Page 1

Guest Opinion Lagos de Moreno: The Rising Star of the Bajío Automotive Corridor

The Lifestyle

Something’s Cooking: Seven Magical Mexican Restaurants

Negocios para exportadores

IT’S ALL ABOUT CREATIVITY

Mexican Creative Industries

X 2014


T

he government of Mexico has set out to transform our country based on five major national goals: to have a peaceful, inclusive, well-educated, prosperous and globallyresponsible Mexico. In order to build the prosperous Mexico we long for, we must generate sustained high economic growth that results in more and better jobs that will improve the quality of life of our population. Mexico has a solid foundation on which to attain these goals: healthy public finances; a manageable debt level; a budget with no fiscal deficit; a responsible and autonomous monetary policy, as well as adequate international reserves. Our macroeconomic stability and institutional strength are enriched by a wide sociopolitical consensus that favors important transformations required to boost the development of our country. Through the Pact for Mexico, two constitutional reforms have been approved: one in education that will enhance the quality of teaching, and another in telecommunications, radio broadcasting and economic

competition that will open up the sector and ensure competition throughout our economy. Furthermore, the Congress is analyzing a financial overhaul to increase the level of credit and make it more affordable. Mexico offers certainty and confidence to investments, a business climate favoring productivity and competitiveness, and an ambitious plan to further develop infrastructure. Moreover, the country’s strategic geographic location and optimal legal framework for international trade, through a network of trade agreements with 45 countries, give us access to a potential market of over one billion people. Mexico’s exceptional economic and geographic conditions, as well as the talent and quality of its human capital, make it the ideal destination for new productive capital to flourish. This is the time to invest in Mexico. Investors will find the government of Mexico and ProMéxico to be allies committed to the success of projects that create quality jobs and prosperity for the country.

Enrique Peña Nieto President of Mexico


Table of Contents October 2014 14

16

32

Guest Opinion

Special Report

Cover Feature

Lagos de Moreno: The Rising Star of the Bajío Automotive Corridor

Tierra Tech Cleaning Systems: Safe, Sure and Sustainable

Want to Film in Mexico? Film Production Incentives in México

cover feature

IT’S ALL ABOUT CREATIVITY

Mexican Creative Industries

photo

archive

30

From ProMéxico

8

10

Briefs

Mexico’s Partner

figures

34

Ánima Estudios

36

Pimienta Films

38

Weeping Willow

40

Atmósfera Producciones

Boletia, Ticket to Expand

42

Come Sesos

44

Dubbing House

Special Feature: E-commerce E-commerce and Entrepreneurs: Mexico’s New Economic Partnership

24

26

Money in Movement

46

Kokonut Studio

20

A Safe Door for E-commerce

28

99 minutos, Faster than the Internet

48

Mantiz Game Studios

22

Online Avenue for Mexican Fashion

50

Chico Chihuahua

52

Mexico at MIPCOM 2014

18


The Lifestyle

The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

56

Teodoro González de León,

photo

the Man Who Transformed Mexico City

photo

archive

photo

archive

The Lifestyle Briefs

omar bárcena

58

photo

courtesy of pujol

Arty Accessories

photo

courtesy of ficg27 / gonzálo garcía

60

Something’s Cooking:

Seven Magical Mexican Restaurants

“What’s Important is That a Film Elicits a Reaction in You” Kenya Márquez, filmmaker

62

More a case of living to eat than eating to live, we bring you seven restaurants that tantalize the taste buds, some of which even feature on San Pellegrino’s list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants.

65


Para exportadores Innovación:

motor de la industria en México 84

De ProMéxico

72

breveS

Puebla:

74

México 76 en el mundo Las estrategias de apertura comercial

capital de la innovación y el diseño

en Medio Oriente

75 Los centros de datos y su importancia en una economía digital

82 Innovación y comercio electrónico en México

fotos

archivo

Tendencias y oportunidades de negocio en México 78 y América Latina

86

El pulso de una industria

De México para el mundo,

de tradición

orgullo que se exporta

80

88


ProMéxico Francisco N. González Díaz CEO Karla Mawcinitt Bueno Communication and Image General Coordinator Sebastián Escalante Bañuelos Director of Publications and Content sebastian.escalante@promexico.gob.mx Copy Editing Felipe Gómez Antúnez Jorge Morales Becerra Contreras Advertising negocios@promexico.gob.mx Cover Photo Archive

Editorial Council consejo editorial Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal Francisco de Rosenzweig Mendialdua Enrique Jacob Rocha Francisco N. González Díaz Embajador Alfonso de Maria y Campos Castelló Luis Miguel Pando Leyva Francisco Javier Méndez Aguiñaga Rodolfo Balmaceda Guillermo Wolf Jaime Zabludovsky Gabriela de la Riva Adolfo Laborde Carranco Silvia Núñez García María Cristina Rosas González Ulises Granados Quiroz Karla I. Mawcinitt Bueno

Negocios ProMéxico es una publicación mensual editada por ProMéxico, Camino a Santa Teresa número 1679, colonia Jardines del Pedregal, delegación Álvaro Obregón, CP 01900, México, DF Teléfono: (52) 55 5447 7000. Portal en Internet: www.promexico.gob.mx; correo electrónico: negocios@promexico.gob.mx. Editor responsable: Gabriel Sebastián Escalante Bañuelos. Reserva de derechos al uso exclusivo No. 04-2009-012714564800-102. Licitud de título: 14459; licitud de contenido: 12032, ambos otorgados por la Comisión Calificadora de Publicaciones y Revistas Ilustradas de la Secretaría de Gobernación. ISSN: 2007-1795. Negocios ProMéxico año 7, número X 2014, octubre 2014, se imprimió un tiraje de 14,000 ejemplares. Impresa por Cía. Impresora El Universal, S.A. de C.V. Las opiniones expresadas por los autores no reflejan necesariamente la postura del editor de la publicación. Queda estrictamente prohibida la reproducción total o parcial de los contenidos e imágenes de la publicación sin previa autorización de ProMéxico. Publicación gratuita. Está prohibida su venta y distribución comercial. ProMéxico is not responsible for inaccurate information or omissions that might exist in the information provided by the participant companies nor of their economic solvency. The institution might or might not agree with an author’s statements; therefore the responsibility of each text falls on the writers, not on the institution, except when stated otherwise. Although this magazine verifies all the information printed on its pages, it will not accept responsibility derived from any omissions, inaccuracies or mistakes. October 2014.

Download the PDF version and read the interactive edition of

This publication is not for sale.

Negocios ProMéxico at negocios.promexico.gob.mx.

Its sale and commercial distribution are forbidden.


From proméxico. Mexico is one of the most relevant exporters of creative goods in the world and the leader in Latin America. According to recent findings, creative industries in Mexico represent around 7% of the gross domestic product. Our country is a strategic platform to reach the industry’s largest market in the world, and a perfect gateway to Latin American countries. Every year, Mexican audiovisual content is watched by over one billion people worldwide, and has transcended geographical borders in over 100 nations. The country offers competitive costs, specialized public funding, and government incentives to develop film projects. In addition to its solid domestic market, state-of-the-art infrastructure, and innovation leadership in several industries, Mexico has internationally renowned technicians and creative professionals, as well as worldclass film studios to boost any project. Besides showcasing a variety of settings for filming locations, our country has been recognized as a leading location in Latin America for content production development. Mexico has the largest water set in the world and more than 1,500 companies to provide the wide range of services required by the industry. Creativity and innovation has made our country the most important talent pool in

Latin America. The efforts of the Mexican government, in coordination with the private sector and academia, have focused on boosting film and creative content projects in the country. Being named country of honor this year for Mipcom –the world’s greatest international TV and film market– acknowledges our competitiveness, quality, talent and creativity. During the event, Mexico shared its success stories, led by the largest Mexican business delegation in the industry, comprising more than 100 companies. In this issue we also include content related to Mexico’s booming e-commerce opportunities. Several local and international entrepreneurs are increasing their participation in this important sector due to the relevance of Mexico’s internal market –the second largest in Latin America– and considering consumer trends based on digital and electronic platforms, and the many companies that offer innovative services by Internet. Mexico is seeing significant expansion of firms that are promoting e-commerce with accessible and highly reliable solutions. The country is ideal for developing attractive business projects, supported by a positive consumer attitude and interest in e-commerce. Lights, camera and action for the Mexican creative industries.

Welcome to Negocios!

Francisco N. González Díaz CEO ProMéxico


9


BRIEFS automotive

Business is where clients are Spanish auto parts maker Gestamp inaugurated a new production plant in the state of Puebla. The new site, built at an estimated cost of 70 million usd, will produce metal components and structural systems for regional automotive OEMs.

photo

archive

www.gestamp.com

courtesy of gestamp

automotive

Fueling investment

photo

US auto parts maker Stant Corp. will invest 100 million usd to establish a manufacturing plant in the central state of Guanajuato. The new site is expected to produce fuel caps, capless refueling systems, filler pipes and related products. www.stant.com

photo

courtesy of vitsenmann

AUTOMOTIVE

from germany to mexico German auto parts manufacturer Witzenmann plans to build a new production plant in the state of Guanajuato. The 12 million usd facility is expected to produce metal hoses for regional automotive OEMs. www.witzenmann.com


BRIEFS RENEWABLE ENERGY

wind harvest continues

photo

archive

Spanish power company Iberdrola has begun construction of the 66 megawatts (MW) Pier II wind farm in Esperanza, Puebla, Mexico. Located in one of the windiest regions in the country, the wind farm will feature 33 turbines to generate enough renewable energy for about 25,000 households and help reduce around 55,000t of CO2 emissions a year. Iberdrola estimates to spend 120 million usd on the project. The Pier II farm is expected to create 400 local jobs during the construction and the subsequent operation and maintenance work.

Mexican company Impulsora Latinoamericana de EnergĂ­as (Iler) is supporting Iberdrola in building the Pier II project, which will be constructed at an altitude of 2,500 meters. Iberdrola and Iler have also signed an agreement to jointly build up to 366MW of projects in the future. Once the Pier II project is commissioned, Iberdrola will manage a wind power capacity of about 600MW in Mexico. Iberdrola already has an installed wind power capacity of 230MW spread across three wind farms in Oaxaca. www.iberdrola.es

ENERGY

courtesy of iberdrola

preparing to seize new opportunitieS

photo

Singapore-based offshore services provider Swiber is projecting investment of approximately 700 million usd in Mexico through 2017. Plans include adding six additional marine crafts to the company’s Mexico operations for offshore rig and pipeline installation. www.swiber.com

photo

courtesy of gkn driveline

AUTOMOTIVE

growing is the goal UK-based auto parts manufacturer GKN Driveline projects investment of 300 million usd over the next three years in its Mexico operations. Plans include a new plant to produce sideshafts for clients such as Nissan, Ford, Volkswagen and General Motors. www.gkn.com


BRIEFS MEDICAL DEVICES

taking good care of business US medical device maker CareFusion inaugurated a 6 million usd expansion to its production facility in the northern border city of Tijuana, Baja California. The project includes an additional 14 million usd investment in acquisition of equipment for the site.

courtesy of carefusion

photo

césar bojorquez

www.carefusion.com

INFRASTRUCTURE

GREEN LOGISTICS incorporated advanced energy saving technologies projected to reduce the site’s energy consumption by 60%.

photo

The international terminal at the northwestern coastal port of Ensenada, Baja California inaugurated a new administrative building at a cost of approximately 3 million usd. The comprehensive remodel

www.puertoensenada.com.mx

AUTOMOTIVE

photo

archive

Investment bound to san luis potosí Japanese auto parts manufacturer Nidec Tosok Corp. will build a new production facility in the northeastern state of San Luis Potosí. At a cost of 16 million usd, the first phase of the complex is planned to produce automatic transmission control valves for the North American market. www.nidec-tosok.co.jp


BRIEFS FORESTRY

growing as lush as a forest Mexican forestry company Proteak will invest 200 million USD to build a new production plant in the southeastern state of Tabasco. The new facility is planned to produce medium density fiberboard (MDF) from its eucalyptus plantations in the state.

photo

courtesy of alpek

www.proteak.com

ENERGY

at least two combined heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) plants on Mexico’s Gulf coast.

photo

Mexican chemical and plastics maker Alpek is projecting investment of up to 4 billion usd in energy projects under Mexico’s recently implemented energy reform. Plans include the construction of

archive

Facing new Business advantages

www.alpek.com

RETAIL

photo

archive

Making of mexico a good home for business US hardware and construction materials retailer The Home Depot inaugurated a new store in the southern state of Oaxaca at a cost of approximately 20 million usd. The site becomes the chain’s 108th sales location in Mexico. corporate.homedepot.com


Negocios ProMéxico | Guest Opinion

photos

archive

Lagos de Moreno: The Rising Star of the Bajío Automotive Corridor This city was founded 451 years ago, and the upturn in the economic fortunes of Lagos de Moreno has surprised many. by josé palacios jiménez*

A key town in the history of the state of Jalisco and of Mexico because of the leading figures it contributed to the Cristero Revolution and the Mexican independence movement, Lagos de Moreno has traditionally been known for its prominent role in contributing to the economy of Jalisco as one of the leading producers of milk and dairy products. However, close coordination between the three levels of government over the last two years, combined with socio-demographic characteristics that mean a large available workforce and the prime location of the city in the Bajío automotive corridor mean that the economic vocation of Lagos de Moreno has taken a promising new direction. Its location at the epicenter of the automotive corridor is precisely its main competitive advantage. Lagos de Moreno is emerging as the new emerging industrial city in central Mexico, given its strategic position at the junction of two major highways: the Pan-American Highway 45 which connects the town with Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Torreón, Zacatecas, León, Irapuato, Celaya, Salamanca, Querétaro, and Mexico City, and Highway 80 which links it with the ports of Tampico and Manzanillo. This geographical position has led world-class companies such as Nestlé, Dräxlmaier, Mexlub, Bachoco, and Global Ends Metallic Parts, among others, to seek business opportunities in this active participant in the country’s central industrial area, comprising the states of Guanajuato, Querétaro, Aguascalientes, and Jalisco.

14

Lagos de Moreno is located within the industrial triangle formed by the country’s three most important cities: Mexico City, Guadalajara, and Monterrey. Thus, around 80% of the Mexican market, 70% of industrial facilities, 70% of the country’s international trade, 70% of Mexico’s exports, and 60% of the total population can be found in a radius of 400 kilometers around Lagos, as it is commonly known. The potential of Lagos de Moreno to be a strong competitor in the Bajío corridor is also underpinned by an infrastructure of services and urban and industrial facilities that is backed by the federal and state governments.

In that regard, the federal government is modernizing and upgrading the Lagos de Moreno-León highway from two to four lanes. The construction of a rail link to directly connect Aguascalientes with Guadalajara is anticipated, saving about three hours in freight transport times. The project will benefit not only the region where the city of Lagos de Moreno is located but also the entire state of Jalisco. Furthermore, the strategic partnership between the state government and Lintel, a leading developer of industrial parks in Mexico, is at the origin of the Colinas de Lagos park, a project that is expected to

October 2014


Guest Opinion | Negocios ProMéxico

open in October 2014, with an area of 280 hectares and international standard infrastructure. That will allow Lagos de Moreno to take a leading role in the Mexican Bajío Automotive Corridor. This public-private partnership will invest 60 million usd that, according to official estimates, will trigger the creation of 25,000 jobs across 50 companies in the automotive sector. Interest from investors is palpable and the word has spread quickly among foreign companies planning to settle in Mexico to the extent that today, 10 automotive companies have already decided to establish their investments in Lagos de Moreno. A labor pool of approximately 800,000 people within 30 minutes; the most accessible land prices in the Bajío; a prime location in the middle of the corridor, and a good quality of life make Lagos de Moreno a very attractive city for new investments.

The potential of Lagos de Moreno to be a strong competitor in the Bajío corridor is also underpinned by an infrastructure of services and urban and industrial facilities that is backed by the federal and state governments.

Tradition and Magic as Added Values The interesting thing about Lagos de Moreno is not only that it is discovering its new economic calling as an industrial city but also that it is a city where both locals and foreigners find a good quality of life. Its historic center is noted for its architectural value and is home to the stateliest civic and religious buildings in the area, mostly built during the 18th and 19th centuries. The richness of its buildings and traditions led to it being declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, a “Magic Town” by the Ministry of Tourism, and an Area of Historical Monuments by the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). Culture, sports, restaurants, ecotourism activities, a strong traditional cuisine, and folklore that can be seen on almost every corner, together with the new business opportunities that are emerging in Lagos de Moreno with its new industrial park and strategic location, make this city one of the rising stars in the Mexican Bajío automotive corridor. N *Secretary of Economic Development, Government of the State of Jalisco.

October 2014

15


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Report

photos

courtesy of tierra tech

Tierra Tech Cleaning Systems: Safe, Sure and Sustainable Tierra Tech’s innovative ultrasonic cleaning system has positioned it as a leader in its field in Mexico, while its products have cleaned out markets in America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. by antonio vázquez

In just four years, Tierra Tech’s ultrasonic cleaning systems have left the Mexican market spick and span and gone on to sanitize foreign lands. Founded in Celaya, Guanajuato, in 2010, the company came into being in response to the need for highly effective cleaning processes in certain industrial sectors. According to Tierra Tech CEO Arturo Gil San Román, at some point in its processes, every industry needs to clean the pieces it manufactures or the machinery it uses to produce them but ordinary clean-

16

ing processes aren’t always efficient, and that is where Tierra Tech comes in. “Traditional cleaning processes have a lot of cons: they take a long time, leave water residues, and employ aggressive chemicals and pollutants. And as if that weren’t bad enough, they don’t always produce the best results,” says Gil San Román. From the very basic need to clean a piece of machinery, Tierra Tech developed a type of ultrasonic technology that cleans on “a molecular level.” “There are several advantages to ultrasonic cleaning: it’s a green system that

October 2014


Special Report | Negocios ProMéxico

intensifies the action of a chemical. We use soft chemicals in low concentrations to achieve better results.” Amazing results. Parts cleaned using this process are left “like new,” says Gil San Román. “During the process, the water molecules implode a certain number of times a second, turning each one into a ‘hoover.’ Cleaning takes place on a molecular level. It’s the best cleaning system currently available.” Tierra Tech’s ultrasonic technology allows for the repeated reuse of water, which translates into water savings of up to 80%, as well as reduced consumption of detergents and energy, not to mention fewer toxins. The company makes standard products for the automotive and industrial sectors, although it has the flexibility to manufacture technology that meets the customer’s specific needs, with capacities that range from 30 to 7,000 liters. “That type of equipment, made to the customer’s specifications, is what we sell most,” says Gil San Román.

October 2014

“Traditional cleaning processes have a lot of cons: they take a long time, leave water residues, and employ aggressive chemicals and pollutants. And as if that weren’t bad enough, they don’t always produce the best results,” says Gil San Román. From the very basic need to clean a piece of machinery, Tierra Tech developed a type of ultrasonic technology that cleans on “a molecular level.” Tierra Tech’s products can be found in the pharmaceutical, hospital, food, plastics, cosmetic, automotive, aerospace, and chemical sectors, among others, and its customers include big names like CAT, Michelin, Metro Bilbao, TRW, Alcatel, Heineken, Renault, Volkswagen, Nissan, Iberia, and Bosch.

