay Singapore: Rights and Resistance in an Authoritarian State Lynette J. Chua 2015 Distinguished Book Award by the Sociology of Law Section of the American Sociological Association The Khmer Lands of Vietnam: Environment, Cosmology and Sovereignty Philip Taylor Winner, 2015 Nikkei EuroSEAS Social Science Book Prize Limbang Rebellion: 7 Days in December 1962 Eileen Chanin Winner, 2014 Royal Marines Historical Society Literary Award Affordable Excellence: The Singapore Healthcare Story William A. Haseltine Winner, 2013 Asian Publishing Award Best Insight into Asian Societies: Excellence Award Floating on a Malayan Breeze: Travels in Singapore and Malaysia Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh Winner, 2012 Asian Publishing Award Best Insights into Asian Societies: Excellence Award Freedom from the Press: Journalism and State Power in Singapore Cherian George Winner, 2012 Asian Publishing Award Best Book on the Asian Media Industry: Excellence Award Muslims and Matriarchs: Cultural Resilience in Minangkabau Through Jihad and Colonialism Jeffrey Hadler Winner, 2011 Harry J. Benda Prize in Southeast Asia Studies The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia James C. Scott Winner, 2010 Bernard Schwartz Book Award

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Ng Chin-keong

Boundaries and Beyond: China’s Maritime Southeast in Late Imperial Times Using the concept of boundaries, physical and cultural, to understand the development of China’s maritime southeast in late Imperial times, and its interactions across maritime East Asia and the broader Asian Seas, these linked essays by a senior scholar in the field challenge the usual readings of Chinese history from the centre. After an opening essay which positions China’s southeastern coast within a broader view of maritime Asia, the first section of the book looks at boundaries, between “us” and “them”, Chinese and other, during this period. The second section looks at the challenges to such rigid demarcations posed by the state and its existence in the status quo. The third section discusses movements of people, goods and ideas across national borders and cultural boundaries, seeing tradition and innovation as two contesting forces in a constant state of interaction, compromise and reconciliation. This approach underpins a fresh understanding of China’s boundaries and the distinctions that separate China from the rest of the world. 
         In developing this theme, Ng Chin-keong draws on many years of writing and research in Chinese and European archives. Of interest to students of migration, of Chinese history, and of the long term perspective on relations between China and its region, Ng’s analysis provides a crucial background to the historical shared experience of the people in Asian maritime zones.  The result is a novel way of approaching Chinese history, argued from the perspective of a fresh understanding of China’s relations with neighbouring territories and the populations residing there, and of the nature of tradition and its persistence in the face of changing circumstances. Ng Chin-keong was professor of Chinese History at the National University of Singapore until his retirement in 2006.

September 2016 Hardback • US$56 / S$60 ISBN: 978-981-4722-01-8 568pp / 229 x 152mm

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Sarah Tiffin

Southeast Asia in Ruins: Art and Empire in the Early 19th Century British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia’s ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia’s cultural remains. This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints. Sarah Tiffin was formerly curator of Asian Art at the Queensland Art Gallery. She is the author of Sparse Shadows, Flying Pearls: A Japanese Screen Revealed.

“A substantial new contribution to the history of British art ... adds a fascinating new chapter to recent scholarship on landscape painting.” – Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art, Yale University

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August 2016 Hardback • US$42 / S$46 ISBN: 978-9971-69-849-2 316pp / 235 x 187mm 82 illustrations

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Zhuang Wubin

Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey Photography in Southeast Asia is a comprehensive attempt to map the emergence and trajectories of photographic practices in Southeast Asia. The narrative begins in the colonial era, at the point when the transfer of photographic technology occurred between visiting practitioners and local photographers. With individual chapters dedicated to the countries of Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines and Vietnam, the bulk of the book spans the post-WWII era to the contemporary, focusing on practitioners who operate with agency and autonomy. The relationship between art and photography, which has been defined very narrowly over the decades, is re-examined in the process. Photography also offers an entry point into the cultural and social practices of the region, and a prism into the personal desires and creative decisions of its practitioners. Zhuang Wubin is a writer, curator, educator and photographer. As a writer, he focuses on the photographic practices of Southeast Asia. A 2010 recipient of the research grant from Prince Claus Fund (Amsterdam), Zhuang is an editorial board member of Trans-Asia Photography Review. In 2013, Galeri Soemardja at the Institute Technology of Bandung, Indonesia, invited Zhuang for a curatorial residency. As a photographer, Zhuang uses the medium to visualise the stories of the Chinese communities in Southeast Asia.