Through its branch in Dallas, Texas, Tierra Tech has been carving out a niche in the US market and already sells its products in Australia, Bolivia, Canada, Costa Rica, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, the European Union, Panama, Peru, South Africa, and Venezuela. “We have a presence in several countries, either through distributors or our own offices. It’s costly to develop international markets, which is why it’s advisable to pinpoint the sector you want to target and focus all your resources on it, both financial and human,” says Gil San Román. In its move to sound out international markets, the company has leaned on the advantages of operating out of Mexico, such as the country’s geographical location –its proximity to the US–, its talented human capital that makes for highly skilled labor, stable macroeconomic environment, clear legal framework, numerous trade agreements, and well-developed infrastructure and logistics. With a workforce of just 35, Tierra Tech now sets the bar in its market niche in Mexico and in less than five years has earned certifications like the ISO 90012008 quality management standard. “For an export company like ours, certifications are of the utmost importance because they require we comply with the highest of quality standards that are standardized in several parts of the world. That, in turn, has forced us to improve our own standards across the board.” Gil San Román is optimistic Tierra Tech will come to spearhead markets in Mexico, the US and the rest of Latin America in the next five years at most and, with this goal in sight, has come up with a strategic business plan for the coordination of its offices in Mexico and the US, and its distributor network throughout the rest of the continent. In Europe, for instance, Tierra Tech leads the way in its chosen technology and has a presence in virtually every European Union member country. “In the future, we see ourselves cleaning up a much bigger share of the domestic and international markets. Over the last three years we’ve posted phenomenal growth and our goal is to consolidate our presence in markets where our products have already made their mark,” says Gil San Román. N www.tierratech.com

17


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

photo

archive

E-commerce and Entrepreneurs: Mexico’s new economic partnership Conditions for a major development of e-commerce are being brewed in Mexico. The combination of factors such as logistics services and infrastructure of the highest quality, reliable payment systems, and the confidence of investors in the country, along with a culture of online shopping that grows stronger every day, are resulting in interesting success stories that allow an optimistic perspective of the future development of e-commerce in the country. by chris dalby* and jeroen posma**

Beware, all of you who still cling to an image of Mexico as an unsophisticated e-commerce market. As Internet penetration has skyrocketed, a report by the Mexican Internet Association (AMIPCI), e-commerce rose by 42% in 2013 to reach a value of 9.3 billion USD. Federico Antoni, Founding Partner of Venture Partners, a venture capital fund specializing in early stage investments, confirms this by stating that Mexico is catching up with other markets. “Product e-commerce penetration remains moderate but we are seeing steady progress in three areas that concern every e-commerce endeavor: logistics and delivery, payments, and cultural barriers. When online retailing began to emerge, companies did not understand e-commerce which harmed delivery systems, Mexico had very few options for online payments, and people did not trust online services. All these have evolved over time.”

18

Due to the presence of international leaders, such as FedEx and DHL that have a strong line in e-commerce, delivery and logistics has rapidly matured in the country. Such giants have brought devoted operations from the US and Europe to bear in Mexico, while smaller, nimbler companies are also developing their own logistics networks. This part of the equation has essentially been solved in Mexico, as next-day or even same-day deliveries are now a reality. Mexico has a range of payment options from paying for deliveries at convenience stores, through PayPal or by credit card, and this evolution has seen banks pushing for better payment systems. Although traditional banks dominate the online payment landscape, certain smaller, private efforts are making themselves known. Already well-established in Brazil and now focusing on the broader Latin American

market, Allpago entered Mexico in July 2014 to provide an alternative to handle online transactions, acting as a payment gateway and seeking to bring the latest technology solutions to the country. The third aspect for e-commerce, culture, has been transformed by the importance of online shopping for the popular tourism sector. This industry contributes almost 7% of Mexico’s GDP and 64% of Mexican tourists have bought services online. Purchasing plane tickets and making hotel bookings are well-established as being easier online, avoiding the hassle of logistics. The maturity of the tourism industry in terms of e-commerce has helped Mexicans become used to such developments. International companies coming to Mexico and looking to develop the e-commerce side may be reassured about successes in delivery and logistics but outstanding gaps in

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

payment methods and consumer culture will remain real concerns. One aspect that can go some way toward relieving such concerns is the amount of investment flowing toward Mexico’s e-commerce sector. “The internal market in Mexico is very big. It is the second largest in Latin America and claimed 18% of the region’s e-commerce activity in 2013, making it of great interest for American, Brazilian and European companies. As such, we have already seen foreign operations become successful in the Mexican e-commerce sphere,” explains Antoni. Although the vast majority of Mexican online retail activity concerns groceries, with Walmart and Superama claiming 92% of that market, Brazil’s Netshoes and Spain’s Privalia stand out by how they have gained ground here. This reality has also sent shockwaves through the Mexican commercial sector as retailers begin to realize just how far behind they have fallen in terms of e-commerce, simply by comparing themselves to their American counterparts. Antoni estimates that e-commerce represents no more than 1% of the sales of a large Mexican group such as Liverpool. However, this is set to change as retailers’ growth strategies are restructured to look beyond just building stores and extending their physical footprint. Given its position between the US and Latin America, Mexico is indeed catching up but which model should it follow? Does the sophistication and breadth of e-commerce in the US give Mexico the chance to shoot for the moon, or should it follow in the footsteps of Brazil, whose reality is closer to Mexico’s own? For Antoni, the country should simply build on the journeys forged by both of its neighbors, allowing it to pick and choose what suits it best from both models. Antoni points to Brazil’s great postal service as giving it a strong platform to build on. “Historically, the Brazilian Correios has been fantastic. Letters arrived on time, with great infrastructure and cheap prices. So when e-commerce was born in Brazil through the rise of companies like Submarino, the postal infrastructure was right there,” he explains. Concerning the US, the sophistication of the financial sector is where Mexico can really stand to learn. “The proliferation of venture capital funds investing in e-commerce since the late 1990s has translated to a better and wider variety of services, as well as a lot of marketing expenditure. This changed the country’s culture and made e-commerce sim-

October 2014

ply the best option in many commercial categories. This amount of investment and the peerless consumer culture it created should be applied in Mexico,” confirms Antoni. The influence of venture capital funds on the development of e-commerce makes the presence in Mexico of specialized funds very important. Aside from channeling investment and indirectly helping to shape the consumer culture, such funds develop another major component of online retail: the entrepreneurs themselves. “Mexico has a firm entrepreneurial spirit, it is traditional, low-tech and un-scalable, but it is there. This is not a barrier to online commerce. Ten years ago, young, well-educated Mexican people did not think of entrepreneurship as a career path. Today, people see this as an option to create value and have a meaningful life. The entrepreneurial spirit that existed in traditional areas is just starting to awake in the more educated segments of society,” he says.

Due to the presence of international leaders, such as FedEx and DHL that have a strong line in e-commerce, delivery and logistics has rapidly matured in the country. Such giants have brought devoted operations from the US and Europe to bear in Mexico, while smaller, nimbler companies are also developing their own logistics networks. An evidence of this blossoming entrepreneurship is Atomika, a Mexican provider of specialist triathlon equipment and nutrition products, “A company like Atomika does not need to educate its clientele, so much as position itself as the go-to place for triathletes. Ricardo Godinez, the founder of Atomika, brought a passion for sports, a deep understanding of the need of triathletes in particular, and saw the opportunity to provide the best assortment of equipment to a niche market. However, in such a market, the barriers to entry are much lower, which is why speed and scale are very important. With Atomika, we have brought something that we do not recommend to all our entrepreneurs, the need to become much bigger and to grow much faster. Since the space

that Ricardo is seeking is not occupied, Atomika needs to occupy it and make it big.” Another reason for this rapid scalingup, according to Antoni, is to help create a community of athletes around Atomika in a way which only online commerce allows. “Having a community associated with the brand,” explains Godinez, “acts as an extra layer of protection from the competition. Even if Decathlon, Walmart, or even a local competitor launches a rival line which is 5% cheaper, people will stay with us out of a sense of loyalty to the brand.” The e-commerce business development done with Atomika varies widely from that done with Carrot. As Mexico’s first car-sharing company, its vehicles are strategically placed around the country’s major cities with reservations and bookings done online. This has made its online presence all the more vital but it has been so successful that Carrot now dominates the whole market, despite still being a small company. “The impact of Carrot’s successful e-commerce forays allowed it to scale up fast in a niche industry. Furthermore, due to its partners, its time, its strategic alliances, and its work with the local government, the company has really created a service that did not exist in Mexico.” In April 2014, Carrot received confidence from investors as it raised 2 million USD in a Series B capital round, with its CEO, Diego Solorzano, saying that this amount would allow Carrot to reach 300 cars and 10,000 users by 2016. The final phenomenon that is boosting the advance of e-commerce in Mexico is the quantity of foreign entrepreneurs trying their luck here. The financial problems in Argentina or the small size of Chilean market have led certain bright sparks from such countries to start online retail companies here. Antoni has even said a growing number of Europeans coming here, escaping the administrative hurdles France places on business owners or high unemployment in Spain. “Spanish venture capitalists are looking at Mexico as an option for investments. This influx of foreign talent will soon become pretty meaningful.” But as online commercial practices become commonplace outside the realms of tourism and general retail, and as Mexican and foreign investors and entrepreneurs increasingly team up, full-blown success stories cannot be far away. N *Senior Editor of Mexico Business Publishing. **Director of Mexico Business Publishing.

19


Negocios ProMĂŠxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

A safe door for e-commerce The growth of electronic commerce in Mexico and around the world depends on the trust of users in the websites to which they provide personal information. The trust seals are placed as an essential element to give certainty to electronic commerce.

20

photo

archive

by omar magaĂąa

Who is behind an online transaction? Who do we provide our personal data to? Are those handled confidentially or, conversely, are they distributed and sold? The trust seal, a badge issued by the Mexican Internet Association (AMIPCI) that is published in web sites and email, aims to give a reliable answer to questions that every user of the Internet has asked themselves when filling out forms, entering A password or clicking the buy button.

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

Through that label, AMIPCI identifies, reviews and certifies companies or institutions that have some form of interaction with Internet surfers and voluntarily adhere to the ethical commitment to protect the data provided by their users. Organizations that meet the requirements set out by AMIPCI and acquire the trust seal are distinguished by their legitimacy. The user enjoys the certainty that there is a legal entity behind the website that publicizes its privacy notice and is committed to following standards over and above those stipulated by law. “We have had a very high level of acceptance from the start from the entities that have been certified,” says Rafael Contreras, manager of trust seals at AMIPCI. When AMIPCI started this program in 2007, Contreras adds, there was no law compelling online service providers to include a notice of responsibility. The first entities that sought to obtain the trust seal –to date a total of 600– did so by choice, in the understanding that demonstrating their responsibility towards their customers or users enhances their status in the industry and their competitiveness. The achievements in that regard were the “spearhead,” in the words of Contreras, for bringing about the Federal Law on Protection of Personal Data Held by private parties in Mexico, which contains the guidelines that require companies to present to their users a privacy notice which indicates how their personal information will be used. “We have a very robust law that is internationally recognized not only for its novelty but also because it incorporates many rules and regulations, mainly from Europe and North America,” says Rafael Contreras. Secure sites Although the law and trust seals concern institutions of all types that store data provided by third parties, the AMIPCI initiative has a particular impact on the companies that every day are joining the growing online market. Industry and institutions that promote e-commerce in Mexico and other Latin American countries recognize that the first strategies to favor the sector

October 2014

Organizations that meet the requirements set out by AMIPCI and acquire the trust seal are distinguished by their legitimacy. The user enjoys the certainty that there is a legal entity behind the website that publicizes its privacy notice and is committed to following standards over and above those stipulated by law. include the construction of legal and ethical frameworks that inspire confidence in users of online services. Studies by AMIPCI indicate that, currently, 20% of the activities performed by Internet users in Mexico are related to electronic commerce. In 2013, the value of transactions in the sector totaled almost 9.3 billion USD, up 42% from 2012. “It is an established market but much remains to be done,” concedes Contreras. Today more and more companies decide to sell their products through the Internet and every day there emerge new online buying and selling websites and mobile applications designed for the same purpose. Internet users require sellers to be clear about their security policies and the protocols that ensure that exchanges of information and money will be protected. “We are at an important moment of consolidation for the continued growth and strengthening of this market,” says Rafael Contreras. The country, he points out, has the characteristics to become a major player in e-commerce in Latin America. Welcome to the network “We’re approaching different, clearly defined chambers of commerce and associations of economic activities that have long been marketing products and services but do not necessarily do so online,” says Contreras. AMIPCI makes various efforts to integrate the productive sectors in the digital race and to professionalize the entities that are already part of it. The E-Business Week conference in Mexico City, for example, becomes an excellent opportunity to add suppliers of goods and services to the trend and raise awareness among them of the benefits of having the backing of the trust seals.

Stamps without borders The trust seal initiative emerged in 2005, within the forum of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). At that time, the Mexican delegation to the international organization took up the concerns of experts to create “a mechanism to procure greater ethical and professional commitment from those who offer services, in order to generate trust,” recounts Contreras. AMIPCI took responsibility for designing the model now known as trust seals, like those that other countries around the world have created, with the same objectives. Nine years later, the APEC assesses the Cross-Border Privacy Rules (CBPR) “for strengthening the exchange of ecommerce between the countries in this region and Mexico,” as the Ministry of Economy of the Mexican government has announced. Contreras is confident that the agreements resulting from this new strategy will allow full entry to different economies. The goal is to expand e-commerce, beyond borders, through the certification of websites. AMIPCI is working so that in the future trust seals provide comprehensive services to organizations that are certified; including the generation of metrics to identify the behavior of the market and to understand the behavior of Internet users, while maintaining the privacy and security of their data. “We are working on a new seal that allows us, precisely, to have certain metrics that are useful both for the recipient of the seal –enabling them to identify, for example, what parts of their website they need to make improvements to– and for the industry itself, to understand where we are going and what the requirements are,” concludes Contreras. N www.amipci.org.mx

21


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

photos

Online Avenue for Mexican Fashion Mexico lacks a physical space that brings together Mexican fashion designers and offers them somewhere to sell their wares. But a new web portal has come online to fill this gap and already has the global market in its sights. by omar magaña

Since September 1, 2014, Mexicouture.mx has been selling clothes and accessories designed and created by young Mexican designers from various Mexican cities which have become fashion hubs, such as Guadalajara, Mexico City, Monterrey, and Puebla. The driving force behind the development of this e-commerce web portal is a business development specialist, María José

22

Hernández, and her business partner, Sara Galindo, former executive fashion editor of ELLE magazine during 12 years, who have been using a number of global initiatives and platforms to promote the new wave of Mexican fashion designers. Since the idea germinated, Hernández and Galindo saw the opportunity for Mexicouture to position itself as a

courtesy of mexicouture

specialist fashion e-commerce site that would “set precedents in the history of Mexico.” On the one hand, it meets the need to bring together, on a single website, creators whose work is widely dispersed, either in their own showrooms or in certain department stores; on the other, it helps export Mexican talent. “Together we’re going to reach every single corner of the planet,” Galindo says. In fact, the target market –according to their own description– is made up of Mexican women with a global vision and unique style, who are proud of their country and its products. “It is [also] for the international set,” adds Galindo, “those who live in London, Paris, New York, Dubai, Sao Paulo. Professional women who look after their families and have fantastic jobs, who love showing off their beauty every time they get dressed.”

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

This is the season to roll out a digital tool that closes the gap between designers and fashionista consumers. “E-commerce has huge growth potential,” says Hernández, “and in Mexico that opportunity has not yet been fully seized; there is an important market that is not so competitive, especially in the world of fashion.” An Echo Abroad With their sights set on international markets, the information on Mexicouture will be available in Spanish and other languages. The website seeks to promote its name abroad at creative industry fairs that other Mexican companies already visit alongside ProMéxico representatives, as well as through the publicity that Hernández and Galindo, as fashion agents, will attract at industry-related meetings. The Perfect Season Hernández and Galindo are confident that this is the perfect moment to start up the business. Despite limited start-up funds, they have worked flat out to get the project off the ground after its conception just eight months ago. During that initial stage, the portal has benefitted greatly from the support of Aura Comunicación, as the agency responsible for developing the online platform, and from La Colectiva, which has worked to spread news about the site in the run-up to its launch. This is the season to roll out a digital tool that closes the gap between designers and fashionista consumers. “E-commerce has huge growth potential,” says Hernández, “and in Mexico that opportunity has not yet been fully seized; there is an important market that is not so competitive, especially in the world of fashion.” The fashion world, according to Hernández and Galindo, has its own channels to reveal the season’s latest designs but catwalks and fashion shows have not had sufficient reach, at least not in the case of new Mexican design, to build up a profitable industry through its close proximity to the consumer.

October 2014

“Beyond Mexico’s borders, few people realize that this country’s designers are producing some amazingly avant garde designs,” Galindo says. Mexicouture faces the challenge of generating new buying habits in Mexico and therefore it will be essential for the site to present itself as a reliable platform that gives users a pleasant online shopping experience. Hernández explains that the platform complies with the protocols to protect and manage personal data, and has the right security certificates for online shopping. In terms of Mexicouture’s product offer, Galindo explains that everything marketed on the portal will undergo a selection process carried out by a fashion council and an expert every six months, who will look out for designers and items that best communicate what the team considers as a trend. That process will take into account the fashion designers’ talent, as well as their business approach. Only the most outstanding creations of each designer, their most select work, will be chosen. The designers, Galindo explains, must continue to meet the highest quality standards while their work remains on the portal. “We are acting as fashion stylists; Mexicouture acts as a clothing guide for women,” says Galindo. Mexicouture was launched with curated pieces from the 2014 fall-winter collections. The site displays waistcoats, trousers, shorts, tops, jackets, overcoats, skirts, dresses, bags, accessories and jewelry by designers such as Alejandro Carlín, Yakampot, Lorena Saravia, Daniela Villegas, José Sánchez, and Sandra Weil, among others. The portal already has a delivery service in place for Mexico and the rest of the world, using two logistics companies. Hernández and Galindo expect to see the first signs of change in consumer habits of Mexican e-shoppers by the end of 2014. By 2020, they aim to have become the leading company in promoting and marketing fashion created by Mexican designers. “This is the business of the future and we definitely have the best designers on board, on an exclusive basis,” Galindo concludes. So far their list includes 33 designers, but the number could vary from one season to the next. N www.mexicouture.mx

23


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

Boletia, Ticket to Expand They saw the opportunity and went for it. Four young entrepreneurs have developed mixed on and off-line strategies to expand their e-commerce business.

24

photos

courtesy of boletia

by omar magaña

With audacity, a good ear for advice and enough flexibility to change course when necessary, entrepreneurs Arnoldo Rodríguez, Alfredo Canales, Jyr Gaxiola, and Joshua Francia are strengthening their ticketing company Boletia. It took less than two years to get where they are today. All across the country, promoters of sporting and entertainment events and organizers of congresses, university reunions, fundraisers, and gourmet fairs are wakening up to the benefits of Boletia’s online ticket booking and payment services. During that period, the platform has proven its reliability at some 800 events. “We expect to triple this number in 2015 and sell over a quarter of a million tickets,” says Francia. The way Boletia works is pretty straightforward. The customer –promoter or organizer– logs on to the website, creates an event and selects the type of ticket he wants to issue, booking terms, and

method of payment (generally credit card, debit card, deposit, PayPal or convenience stores). Meanwhile, the user is directed to a microsite where he can book his ticket and choose a payment option, while the customer can keep track of reservations and payments in real time. “We’ve sold tickets for events in practically every big city in Mexico, although we have a stronger presence in Monterrey and other cities up north,” says Francia. It was the product itself that determined the strategy the company was to follow. Boletia’s founding premise was to gain recognition as a reliable service for customers who want some certainty as to whose pockets any profits end up in and for users who want to be sure they’ll get what they’ve paid for. The strategy also provides for offline promotion, a sales team, and alliances with event-related agents and establishments that host them, such as hotels and convention centers.