“… this original study also offers an insight into the role of images and visuality in shaping Southeast Asian society, culture and politics.” – Nora Taylor, Professor, Art History, Theory and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

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September 2016 Hardback • US$40 / S$48 ISBN: 978-981-4722-12-4 512pp / 235 x 187mm 200 photographs

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Timothy P. Barnard

Nature’s Colony: Empire, Nation and Environment in the Singapore Botanic Gardens

stablished in 1859, Singapore’s Botanic Gardens has been important as a park for Singaporeans and visitors, a scientific institution, and as an economic testing ground and launchpad for tropical plantation agriculture around the world. Underlying each of these stories is the broader narrative of the Botanic Gardens an arena where power and the natural world meet and interact, a story that has impact far beyond the boundaries of its grounds. Initially conceived to exploit nature for the benefit of empire, the Gardens were part of a symbolic struggle by administrators, scientists, and gardeners to assert dominance within Southeast Asia’s tropical landscape, reflecting shifting understandings of power, science and nature among local administrators and distant mentors in Britain. With the independence of Singapore, the Gardens has had to find a new role, first in the “greening” of post-independence Singapore, and now as Singapore’s first World Heritage Site. Setting the Singapore gardens alongside the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and botanic gardens in India, Ceylon, Mauritius and the West Indies, this book tells the story of nature’s colony—a place where plants were collected, classified and cultivated to change our understanding of the region and world.

Timothy P. Barnard

Established in 1859, Singapore’s Botanic Gardens has been important as a park for Singaporeans and visitors, a scientific institution, and as an economic testing ground and launchpad E for tropical plantation agriculture around the world. Under­ lying each of these stories is the broader narrative of the Botanic Gardens an arena where power and the natural world meet and interact, a story that has impact far beyond the boundaries of its grounds.   Initially conceived to exploit nature for the benefit of empire, the Gardens were part of a symbolic struggle by administrators, scientists, and gardeners to assert dominance within Southeast Asia’s tropical landscape, reflecting shifting understandings of power, science and nature among local administrators and distant mentors in Britain. With the independence of Singapore, the Gardens has had to find a new role, first in the “greening” of post-independence Singapore, and now as Singapore’s first World Heritage Site.  Setting the Singapore gardens alongside the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and botanic gardens in India, Ceylon, Mauritius and the West Indies, this book tells the story of nature’s colony — a place where plants were collected, classified and cultivated to change our understanding of the region and world.

Timothy P. Barnard

Empire, Nation and Environment in the Singapore Botanic Gardens

Timothy P. Barnard is an associate professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore, where he specializes in the environmental and cultural history of island Southeast Asia.

http://nuspress.nus.edu.sg

9 789814 722223

Timothy P. Barnard is an associate professor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore, where he specializes in the environmental and cultural history of islands in Southeast Asia. He is the editor of Nature Contained: Environmental Histories of Singapore and Contesting Malayness: Malay Identity Across Boundaries, also published by NUS Press.

September 2016 Paperback • US$34 / S$34 ISBN: 978-981-4722-22-3 304pp / 229 x 152mm 25 illustrations

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John van Wyhe editor

The Annotated Malay Archipelago by Alfred Russel Wallace Wallace’s Malay Archipelago is a classic account of the travels of a Victorian naturalist through island Southeast Asia. It has been loved by readers ever since its publication in 1869. Despite numerous modern reprints and dozens of e-book editions, this is the first—and long overdue—with hundreds of annotations. This all new e-book edition explains, updates and corrects the original text and adds a number of new elements, including sound and video, and more than 50 beautiful 19th-century colour illustrations, made from specimens Wallace collected. Whenever available, the common names for species have been provided, and scientific names updated. The content of the book has never been thoroughly analysed and compared against other contemporary sources. It turns out that the book contains many errors. This includes not just incorrect dates and place names but some of the most remarkable anecdotes; for example, the dramatic claim that tigers “kill on an average a Chinaman every day” in Singapore or that a Dutch Governor General committed suicide by leaping from a waterfall on Celebes. By correcting the text of the Malay Archipelago against Wallace’s letters and notebooks and other contemporary sources and by enriching it with modern identifications, this edition reveals Wallace’s work as never before. This new e-book edition further enhances Wallace’s classic work for the digital age. John van Wyhe is a historian of science and one of the world’s leading experts on Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. He is a fellow of Tembusu College, National University of Singapore, and a senior lecturer in the Departments of History and Biological Sciences.

October 2016 E-book • US$7.99 / S$9.99 ISBN: 978-9971-69-864-5 Made for iBooks • US$7.99 / S$9.99 ISBN: 978-9971-69-865-2 836pp 118 illustrations

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Ann Wee

A Tiger Remembers: The Way We Were in Singapore A Tiger Remembers The Way We Were in Singapore A Tiger Remembers

orn in the Year of the Fire Tiger, Ann Wee moved to Singapore in 1950 to marry into a Singaporean Chinese family, travelling by ship into a world of cultural expectations and domestic rituals that she would eventually come to love. Her work in Singapore’s fledgling social welfare department in the 1950s only deepened her cross-cultural learning and appreciation for the shapes and forms of the Singapore family. One of Singapore’s pioneering social workers, Ann shares her experiences frankly and with great humour. Her talent is for remembering the things that history books leave out: the embarrassing bits, questions of hygiene, terms of endearment, the emotional nuance in social relations, the stories of convicts, ghost wives and changeling babies, rural clan settlements and migrant dormitories, the things that disappeared when families moved into HDB estates. Affectionately observed and wittily narrated, with a deep appreciation of how far Singapore has changed, this book brings to life the country’s social transformation by talking about the family, “in its 101 different shapes and sizes, with its capacity to cope which ranges from truly marvellous to distinctly tatty: still, in one form or another, the best place for most of us to be”.