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

That, says Francia, fueled rapid growth in the north of Mexico and right now the company is “adding to its sales team to provide better coverage of Central Mexico. We’re also making the necessary adjustments to the platform so it’s a valid, recognized option on other Latin American markets.” Boletia is currently negotiating with PayPal in order to include it as a payment option for global currencies and is smoothing out some finer details of a strategic alliance with Innovasport that will turn it into a base platform for the booking and sale of tickets to the chain’s sporting events. In August 2014, Boletia implemented a referral program with individuals and corporations linked to the organization of congresses, concerts, and sporting events. The program has helped attract more customers, with whom the company has set up a commission-based reward system. What started out as a three-man business has nine people working for it one and a half years later. That number is expected to rise to 20 in the last four months of 2015, including customer support, sales personal, and the developers so essential to keeping a technological-based company like this on the cutting edge. A new chapter in e-commerce Mexico is seeing the expansion of startups that are promoting e-commerce with accessible, reliable solutions. The Mexican market is huge, which “makes it ideal for starting an attractive business. This is a new chapter in e-commerce in which the government is cooperating with industry to catapult high-impact enterprises to success and there is plenty of human talent available,” says Francia. It is estimated that e-commerce in Mexico could grow as much as 200% over the next three years, thanks to newcomers like Boletia that are breaking down the barriers and closing the gap between sellers and potential buyers. Rodríguez, Canales, and Francia realized Mexico lacked an integrated online ticketing platform for medium-sized events and took the initiative. Along the way, they had the support of 500 Startups, a venture capital fund that got Boletia launched. Today, they continue to receive guidance from institutions and seasoned entrepreneurs. “We belong to a non-profit organization that ‘mentors’ high-impact companies like ours and we have investors with a lot of corporate experience,” says Francia.

October 2014

Rodríguez, Canales, Gaxiola, and Francia are always open to a word of advice and are prepared to adjust their strategy to ensure the continued growth of the business. In the future, they aim to consolidate Boletia as Mexico’s top online booking service and offer the user a complete experience before, during and after purchasing a ticket. That means offering the user options and complying with legal and fiscal regulations. “The time will come when the broadening of the platform leads us to compete for mass entertainment events and large congresses, but for the time being, there’s a lot to be done in the market niche we cater to and there’s always room to negotiate and share,” says Francia. “Instead of competing with them [planners of congresses with over 5,000 attendees], we are forging alliances with those that have the vision to hire the services of a company like ours that renders technological support in the ticketing department,” he concludes. N

Boletia is currently negotiating with PayPal in order to include it as a payment option for global currencies and is smoothing out some finer details of a strategic alliance with Innovasport that will turn it into a base platform for the booking and sale of tickets to the chain’s sporting events.

boletia.com

25


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

photos

courtesy of pago fácil

Money in Movement “How do you want to be paid?” is the only question you have to worry about answering when you use PagoFácil, a startup that designs safe, user friendly online payment services to smooth transactions between buyers and sellers. by omar magaña

In its value proposition, PagoFácil says that adopting its tools for fast, easy and safe online transactions does away with the consumer’s reluctance to pay and the obstacles to a seller’s collecting. To the extent that smartphones and other mobile devices become more popular and we gain a better understanding of and trust in the financial applications of these technological tools, more and more people, in Mexico and Latin America will be making online purchases. This market is potentially huge and will confirm that value proposition. PagoFácil –a startup initiated by Javier Rincón Perezsandi, Luis Fernando Huerta and Pablo Hernández O´Hagan, founder and CEO of Ingenia Group, who were later

26

joined by banking expert Eugenio Perea– introduced online payment tools and bank card readers for smartphones to Mexico. Similar to Square in the US, they adapted their system to the Mexican market. There are now 1,710 customers answering the question, “How do you want to be paid?” They come in all shapes and sizes and deal in the most diverse products and services, from “companies that organize expos, sell juice and health food, jewelry and second hand clothes to people who teach online Master’s Degrees and car sharing companies like Carrot,” says PagoFácil CEO Eugenio Perea. So far this year, these companies and individuals have made transactions valued at 43 million pesos (around 3.3

million USD), according to the most recent figures divulged by Perea. And if we consider that in 2013 the total value of transactions was 11 million pesos (almost 830,000 USD), the company’s growth has been exponential. Getting back up What we see today –a company capable of generating an incredible 1 million pesos (75,000 USD) in transactions in just three days– didn’t happen overnight but was the result of a long and occasionally painful process. It was Hernández, Huerta and Rincón who originally had the idea to create a web-based payments system. Hernández and Huerta financed Rincón’s work on the

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

project between 2009 and 2010 and by 2011 the platform was up and running as an Internet payment option, with Banorte acting as the financial go-between. In 2012, when the platform began marketing bank card readers, PagoFácil took its first fall. Its acquiring bank pulled out of the game for a time, leaving the company with no customers. Rincón met Perea at the offices of the Venture Institute accelerator in October 2012. The two shook hands and immediately began working on getting the startup back on its feet. “We gave a PowerPoint presentation and in six weeks managed to raise 1 million USD in seed capital,” says Perea. It was a lot easier than they’d thought because “the market was right. Latin America is the perfect market for this. Online payment services are new, but have potential.” Perea and Rincón came to the conclusion that they were in the right place at the right time for a solution like PagoFácil. It was then or never. Part of the seed capital was used to restructure the company from the bottom up. Perea and Rincón modified the platform’s technological profile, regained the trust of their acquiring bank, got their customers back on board and designed a system that was to enable them to post steady growth over the next seven years. From that moment on, PagoFácil started registering growth as high as 78% from one week to the next and hit its first million in transactions a mere 22 weeks after the relaunch of the platform. The company’s core staff has grown too, from two to nine employees in 2013 and from nine to 16 so far this year. Like Mexican rock music Perea compares PagoFácil to the Mexican rock movement of the 1990s. The bands that were most successful and that have managed to survive to this very day are the ones who had a keen grasp of American and British musical genres and fused them with their own identity as Mexicans and as Latinos, in a broader sense. “We look for mechanisms that are compatible with the cash flows of a Mexican corner store or a drycleaners,” says Perea. Success, says Perea, has depended on understanding the market’s strengths and opportunities. “In Mexico, only 22% of the population owns smart phones and

October 2014

From that moment on, PagoFácil started registering growth as high as 78% from one week to the next and hit its first million in transactions a mere 22 weeks after the relaunch of the platform. The company’s core staff has grown too, from two to nine employees in 2013 and from nine to 16 so far this year. only 33% have Internet access, so we can’t apply Silicon Valley models.” Still, the projections point to a potentially strong market. Micro companies –just over 4 million of them– play a significant role in the Mexican economy, while there is a large sector of the population that requires non-banking payment services. The coming together of these factors and technology herald a lot more opportunities for businesses like PagoFácil, both in Mexico and other parts of Latin America. “The cake is so big that we work side by side with our competitors without worrying about stepping on each other’s toes,” says Perea, who believes the time has come for the industry’s players to work together to familiarize Mexico and the region as a whole with e-commerce and develop antifraud technology. “The biggest challenge Mexico faces in this area is the integration of payment mediums. The more cooperation there is, the more information we can share and the better equipped we will be to deal with organized crime,” says Perea. Paying it forward PagoFácil expects to experience “meteoric growth” from now through 2020.

Investors are banking on the consolidation of the platform in Mexico and its expansion to Southern Cone markets. The company’s internationalization strategy consists of first entering the Pacific Alliance region (Chile, Colombia and Peru), then medium and smaller countries in Central and South America before finally taking on Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela. At the same time, the startup is preparing for technological changes as more people start making payments via their smart phones. That will be determined by innovations in the US, the last country to substitute bank cards with magnetic stripes for EMV cards with chips. “It’s exorbitantly expensive for the US to adopt chip technology,” says Perea, adding that “2014 has been the year in which the most has been invested in online payments initiatives. My theory is that the US is waiting for what’s around the corner.” Meanwhile, PagoFácil will continue to provide safe, accessible online payment tools that facilitate life for users and help save them a penny or two in the process. N www.pagofacil.net

27


Negocios ProMéxico | Special Feature: E-commerce

photos

courtesy of 99 minutos

99 minutos, Faster than the Internet A young startup, but one with a very clear vision of its role in the e-commerce industry, 99 minutos aims to become an agent of change and a catalyst for economic growth. by omar magaña

You work from home and are short on time, only to discover you’re all out of dog food. So you log on to the pet products e-commerce site and place your order. 99 minutos takes it, a delivery service picks the product up from the company’s in-situ warehouse and you get an e-mail confirming it’s on its way. And if you want, you can track your order with a smart phone application. In a matter of minutes, you get your order and pay for it on delivery. As a user, you can say this particular logistics startup has remained true to its value proposition: the product purchased online has been de-

28

livered to your home quickly, in one piece, and you’ve been able to keep track of every phase in the process. “One of the reasons people were reluctant to purchase online was because they were afraid they would never get their product or that it would take a long time,” says José Antonio Salomón when asked what motivated him and his partners, Alexis Patjane and Pablo Erreguerena, to develop this exclusive solution for e-commerce enterprises. Founded in Mexico City in 2013 with the support of the 500 Mexico City fund, 99 minutos has added value to the e-com-

merce chain, which, according to developers, newcomers and authorities, is already showing the first signs of growth and consolidation. The company has since become an essential link in that chain, helping ebusinesses sell their products and doing away with taboos to ensure consumers come away with a pleasant experience. And having satisfied customers benefits everyone. “Good service is our best publicity,” says Salomón. A good eye Startups are defined by their ability to come up with fast solutions to specific

October 2014


Special Feature: E-commerce | Negocios ProMéxico

problems and cash in on them. 99 minutos has found its perfect niche and has jumped at every opportunity that’s come its way. But reaching this point has required innovating, rethinking and sometimes even getting it wrong. The initiative started as an e-commerce site that had a relatively diverse product portfolio and offered express delivery services in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. Consumers expressed satisfaction with the reliability and speed of these services, which is when the startup realized where its calling was. “We realized it wasn’t the site that was innovative but the services we were offering,” says Salomón. A timely concept Things couldn’t be clearer now. 99 minutos is the vehicle that delivers the goods of some 45 e-commerce enterprises, to the tune of 3,500 deliveries a month in Mexico City and, to a lesser degree, Guadalajara. “In a year’s time, we expect to have between 200 and 300 customers,” says Salomón, who estimates that the number of de-

October 2014

The company has even developed its own automated order control system. When the user places an order on the website of one of its customers, 99 minutos is immediately notified and collects the goods either at the customer’s or its own warehouse. The fact that 99 minutos has its own stock has translated into added value in terms of customer service, while its tracking tool is greatly appreciated by the final user. liveries could rise to 6,000 or 7,000 a month by December 2014, reason why the company has deemed it prudent to lease sufficient fleet capacity for the remainder of the year. Young consumers, he says, don’t need to be persuaded of the advantages of ecommerce and in the case of customers

who are more wary of online transactions, 99 minutos has established a paymenton-delivery system. Those more reticent customers tend to purchase wine, clothes, accessories, membership cards, prepaid chips, pet products, craft beer and similar products online. “We are a company specialized in ecommerce deliveries, this is our value proposition,” says Salomón. The company’s customers include other startups created by the same generation of young entrepreneurs, like Carrot and Clip, but more recently, bigger fish have started seeking out its services. The services of a logistics company like 99 minutos are invaluable to startups that are just getting their feet wet in the ecommerce industry because it allows them more time to focus on their core activity. “You worry about being innovative, developing products and marketing them on your site. Don’t waste time worrying about how you’re going to get them to the customer,” says Salomón. The company has even developed its own automated order control system. When the user places an order on the website of one of its customers, 99 minutos is immediately notified and collects the goods either at the customer’s or its own warehouse. The fact that 99 minutos has its own stock has translated into added value in terms of customer service, while its tracking tool is greatly appreciated by the final user. It’s a mechanism that’s easy to replicate in other cities, says Salomón, but “we don’t want to expand until we have a solid structure and can position ourselves well.” Now’s the time Mexico and the rest of Latin America constitute a huge playing field for online businesses. “Now’s the time to jump on the bandwagon. There’s a lot of government support out there, which is a good thing. We’re experiencing growth and investors are cottoning on to the potential of the industry, reason why more opportunities for the consolidation of startups are opening up,” says Salomón. Aware of its export potential, 99 minutos has held meetings with ProMéxico to discuss strategies for its future internationalization, for, as Salomón says, technological-based companies are those with the greatest possibilities of going global. N www.99minutos.com

29


Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

infographic

oldemar

MEXICO: IT’S ALL ABOUT CREATIVITY 18th

5th

Creative and media industries account for 7% of Mexico’s gross domestic product (GDP).

It is the country’s 5th strategic industry, just behind the aerospace, agriculture, food and automotive industries.

Mexico is the 18th largest exporter of creative goods worldwide. It is the only Latin American country among the world’s top 20 creative goods exporters.

The country is a major power in television content production.

TALENT IS THE ANSWER

Mexico produces over 100,000 hours of TV every year. These contents are exported to over 100 countries and translated into more than 30 languages.

ON THE RED CARPET

Mexico has highly skilled talent that is also experienced in audiovisual production.

9th

The country is the 9th hub worldwide in terms of IT-specialized talent (CONACYT). It is the largest technological talent pool in Latin America (CONACYT). In 2013, more than 100,000 students graduated from engineering and technology programs (ANUIES). There are more than 900 graduate programs related to engineering and technology fields in Mexican universities (ANUIES).

2010

30

TV content produced in Mexico is watched by more than one billion people in more than 100 countries.

Mexican films received 127 international awards in 2013 including the Best Director Award at Cannes Film Festival. In 2013, Mexican movies were released in commercial theaters in over 40 countries, a record high since 2009. Mexico is one of the world’s top five film markets for theatrical exhibition. During 2013, 248 million spectators attended cinemas in Mexico (an increase of more than 20 million over 2012).

2011

Creative Industries Roadmap

PROAV

Strategy coordinated by ProMéxico and supported by experts from government, industry and academia, to foster creative industries (audiovisual and digital). The roadmap sets out goals and strategies for achieving them.

The program aims to boost investment in the audiovisual industry by supporting high-impact projects that enhance local capacities and promote the export of Mexican services and the country as a destination for production.

2012

Film Friendly Mexico www.filmfriendlymexico.com Electronic platform designed to provide step-by-step guidance to film investors and a unique production experience in Mexico.

October 2014


Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

13th

In 2013, 1,418 economic units that produce channel programming for cable or satellite television systems, films and video were registered in Mexico.

Mexico offers a wide range of services of international quality. There are more than 1,500 film production and post-production, software, and video game developing companies.

Mexico is one of the leading markets for creative industries in Latin America.

Due to its market value, Mexico is ranked 13th worldwide in the entertainment and advertising industry.

It is estimated that the entertainment and advertising industry in Mexico will record a market value of over 27 billion  in 2014 (a 9.5% increase compared to 2013).

THE “Ñ” MATTERS 3rd

Spanish is the third most widely spoken language in the world, after English and Mandarin. The Spanish-speaking population is one of the fastest growing segments of the entertainment industry. There are 400 million Spanishspeaking people in the world. By 2050, that figure is expected to reach 530 million, and close to one third of them will be located in the United States. Mexico produces creative content that impacts over 50 million Hispanics in the United States. Mexico is determined to establish itself as a leading content producer for the Spanish-speaking market.

2013

Ciudad Creativa Digital ccd.guadalajara.com A project supported by the federal government that combines the entrepreneurial spirit of Mexico’s “Silicon Valley” with the unique Mexican culture and traditions. It incorporates the creativity of Mexican human capital and urban lifestyle in order to position Mexico as a leading international content production hub.

2014

Second Edition of the Creative Industries Roadmap.

CCD Ventures

MIPCOM 2014

An investment fund powered by Ciudad Creativa Digital to enhance the entrepreneurial ecosystem in the creative industries.

Mexico is the guest of honor at MIPCOM 2014, the world’s most important contents market.

Sources: The Orange Economy. An Infinite Opportunity (2013). Inter-American Development Bank (IADB); Creative Economy Report 2010, UNESCO; Global Entertainment and Media Outlook 2014-2018, PwC; Spanish Speaking Market Explodes, CSN Intelligence for Global Business; ProMéxico with information from ANUIES, CONACYT, IMCINE. October 2014

31


Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

infographic

oldemar

Want to film in Mexico?

FILM PRODUCTION INCENTIVES IN MEXICO

FOPROCINE

FIDECINE

EFICINE 189

Grants resources through coproduction contracts by means of venture capital or credit contracts.

A trust for the coproduction, post-production, distribution and exhibition of fiction and animated feature films (75 minutes or more), which offers support through venture capital and credit.

A fiscal stimulus for taxpayers granted by Article 189 of Mexico’s Income Tax Law (Ley del Impuesto Sobre la Renta), to support the production or post-production and distribution of fiction, documentary and animated feature films.

A trust for the production or post-production of fiction, documentary and animated features (75 minutes or more), in coproduction. Candidates must be Mexican production companies or individuals. Participation by foreign directors is subject to their association to a Mexican production company, at least two years of legal residence in the country and a solid background in Mexican cinema.

In addition, it offers other stimuli for commercial run and for outstanding performance at festivals in Mexico and abroad. If the supported project recovers 100% of the amount received, there’s a reserve equal to the sum previously granted to carry out the director’s next project.

Through EFICINE, taxpayers investing in film projects in Mexico can obtain a deductible tax credit equal to the sum of their investment. Each project cannot receive more than 1.5 million  or maximum 80% of the cost of the project.

THIS SUPPORT CAN BE COMBINED WITH EFICINE 189

THIS SUPPORT CAN BE COMBINED WITH EFICINE 189

32

October 2014


Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

PROAV

ATA CARNET

Incentive program for high-impact film and audiovisual industries, designed to complement existing policies aimed at boosting and strengthening the film and audiovisual industry in Mexico.

A customs document that allows the temporary import and export of non-perishable goods –for example, goods for exhibition displays and commercial equipment for production and conducting professional work.

A comprehensive, three-pronged support mechanism:

Goods must be re-imported to the country of origin in the maximum period of one year.

0% VAT INCENTIVE FOREIGN PRODUCTION WORK Foreign productions are entitled to claim back the VAT (Value Added Tax) at the end of the shooting, as long as the project is registered with the Ministry of Finance through a legally established Mexican company that is up to date with its tax payments.

Direct financial reimbursements of up to 7.5% of the budget spent in Mexico: Available for Mexican and foreign films and audiovisual projects with a minimum expenditure of 3 million  in production costs or 700,000  in post-production expenses.

Foreign productions are entitled to apply for a value-added tax (VAT) refund*

A specialized service platform including all the government agencies at the federal level that are involved with the film and audiovisual industry at some point or another.

This incentive is available for all types of productions regardless of budget. Not all expenses are subject to VAT in Mexico. Usually, VAT refund will represent approximately 9-12% of the total expenses.

A combination of both production and post-production costs may apply, in which case the minimum will be 5.3 million . The sum of both the fiscal (VAT refund) and financial incentives (cash reimbursement) will be capped at 17.5% of the budget spent in Mexico. Therefore, the difference between the VAT refund and the 17.5% cap will come in the form of a cash rebate from an independent fund managed by ProMéxico.

*In Mexico VAT rate is 16%. For more information visit www.imcine.gob.mx October 2014

33


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of ánima estudios

Ánima Estudios, Artistic Heritage Transformed into Animation Almost 15 years after it was founded, this Mexican creative company has made around 10 films and several animated episodes for television that have been shown and broadcast in countries in the Americas and Europe. by antonio vázquez

With a grandfather and father who were filmmakers and an actress mother, an artistic legacy runs through the veins of Fernando De Fuentes, director of Ánima Estudios, that has him focused on the field of animation. With nearly 10 films and several episodes of animated series, De Fuentes has created an audiovisual product that has been seen in several countries in Latin America and Europe. Before the end of the 90s, Fernando De Fuentes was a young engineer who joined

34

the ranks of a small electronic website. There he focused on animation with characters parodying personalities in Mexican sports, such as footballer Cuauhtémoc Blanco and commentator José Ramón Fernández. By 2000, the media company closed its doors but De Fuentes and 15 other partners decided to start a company 100% dedicated to animation. Ánima Estudios was born. Supported by 20th Century Fox, in 2003 Ánima Estudios created Wizards and Giants, its first animated film

that produced just enough profit for the creative studio to undertake other productions. In 2006, Televisa –Mexico’s main television network– and the family of actor Roberto Gómez Bolaños asked Fernando De Fuentes’s company to embark on a challenging task: to create the animated version of El Chavo, a character created by Gómez Bolaños himself which for decades had enjoyed great success throughout Latin America. The animated series El Chavo was released after 18 months of work. It featured

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

135 episodes of animation –including the leading roles of the original TV program– and aired in 16 countries in Latin America, as well as Spain and Canada. The first episodes of the series were adaptations of some of the scripts from the original series. But for the second season, the Ánima Estudios and Roberto Gómez Bolaños teams worked on new stories for the animated character. Throughout its career, Ánima Estudios has chosen to inject a touch of Mexico into each of its productions. Each project has portrayed stories, legends, and ways of life from Mexican society but at the same time has made them universal, to make them understandable in other parts of the world. “We saw two aspects to the business: one was to attack the local market, with the traditions and customs that identify Mexicans, but we also wanted to create films with an international reach. That is why we did Don Gato (Top Cat), with different partners, which in the end has been shown in more than 60 countries, both in film theaters and on video and television,” says De Fuentes. Top Cat, the Hanna Barbera character, was made into a film in 2011 by Ánima Estudios. The movie has been screened in cinemas in 27 different countries; in England it was among the top 10 movies for almost four weeks. La leyenda de la Llorona (The Legend of La Llorona) and La leyenda de las momias (The Legend of the Mummies) –to be premiered in 2014– are some of the classic movies by Ánima Estudios that incorporate Mexican traditions and myths. Another of the company’s major projects is Teenage Fairytale Dropouts, a series

October 2014

made with investment from Australia and Ireland, which has been shown in over 20 countries. The animated series deals with the story of three teenagers whose life unfolds in a world of wizards, giants, and fairies. Over 14 years, Ánima Estudios has partnered with companies such as Warner Brothers, Cartoon Network, and Nickelodeon, among others. According to Fernando De Fuentes, animation is an industry that provides significant dividends to the Mexican economy. The creator notes that, due to the economic importance of the

sector, agencies like ProMéxico have focused their efforts on promoting Mexican creative companies in different countries. Proof of that, he says, is that this year Mexico is the guest country at the MIPCOM international television festival in Cannes, France. “It has been up to us to demonstrate that this industry generates many jobs and exports to many countries. We are continuing to grow and I think in 10 years the outlook will be much better for this industry,” he concludes. N www.animaestudios.com

Throughout its career, Ánima Estudios has chosen to inject a touch of Mexico into each of its productions. Each project has portrayed stories, legends, and ways of life from Mexican society but at the same time has made them universal, to make them understandable in other parts of the world.

35


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

Pimienta Films, independent films made in Mexico Though a relative newcomer, Pimienta Films, a Mexican film producer, is encountering success, with coproductions with other countries and its own catalogue of independent films. by antonio vázquez

Founded in 2008, Pimienta Films began as an independent production company, with a single guiding principle: to create short films, documentaries and auteur independent feature films. “I started in those years with a first project as a producer. I traveled to festivals and I realized I needed a back-

36

up, not only to be the producer, but to have a company as a calling-card when making international co-productions. That was how the need to formally set up Pimienta Films arose,” says Nicolás Celis, founder of the company. Nicolás has enjoyed the support of his brother Sebastián Celis to take the produc-

tion house forward. In these six years, Pimienta Films has made its mark on more than 16 feature films and four short films, many of them screened at major film festivals in Europe. For television, Pimienta Films has been involved in series for channels like ESPN and HBO. “This is a good time for us. People trust that we can make movies no more expensively than other producers. We can prepare a lower-risk business proposal, one that isn’t a shot in the dark” says Nicolás Celis. And although money in a creative company dedicated to films is important, for Pimienta Films still more so is the vision and project of each of the directors he works with.

pimienta films

In Agua Fria de Mar, a film by the director Paz Fabrega, Pimienta Films participated as co-producer in 2010. The film, a co-production between Costa Rica, France, Netherlands, Spain and Mexico, won the Tiger Award at the Rotterdam Film Festival. The Celis brothers also participated in 2011 providing production services in the US film The Broken Tower, directed by actor James Franco. With Somos lo que hay, a Mexican film made in 2010 by director Jorge Michel Grau, Nicolás Celis –as its producer– reached French soil, since the film was premiered that year at the Cannes Directors’ Fortnight. Currently, the Celis brothers’ company is working on about eight feature film projects. It is participating in dif-

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

ferent stages of each, either in pre-production, under development or in post-production. Nicolás Celis says his company has given priority to film production before anything else. “We have a lot of film projects right now. It wasn’t like that at the start. Many companies do things like advertising at the same time, they diversify to earn resources, but in the long term this means they get involved in other things that distract them from making films. In our case it has been different,” adds Sebastián Celis. The commitment to independent cinema has proven fruitful for Pimienta Films. “The kind of film we do is not very conventional, and it is what has produced results. We are consistent with the cost of a movie and its potential scope. For example, there is Heli (Amat Escalante, 2013) –on which I was line producer– a really powerful film that has toured many countries around the world,” explains Nicolás Celis. He adds, “We try to make movies with good scripts, without sacrificing the quality of a project. We work closely with directors and more than offering a production service, where they come and pay for what they get, our work is 100% committed.” The cinematic touch of the brothers Celis has also been injected into television projects, such as the ESPN series Capitales del futbol, in which they participated in 2012, and production of the program The Road to South Africa, an HBO special on the 2010 World Cup. Sebastián Celis stresses that Mexico offers a wide range of funds to filmmakers, plus several advantages for the production of films, at competitive prices, and a great range on offer in terms of locations and skilled personnel.

October 2014

The Celis brothers argue that 2014 is a key year for Pimienta Films. The company has diversified and consolidated, and is working on a French and German co-production of a film by an Iranian director. “It is always a pleasure to discover a project that we like, meet a director with great ideas, and raise and build the project from scratch,” concludes Nicolás Celis. N www.pimientafilms.com

The commitment to independent cinema has proven fruitful for Pimienta Films. “The kind of film we do is not very conventional, and it is what has produced results. We are consistent with the cost of a movie and its potential scope. For example, there is Heli (Amat Escalante, 2013) –on which I was line producer– a really powerful film that has toured many countries around the world,” explains Nicolás Celis.

37


Negocios ProMéxico | Figures

photos

courtesy of weeping willow

Weeping Willow, art and passion with a bicultural flavor Mexico and Canada are at the roots of Weeping Willow, a film and television production company that seeks to establish itself in the quality content market in North America. by antonio vázquez

Passionate is the right word to describe Weeping Willow, a film and television production company that contains the best of two countries: Mexico and Canada. Andrea Martínez Crowther –who has both Mexican and Canadian roots– heads up the company that has been involved in co-productions that cross borders. One of its most notable movies is Ciclo, filmed in 2009 but released in 2012. The movie was the first with the seal of the Weeping Willow production company, though years earlier, Andrea Martínez had already filmed another movie whose rights were sold. “When Ciclo premiered, so did Weeping Willow. The English name is not meant to be anti-Mexican but is because of my bicultural origin. One of the goals of the company is to export content. I am bilingual, I am bicultural, I know how to speak to audiences outside of Mexico, to speak culturally. They love the things we have done for Canada,” says Martínez Crowther, who is strongly attached to her cultural and family roots. That

38

October 2014


Figures | Negocios ProMéxico

passion for her two cultures and her family history was captured in Ciclo. The film documents the bike trip made by Arthur and Gustavo Martínez (Andrea’s father and uncle) to Canada. Fiftythree years earlier, the brothers had made the same 5,600-mile journey between Mexico City and Toronto, mounted on their two-wheelers. On their first trip, they left only with bikes, 100 usd and two changes of clothes. This time, they were accompanied by a whole production team that recorded each push of the pedals as they visited the same points they did half a century before. “I grew up with this story; it is part of my family, of my own bicultural origin. My father met my mother in Canada and returned to Mexico,” says the filmmaker. For the production of Ciclo, Andrea Martínez had access to funds from both Mexico and the US. The story of the two men, who are now over 70 years of age, drew attention in both countries. The film allowed the head of Weeping Willow to explore other fields, such as television content. Thus, the production company has mixed the two media in order to create quality productions. The company’s first television project is called Ingredients for a Good Life. It is a series of programs presented by Amanda Martínez –a Mexican-Canadian singer and cousin of Andrea– who travels through different regions of Mexico analyzing the local culture. “It is about presenting the lesser-known regions of Mexico to the Canadian public. We wanted to build confidence among Canadians that they can eat anywhere in Mexico and feel safe, that they can travel to Mexico safely,” explains Martínez Crowther.

October 2014

Ingredients for a Good Life now has six episodes that capture the richness of San Luis Potosí and another six addressing the beauty of Baja California. Another project is Bicycle Diaries, a production broadcast by TV-UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) that recounts the experience of people who use bikes to commute to work, home, school, for exercise or just for fun. “Bicycle Diaries is a great product for export, since people from France or the US are just as interested because it is a universal theme. There is a lot of material in Mexico to export,” points out Martínez Crowther, who has worked in international productions and considers that Mexico’s film industry has some excellent talent. Mexican directors, photographers, and crews are acknowledged by professionals from other countries, she says. The producer has engaged in dialogue with ProMéxico to plan a marketing strategy in other countries. For now, among her plans is to open offices in Canada and on Mexico’s border with the US. “We are working to position ourselves as a producer and exporter of quality television content; we will open offices in Tijuana and Toronto to generate co-productions that are seen both inside and outside of Mexico,” reveals Martínez Crowther. Currently Weeping Willow is producing the program My Dancing Heart for Al Jazeera’s Viewfinder series. This documentary is an exploration of sensuality, romance and the possibility of love among senior citizens in Mexico City whose passion revolves around the danzón, a traditional slowmoving dance which is very popular in Mexico. N

For the production of Ciclo, Andrea Martínez had access to funds from both Mexico and the US. The story of the two men, who are now over 70 years of age, drew attention in both countries. The film allowed the head of Weeping Willow to explore other fields, such as television content. Thus, the production company has mixed the two media in order to create quality productions.

weepingwillow.mx

39


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of atmósfera producciones

Atmósfera Producciones, a layer of creativity From the Mexican border with the US, this producer of audiovisual content has created television programs for networks such as ABC, Telemundo and CNN, among others. by antonio vázquez

Located in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, on the Mexican border with the US, Atmósfera Producciones is a company capable of creating any communication product, some of which have been transmitted by US networks like ABC. The company run by Abigail Villegas and Juan Carlos Domínguez, began operations

40

in the late 1990s, when Ciudad Juárez had about 16 local channels in operation, generating a high level of demand for audiovisual services for different customers. Villegas was a great visionary and thought beyond meeting the needs of local television consumers. With Atmósfera Producciones she

began creating independent television not only for consumers in Ciudad Juárez but also in the US. “Being on the border allowed us to contact a lot of producers from other networks and generate content for the US, mostly focused towards the Spanish-speaking public that lives there. We began to

build up collaborations, a network of contacts and we now cover a high level of demand for independent television along the border of Mexico and the US,” says Villegas. The first productions by Atmósfera were magazine and youth programs aimed at border audiences. Social and political issues were soon added to the catalogue of the company, in response to the demands of its customers in the US. Over time, the contributions for the US gained ground on the agenda of Atmósfera Producciones, according to Villegas. “We produced content mainly for ABC that aired nationally in the US. As a small business, for us it has been a great experience that our content is transmitted over a network like ABC in prime time and, moreover, in another language,” she says. In total, Atmósfera Producciones developed over 40 programs on tourism themes for ABC, which highlighted the major tourist attractions in five states of Mexico –including Chihuahua, Yucatán and Quintana Roo. Reforms in telecommunications approved in 2014 in Mexico will bring great opportunities for producers of television content, says Villegas. For her, the fact that competition will be opened up

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

within the sector will allow the number of television channels to increase and as a result there will be greater demand for content. “In the US, for example, the transition from analog to digital television led more channels to open overnight. In Mexico something similar will happen and that will benefit the user because there is more competition. It will also benefit those who work in production because there will be more demand for content,” Villegas suggests. With a team of 15 people, in recent years Atmósfera Producciones has been focused on creating audiovisual products for the corporate image of companies, as well as touristic content for different customers. “We’ve worked with CNN, Telemundo and many other networks that come to Ciudad Juárez looking for information [...] Being based on

October 2014

With a team of 15 people, in recent years Atmósfera Producciones has been focused on creating audiovisual products for the corporate image of companies, as well as touristic content for different customers. the border, we have the best of both countries and understand both sides,” claims Villegas. Currently, Atmósfera Producciones is working closely with ProMéxico to help its own independent content reach other global markets. “We are growing and we have plans to generate content for social networks. Producing

content for television is expensive but the opportunities will open up and we will be working on this because it’s what we like. In Mexico, there are many opportunities to grow; there is a lot of talent and a very positive outlook,” concludes Abigail Villegas. N www.atmosferaproductions.com

41


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of come sesos

Come Sesos, a Young Mexican Filmmaker Headed for International Fame Founder and director of the Come Sesos animation studio, Jonathan Ostos is barely 28 but is already garnering attention at international film festivals. by antonio vázquez

He’s barely 28 but Jonathan Ostos Yaber is shaping up as one of the Mexican creators most likely to get tongues wagging in film and animation circles in the coming years. Founder and director of the Come Sesos animation studio, Ostos’ short films have been screened at over 130 festivals, including Cannes, Edinburgh, LA Short Fest and the Hong Kong International Film Festival, to name just a few. After a lengthy sojourn in the United Kingdom, Ostos returned to Mexico in 2007 to work on his pet project: Come Sesos. He managed to recruit a team of 10 talented professionals, who have helped him produce everything from short films and features to television series and commercials. Commercials like the United Nations Human Rights Campaign for Latin America that Ostos directed in 2011 and that received over 1,000,000 hits in just one week. “It was a commercial on human rights; a campaign on how to defend them. We also have several clients in Mexico who we do commercials for, like the Chamber of Deputies and Cinépolis [Mexico’s largest movie theater chain],” says Ostos. One of his pride and joys is La nostalgia del señor Alambre (Mr. Wire’s Nostalgia, 2009), which won Best Short

42

Film in Mexico and has been shown at the Cannes and Hong Kong film festivals and the Berlin International Short Film Festival, among others. “Mr. Wire is a wonderful storyteller. He loves telling children stories about his village, about aliens and monsters. Every story, every chapter is filled with drama and romance. And it’s all told through shadow theater,” says Ostos. The short caught the eye of producers in Ottawa who have decided to take Mr. Wire to Canadian television screens. “Of the thousands of projects submitted, only two were selected to be broadcast on Canadian television and one of them was Mr. Wire,” Ostos recalls. Ostos, who presides over CutOut Fest, a prestigious international animated film festival held every year in Querétaro, says Mexico has the talent to get people in film and animation circles all over the world sitting up and taking notice. His most recent project is a feature called The Morphable Man. Of a more commercial bent, this co-production with France and the US aims to “show the world of conventional film that Mexico is capable of producing quality visual effects that entertain people.”

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Ostos, who presides over CutOut Fest, a prestigious international animated film festival held every year in Querétaro, says Mexico has the talent to get people in film and animation circles all over the world sitting up and taking notice.

The Morphable Man tells the story of a young man who is viewed as a freak because of his ability to change his physical appearance. Unable to control his morphability, there is, however, one girl who accepts and loves him for who he is. In 2014, the Mexican beer brand Sol selected Ostos as the face of its “Free Spirit” campaign and will be promoting the work of this independent filmmaker worldwide. One of Ostos’ future projects is a feature made up of 10 short animated films on the traditions of Mexico’s indigenous peoples. Each story will be directed by a different Mexican filmmaker and will be set to symphony music. “In five years’ time,” he says, “I see myself producing a lot of films. It’s what I love most.” N www.comesesos.com

October 2014

43


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of dubbing house

Dubbing House: Mexico’s Voice AbroaD With 80% of its annual production for export, this Mexican dubbing company translates some of the world’s most successful TV series and films into Spanish, English and Portuguese. by antonio vázquez

More than half the Spanish dubbing of films, series and programs that are produced around the world is done in Mexico, a fact that has not gone unnoticed by Dubbing House, a company directed by Jorge Arregui and Paola Felgueres, professionals with almost three decades of experience in the industry. Arregui began working in the dubbing industry in the mid 1980s, when he worked for a company that formed part of Televisa, Mexico’s main television company. In 2004, Jorge and Paola decided to set up their own venture and created Dubbing House, a company that specializes in dubbing but which also offers post-production audio services for different entertainment platforms (film, television, videogames), subtitling and audio design, among others. “Over time, our clients have asked us to help them dub into other languages,” Arregui says, “and so we now have affiliate studios in Brazil, the US and Canada, where we dub mainly into Portuguese and English.” Practically 80% of the firm’s dubbing projects are exported to the US, from where the television networks and producers distribute their series, now dubbed into Spanish, to Latin America and Hispanic communities in the US. Mexico’s dubbing industry is thriving; in Mexico

44

alone, around 37,000 programs are dubbed each year by 35 fully fledged companies using approximately 1,200 actors who offer a wide range of voices, and generating some 3,000 direct jobs. Where does the dubbing voice fit into the picture? “We are working for 20th Century Fox on the dubbing of the Modern Family series,” answers Arregui, “and on films that are being shown at cinemas in Mexico and Latin America, such as Don Gato (Top Cat) and recently Boxtrolls. For a long time we also dubbed several episodes of Sesame Street as well as many other famous TV series.” The company also dubbed into English the cartoon series of El Chavo –a character created by the Mexican actor Roberto Gómez Bolaños, which has enjoyed success in Latin America for a number of decades. The English version of El Chavo now numbers 70 episodes, each one dubbed by Jorge Arregui’s company. “The great contribution of Mexican industry to the world of dubbing has been that we not only translate but also adapt. Many countries in the region have their own idiomatic expressions but in Mexico we have been very careful to neutralize the language,” says Arregui. He adds that “Mexican actors are creative and versatile; they can come up with a

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

voice for any cartoon, animal or Disney character. They cry with the same intensity as the screen actor and take care with the language so that it can be understood throughout Latin America. Mexican dubbing is undoubtedly the most widely accepted.” With 25 employees, a portfolio of more than 500 voice actors, 25 dubbing directors and a similar number of translators, the company also dubs documentaries and programs for IMAX screens. Jorge Arregui recounts that 90% of dubbing production in Mexico is exported to the US and several European countries.

October 2014

“Fortunately, ProMéxico has created a section for creative companies and it’s beginning to provide support for other markets, for independent production companies, so that they can sell their products around the world,” says Arregui. The firm’s president emphasizes that new technologies and globalization will allow the Mexican dubbing industry to grow significantly in the coming years. For the time being, Dubbing House is already working on its own productions for cell phones, tablets and other mobile devices; the Internet trend has also led to a

“The great contribution of Mexican industry to the world of dubbing has been that we not only translate but also adapt. Many countries in the region have their own idiomatic expressions but in Mexico we have been very careful to neutralize the language,” says Arregui. new production line within the company itself. “We also work practically hand in hand with other Mexican production companies such as Ánima Estudios in order to compete as partners in other countries.” At the same time, the company leads the market for

dubbing in Mexico. “The best movies are dubbed in Mexico. Major film launches by Fox, Universal, Disney and Sony are dubbed here, along with the world’s best series and videogames,” concludes Arregui. N www.dubbinghouse.com.mx

45


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Kokonut Studio: When Everything Aligns in Your Favor The Mexican company Kokonut Studio has been listed by Apple as one of the best developers of games for mobile devices in Latin America.