Ann Wee

Born in the Year of the Fire Tiger, Ann Wee moved to Singapore in 1950 to marry into a Singaporean Chinese family, travelling by B ship into a world of cultural expectations and domestic rituals that she would eventually come to love. Her work in Singapore’s fledging social welfare department in the 1950s only deepened her cross-cultural learning and appreciation for the shapes and forms of the Singapore family. One of Singapore’s pioneering social workers, Ann shares her experiences frankly and with great humour. Her talent is for remembering the things that history books leave out: the embarrassing bits, questions of hygiene, terms of endearment, the emotional nuance in social relations, the stories of convicts, ghost wives and changeling babies, rural clan settlements and migrant dormitories, the things that disappeared when families moved into HDB estates. Affectionately observed and wittily narrated, with a deep appreciation of how far Singapore has changed, this book brings to life the country’s social transformation by talking about the family, “in its 101 different shapes and sizes, with its capacity to cope which ranges from truly marvellous to distinctly tatty: still, in one form or another, the best place for most of us to be”. Often described as the founding mother of social work education in Singapore, Ann Wee arrived in Singapore in 1950. Her contributions to social work extended to her shaping the education system for social work undergraduates. She is now an associate professorial fellow at the National University of Singapore.

http://nuspress.nus.edu.sg

Ann Wee

9 789814 722377

Often described as the founding mother of social work in Singapore, Ann Wee arrived in Singapore in 1950. Her contributions to social work extended to her shaping the education system for social work undergraduates. She is now an associate professorial fellow at the National University of Singapore.

RIDGE BOOKS October 2016 Paperback • US$20 / S$18 ISBN: 978-981-4722-37-7 160pp / 216 x 140mm 12 illustrations

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Ng Beng Yeong

(Second Edition)

Till the Break of Day: A History of Mental Health Services in Singapore, 1841–1993 This book documents the development of psychiatry in Singapore since its humble beginnings in the British colonial period. It should be of interest to health professionals, medical students, historians interested in the development of medicine and psychiatry and even members of the public with some basic understanding of psychiatry and psychology. Relatives and caregivers of psychiatric patients would also find the information furnished in this book enlightening. Ng Beng Yeong is a psychiatrist at the Department of Psychiatry, Singapore General Hospital.

“Dr Ng has written an informative and detailed history of an issue of national importance. Psychiatry is a discipline continually facing stigma, and its history is often ignored on such a basis. Dr Ng’s history, and his clear advocacy of the advances made in Singapore psychiatry, should inform both general and specialist readers.” – Prof. Gordon Parker, Research Director, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore (1998–2000)

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Second Edition

TILL THE BREAK OF DAY A History of Mental Health Services in Singapore 1841–1993

Ng Beng Yeong

October 2016 Paperback • US$34 / S$38 ISBN: 978-981-4722-40-7 340pp / 229 x 152mm

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Edward Aspinall and Mada Sukmajati editors

Electoral Dynamics in Indonesia: Money Politics, Patronage and Clientelism at the Grassroots How do politicians win elected office in Indonesia? To find out, research teams fanned out across the country prior to Indonesia’s 2014 legislative election to record campaign events, interview candidates and canvassers, and observe their interactions with voters. They found that for grassroots electioneering political parties are less important than personal campaign teams and grassroots vote brokers who reach out to voters through a wide range of networks associated with religion, ethnicity, kinship, sports clubs and voluntary associations. Above all, they distribute patronage—cash, goods and other material benefits—to indivi­ dual voters and to local communities. Electoral Dynamics in Indonesia brings to light the scale and complexity of vote buying and the many uncertainties involved in this style of politics, providing an unusually intimate portrait of politics in a patronage-based system. Edward Aspinall is a professor of politics at the Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, Australian National University. Mada Sukmajati is a lecturer in the Department of Government and Political Science, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta.