46

photos

courtesy of kokonut studios

by antonio vázquez

It is possible that Benjamin Morales, co-founder of the Mexican creative company Kokonut Studio, never imagined that one day his creations would be among the best ranked by the American company Apple. In 2009, fresh out of college, Morales decided to start his own project that would include four other professionals also newly emerged from the classroom. The group formed Kokonut Studio and began working on what was in vogue at the time: multimedia. Soon, Benjamin Morales departed to Canada and other partners took their own di-

rections. But in 2011, they resumed the original project, now with a new purpose: to enter the world of apps and games for iPhone, Apple’s mobile phone. Kokonut Studio took a risk, creating a first game for Apple, which led to TechBA –a program of the US-Mexico Foundation for Science (FUMEC) based in Seattle, Washington, which supports talented companies– taking an interest in the work of Morales and his colleagues. In Seattle, the Kokonut team focused on learning a business model to leverage their creativity.

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Then, Chillingo, a leading global video games publishing company, became interested in Kokonut Studio and thus the success story for the Mexican company began. “The truth is that the stars were in alignment and we were very lucky. From there, we started working on a game called Sky Hero which went very well. In 2013, Apple selected Sky Hero as one of the best applications made in Latin America. With that we fulfilled one of our initial goals: to win credibility and create a First World product,” explains Benjamin Morales. Sky Hero is a game based on an episode from Mexican history. The “Niños Heroes” are well known in the country as a group of young Military Academy cadets who fought in September 1847 during the war between Mexico and the US. Juan Escutia, one of those cadets, has become an iconic figure in Mexican history; it is claimed he threw himself from the top of Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City, wrapped in the Mexican flag, rather than surrender to the advancing American troops. Sky Hero recreates the legend of Juan Escutia. In the video game developed by Kokonut Studio for the iPhone screen, the character who represents Juan Escutia throws himself from the castle, evades enemies and, as in any game, collects points.

October 2014

But Sky Hero had an added value which caught the attention of users. “We integrated a weather system. If you play in a city where it is raining, it rains in the game too; if it is snowing, it snows in the game also. That is what we were looking for and do now with our games: they integrate technology, the virtual world with reality,” Morales points out. Currently, Kokonut Studio is developing a couple of games that will be released between October 2014 and March 2015, for both iOS and Android. In addition, the company creates applications for clients such as McDonald’s, Playboy and Televisa –Mexico’s leading television company. Benjamin Morales notes that Mexico has a talent for creating games and apps for mobile devices and emphasizes that local talent is emerging across the country. “There is a great development in the industry in Mexico. Many US companies are turning to Mexico and see it as a good

developer, with a lot of talent. Before we had a lot of competition with South America, with countries like Colombia and Argentina, but that has been changing and will continue to change because the world increasingly sees us as good developers,” he says. According to Morales, the increasing use of mobile devices in Mexico will further boost the development of the sector and open the doors for companies in the US and Asia to settle in the country, which will result in increased employment. Today, with a team of over 20 people, Kokonut Studio is poised to become a leader in the development of apps and games around the globe. Among the company’s future plans are to venture into console games, which require investments to multiply fivefold. “It’s more expensive, with bigger development and there is more risk, but we want to stay ahead and continue to produce first class applications,” concludes Morales. N

“We integrated a weather system. If you play in a city where it is raining, it rains in the game too; if it is snowing, it snows in the game also. That is what we were looking for and do now with our games: they integrate technology, the virtual world with reality,” Morales points out.

www.kokonutstudio.com

47


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of mantiz game studios

The Global Career of Mantiz GAme Studios The video games created by this developer founded in the center of Mexico are downloaded across Asia and North America. Having understood the business to perfection, it is time to accelerate growth. by omar magaña

Mantiz Game Studios has built many bridges; the strongest of them links the Hidalgo State Science and Technology Park, in central Mexico, with the city of Vancouver, British Columbia in Western Canada. The Mexican company, which produces content for digital platforms, operates in both places and as a result has carved out valuable spaces for itself in the global market for video games and content for the commercial and educational sectors. Mantiz Game Studios aspired to internationalization since its creation in 2009. Joining the acceleration program for technology-based small and medium enterprises (SMEs) from Mexico (TechBA) in 2012 helped to clarify its

48

objectives and define the forms and processes to be followed to enter and survive in the global environment. “It has helped us a lot to establish the global market as our goal and to make applications and games with the quality expected by this market; it’s not about making just another App but one that makes a real impact,” says Camilo Islas Amador, CEO of Mantiz Game. TechBA, the business accelerator created by the USMexico Foundation for Science (FUMEC) with the aim of promoting Mexican SMEs that offer innovative value and potential to compete in global markets, hosted Mantiz Games at its headquarters in Vancouver.

“The dynamic and innovative digital media and videogames industry in British Columbia is recognized as a leader in design, development and animation. With more than 1,000 digital media companies, it generates revenue of 1.7 billion USD each year and shows annual growth rates of 30%,” reports the TechBA website. Two years after it began activities in Hidalgo, the founders of Mantiz Game approached TechBA during SME Week 2011. “We saw that we had the capacity to move forward and it has been a success,” recalls Islas. “That has enabled us to improve a huge range of processes and develop new products and services demanded by the international market,” he adds.

Since Mantiz Game joined TechBA, it has generated products that have been downloaded in Japan, South Korea, China and the US. The latter two nations have become its two largest consumers. An ally in the world According to Islas, the connection with ProMéxico has enabled Mantiz Game to get to the places where the business relevant to its industry is carried out. In 2012, it participated in the convention for professionals, Game Connection; in 2013 it also participated in GamesCom, in Cologne, Germany, where the company’s delegates conducted business with publishers who were interested in the firm, and in October

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

2014 it will attend international meetings where intellectual property and products are bought and sold. The Mantiz seal The name of the company (which refers to the Praying Mantis) expresses its purpose: “To provide experiences through technology, catch the target and not let it go.” With that premise, Mantiz Game has developed specialized applications for major brands and companies, including Liverpool, Sony Ericsson, British American Tobacco and Coca Cola. It offers two kinds of solutions for these firms. Firstly, advergames, a form of digital marketing that integrates consumers with the products and services of a company through playful platforms for mobile devices, or apps, which organizations use to offer differentiated services that are of great value to their market. Secondly, augmented reality, which is another useful way of providing the brands with a presence in the immediate surroundings of users, linked to new technologies. Mantiz Game also serves the education sector with applications and games that bring scientific knowledge to young people in a fun way. Those include Mighty Mike, which challenges the user’s knowledge of history; Experiments with Liquids, which gives the player information on the melting point, boiling point and density of various elements before challenging him, and others related to health sciences. Islas explains that there are three ways to monetize their products: by direct payment, through the downloadable content sold in the store of each application, or with advertising that is inserted into the free apps. Several of its products have achieved up to 1,400

October 2014

Several of Mantiz Game’s products have achieved up to 1,400 downloads on the day of publication and an average of 30,000 total downloads. Some like PiojoGoool, available for Android devices from June 27, 2014 –during World Cup fever–, have come close to 100,000 downloads. downloads on the day of publication and an average of 30,000 total downloads. Some like PiojoGoool, available for Android devices from June 27, 2014 –during World Cup fever–, have come close to 100,000 downloads. According to Islas, in 2014, Mantiz Game will complete two new games, one for a client and one of its own. Another important challenge before the end of 2014 is to achieve CMMI Level 2 certification “and thus enter the largest and most important markets,” says Islas. The company, he continues, should strengthen the line of business related to the development of its own video games for various platforms, including consoles. As an organization, Mantiz has consolidated its hu-

man capital. That has grown from two to 16 people, for whom game development has become a stable and formal mode of employment. That has been achieved, according to Islas, as a result of understanding how to capitalize in the field. “We need to create products, not only know how to program,” says Islas. It is here, he says, where the support of experts becomes important: in addition to promoting investment, they help generate the context for producing, selling and exporting. In Mexico it is crucial to generate these synergies, insists Islas. Opportunities for development “There are great expectations for Mexico and Latin America. In fact, large companies are

looking for intellectual property that can only be sold or can only be understood in Latin America,” says Islas. Increasingly, he asserts, multinational companies are looking for content specific to the region and for developers who understand the culture and can take charge of generating those products. However, in a region where the industry is still emerging, the challenge is to understand the tools and standards of the major economies and use those as a basis for production. Mantiz Game offers training workshops for young people interested in developing video games that are sold on the iOS, Android and Facebook platforms. “Soon we’ll have it online. We not only want young people from the region (Central Mexico) to come to work at Mantiz but also we want the industry to grow, for there to be many games companies because then it is easier to be noticed from abroad,” concludes Islas. N www.mantizgs.com

49


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of chico chihuahua

Chico Chihuahua, the Cartoon Character that Changed an Animator’s Life Chico Chihuahua has achieved cyberspace fame though animated films, comic strips and other creative products. As many as 70,000 users in Latin America and as far afield as Japan and Russia visit this cartoon dog’s site every month. by antonio vázquez

Designer and animation artist Blanca Ruiz graduated from the prestigious Iberoamericana University and began her professional career in graphic design, but in the back of her mind she still nurtured the idea to “create cartoon figures” that incarnated the idiosyncrasies of Mexican society.

50

And so, in 2010, she invented a character that was to change her life: Chico Chihuahua, a cartoon dog that gets mixed up in all kinds of adventures, always in the company of his six best friends. “I had a diploma from Oxford after publishing a bilingual Mexican cook book,

and that was when I created Chico Chihuahua. “Chico Chihuahua was a product of the dissertation I did for my Oxford diploma. I did a great deal of market research and realized there were no books for children in Mexico and Latin America that portrayed their cultures. All the charac-

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

ters that reach the region are imported. Not a single one reflects our own culture. That’s why I chose the Chihuahua, which everyone knows is a Mexican dog, and other characters like Pulga, a flea who lives in Chico Chihuahua’s fur. Both are friendly and cheerful, which are very Mexican attributes,” says Ruiz. Motherhood forced me to shelve the project for a couple of years but I took it up again and designed a simple site for Chico,” says Ruiz. It didn’t take long for Ruiz’ creation to reach 20,000 hits. Telcel, one of Mexico’s leading mobile phone companies, saw in Chico Chihuahua an excellent vehicle to market digital content to younger users.

October 2014

Chico Chihuahua has managed to sustain his popularity, receiving as many as 100,000 hits a month during high season (between May and November) and has just over 9,000 followers on Facebook.Approximately 80% of visitors to the Chico Chihuahua site are Mexican but there are also fans in other Latin American countries and as far afield as Japan and Russia. By then, however, Garfield producer Phil Roman had seen Chico Chihuahua on the Internet and contacted Ruiz. Roman, being a Mexican-American, liked Chico Chihuahua and gave her very good advice on how to further develop Chico Chihuahua. Ruiz took Roman’s advice and redesigned the Chico Chihuahua site in Spanish and English and in less than three weeks she had tallied 70,000 visitors. Chico Chihuahua has managed to sustain his popularity, receiving as many as 100,000 hits a month during high season (between May and November) and has just over 9,000 followers on Facebook. Approximately 80% of visitors to the Chico Chihuahua site are Mexican but there are also fans in other Latin American countries and as far afield as Japan and Russia. Although Ruiz has several graphic design projects on the go, her chirpy cartoon mutt takes up most of her time. In 2013, she launched an online store offering various Chico Chihuahua gift products like jewelry, plush toys, t-shirts and free content like postcards, comic strips, wallpapers, calendars and downloads for mobile devices, among others. “What I’m aiming to convey with Chico Chihuahua are positive values. The content targets mainly children aged 7-11 and tweens, kids from 11 to 13, and up,” says Ruiz, but we can say that the property is psicographic aiming at people

of any age and any cultural background but share the values of the brand. Her cute character has been adopted by a string of organizations, companies and government agencies, and even features in a guidebook for children on the Cholula, Puebla archaeological site in 2013 that reached over 100,000 kids Meanwhile, Chico Chihuahua is rehearsing for his first animated short film, in which he digs to the roots of Mexico’s Day of the Dead tradition in a funny way. “Chico Chihuahua is an entertainment brand. What I want people to see in him are the values of our own culture, not those imposed by others,” says Ruiz. The content of the Chico Chihuahua site is free but Ruiz is working on a Premium pay

zone, where users can purchase improved subscriptionbased products. Her plans for Chico’s future include the opening of a store in the Magical Town of Cholula, in Puebla, which receives some 700,000 visitors a year, more short films and even a television series starring her adorable cartoon dog. In September 2014, the company inked a licensing contract with Boston, Massachusetts based Bare Tree Media for the development and distribution of virtual products including stickers, Emojis and Emoticons, which will be distributed on instant messaging platforms, social networks and online and console games. Bare Tree Media’s network of social partners reaches more than 20 billion users worldwide. Among its portfolio of licensed brands are Garfield, Domo, Hello Kitty and SO SO Happy. “The partnership with Bare Tree Media will enable us to venture boldly into new markets; the brand will be communicated through emotions, using its characteristic humor. The concept will be easily exportable to new markets,” Blanca Ruiz concludes. N www.chico-chihuahua.com

51


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

infographic

oldemar

MEXICO AT MIPCOM 2014 MEXICO IS THE COUNTRY OF HONOR AT MIPCOM 2014 AND OVER 100 MEXICAN COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS RELATED TO THE CREATIVE AND MEDIA INDUSTRIES WILL PARTICIPATE IN THIS IMPORTANT EVENT.

Advertising/ Application Dubbing Official Online Portal/ PostProducer Rights TV Technology media Development organisation/ producer social production holder- channel provider agency association networks distributor

Adicta Films Alazraki Entertainment All About Media Altea Internacional Anima Estudios Argos Comunicación Arte Mecánica Producciones ANIAMEAD1 Avanti Pictures BluePrint Boxel interactive Bravo Films Brinca Taller de Animación Caaliope Cadereyta Media Calavera Films Camaleón Films CANIEM2 Canal 22 México Canal Once Caponeto Producciones Caramel VFX Chamán Animation Studio Chico Chihuahua Cluster Studio Colectivo Coronel3 Color Space Comarex Comtelsat Diecinueve Treinta y Seis Dir. de Cinematografía de Dgo. Dir. Gral. de TV. Educativa Don Porfirio 1Asociación Nacional de la Industria Audiovisual, Multimedia, Entretenimiento y Arte Digital / 2Cámara Nacional de la Industria Editorial Mexicana / 3Resonant TV Mexico

52

October 2014


Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Theatrical- Venture Licensing Kids & Docs & NonDrama/ Adult Music Sports Games Publishing Capital all rights teens factual scripted fiction/ content investor formats scripted format

HD

3D

SEDECO Jalisco 4 El Mall Epics FX Studios México Estudios Máquina Voladora ETC Media Group Éxodo Animation Studios Film Tank Filmalia Fly & Lovestory FPU Nexus Fremantlemedia Gasolina Studios GP Films Gyroscopik Studios Habitant Productions Industria Digital IMCINE Integradora Cinematográfica InterSAD/Red2play TV Irreversible Cinema5 Kaxan Media Group KW entertainment Lemon Films Lemon Media Locomoción Animaciones Los Cuates Films Los Ojos de mi Abuela Lumen Entertainment Mantiz Game Studios Mental Revolution Metacube Mexico Channel Mighty Studio 4Economic Development Secretariat of Jalisco / 5101 producciones

October 2014

53


Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Advertising/ Application Dubbing Official Online Portal/ PostProducer Rights TV Technology media Development organisation/ producer social production holder- channel provider agency association networks distributor

Milenio Televisión Milos Funky Studios Minotauro Producciones Modelarte | Efecto Secundario Multimedios Televisión Muv Experimento Ocelotl Company Univ. de Guadalajara TV6 Pisito Trece Producciones Pixelatl Presumiendo México Producciones Kamaleon Proteus International Radio Televisión de Veracruz Red México 7 Render Farm Studios Sansierra Studio Sidi Media Sin Sentido Films Radio y TV Mexiquense SPREM 8 Stella Flora Films Story: We produce 9 Sulafilms Taller de Luz Producciones Taller de Luz Producciones 10 The Dubbing House Transmedia Audiovisual Treehouse Army TV UNAM Vision TV Vitruvio Ingeniería Cultural WeAreNotZombies Weeping Willow Productions Z Grupo Creativo 6Operadora Sistema Universitario de Radio y Televisión/ 7Red de Radiodifusoras y Televisoras Educativas y Culturales de México / 8Sistema Público de Radio Difusión del Estado Mexicano / 9La Máquina Film and Tape / 10Efecto Luna Azul

Theatrical- Venture Licensing Kids & Docs & NonDrama/ Adult Music Sports Games Publishing Capital all rights teens factual scripted fiction/ content investor formats scripted format

54

HD

3D

October 2014


The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

The Lifestyle

photo

courtesy of pujol

Something’s Cooking: Seven Magical Mexican Restaurants

More a case of living to eat than eating to live, we bring you seven restaurants that tantalize the taste buds, some of which even feature on San Pellegrino’s list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. 65

56

The Lifestyle Briefs

60

Arty Accessories

58

Teodoro González de León, the Man Who Transformed Mexico City

62

“What’s Important is That a Film Elicits a Reaction in You” Kenya Márquez, filmmaker


The Lifestyle Briefs

ART

The Museum of Modern Art opened its doors on September 20, 1964, aspiring to house the biggest and most significant assemblage of art that depicts the evolution of the visual arts in Mexico. To date, the Museum has a collection of 2,688 works comprising the painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography and graphic art of 773 artists. Located in a privileged wooded area of Mexico City, Chapultepec Park, the site was built on lands that once housed the Museum of Flora and Fauna and later the Chapultepec Galleries and a children’s art school, the Escuela Dominical de Arte. The original design was the work of architects Pedro Ramírez Vázquez and Rafael Mijares, with predominant glass and steel and which, like the vocation that defines the Museum, sought to illustrate the modern side of the country. The Museum has shown the best of Mexican and international plastic aesthetics. It has received exhibitions from the likes of

photo courtesy of museum of modern art

Museum of Modern Art’s 50th Anniversary

sculptor Henry Moore, French painter Pierre Soulages, the Settecento Veneziano, the Tesoros de San Marco, from Venice, and others. It has featured an array of exhibitions that has given millions of people access to Mexican and universal art. The exhibitions 50 Years/50 Works, Pedro Ramírez Vázquez. Inédito y funcional (Unpublished and Functional), and Carteles del MAM, are part of the celebration. 50 Years/50 Works comprises 50 canonic paintings and sculptures from 36 artists that

evoke the major art trends of the first half of the 20th century. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez. Inédito y funcional is the first retrospective that focuses on architect Ramírez Vázquez’s ability to lead interdisciplinary teams, and to reconcile an overwhelmingly public career and fresh artistic creativity. Finally, Carteles del MAM outlines the cultural history of the Museum through publicity material from its Documentation Center.

In recent years, we’ve seen an upsurge in the number of Mexican designers, not just of clothes but of furniture and accessories, who are turning to their roots in search of inspiration. The resulting fusion

of old and new has paved the way for a reappraisal of the cultural and artistic traditions of Mexico’s indigenous peoples.

www.museoartemoderno.com

DESIGN

Designer Elissa Medina has launched a series of collector’s rugs that take their inspiration from the psychedelic art of the Huichol, an indigenous group from West Mexico. First shown in 2013 at the Mexican Design Open, these brightly colored rugs measuring 250 x 200 centimeters take the form of animal pelts in reference to the hunting traditions of the Huichol. Medina’s geometrical designs are computer-based, meticulously mapped out pixel by pixel with mathematical precision and then hand embroidered and assembled according to the collector’s color preferences. These are strong pieces that lend a room character and that are often the lynchpin of interior design projects, serving as the focal point around which everything else in the space is planned.