March 2016 Paperback • US$34 / S$38 ISBN: 978-981-4722-04-9 472pp / 229 x 152mm

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Nicholas Herriman

Witch-Hunt and Conspiracy: The ‘Ninja Case’ in East Java This book brings unique insight and prize-winning analysis to an extraordinary story—that of a witch-hunt and ‘ninja’ craze that swept a region of Java, Indonesia, in 1998. When neighbours, family members and friends believed that one among them was a sorcerer, this suspicion would sometimes culminate in the death of the suspect. In 1998, these sporadic killings turned into an outbreak of violence. Muslim organisations attributed the escalation of these killings to political conspirators, alleging that squads of ‘ninjas’ were responsible. A paramilitary group (Banser NU) began preparing and training for an onslaught of further violence, while anxious residents throughout East Java established road-side guards. Dozens of suspected ninjas were caught and some were tortured and killed. Using first-hand accounts, Herriman provides these events with a detailed context and history and analyses their develop­ ment in terms of the interplay of national institutions and local culture and dynamics. This book represents the culmination of his researching of witch-hunts for more than a decade. Nicholas Herriman is senior lecturer in anthropology at La Trobe University. His podcasts on iTunesU, including the Audible Anthropologist and Witch-hunts and Persecution have tens of thousands of listeners. He has written a number of significant and award-winning publications on East Java, including his PhD dissertation—the Australian Anthropological Society’s “Best Thesis” in 2008.

August 2016 Paperback • US$28 / S$32 ISBN: 978-981-4722-33-9 256pp / 229 x 152mm

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Brian Bernards

Writing the South Seas: Imagining the Nanyang in Chinese and Southeast Asian Postcolonial Literature Postcolonial literature in Chinese from the Nanyang, literally the South Seas, examines the history of Chinese migration, localization, and interethnic exchange in Southeast Asia, and offers a rich variety of approaches to identity. In Writing the South Seas, Brian Bernards explores why Nanyang encounters, which have been neglected by most literary histories, should be seen as crucial to the national literatures of China and Southeast Asia. He shows how Nanyang, as a literary trope, has been deployed as a platform by mainland and overseas Chinese writers to rethink colonial and national paradigms. Through a collection of diverse voices—from modern Chinese writers like Xu Dishan, Yu Dafu and Lao She to postcolonial Southeast Asian authors from Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand—writers such as Ng Kim Chew, Chia Joo Ming, Pan Yutong, Yeng Pway Ngon, Suchen Christine Lim, Praphatson Sewikun and Fang Siruo—Bernards demonstrates how the Nanyang imagination negotiates the boundaries of national literature as a meaningful postcolonial subject, and speaks to broader conversations in postcolonial and global literature. This book, written from the emerging field of Sinophone Studies, puts the literature of the region in a new light. Brian Bernards is assistant professor of East Asian languages and cultures at the University of Southern California. He is the co-editor of Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader.

September 2016 Paperback • US$30 / S$32 ISBN: 978-981-4722-34-6 288pp / 229 x 152mm

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Bernard Arps

Tall Tree, Nest of the Wind: A Study in Performance Philology Javanese shadow puppetry is a sophisticated dramatic form, often felt to be at the heart of Javanese culture, drawing on classic texts but with important contemporary resonance in fields like religion and politics. How to make sense of the shadowplay as a form of world-making? In Tall Tree, Nest of the Wind, Bernard Arps explores this question by considering an all-night performance of Dewa Ruci, a key play in the repertoire. Thrilling and profound, Dewa Ruci describes the mighty Bratasena’s quest for the ultimate mystical insight. The book presents the Dewa Ruci as rendered by the distinguished master puppeteer Ki Anom Soeroto in Amsterdam in 1987. The book’s unusual design presents the performance texts together with descriptions of the sounds and images that would remain obscure in conventional formats of presentation. Copious annotations probe beneath the surface and provide an understanding of the performance as a highly sophisticated and multi-layered creation. These annotations explain the meanings of puppet action, music, and shifts in language; how the puppeteer wove together into the drama the circumstances of the performance in Amsterdam, Islamic and other religious ideas, and references to contemporary Indonesian politics. Also revealed is the performance’s historical multilayering and the picture it paints of the Javanese past. Tall Tree, Nest of the Wind not only presents an unrivalled insight into the artistic depth of wayang kulit, it exemplifies a new field of study, the philology of performance. Bernard Arps is professor of Indonesian and Javanese Language and Culture at Leiden University.