56

photo santiago cassarino

Huichol Rug, A Collector’s Piece

www.elissamedina.com

October 2014


The Lifestyle Briefs

DESIGN

The United Kingdom will be the guest country at Design Week Mexico 14, an event established in 2009 to promote design and creativity as values that contribute to social, economic, and cultural development. From October 14-18, Mexico City will be hosting some 100 activities geared toward architects, industrial, graphic and interior designers, and students, while the organizers are anticipating a turnout of over 150,000 visitors this year. A highlight of the event will be the opening of the DWM Pavilion at the Tamayo, where the architect Alejandro Castro will be leading an intervention of the museum’s back garden in an exercise that combines art, design, and architecture. Design House is another exercise in which 16 architecture studios will be putting forward restoration and interior design ideas for an abandoned house in the city’s Lomas de Chapultepec district. Finally, Anna Karlín, Christopher Sharp,

photo archive

Design Week Mexico 14

Matthew Hilton, Michael George Hemus, Nigel Alkinson, Tom Dixon, Sir John Sorrell, and Russell Pinch will be giving conferences at the Tamayo and Modern Art

museums in Mexico City as part of Design Week’s program of activities. www.designweekmexico.com

ART

Maya Festival Down South

photo ralf peter reimann

“Architecture in the Time and Space of the Mayab” is to be the theme of the 3rd International Festival of Maya Culture (FIC Maya), which will take place on October 17-26 in Yucatán. Guatemala and the state of Campeche in Southern Mexico will be the guests of honor at the event, whose purpose is to showcase the richness of the Maya culture, which remains very much alive in Southeast Mexico and Central America. Literary activities, performances, music and academic sessions look set to make for an action-packed festival, which will kick off at the stunning archaeological site of Dzibilchaltún –a city founded in 500 BC and inhabited right up until the Spanish Conquest in 1540– before traveling on to 60 venues throughout the state of Yucatán. www.ficmaya.com

October 2014

57


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photos

Teodoro González de León, the Man Who Transformed Mexico City A man who has revolutionized Mexican architecture at the ripe age of 88, Teodoro González de León admits it takes some effort not to repeat himself. by antonio vázquez

Architect, painter, sculptor, and author of several books, Teodoro González de León (Mexico City, 1926) is the quintessential artist. And although his talents encompass almost every genre, he has chosen to apply them to architecture, creating an empire that has transformed Mexico City’s skyline.

58

González de León has designed buildings with unmistakable lines, shapes, and textures; grandiose, abstract, modern buildings that lend Mexico’s capital its unique identity. A revolutionizing force in Mexican architecture, his faithful companion, the pencil, became an indispensable tool when he

archive

witnessed the building of artist Diego Rivera’s home and studio in the 1920s, under the creative direction of Juan O’Gorman, another icon of contemporary Mexican architecture. Later, it was the Architecture Faculty at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that was to map out González de León’s career, while a scholarship from the French government allowed him to develop a style all his own. A disciple of Mario Pani in Mexico and Le Corbusier in France, he has sculpted large sections of Mexico City’s urban landscape with stone, walls, beams, and light. During the two years he worked with Le Corbusier, he claims the most valuable lesson he learned was that “architecture is a silent craft.” González de León also teamed up with another giant of Mexican architecture, Abraham Zabludovsky, for a time. The in-

October 2014


The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Minimalist blocks, chiseled concrete, and respect for the colossal works of Pre-Columbian Mexico are his leitmotifs, while materials, structure, and dimensions form an equation that always balances out perfectly in his works. fluence of both architects can be seen in the central offices of the National Workers Housing Fund Institute (INFONAVIT), the Mexican embassy in Brazil, El Colegio de México, the Rufino Tamayo Museum, and the Nacional Auditorium, which they renovated and extended. The Federal Courthouse, the headquarters of the Fondo de Cultura Económica –an important publishing house– and the National Pedagogical University (UPN) are other buildings that bear González de León’s inimitable mark. Minimalist blocks, chiseled concrete, and respect for the colossal works of Pre-Columbian Mexico are his leitmotifs, while materials, structure, and dimensions

October 2014

form an equation that always balances out perfectly in his works. Among the many awards he has taken home over the years are the National Arts Prize (1982), the Grand Prize at the Sofia Biennial in Bulgaria (1988), and Winner of the Buenos Aires Biennial in Argentina (1991). In interview in August 2014, on the threshold of reaching 90 years of age, González de León acknowledged that every project poses a challenge. The reason? “Architecture is difficult if you want to do something new and not repeat yourself. I keep accumulating experience and that makes it all the harder,” he has been quoted as saying. N

59


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

Arty Accessories Georgina Treviño and Ana Bárbara Núñez are two Mexican designers who have found in jewelry making a means of expressing their creative talents with pieces that add a special touch to any outfit.

Georgina Treviño Object Gems

Globalization and the growing popularity of social media have put the world at our fingertips and fashion has been one of the creative areas to benefit most, especially in Mexico, where access to the Internet has produced increasingly sophisticated collections. The craft of jewelry making is no exception, as Georgina Treviño and Ana Bárbara Núñez, two talented designers from North Mexico, go to prove.

Treviño has launched three collections to date: Arquitectura, which is inspired by geometrical lines and works of architecture; Querida obsidiana, the product of a trip to the Cantona archaeological site in Puebla, where she came upon several obsidian stones, and Somos una piedra preciosa, in which her raw materials are the stones she has found and collected. At the moment, she is working on a collection that incorporates alternative materials like cement, steel, and wood. Working with other designers and artists has allowed her to enrich her outlook and creative process. “My inspiration comes from people I admire, architecture, books, photography, art, and geometry. I’m particularly interested in spaces, shapes, lines.” www.trevinojoyeria.com

photo courtesy of georgina treviño

In the early 20th century, Marcel Duchamp coined the term objet trouvé, which basically refers to the use of everyday objects for artistic purposes. It is a concept Georgina Treviño appears to have discovered for herself as a young girl, when she would play at making necklaces, earrings, and bracelets out of stones, pieces of glass, and bits of wood she’d found. In time, her love of jewelry evolved into a vocation and in 2011 she founded her own jewelry Brand in which she combines unusual objects and materials with silver and other metals to create minimalist, contemporary pieces. “I’ve had a passion for jewelry since I was a girl, when I’d make my own jew-

elry out of stones and objects I’d found. My curiosity gradually grew and I took an art course at the University of San Diego, California, with a specialty in silver and goldsmithing,” she says. A native of Tijuana, Baja California, Treviño is constantly on the hunt for new techniques and materials for her creations. Silver, gold plate, and tin are her staples but she has been known to incorporate stones and minerals like quartz and obsidian, whose multifarious shapes and properties she finds fascinating. “I like to incorporate objects I’ve come across by chance, like stones, and explore their shapes. Manipulating an object and presenting it in a fresh context imbues it with meanings other to those we usually associate with it,” she says.

by karla bañuelos

60

October 2014


photo courtesy of ana bárbara núñez

Ana Bárbara Núñez On the Trail of Lola Bassó Bees with bright blue, yellow, and purple bellies, petrified by delicate hands. A black pearl engaging in dialogue with a pink amethyst. A climbing plant that makes its way up the side of an ear. A golden spider’s web adorning an arm. Gold seahorses swimming up long fingers. Knives that hang alongside shiny skulls. Those tongue in cheek pieces with a hint of the obscure are the trademark of Lola Bassó, a jewelry firm that is on the tip of everyone’s tongue in Mexico’s fashion circles. The creative force behind the company is Ana Bárbara Núñez, who studied jewelry design in Barcelona and Milan and has earned herself a name for the fine craftsmanship of her pieces, fashioned out of silver, gold, and semiprecious stones. “Jewelry has always been present in my life. When I was very young, my mother showed me all the jewelry that’s been in my family for years; pieces with sentimental value. To mark special occasions, my parents would sometimes give me a ring, bracelet,

October 2014

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

or necklace. I think a piece of jewelry helps immortalize an important moment in life,” says Ana Bárbara, whose collections borrow from her surroundings and landmark moments in her life. Born in Mexicali, her first collection was inspired by the Baja California desert and features figures like snakes and spider’s webs in ocher and gold, while pearls in pastel shades are the protagonists of her most recent one. “My collections reflect where I’m at in my life. My style changes with me. Right now I’m working more with pearls, precious and semiprecious stones; something more modern.” A look at her catalogue reveals an interesting selection of pendants, necklaces, rings, earrings, ear cuffs, and quirky acrylic clutches with appliqués featuring pop icons. “Mexican design has come a long way. There are several jewelry firms whose good design and craftsmanship have helped build Mexico a very solid reputation,” says Núñez. www.lolabasso.com

61


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photo

courtesy of ficg28 / eugenia isfi

“What’s Important is That a Film Elicits a Reaction in You” Kenya Márquez, filmmaker She hasn’t yet turned 45, but already she’s worn the hats of screenwriter, director, and festival organizer. Polanski marked her and Almodóvar showed her the way forward.

by pola sáenz

Maybe it was the wig, the deep blue shadow, the red of Roman’s lips. A deserted street in Paris. The chiaroscuro. The blood on his hands. Or maybe there was more to it than that. But one day Kenya Márquez saw Polanski’s The Tenant in a film appreciation class and it changed the course of her life. Previously unimagined paths opened up before her eyes. Rejected by more than one film school, she’d turned her hand to journalism. Years later, the burning desire to make films drove her to test her luck on the other side of the Atlantic, where she worked as a telephone operator. It wasn’t until she met Pedro Almodóvar in a phone booth in Spain and asked for his advice that she took the first flight back to Mexico to “write her films and get them off the ground.” Director, producer, and screenwriter Kenya Márquez (Guadalajara, 1972) studied Communications Sciences at the Valle

62

de Atemajac University and screen writing at the Film Training Center (CCC). Her first short film, Cruz (1997), won Best First Film at the 1st Mexico City International Short Film Festival in 1998 and the following year was nominated for an Ariel in the category of Best Fictional Short. In 2001, La mesa servida (2000) was chosen as Best Comedy at the New York Shorts International Film Festival and nominated one of the six best short films at the 3rd Belo Horizonte International Short Film Festival. In 2007, Señas particulares (2006), a prelude to her first feature, won the Jalisco Film Academy Award at the 22nd Guadalajara International Film Festival and the Palmita EFM Award for Best Short Film at the 5th Franco-Mexican Film Festival. Márquez made her feature debut with Fecha de caducidad (2011), which won more than a dozen awards in several categories –directing, photography, acting,

sound– at Morelia, Miami, Cine-Ceará (in Fortaleza, Brazil), Moscow, Vancouver, Valladolid, Trieste, Huelva, and Marseille. She also directed the documentary El secreto de Candita (2001) and produced the short film Epílogo (2009) and the feature length documentary Voces del subterráneo (2009). At 30, she was appointed director of the Guadalajara International Film Festival, a position she held for four years (2002-2005). She has also sat on the juries of numerous festivals in Mexico and abroad and taught audiovisual arts at several universities. More recently, she was awarded a screenwriting bursary by the Mexican Film Institute for her project Asfixia, which tells the story of an albino woman who has done time and who makes friends with a hypochondriac. “I want to address the subject of discrimination with a touch of black humor,” says Márquez.

October 2014


photos archive

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

—How did you become interested in film as a profession? It was circumstantial. I started out in journalism, where I initially covered police reports and later politics and entertainment and sports too. I traveled a lot. Back then, I realized I was constantly observing people. I’d listen in on their conversations, take note of their behavior. Sometimes I’d even ask them things that had nothing to do with the story I was covering. I found myself writing stories about the people I’d interviewed. It was a way of telling stories but totally unpremeditated. —Do you remember the first film or film experience that marked you? I started working as a journalist while I was studying Communications Sciences. It was there, at university, that I saw Roman Polanski’s The Tenant during a film appreciation class. It was a watershed for me. I left

October 2014

that class knowing without a shadow of a doubt that I wanted to make films, a dream that took me a long time to realize because I was turned away by several film schools in Mexico and abroad. I backpacked around Europe to see if I could make it, but had no luck. Until one day I bumped into Pedro Almodóvar in a phone booth in Spain and told him I wanted to study film but couldn’t get into a school. He replied categorically, “Go back to your country.” I was working as a telephone operator at the time and decided to take his advice and get the first flight back to Mexico, where I got down to writing my films and getting them off the ground. I started taking filmmaking more seriously while I was in journalism. I read a lot of books on the language of film. I’ve always been a film buff and avid festivalgoer. I’d watch movies from the Golden Age of Mexican film with my grandmother and international films with my mother.

“Discrimination is a constant in my stories; that cruel part of humans, how we discriminate against people because of trivialities like the way someone dresses, their economic situation, their behavior. I like to tackle social subjects subtly, so it doesn’t seem like I’m lecturing.”

63


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photos

archive

—How would you define your style? Journalism gave me the sensitivity to be a good observer. It helped me tell the stories of people who are all around us. I like marginalized characters, the ones you hardly ever see. Aside from Polanski, other films and directors that have influenced me are Tom Tykwer’s María Mortal and Bergman, especially Cries and Whispers, the Taviani brothers, Kaurismäki, Visconti, and Buñuel, who marked me from an early age. Krzysztof Kieslowski, in terms of sensations and depth. He’s very incisive without being obvious. I’m more of a classicist, although I tend to veer towards unique narratives and characters. —What kind of stories are you interested in telling? My time as a news reporter left its mark on me. It made me who I am. My dark side, my sense of black humor largely stems from there. Discrimination is a constant in my stories; that cruel part of humans, how we discriminate against people because of trivialities like the way someone dresses, their economic situation, their behavior. I like to tackle social subjects subtly, so it doesn’t seem like I’m lecturing.

photo courtesy of short shorts méxico

I filmed my first project, Cruz, in 1997, based on a script I’d worked on with Alfonso Suárez. The theme of the film is matriarchy and it’s inspired by several places in Guadalajara where I once lived. The film did really well. It was screened at some 60 festivals and won several awards. In a manner of speaking, it was my cinematic coming of age. It allowed me to realize that pre-production and being on set made me happy. I’d found my path.

“Journalism gave me the sensitivity to be a good observer. It helped me tell the stories of people who are all around us. I like marginalized characters, the ones you hardly ever see.”

64

photo archive

—What do you see on the horizon for Mexico’s film industry? Right now, comedy is the strength of the Mexican film industry but there’ll be other filmmakers who’ll make different kinds of movies and I think diversity is what matters most. I think there should be films for every audience and there will always be films that reflect our reality. What’s important is that a film elicits a reaction in you, no matter what that reaction is. N

October 2014


The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Something’s Cooking: Seven Magical Mexican Restaurants More a case of living to eat than eating to live, we bring you seven restaurants that tantalize the taste buds, some of which even feature on San Pellegrino’s list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. by antonio vázquez

If you’re traveling in Mexico and don’t take the time to sit down at a good restaurant and sample some regional fare, you could almost be accused of committing a culinary crime. Mexicans love their food and like all good hosts, love sharing it with their guests.

The choice of dishes is endless but all have one thing in common: their ingredients are tied to the land, so much so that you can practically taste the local weather and soil. We bring you seven restaurants that can be incorporated into a delicious itinerary. Some have revolutionized local dishes and

brought Mexican cuisine international fame, while others have created unique sensations and experiences for those eager to explore new culinary horizons, and yet others remain true to the traditional flavors and textures of Mexico. All, however, are guaranteed to leave a pleasant aftertaste!

mutton mixiote accompanied with onion and prickly pear with panela cheese; tuna with pumpkin seeds, vegetables and a chiliinfused oil; Veracruz-style squid with beans and guajolotas, sandwiches made with home baked bread that are best washed down with a tasty house mezcal. Or how about some deep fried veal tacos to whet the appetite? Or if you’re vegetarian,

a bowl of soup made with chipilin leaves, purslane and other wild greens, served with chochoyotes (balls of corn dough) and sprinkled with fresh cheese.

A descendent of Dionisio Mollinedo, founder of the famous Café de Tacuba where Mexico City dwellers have been coming for over a century, Juan Pablo Ballesteros Canales has left his own mark on the city’s culinary landscape with Limosneros, a restaurant where “the protagonists are the raw ingredients and our mission as cooks is to bring out their best.” Limosneros reveres every ingredient that goes into its dishes, which are served in the perfect ambiance, in a big old house on Allende Street in the Historic Center of Mexico City. Boasting elements of traditional Mexican art, like blown glass from Tonalá, plates made of Talavera pottery from Puebla, Huichol handicrafts and works by famous Mexican artists, the sturdy walls of this restaurant are made of a mixture of volcanic, quarry and other stones, like the impenetrable bulwarks of the monasteries of New Spain, and like them, are steeped in history. But the comparison goes beyond that, for Limosneros is a veritable place of worship for the gourmand. The concept was created by Juan Pablo Ballesteros himself, but the menu was designed with the help of chefs Lula Martín del Campo and Octavio Figueroa, along with food historian José Luis Curiel. Guests can choose from a variety of traditional Mexican dishes with a contemporary twist, like

October 2014

photo courtesy of limosneros

Limosneros A Tradition Revolutionized

Allende 2 Historic Center Mexico City www.limosneros.com.mx

65


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photos

courtesy of angelopolitano

Angelopolitano Simply Heavenly There’s one thing everyone loves about Puebla and that’s its food. And in the capable hands of Chef Gerardo Quezada, the gastronomy of this central Mexican state is baked, grilled, fried and roasted into works of art. Quezada has brought a little piece of Puebla to Mexico City with his restaurant Angelopolitano, located in the city’s Roma district. Mole, a type of salsa made with chili peppers, chocolate, peanuts and a whole host of other ingredients, is Puebla’s signature dish but Angelopolitano has tweaked the original recipe to produce fig, blackcurrant and guava varieties. Normally served with chicken, here they are poured liberally over sugar cane desserts and chicken breasts stuffed with goat’s cheese and green apple. Another specialty guaranteed to send you into raptures are the chalupas, (fried tortillas with pork loin smothered in red or green salsa), but nothing beats the house specialty: champandongo, a baked chicken loaf with mole, cheese, cream and tortillas, served with salad. On the ground floor is a small bar that serves cemitas, a type of bread bun that Puebla is famous for, made with water and rye. Generally filled with some kind of meat like escalope, beef in brine, chorizo or even Biscayan-style codfish, they are served with fresh cheese, avocado, tomato, onion, chipotle chili and a type of leafy green herb called pápalo. Puebla 371 Colonia Roma Mexico City +52 (55) 6391 2121 / 6391 2020

66

October 2014


The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Pangea A Harmonious Culinary Kingdom Aromas, colors, flavors, textures… a delicate mix of ingredients harmoniously combined in dishes that leave the most discerning of gourmands open mouthed. This is Pangea, a restaurant in Monterrey, in the northern state of Nuevo León, owned by Chef Guillermo González Beristáin. And according to the San Pellegrino list, it’s right up there among Latin America’s best Over the course of his studies in California, Madrid and Paris, González Beristán has acquired both the patience and knowledge to allow him to marry traditional, indigenous Mexican dishes with European haute cuisine. Pangea’s main menu features delicacies like fresh red snapper on a bed of red risotto with baby scallops and Moroccan crab salsa; breast of roast duck with pumpkin raviolis, red wine salamis and basil emulsion; crispy deboned roast pig served with hominy stew, accompanied by a salsa of roast green peppers and powdered beans. This particular chef also happens to be a big wine lover, so it should come as no surprise that Pangea has a fantastic selection of Mexican labels. Bosques del Valle 110-20 Colonia del Valle San Pedro Garza García, Nuevo León

photos

courtesy of pangea

www.grupopangea.com

October 2014

67


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photos

courtesy of pujol

Pujol World Class Culinary Perfection Located in an exclusive area of the Polanco district of Mexico City, Pujol was rated number 20 on San Pellegrino’s most recent list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Its proud owner is acclaimed Mexican chef Enrique Olvera, who is making international culinary history. Attention to detail is Olvera’s signature ingredient, and he has created innovative dishes that blend contemporary gastronomy with Mexico’s ancestral recipes. In its quest for perfection, Pujol is constantly reinventing itself. The menu is changed periodically, reflecting the chef’s latest sources of inspiration and experiments in the kitchen. A typical tasting menu might include chia seed aguachile (shrimp cooked in

68

lime and chili) served with avocado and salt, dried mezcal worms and peppers; curly cabbage cracklings; corncobs with leaf-cutter ant, coffee and costeño chili mayonnaise; roast leek with escamoles (ant larvae) and bone marrow mayonnaise; lobster and chorizo tacos; beans and pepperleaf; barbacoa taco with marinated avocado leaves, peas, cocoa and poblano chili, or smoked mushroom tacos with tomato seeds, cress and griddlewarmed tortillas.