May 2016 Paperback • US$42 / S$48 ISBN: 978-981-4722-15-5 648pp / 238 x 167mm

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James A. Flath

Traces of the Sage: Monument, Materiality and the First Temple of Confucius The Temple of Confucius (Kong Temple) in Qufu is the definitive monument to the world’s greatest sage. From its humble origins deep in China’s past, the home of Confucius grew in size and stature under the auspices of almost every major dynasty until it was the largest and most richly endowed temple in the Ming and Qing empires. The decline of state-sponsored ritualism in the twentieth century triggered a profound identity crisis for the temple and its worshipers, yet the fragile relic survived decades of neglect, war, and revolution and is now recognized as a national treasure and a World Heritage Site. Traces of the Sage is the first comprehensive account of the history and material culture of Kong Temple. Following the temple’s development through time and across space, it relates architecture to the practice of Confucianism, explains the temple’s phenomenal perseverance, and explores the culture of building in China. Other chapters consider the problem of Confucian heritage conservation and development over the last hundred years—a period when the validity of Confucianism has been called into question—and the challenge of remaking Confucian heritage as a commercial enterprise. By reconstructing its “social life,” the study interprets Kong Temple as an active site of transaction and negotiation and argues that meaning does not hide behind architecture but emerges from the circulation and regeneration of its spaces and materials. The most complete work on a seminal monument in Chinese history through millennia,Traces of the Sage will find a ready audience among cultural and political historians of imperial and modern China as well as students and scholars of architectural history and theory and Chinese ritual. James A. Flath is professor in the Department of History at the University of Western Ontario, Canada. March 2016 Hardback • US$55 / S$62 ISBN: 978-981-4722-16-2 310pp / 235 x 156mm 60 illustrations

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Kenneth Dean and Hue Guan Thye

Chinese Epigraphy in Singapore, 1819–1911 The history of Singapore’s Chinese community is carved in stone and wood: in the epigraphic record of 62 Chinese temples, nativeplace associations, clan and guild halls, from 1819 to 1911. These materials include temple plaques, couplets, stone inscriptions, stone and bronze censers, and other inscribed objects found in these institutions. They provide first-hand historical information on the aspirations and contributions of the early generation of Chinese settlers in Singapore. Early inscriptions reveal the centrality of these institutions to Chinese life in Singapore, while later inscriptions show the many ways that these institutions have evolved over the years. Many have become deeply engaged in social welfare projects, while others have also become centers of transnational networks. These materials, available in Chinese and in English translation, open a window into the world of Chinese communities in Singapore. These cultural artifacts can also be appreciated for their exceptional artistic value. They are a central part of the heritage of Singapore. Kenneth Dean is professor at the Asia Research Institute and head of the Department of Chinese Studies, National University of Singapore. Hue Guan Thye is a senior research fellow at the Department of Chinese Studies, National University of Singapore.

CO-PUBLISHED WITH GUANGXI NORMAL UNIVERSITY PRESS

August 2016 Hardback • US$195 / S$245 ISBN: 978-9971-69-871-3 1456pp / 210 x 297mm 2 volumes 1300 illustrations

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Stefan Huebner

Pan-Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia, 1913–1974 The history of regional sporting events in 20th-century Asia yields insights into Western and Asian perspectives on what defines modern Asia, and can be read as a staging of power relations in Asia and between Asia and the West. The Far Eastern Championship Games began in 1913, and were succeeded after the Pacific War by the Asian Games. Missionary groups and colonial administrations viewed sporting success not only as a triumph of physical strength and endurance but also of moral education and social reform. Sporting competitions were to shape a “new Asian man” and later a “new Asian woman” by promoting internationalism, egalitarianism and economic progress, all serving to direct a “rising” Asia toward modernity. Over time, exactly what constituted a “rising” Asia underwent remarkable changes, ranging from the YMCA’s promotion of muscular Christianity, democratization, and the social gospel in the US-colonized Philippines to Iranian visions of recreating the Great Persian Empire. Based on a vast range of archival materials and spanning 60 years and 3 continents, Pan-Asian Sports and the Emergence of Modern Asia shows how pan-Asian sporting events helped shape anti-colonial sentiments, Asian nationalisms, and pan-Asian aspirations in places as diverse as Japan and Iran, and across the span of countries lying between them. Stefan Huebner is a historian of colonialism, modernization, and development policy. He is a postdoctoral research fellow at Bundeswehr University Munich, Germany. In spring 2016, he will be a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center, DC, and afterwards a research fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore.

“A very rich, readable, and revealing account of connections between different actors, institutions, and government agencies … [and] the first major contributions to the history of sport across Asia.” – John Sidel, Sir Patrick Gillam Professor of International and Comparative Politics, London School of Economics

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May 2016 Paperback • US$42 / S$46 ISBN: 978-981-4722-03-2 416pp / 229 x 152mm

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Fenneke Sysling

Racial Science and Human Diversity in Colonial Indonesia Indonesia is home to diverse peoples who differ from one another in terms of physical appearance as well as social and cultural practices. The way such matters are understood is partly rooted in ideas developed by racial scientists working in the Netherlands Indies beginning in the late nineteenth century, who tried to develop systematic ways to define and identify distinctive races. Their work helped spread the idea that race had a scientific basis in anthropometry and craniology, and was central to people’s identity, but their encounters in the archipelago also challenged their ideas about race.

 In this new monograph, Fenneke Sysling draws on published works and private papers to describe the way Dutch racial scientists tried to make sense of the human diversity in the Indonesian archipelago. The making of racial knowledge, it contends, cannot be explained solely in terms of internal European intellectual developments. It was “on the ground” that ideas about race were made and unmade with a set of knowledge strategies that did not always combine well. Sysling describes how skulls were assembled through the colonial infrastructure, how measuring sessions were resisted, what role photography and plaster casting played in racial science and shows how these aspects of science in practice were entangled with the Dutch colonial Empire. Fenneke Sysling is a historian of science and colonialism. She holds a PhD from the VU University of Amsterdam, and has published on the history of museum collections, environmental history and the making of race. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Utrecht.