Francisco Petrarca 254 Polanco Mexico City www.pujol.com.mx

October 2014


The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

photos

Biko stands on Masaryk, a busy avenue in the upscale Polanco district of Mexico City. Here, the flavors and cultures of Spain and Mexico come together on a small piece of hallowed ground. “Cocina Gachupa [in Mexico, Spaniards who have settled in the country are referred to as gachupines] is a cuisine that is an honest reflection of our reality. Neither traditional Mexican nor thoroughbred Basque, it is a type of Mexican cuisine that starts now and that is going to continue developing freely,” reads the Manifesto of Gachupa Cuisine written by Gerard Bellver, Bruno Oteiza and Mikel Alonso, the trio of chefs who have built Biko into a one-of-a-kind gastronomic nation. After two decades wooing the most demanding of palates, Biko’s menu has evolved into an amalgamation of traditional Basque cuisine and Mexican ingredients adapted to modern international gastronomic trends. The kind of cuisine that evokes emotions and moods. Madness, freedom, passion and affection have all been known to invade the serene atmosphere of this restaurant, where memories can be triggered by a cotton candy foie gras with a hint of tomato; a cream of amaranth soup with pigweed and goosefoot; pork chops with

courtesy of biko

Biko Food with Feeling

tomato and pork cracklings; crab with tomato and capers, or a codfish tortilla, among other culinary delights. And to round off, chocolate and coconut mousse; chocolate and sesame-seed truffles; a chocolate, peanut and hominy dessert or crunchy sheep’s cheese scented with eucalyptus.

Just take a look around at the expressions on people’s faces. There’s no denying this is food with feeling! Presidente Masaryk 407 Polanco, Mexico City www.biko.com.mx

October 2014

chili, tomato and cream cheese, and roast duck tacos smothered in green salsa. Follow up with a cold avocado and melon soup, black mole, Mixtec-style lamb and purslane in a chili and garlic sauce or a traditional tlayuda, which is basically a large tortilla spread with beans and cheese, served with barbecued rib eye. And to put the icing on the cake, perhaps some chocolate rolls filled with soursop mousse or a mango dessert with tree chili and goat’s cheese mousse. Casa Oaxaca is definitely a special experience that engages all five senses. Constitución 104-A Centro Oaxaca, Oaxaca

photo

Casa Oaxaca is a restaurant, but it’s also a hotel where you can chill out, get some fresh air and revel in the irresistible smells wafting out of Chef Alejandro Ruiz’ kitchen. Rated one of the best restaurants in Latin America, Casa Oaxaca seduces the palates of its guests with the flavors of Oaxaca, one of the Mexican states with the most varied cuisines. During his time as head chef of Casa Oaxaca, Ruiz has devoted himself to enhancing the region’s traditional cuisine with the use of organic ingredients. For starters, crickets are a must. Or how about shredded veal served on thin slices of fried sweet potato? Other regional treats include cricket tacos with fresh cheese; bean pasta; a delicious salsa made with morita

courtesy of casa oaxaca

Casa Oaxaca Food and Lodgings Under One Roof

www.casaoaxacaelrestaurante.com

69


Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

photos

courtesy of alcalde

Alcalde Simple, but Sensual In less than two years, Alcalde has become a culinary mainstay of Guadalajara, known for offering its guests simple, but sensual food. Named after one of the city’s more famous fruit and vegetable markets near the neighborhood where Chef Francisco Ruano grew up, Alcalde’s mission is to rescue the region’s mestizo flavors in dishes that incorporate local ingredients like corn, vegetables, beans, red meats, seafood and pork. Chefs and co-owners Ruano and Luis González Rodríguez make it their business to enthrall their guests with beautifully presented, colorful dishes that taste as good as they smell and that leave you wanting to try everything else on the menu. Home cured meat in a roast chili salsa and powdered mushrooms; chochoyotas (balls of corn dough) with wormseed and almond martejada, mushroom purée and fresh cheese; cricket sopes and marinated prickly pear are just some of the entrées to get you started on what, in all likelihood, will turn out to be a long-term love affair. One of Alcalde’s most popular dishes is crispy roast pig covered in a thick green chili sauce and served with baby squash salad and spicy leaves or you can order the catch of the day done just how you like it. Avenida México 2903 Vallarta Norte Guadalajara, Jalisco alcalde.com.mx

70

October 2014


Negocios ProMéxico

foto

archivo

Para Exportadores

Innovación:

motor de la industria en México En la actualidad, la creación, difusión y aplicación del conocimiento son imprescindibles para que las empresas y los países prosperen en una economía mundial cada vez más competitiva. 84

Puebla:

capital de la innovación y el diseño

75

MéXICO EN EL MUNDO 76

Los centros de datos y su importancia en una economía digital

Tendencias y oportunidades de negocio en México y América Latina

78

El pulso de una industria de tradición

80

LAS ESTRATEGIAS DE APERTURA COMERCIAL EN MEDIO ORIENTE

82

Innovación y comercio electrónico en México

86

De México para el mundo, orgullo que se exporta

88


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

de proméxico. La innovación y el emprendimiento son componentes esenciales para afianzar el desempeño de las empresas, además de que inciden directamente en el crecimiento y desarrollo de los países. En esta edición se publican algunas reflexiones sobre la importancia de la innovación, sobre todo si alguna empresa desea extender sus operaciones a otros mercados o está interesada en concretar su diversificación comercial. Asimismo, se incluye un análisis relacionado con el comercio electrónico en México, en el que se destacan algunas de sus implicaciones y perspectivas a futuro. México se ha convertido en uno de los mercados más prósperos en América Latina, por lo que deberá seguirse con detenimiento la evolución del comercio, así como de las transacciones electrónicas que se realizan en el país. El Premio Nacional de Exportación es una ceremonia anual muy importante en la que se entregan varios reconocimientos a empresas, instituciones y organizaciones que han destacado en el país mediante proyectos o iniciativas comerciales de vanguardia. La entrega de premios se realizó en el marco del XXI Congreso del Comercio Exterior Mexicano donde se galardonaron a los empresarios mexicanos que han contribuido a posicionar a México en el exterior, con productos y servicios de calidad global.

También se publica una interesante reflexión sobre las oportunidades comerciales de México en los países de Medio Oriente, sobre todo al considerar la estrategia de diversificación de mercados en la que pueden participar las empresas mexicanas que tengan consolidada su relación comercial en otras latitudes. El mercado árabe está compuesto por una población en constante crecimiento, la cual está demandando productos que México podría proveer de forma categórica, por lo que el acercamiento con los países de esta región será cada vez más cercano y tenderá a consolidarse en los próximos años. Se incluye una nota sobre la Feria Nacional para la Industria del Agave (ProAgave) en la que participarán alrededor de 100 empresas del sector. Este espacio es un punto de encuentro para industriales, empresarios, cámaras y asociaciones vinculadas con el agave, además de promover un encuentro de negocios, ciclos de conferencias y áreas de vinculación para el público asistente. Por último, se publica un breve ensayo sobre la relevancia de los centros de datos para la economía digital en el que se enfatizan las oportunidades de estos nodos de información para las pequeñas y medianas empresas establecidas en México, así como en otros países de América Latina. Esperemos que los contenidos incluidos en esta edición sean de su interés.

¡Bienvenidos a Negocios ProMéxico!

72

Octubre 2014


BREVES INDUSTRIAS CREATIVAS

foto

A Shaded View On Fashion Film (ASVOFF) es un festival internacional de cine y moda que se originó hace seis años en el Centro Pompidou de París, Francia. Este evento se presenta en diversas capitales del mundo. A la fecha, ha recorrido tres continentes en ciudades como Nueva York, Cannes, Londres, Tokio y Milán. Este año llega a la Ciudad de México. Este innovador festival fue fundado por Diane Pernet, conocida crítica de moda y escritora del blog A Shaded View On Fashion –uno de los blogs de moda más reconocidos en el mundo. Durante el festival se presentarán los cortometrajes ganadores de la primera convocatoria que ASVOFF ha hecho en México. Diane Pernet hará una pre-selección y los ganadores serán determinados por el jurado constituido por Gabriel Orozco, Michel Mallard, Enrique Badulescu, Zélika García, Paco Blancas, Michel Franco y Ariadne Grant.

cortesía asvoff

ASVOFF en México

En paralelo, se impartirá un ciclo de conferencias sobre temas diversos, como la moda en México. Algunos de los conferencistas invitados son Alberto Kalach, Frida Escobedo, Mauricio Rocha, Michel

Rojkind, Tatiana Bilbao, Gustavo Prado, Jorge Bolado, Yoshua Okón, Moisés Cosio y Gerardo Gatica, entre otros. asvoff-mexico.com

COMERCIO EXTERIOR

foto

Durante el XXI Congreso del Comercio Exterior Mexicano “Evolución del Comercio Exterior Mexicano ante un Mercado Global”, efectuado el 5 de septiembre de 2014 en Mazatlán, Sinaloa, Valentín Diez Morodo, Presidente del Consejo Empresarial Mexicano de Comercio Exterior, Inversión y Tecnología (COMCE), ante más de mil congresistas, exhortó a la clase política a trabajar unida para impulsar el crecimiento económico, así como la generación de empresas y empleos. Durante este evento, se destacó la relevancia del Programa Estratégico para el Desarrollo Económico de Sinaloa, el cual contempla crear más infraestructura para el puerto de Mazatlán, con el propósito de impulsar su vínculo comercial con países asiáticos, además de la costa oeste de Estados Unidos. Al discutir el tema de las recientes reformas estructurales, se habló sobre su impacto

cortesía puerto de mazatlán

Celebra COMCE el XXI Congreso del Comercio Exterior Mexicano

en el desarrollo industrial, además de resaltar el papel representativo de Sinaloa en la producción agrícola y pesquera. Al respecto, se analizó la evolución y las perspectivas de la economía mexicana, considerando el entorno internacional. También se analizó la función de las aduanas y el programa de modernización en proceso. Se explicaron algunos de los objetivos contemplados para las aduanas del país, los cuales están dirigidos a facilitar el comercio exterior de México. Se analizó el impacto y la relevancia de los acuerdos de libre comercio suscritos por México, sobre todo al referirse a los alcances que ha tenido el Tra-

tado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN) a 20 años de haber entrado en vigor. Asimismo, se hizo alusión al Acuerdo Económico suscrito con la Unión Europea, a los retos que propone la Alianza del Pacífico, así como a la relevancia del Acuerdo de Asociación Transpacífico (TPP), entre otros mecanismos comerciales y/o de integración. Por último, se explicó cuál es la relevancia de los apoyos de instituciones que ofrece ProMéxico y Bancomext en apoyo al comercio exterior e internacionalización de empresas mexicanas. comce.org.mx


foto

archivo

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

Puebla:

capital de la innovación y el diseño En Puebla se concertó un proyecto de innovación social, económica y cultural que nace de una voluntad común entre los gobiernos municipal, estatal y federal –a través de ProMéxico–, universidades y sociedad civil, con el propósito de promover al pensamiento creativo y al diseño como componentes estratégicos para impulsar el desarrollo económico. por proméxico

Puebla es una ciudad con una gran vocación para impulsar su desarrollo económico a través del diseño. Hoy, la ciudad busca consolidar la economía creativa aprovechando la combinación de su tradición industrial y el potencial académico concentrado en todo el estado, para vincular a diseñadores con empresarios e industrias productivas y, de esta forma, contribuir a incrementar la actividad económica y el empleo, así como a generar mayores oportunidades. Tal como lo ha señalado Marco Bettiol, investigador de Universidad de Padova y Jefe de la Unidad de Creatividad del Centro de Estudios sobre Tecnologías en Sistemas de Inteligencia Distribuida (TeDIS), el diseño se está convirtiendo en la expresión sintética de una serie de procesos de gestión, incluyendo la innovación de productos, comunicaciones, canales de distribución y formas de interacción con

Octubre 2014

los clientes, y está adquiriendo un papel central para el rediseño y la reestructura de los productos y la generación de cadenas de valor. A partir del segundo semestre de 2014, se emprendió el rediseño de la estrategia regional Puebla: Capital de la Innovación y el Diseño –en la que participan los gobiernos municipal, estatal y federal (a través de ProMéxico)–, con base en los siguientes ejes rectores: talento; vocación productiva; infraestructura; urbanismo y tecnologías de la información; comunicación y posicionamiento. El proyecto Puebla: Capital de la Innovación y el Diseño busca: • Posicionar a Puebla a nivel nacional e internacional, como una metrópoli en la cual se vive un entorno creativo inmerso en un ecosistema de diseño. • Fomentar el aprovechamiento del potencial creativo, social y económico de

las colectividades y fomentar la diversidad cultural. • Incentivar la innovación, el diseño y el desarrollo en la región –y en general, en la región central del país– para generar mayor valor agregado a los productos y servicios que en ella se generan. • Impulsar el desarrollo económico de la ciudad de Puebla. • Innovar y desarrollar una mejor calidad de vida para los ciudadanos. Como parte de las actividades que se han contemplado dentro de este proyecto, en coordinación con Coordenada 21 –asociación de diseñadores en Puebla–, del 1 al 26 de octubre se realizará la segunda edición del Puebla Design Fest, que reunirá a diseñadores, empresas e instituciones con el fin de ofrecerles un espacio de vinculación, posicionar Puebla en el mapa del liderazgo y el emprendimiento mexicano, y fomentar la innovación y el desarrollo de la economía creativa. N

75


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

MÉXICO EN EL MUNDO

El comercio internacional de México en cifras

CANADÁ $5,965 | 2.6%

259,750 millones de dólares entre enero y agosto de 2014 (un incremento de 4.0% con respecto al mismo periodo en 2013).

Principales socios comerciales de México $ Exportaciones acumuladas de enero a julio de 2014

#2

ESTADOS UNIDOS

180,230

#

1

(79.6 % del total)

Millones de dólares

COLOMBIA $2,607 | 1.2%

% Participación de las exportaciones mexicanas totales

BRASIL $2,876 | 1.3%

#6

#5

Enero a julio de 2014

CHILE $1,264| 0.6%

#10

Fuente: Banco de México (cifras revisadas, septiembre de 2014)

76

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

Exportaciones

Millones de dólares Rubro

Manufacturera

Petroleras

Agropecuarias

Extractivas

Ene.-Ago. ‘14

217,781

30,188

8,265

3,517

Variación ’13

5.7%

-8.8%

7.4%

15.0%

(Cifras oportunas, septiembre 2014)

ESPAÑA $3,900 | 1.7%

ALEMANIA $2,109 | 0.9%

INDIA $1,534 | 0.7%

CHINA $3,570 | 1.6%

JAPÓN $1,646 | 0.7%

#7

#3

#8 #4

#9

Por sector Enero-julio 2014

Variación

Millones de dólares

Mismo periodo en 2013

Productos metálicos maquinaria y equipo

Alimentos, bebidas y tabaco

Minerometalurgia

Química

Productos de plástico y caucho

142,221

7,970

6,570

6,360

6,094

8.0%

5.5%

-18.3%

-3.1%

7.8%

Octubre 2014

77


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

Los centros de datos y su importancia en una economía digital

Tendencias y oportunidades de negocio en México y América Latina En la economía digital, México y América Latina están inmersos en una plataforma de oportunidades de negocio para las pequeñas, medianas y grandes empresas. La capacidad para aprovecharlas está directamente vinculada con el desarrollo de los centros de datos en la región.

78

fotos

archivo

por george rockett*

La era digital es como una hidra que se infiltra en las actividades de la vida cotidiana. Ante el creciente uso de dispositivos móviles, el uso de Internet para gobiernos, así como para vender, informar, interactuar, ofrecer servicios y hacer negocios, es necesario contar con servidores y redes con suficiente capacidad para realizar todas las tareas digitales necesarias. Esto solo puede proporcionarse mediante grupos de servidores soportados por centros de datos. En México el crecimiento en los centros de datos puede vincularse con dos tendencias socioeconómicas:

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

• El crecimiento de la clase media y del número de consumidores digitales que se registra en las principales ciudades de México. • Una mayor flexibilidad y alcance en la economía mexicana, especialmente relacionada con la capacidad que tienen los negocios pequeños para convertirse en empresas medianas. En términos generales, América Latina está compuesta por mercados con un pequeño número de centros de datos en los que se registra una demanda energética relativamente baja, niveles mínimos en adopción de tecnologías de vanguardia, y parámetros más reducidos de cualificación especializada y de mejores prácticas en comparación con otros mercados como Estados Unidos. Sin embargo, los mercados de la región son diferentes y presentan niveles de madurez distintos: Brasil es uno de los 12 mercados más grandes de centros de datos del mundo, mientras que México tiene un tamaño más parecido al de algunos mercados europeos –por ejemplo, los países nórdicos, Suiza o Bélgica. Comparado con el resto de América Latina, México es un mercado establecido. En el país hay una mayor potencia para la densidad de racks (un rack es un soporte metálico destinado a alojar equipamiento electrónico, informático y de comunicaciones, las medidas para la anchura están normalizadas para que sean compatibles con equipamiento de cualquier fabricante; también son llamados bastidores, cabinas o armarios, pero ahí es donde se instala todo el equipo de procesamiento de un centro de datos), niveles mayores de inteligencia en las instalaciones, y mayor facilidad para adoptar nuevas tecnologías y arquitecturas. En términos de porcentajes de la base de activos, los sectores en los que se observa una mayor demanda de centros de datos en México son el financiero, de telecomunicaciones, de servicios de colocación para centros de procesamiento de datos y de servicios de TI –incluidos los proveedores de servicios de Internet (ISP). Por lo que se refiere a los niveles de confianza y seguridad con los que operan los centros de datos en México –al igual que ocurre con los data center de cualquier otro lugar del mundo– los propietarios y operadores profesionales establecen el nivel de riesgo al que están dispuestos a operar sus centros de datos, así como equilibrar dicho riesgo frente a los costos de reducirlo. Esto tenderá a ser una comparación de instalación a instalación.