July 2016 Paperback • US$42 / S$42 ISBN: 978-981-4722-07-0 320pp / 229 x 152mm

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Kosuke Mizuno, Motoko S. Fujita and Shuichi Kawai editors

Catastrophe and Regeneration in Indonesia’s Peatlands: Ecology, Economy and Society The serious degradation of the vast peatlands of Indonesia since the 1990s is the proximate cause of the haze that endangers public health in Indonesian Sumatra and Borneo, and also in neighbouring Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand. Moreover peatlands that have been drained and cleared for plantations are a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. This new book explains the degradation of peat soils and outlines a potential course of action to deal with the catastrophe looming over the region. Concerted action will be required to reduce peatland fires, and a successful policy needs to enhance social welfare and economic survival, support natural conservation and provide a return on investment if there is to be a sustainable society in the peatlands. This book argues that regeneration is possible through a new policy of people’s forestry that includes reforestation and rewetting peat soils. The data come from a major long-term research effort—the humanosphere project—that coordinates work done by researchers from the physical, natural and human or social sciences. Kosuke Mizuno is professor at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University. Motoko S. Fujita is researcher at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University. Shuichi Kawai is professor at the Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University.

X JAPAN

KYOTO CSEAS SERIES ON ASIAN STUDIES

February 2016 Paperback • US$42 / S$46 ISBN: 978-981-4722-09-4 512pp / 229 x 152mm 110 illustrations

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Rob Cramb and John F. McCarthy editors

The Oil Palm Complex: Smallholders, Agribusiness and the State in Indonesia and Malaysia The oil palm industry has transformed rural livelihoods and landscapes across wide swathes of Southeast Asia, generating wealth along with economic, social, and environmental contro­ versy. Who benefits and who loses from oil palm development? Can oil palm development provide a basis for inclusive and sustainable rural development? This book considers the impacts of specific communities and plantations. It analyses the regional political economy of oil palm, examining how the oil palm industry in Malaysia and Indonesia work as a complex, in which land, labour and capital are closely connected. It unpicks the dominant policy narratives, business strategies, models of land acquisition and labourprocesses. Understanding this oil palm complex is a prerequisite to developing improved strategies to harness the oil palm boom for a more equitable and sustainable pattern of rural development. Rob Cramb is professor of Agricultural Development in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences at the University of Queensland. John F. McCarthy is director of Resources Environment and Development (RE&D) program, Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University.

March 2016 Paperback • US$36 / S$38 ISBN: 978-981-4722-06-3 488pp / 229 x 152mm

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Peter Borschberg editor

Admiral Matelieff’s Singapore and Johor, 1606–1616 Few authors have as much to say about Singapore and Johor in the early 17th century as Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (c.1570– 1632). This admiral of the Dutch East India Company sailed to Asia in 1605 and besieged Portuguese Melaka in 1606 with the help of Malay allies. A massive Portuguese armada arrived from Goa to fight the Dutch at sea, break the siege and relieve the Portuguese colony. During his Asian voyage and on his return to Europe in September 1608, Matelieff penned a series of letters and memorials in which he provided a candid assessment of trading opportunities and politics in Asia. He advised the VOC and leading government officials of the Dutch Republic to take a long term view of Dutch involvement in Asia and fundamentally change the way they were doing business there. Singapore, the Straits region, and Johor assumed a significant role in his overall assessment. At one stage he seriously contemplated establishing the VOC’s main Asian base at a location near the Johor River estuary. On deeper reflection, however, Matelieff and the VOC directors in Europe began to shift their attention southward and instead began to prefer a location around the Sunda Strait. This was arguably a near miss for Singapore two full centuries before Thomas Stamford Raffles founded the British trading post on the island in 1819. Peter Borschberg is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and teaches history at the National University of Singapore. He is a also a visiting professor at the AsiaEurope Institute at the University of Malaya as well as a guest professor in Modern History at the University of Greifswald.

October 2016 Paperback • US$18 / S$20 ISBN: 978-981-4722-18-6 260pp / 216 x 140mm

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Sari K. Ishii editor

Marriage Migration in Asia: Emerging Minorities at the Frontiers of Nation-States Migration in Asia is leading to more marriages across nationa­ lities. New patterns of migration are complicating the picture of women from poorer Asian countries migrating to marry men in more wealthy ones. The contributors to this volume explore the agency of marriage migrants, showing how migration is often more than a simple movement from home to destination but can involve return, repeated, or extended migrations, and that these transitions that can alter geographies of power in economics, nationality, or ethnicity. Together, the contributors identify this emerging diaspora and its long-term consequences for families. Sari K. Ishii is associate professor of sociology at the Department of Social Science, Toyo Eiwa University, Yokohama, Japan.

KYOTO CSEAS SERIES ON ASIAN STUDIES February 2016 Paperback • US$34 / S$38 ISBN: 978-981-4722-10-0 232pp / 229 x 152mm

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Yusuke Takagi

Central Banking as State Building: Policymakers and Their Nationalism in the Philippines, 1933–1964 From its creation in 1949 until the 1960s, the Central Bank of the Philippines dominated industrial policy by means of exchange controls, becoming a symbol of nationalism for a newly independent state. The pre-war Philippine National Bank was closely linked to the colonial administration and plagued by corruption scandals. As the country moved toward indepen­dence, ambitious young politicians, colonial bureaucrats, and private sector professionals concluded that economic decolonization required a new bank at the heart of the country’s finances in order to break away from the individuals and institutions that dominated the colonial economy. Positioning this bank within broader political structures, Yusuke Takagi concludes that the Filipino policymakers behind the Central Bank worked not for vested interests associated with colonial or neo-colonial rule but for structural reform based on particular policy ideas. Yusuke Takagi is assistant professor at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS).

KYOTO CSEAS SERIES ON ASIAN STUDIES March 2016 Paperback • US$32 / S$36 ISBN: 978-981-4722-11-7 236pp / 229 x 152mm

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China: An International Journal

Journal of Burma Studies

Vol. 1 (2003) through current issue

Volume 1 (1997) through current issue

Published in February, May, August and November by Singapore’s East Asian Institute, China: An International Journal focuses on contemporary China, including Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, covering the fields of politics, economics, society, geography, law, culture and international relations. Based outside China, America and Europe, CIJ aims to present diverse international per­­­­­­­­­­­ceptions and frames of reference on con­temporary China, including Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. The journal invites the submission of cutting-edge research articles, review articles and policy comments and research notes in the fields of politics, eco­ nomics, society, geography, law, culture and international relations. The unique final section of this journal offers a chronology and listing of key documents pertaining to developments in relations between China and the 10 ASEAN member-states.

The Journal of Burma Studies is one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed printed journals dedicated exclusively to Burma. Jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University, the Journal is published twice a year, in June and December. The Journal seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law. Published since 1997, it draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

CIJ is indexed and abstracted in Social Sciences Citation Index®, Journal Citation Reports/Social Sciences Edition, Current Contents®/Social and Behavioral Sciences, International Bibliography of Social Sciences, Bibliography of Asian Studies and Econlit.

The Asian Bioethics Review covers a broad range of topics relating to bioethics. An online academic journal, ABR provides a forum to express and exchange original ideas on all aspects of bioethics, especially those relevant to the region. The Review promotes multicultural and multi-disciplinary studies and will appeal to all working in the field of ethics in medicine and healthcare, genetics, law, policy, science studies and research.

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Asian Bioethics Review Inaugural edition (2008); Vol. 1 (2009) through current issue

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Information for Authors NUS Press (formerly Singapore University Press) originated as the publishing arm of the University of Malaya in Singapore, and between 1949 and 1971 published books under the University of Malaya Press imprint. The Singapore University Press imprint first appeared in 1971. In 2006 Singapore University Press was succeeded by a new NUS Press to reflect the name of its parent institution and to align the Press closer to the university’s overall branding. The Press publishes academic, scholarly and trade books of importance and relevance to Singapore and the region. While the Press has an extensive catalog that includes titles in the fields of medicine, mathematics, science and engineering, the Press is particularly interested in manuscripts that address these subjects: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Japan and Asia The Chinese overseas and the Chinese diaspora The Malay World Media, cinema and the visual arts Science, technology and society in Asia Transnational labour and population issues in Asia Popular culture in transnational perspectives Religion in Southeast Asia Ethnic relations The city, urbanism and the built form in Southeast Asia Violence, trauma and memory in Asia Cultural resources and heritage in Asia Public health, health policy and history of medicine The English language in Asia

All books are subject to peer review, and must be approved by the University Publishing Committee, drawn from the NUS faculty. Download our detailed author’s guidelines at www.nus. edu.sg/nuspress/submit.pdf

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Visit nuspress.nus.edu.sg for our full catalogue, and subscribe to the NUS Press mailing list for new title alerts and the latest news.

Our home territory is Southeast Asia, and NUS Press works very closely with APD Singapore and APD Malaysia to distribute to libraries, institutions and to the bookstores in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and the other countries of Southeast Asia. We service the NUS campus bookshops directly, and conduct sales to students and staff from our office on the NUS campus. APD Singapore Pte Ltd 52, Genting Lane #06–05 Ruby Land Complex 1 Singapore 349560 T +65 6749 3551 F +65 6749 3552 E apdacad@apdsing.com.sg APD (Malaysia) 24–26, Jalan SS3/41 47300 Petaling Jaya Selangor Darul Ehsan Malaysia T +60 3 7877 6063 F +60 3 7877 3414 E customersvc@apdkl.com

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Stocked and distributed by

Agents and Representatives

THE AMERICAS (from 1 July 2016)

TAIWAN, CHINA (NON-EXCLUSIVE) AND SOUTH KOREA

The University of Chicago Press Chicago Distribution Center 11030 South Langley Chicago, IL 60628, USA T (US & Canada) +1-800-621-2736 T (rest of world) +1 (773) 702-7000 E custserv@press.uchicago.edu www.press.uchicago.edu UK, CONTINENTAL EUROPE, AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST, AND CENTRAL ASIA

Eurospan Group c/o Turpin Distribution Pegasus Drive, Stratton Business Park Biggleswade, Bedfordshire SG18 8TQ United Kingdom T +44 (0) 1767 604972 F +44 (0) 1767 601640 E eurospan@turpin-distribution.com www.eurospanbookstore.com For additional information, contact Eurospan Group 3 Henrietta Street London WC2E 8LU T +44 (0) 207 240 0856 F +44 (0) 207 379 0609 E info@eurospan.co.uk

B.K. Norton 5F, 60, Roosevelt Rd Section 4 Taipei 100, Taiwan F +886 2 6632 9772 E meihua@bookman.com.tw CHINA

China Publishers Marketing Room 2804, Building #1 No.77, Lane 569, Xinhua Road Changning District, Shanghai China 200052 T +86 13061629622 E benjamin.pan@cpmarketing.com.cn http://www.cpmarketing.com.cn/ JAPAN

Hotaka Book Co., Ltd. 1-15, Kanda Jinbo-cho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0051 Japan T +81 3 3233 0331 F +81 3 3233 0332 E distr@hotakabooks.com www.hotakabooks.com AUSTRALIA / NEW ZEALAND

Asia Bookroom Unit 2, 1-3 Lawry Place Macquarie, ACT 2614 Australia T +61 (0)2 6251 5191 E books@AsiaBookroom.com http://www.asiabookroom.com/ Nusantara Indonesian Bookshop 72 Maroondah Highway Croydon, Vic 3136 Australia T +61 (03) 9723 1195 E info@nusantara.com.au http://www.nusantara.com.au/

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Abbreviations and Icons Singapore dollars US dollars

S$ US$

Available Worldwide Available in Asia-Pacific Available in Asia-Pacific except Indonesia Available Worldwide except Japan Available Worldwide except Japan and Philippines Available Worldwide except Malaysia Available Worldwide except Philippines Available Worldwide except North America Available in Malaysia Available in Singapore Available in Southeast Asia NUS Press Pte Ltd (formerly Singapore University Press) AS3-01-02, 3 Arts Link National University of Singapore Singapore 117569 T +65 6776 1148 F +65 6774 0652 E nusbooks@nus.edu.sg http://nuspress.nus.edu.sg Twitter @NUS_Press Notes 1 S$ prices are applicable for purchases in Singapore only. 2 All prices and information in this catalogue are current at the time of printing (August 2016) and may be subject to change. 3 Potential authors are invited to download our author guidelines at http://nuspress.nus.edu.sg/pages/prospective-authors

Cover image: William Daniell, One of the temples on the Mountain Dieng or Prahu (plate from The History of Java by T. S. Raffles, London: 1817, vol. 2), aquatint.

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NUS Press “Publishing in Asia, on Asia, for Asia and the World” NUS Press issues around 40 publications per year, maintaining a regional focus on Southeast Asia and a disciplinary focus on the humanities and social sciences. Established books series include the Southeast Asia Publications Series of the Asian Studies Association of Australia, the Kyoto CSEAS Series on Asian Studies, Challenges of the Agrarian Transition in Southeast Asia, the IRASEC Studies of Contemporary Southeast Asia (published in conjunction with the Institut de Recherche Sur l’Asie du Sud-Est Contemporaine in Bangkok), as well as a series on the History of Medicine in Southeast Asia. NUS Press is heir to a tradition of academic publishing in Singapore that dates back 60 years, starting with the work of the Publishing Committee of the University of Malaya, beginning in 1954. Singapore University Press was created in 1971 as the publishing division of the University of Singapore. The University of Singapore merged with Nanyang University in 1980 to become the National University of Singapore, and in 2006 Singapore University Press was succeeded by NUS Press, bringing the name of the press in line with the name of the university. Within NUS, the Press is positioned as a unit of NUS Enterprise.

NUS Press Pte Ltd AS3-01-02, 3 Arts Link National University of Singapore Singapore 117569 T +65 6776 1148 F +65 6774 0652 E nusbooks@nus.edu.sg http://nuspress.nus.edu.sg

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New Books. January - December 2016  

The catalog of new and forthcoming books from NUS Press, the publishing arm of the National University of Singapore.

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