Octubre 2014

México es una de las economías de mayor crecimiento del mundo. El sector comercial mexicano reconoce que el crecimiento está ligado a la participación en la era digital que es, además, un factor esencial para interactuar con economías como Estados Unidos. Al igual que con cualquier mercado, México tendrá una serie de instalaciones que sufrirán solo algunos segundos de tiempo de inactividad al año hasta llegar a instalaciones más viejas, menos críticas, capaces de funcionar a un nivel de riesgo más alto sin comprometer la actividad comercial y de procesamiento. El llamado tiempo de inactividad del centro de datos puede planificarse y estar preparado para afrontarlo, pero también puede ser accidental. Ahora bien, es primordial que un país tenga suficiente capacidad de centros de datos para satisfacer sus necesidades de TI actuales y futuras. México es una de las economías de mayor crecimiento del mundo. El sector comercial mexicano reconoce que el crecimiento está ligado a la participación en la era digital que es, además, un factor esencial para interactuar con economías como Estados Unidos. Pero México no puede ir solo en ese crecimiento, sino que tiene que asegurarse que el resto de América Latina siga el mismo camino. En el informe del censo 2013-2014 Tendencias de los Mercados de Data Center en Latinoamérica, Estudio de Mercado e Informe Analítico, desarrollado por el área de in-

vestigación de mercados de DCD Group, se menciona que América Central tiene un mayor crecimiento que el resto del continente. De acuerdo con el documento, la mayor tasa de crecimiento de América Central, como la de Perú y algunos mercados más pequeños de América del Sur es, en parte, por su base de activos, inicialmente pequeña. Es más fácil crecer de manera rápida partiendo de una base menor, que crecer rápidamente iniciando de una gran base de activos como la de México. Una buena parte de ese crecimiento está vinculada a los sistemas de cableado y de redes que operan en toda la región entre las dos economías más grandes de América. De forma parecida a lo que representó el Canal de Panamá hace 100 años, esto es importante para la continuidad de los servicios digitales en toda América conforme se avanza hacia una cooperación económica más estrecha. Si bien una América Central poco desarrollada no representa necesariamente una brecha digital, el papel de las TI en la creación da una prosperidad regional mayor, gracias a la cooperación, funcionará mejor si todos los países forman parte de ella. N *Director General, Datacenter Dynamics Group.

79


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

fotos

archivo

El pulso de una industria de tradición

El agave o maguey es un patrimonio mexicano. De él deriva una industria que tiene por epicentro a ProAgave, un espacio para hacer negocios y revisar los adelantos tecnológicos y científicos en el ramo. por omar magaña

La Feria Nacional para la Industria del Agave (ProAgave) es un eslabón central en la cadena de valor de una industria eminentemente mexicana: aquella que transforma las variedades de una planta multiusos en bebidas espirituosas, fibras y materiales para construcción. ProAgave tiene lugar en Guadalajara, Jalisco –el estado cuna del producto más popular derivado de la planta, el tequila–, cada otoño. En 2014 celebrará su tercera edición los días 16 y 17 de octubre, en un área de 4,000 metros cuadrados dentro del centro de convenciones Expo Guadalajara. ProAgave convoca a toda empresa involucrada en la producción de los destilados que se obtienen en México con la fermentación de unas 30 especies de agave o maguey, entre ellos tequila, bacanora, sotol, raicilla y mezcal. También promueve la participación de empresarios que emplean las cualidades orgánicas de la planta para fabricar corchos de botella y útiles de escritura, entre muchos otros productos. Vanessa Santana, directora de ProAgave, informa que en esta edición de la feria participarán 100 empresas del sector, contarán con 90 expositores y recibirán a unos 3,500 invitados. “La importancia de esta expo es la funcionalidad de agrupar proveedores tanto internacionales como nacionales que ofrecen avances tecnológicos a los productores de la industria”, señala Santana. La feria funciona como punto de encuentro para industriales de bebidas espirituosas, productores de plantas, proveedores de maquinaria y servicios, cámaras y asociaciones que agrupan a grandes y pe-

80

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

queños especialistas en la transformación de la materia prima. “Este año contaremos con expositores de talla internacional. Hay proveedores de maquinaria agrícola con una variedad de productos que ayudan a hacer eficientes los procesos y bajar los costos, así como agaves in vitro para la propagación de la planta, y fertilizantes y enzimas que se requieren para mejorar los cultivos”, abunda Santana. Ciencia y negocios ProAgave también reúne a estudiosos y científicos del ramo pues acoge al Simposio Internacional del Agave, organizado por el Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco (Ciatej). Esta será la segunda ocasión en que se realice este ciclo de charlas, del 15 al 17 de octubre. Los gestores del encuentro de negocios han coincidido con la entidad académica en que, además de los temas de tecnología para la producción y desarrollo de proveedurías, la sustentabilidad de la cadena de valor debe convertirse en el concepto rector de este año. De ello resulta un exhaustivo calendario de conferencias, 35 en total, dirigidas por especialistas en biotecnología de las universidades de California, Michigan y Viena, así como de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y el Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya.

Intercambiar conocimientos sobre nuevas tecnologías e investigaciones en torno a la permanencia biológica y la diversidad de una planta con fuerte arraigo en la estructura cultural y económica de México se ha convertido en un tema primordial. El número de hectáreas destinadas a la siembra y cosecha de magueyes crece conforme aumenta la producción y la exportación de destilados, en particular, de tequila. El Ciatej informa que durante 2013, el Consejo Regulador del Tequila reportó que se obtuvieron 226.5 millones de litros de la bebida en 131 municipios de las entidades mexicanas con denominación de origen. De estos, se exportaron 172 millones de litros. Con el crecimiento de la demanda, surgen las preguntas en torno a la conservación de una planta considerada patrimonio natural nacional. Así, el simposio diseñado para productores, transformadores, científicos y estudiantes, contempla discusiones en torno a las afectaciones del cambio climático en la cosecha de planta, la generación de biocombustibles a partir de la misma materia prima, el aprovechamiento de las tecnologías AFEX para el uso de los residuos de agave en la producción de bioenergéticos líquidos, la estrategia nacional para la conservación y la sustentabilidad del maguey, el agave en la era genómica y otros temas. www.proagave.mx

Intercambiar conocimientos sobre nuevas tecnologías e investigaciones en torno a la permanencia biológica y la diversidad de una planta con fuerte arraigo en la estructura cultural y económica de México se ha convertido en un tema primordial.

Octubre 2014

81


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

foto

LAS ESTRATEGIAS DE APERTURA COMERCIAL EN MEDIO ORIENTE

En su estrategia por diversificar mercados, México tiene enormes oportunidades para potencializar sus vínculos comerciales y de inversión con los países de Medio Oriente. El acercamiento con los países de esta región es cada vez más ágil y tenderá a consolidarse en los próximos años. por juan antonio cepeda*

La diversificación de mercados para las empresas mexicanas debe considerar dos aspectos: 1) una estrategia comercial mediante la cual se reducen los riesgos en caso de que sus mercados habituales (principalmente Europa y Estados Unidos) no demanden sus productos; 2) una estrategia que aproveche la madurez de la economía mexicana, así como de su oferta exportable, bajo el sustento de empresas sólidas capaces de incrementar su participación en determinado sector.

82

Asimismo, la diversificación en materia de atracción de IED hacia México se lleva a cabo desde un sector manufacturero de alto valor agregado, el cual se ha respaldado por el talento y capital humano disponible en el país. Las reformas estructurales impulsadas por la administración del Presidente Enrique Peña Nieto en el sector energético, financiero y de telecomunicaciones, aunadas con los cambios en materia educativa, de competencia económica y hacienda pública, también han conso-

archivo

lidado un ambiente de negocios propicio para recibir más inversiones productivas. En este sentido, durante casi dos años de la actual administración se ha impulsado una importante vinculación comercial con diversas regiones. En Asia y América Latina vemos con claridad esta estrategia de apertura y diversificación. Lo mismo ha sucedido con Medio Oriente, principalmente con los países que integran el Consejo de Cooperación del Golfo (CCG) –Arabia Saudita, Bahréin, Catar, Emiratos Árabes Unidos (EAU), Kuwait y Omán–, y otros países como Jordania, Israel y, en cierta medida, Irán. Se ha intensificado la relación no solo comercial, sino política, cultural, científicotecnológica, así como de amistad y cooperación. Cabe destacar que el acercamiento de México con los países de esta región siempre ha estado latente. Sin embargo, hasta ahora se ha avanzado decisivamente en su consolidación. La estrategia se ha venido implementando, primordialmente, durante lo que va de este año y tiene como base fundamental los objetivos y líneas de acción del Plan Nacional de Desarrollo (PND) 2013-2018.

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

El PND 2013-2018 y la estrategia hacia Medio Oriente El PND 2013-2018 indica que “los procesos de cambio político y social del Medio Oriente […] presentan una oportunidad en términos de política exterior para nuestro país. Ante el reto que enfrentan algunos de los países más importantes de la región en términos de transición democrática, México es una referencia obligada. Por otra parte, puesto que algunos países de dicha zona presentan sólidas tasas de crecimiento, debemos aprovechar esta ventana de oportunidad para profundizar las relaciones bilaterales, establecer mecanismos de cooperación y fortalecer las relaciones económicas”. En este contexto, se definió una estrategia destinada a “aprovechar las oportunidades que presenta el sistema internacional actual para fortalecer los lazos comerciales y políticos con los países de Medio Oriente […]”. Para lograrlo, se definieron varias líneas de acción, entre ellas: • Ampliar la presencia de México en Medio Oriente y África como medio para alcanzar el potencial existente en materia política, económica y cultural. • Impulsar el diálogo con países de especial relevancia en ambas regiones en virtud de su peso económico, su actividad diplomática o su influencia cultural. • Aprovechar el reciente acercamiento entre los países de Medio Oriente y de América Latina para consolidar las relaciones comerciales y el intercambio cultural. • Impulsar proyectos de inversión mutuamente benéficos, aprovechando los fondos soberanos existentes en los países del Golfo Pérsico. La estrategia integral Quizá el hito original sobre el que podemos apreciar cronológicamente el desencadenamiento de acciones que han impulsado el acercamiento con los países del Medio Oriente fue la visita oficial del Canciller José Antonio Meade a la región en marzo de 2014. El único precedente de una visita de tal envergadura se registró en 1975, cuando comenzaron las relaciones diplomáticas de México con la mayoría de los países del CCG. Como resultado de esta gira se han recibido muestras de voluntad política de Israel, Jordania y EAU. Pasaron casi 40 años para que este vínculo se fortaleciera. Asimismo, se han organizado encuentros empresariales en México con delegaciones provenientes de EAU (junio de 2014), así como misiones co-

Octubre 2014

merciales de compañías mexicanas que han visitado Arabia Saudita, Catar, EAU, Irán y Kuwait. Además, la Embajada de México en Catar ha abierto sus puertas y ya se han instalado las negociaciones para firmar un tratado de libre comercio con Jordania. Esta gira dio pauta a una estrategia integral que ha involucrado a diversas dependencias del Gobierno de la República. Se han definido caminos para estrechar los vínculos en diversos ámbitos (político, económico, cultural, científico, educativo, financiero y de cooperación). En el económico, ProMéxico tiene (y ha tenido) un papel muy importante. Ha identificado varias estrategias de apertura comercial, las cuales en coordinación con otras instancias del Gobierno de la República y el sector empresarial, podrán rendir frutos en un futuro próximo. Con la próxima apertura de una oficina de representación de ProMéxico en la región, estas estrategias podrán implementarse de manera aún más consistente y efectiva.

ProMéxico está consolidando su estrategia para que las empresas mexicanas aprovechen las oportunidades que les brinda esta región. Mediante los apoyos y servicios que ofrece la entidad, todas las empresas con intenciones de exportar encontrarán un aliado más en esta apertura de un mercado que puede constituirse como una diversificación importante dentro de sus planes de expansión o de internacionalización. En primera instancia, una política de promoción de productos con certificación halal es indispensable para acceder a los mercados en esta región. En este ámbito, ProMéxico impulsa las iniciativas para contar con mejores prácticas a nivel nacional, contar con organismos certificadores mexicanos avalados por las autoridades competentes y, a la par, promueve este estándar entre las empresas que desean incursionar en el merca-

do musulmán. Halal es la llave que abre la puerta de un mercado aproximado de 2,000 millones de musulmanes. En esta región, el tema de la “seguridad alimentaria” es una ventana de oportunidad para las empresas mexicanas del sector agroindustrial y alimentos. En segunda instancia, hay que difundir las dinámicas y requerimientos comerciales de estos países. Por ejemplo, según datos del Global Trade Atlas, entre los principales productos que México exporta a los EAU destacan los vehículos automotores para el transporte de mercancías, químicos como los ácidos policarboxílicos utilizados en la construcción, aparatos de telefonía, refrigeradores y congeladores, entre otros. Sin embargo, existe un gran abanico de oportunidades para el mercado mexicano en ese país. El sector de la construcción y ferretería ha experimentado un rápido crecimiento en casi todos los países de la región. Existe un gran potencial para que más empresas mexicanas participen en estos mercados. Se estima que la industria de la construcción podría ampliar su cuota de mercado en más de 20,000 millones de dólares. Las oportunidades de otros sectores son igual de importantes: manufacturas de acero (349 millones de dólares), alimentos procesados (169 millones de dólares), químico (133 millones de dólares), aparatos de óptica y médicoquirúrgicos (115 millones de dólares) y agropecuario (86 millones de dólares). De 2003 a 2013 el comercio de México con Arabia Saudita creció 373%. Los principales productos que se exportan son vehículos automotores, material para construcción (ácido carboxílico), tubos y perfiles huecos sin soldadura, así como aparatos de telefonía. Los alimentos procesados, los muebles, productos químicos y agropecuarios tienen un gran potencial para incursionar en este mercado. Las exportaciones de México a Catar crecieron en promedio 23% anual durante el periodo 2003-2013. En Kuwait, el sector agropecuario representa una gran oportunidad para los productos mexicanos. Estos ejemplos muestran la confluencia de intereses e identidades entre México y Medio Oriente que pueden aprovecharse por México para lograr acceder a una relación mucho más fructífera en términos comerciales. N * Asesor de Gestión y Planeación Estratégica, ProMéxico.

83


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

foto

archivo

Innovación:

motor de la industria en México En la actualidad, la creación, difusión y aplicación del conocimiento son imprescindibles para que las empresas y los países prosperen en una economía mundial cada vez más competitiva. por jorge vega*

De acuerdo con la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos (OCDE), la innovación es el detonante del proceso mediante el cual las empresas se desarrollan y además es un factor que proporciona cimientos para nuevas industrias, empresas y empleos. Según el Foro Consultivo Científico y Tecnológico, innovar significa “introducir al mercado un producto (bien o servicio), proceso, método de comercialización o método organizacional nuevo o significativamente mejorado por una organización”. Por su parte, la revista Expansión hace hincapié en que innovar no solo involucra crear valor para una compañía, sino también transformar el mercado en el que dicha compañía opera.

84

El binomio innovación y emprendimiento es esencial para todo desarrollo económico. Los emprendedores son individuos que transforman ideas en iniciativas rentables. Esta transformación requiere talentos especiales para crear, introducir nuevos productos y explorar nuevos mercados. Los emprendedores prosperan cuando el entorno económico y empresarial es favorable e impulsa los rendimientos de la innovación, estimula la productividad mediante las dinámicas de entrada y salida del mercado de las empresas, y promueve el desarrollo económico. Para las empresas, la innovación trae como resultado una mayor rentabilidad derivada de la posibilidad de diseñar y producir bienes y servicios nuevos o mejores, y de

utilizar técnicas productivas más eficientes que las de sus competidores. Aquellas empresas que generan capacidades permanentes de innovar cuentan con el conocimiento necesario para dar respuesta rápida y eficaz a las oportunidades que ofrece la globalización, y hacer frente de manera eficiente a las amenazas competitivas de sus rivales y del entorno. Todo esto se traduce en la posibilidad de crecer de manera sostenida. La innovación en México Según la Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI), de 2012 a 2013 México escaló 16 posiciones en el Índice Mundial de Innovación, al pasar de la posición 79 a la 63 de entre 142 países. De acuerdo con la OMPI, México muestra fortalezas

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

en la exportación de bienes creativos, el ambiente de negocios, el dinamismo del comercio exterior, el número de graduados en ingeniería, el ranking mundial de universidades, así como en la penetración de Internet. La innovación aplicada florece en clústeres regionales que tienen lo necesario para que una industria prospere –infraestructura, investigadores e ingenieros, entre otros elementos. En México existen algunos casos de éxito de clústeres regionales innovadores, por ejemplo, en el sector aeroespacial. De acuerdo con cifras de ProMéxico, México es el sexto proveedor mundial de productos aeroespaciales a Estados Unidos, la industria aeroespacial genera más de 30,000 empleos en el país y desde 2005 la cantidad de empresas del ramo en seis entidades federativas se cuadruplicó. De acuerdo con cifras del Banco Mundial, en 2012 México gastó el equivalente a

También se está buscando implementar un sistema de incentivos que propicie un ecosistema favorable para la innovación. Por ejemplo, hoy el Instituto Mexicano de la Propiedad Industrial (IMPI) está haciendo grandes esfuerzos para consolidar un sistema robusto de protección a la innovación. Aunado a ello, desde mediados de 2013, la American Chamber of Commerce of Mexico (AmCham) fundó un grupo de trabajo relacionado con la innovación, integrado por empresas globales como Microsoft, 3M, Alexion, Dupont, Ford, General Motors, Indra, GE México, Pfizer y Softtek, con el objetivo de contribuir a la formulación de políticas públicas en materia de innovación y crear puentes entre los diferentes actores que la impulsan como motor del crecimiento económico.

Para las empresas, la innovación trae como resultado una mayor rentabilidad derivada de la posibilidad de diseñar y producir bienes y servicios nuevos o mejores, y de utilizar técnicas productivas más eficientes que las de sus competidores. 0.37% del PIB en investigación y desarrollo. Al respecto, es encomiable el propósito del Gobierno de la República de incrementar gradualmente esa inversión, para llegar a 1% del PIB en 2018. Para que este esfuerzo rinda frutos, el siguiente paso será establecer criterios de aplicación de estos recursos, su alineación con los ejes de desarrollo del país y definir indicadores para evaluar su éxito. Como parte de los esfuerzos para promover la innovación en México, una de las estrategias transversales que persigue el Plan Nacional de Desarrollo 2013-2018 es democratizar la productividad. Para lograrlo es fundamental diseñar una política pública integral de innovación como elemento impulsor de la economía competitiva y generadora de empleos, cuyos beneficios no solo sean económicos sino también sociales. Los actores involucrados en el proceso de innovación están buscando construir una política pública que asegure la disponibilidad de recursos, así como la consolidación de una triple hélice, porque la innovación no surge de forma aislada sino que es una actividad que prospera en redes que agrupan a empresas privadas, centros de investigación y entidades gubernamentales.

Octubre 2014

En 2014 este grupo realizó su primer sondeo de innovación empresarial en el que participaron 100 empresas socias de AmCham. En este sondeo se contemplaron compañías grandes, medianas y pequeñas (nacionales y extranjeras) de 20 giros empresariales, y entre los temas que se exploraron destacan: • Percepción de la innovación en el sector empresarial. • Características de la innovación empresarial en México. • Recursos humanos, financieros y materiales que las empresas destinan a la innovación. • Asociaciones que se establecen entre empresas, instituciones públicas y centros educativos y de investigación para impulsar la innovación. • Percepción y aprovechamiento de las políticas públicas federales de estímulo a la innovación por parte del sector empresarial. Entre los hallazgos de este sondeo, se pueden resaltar los siguientes: • El concepto de innovación varía según el tamaño de la empresa. • Las empresas encuestadas revelaron

• • •

un ecosistema de innovación robusto, pues el porcentaje de desarrollo local de productos es elevado y la mayoría de las empresas cuenta con capacidades locales para innovar. Algunas empresas no innovan porque o bien no es parte de su estrategia de negocio, o aún enfrentan impedimentos para innovar. Las empresas que sí innovan destinan un porcentaje importante de su presupuesto anual a innovación. En promedio siete de cada 10 empresas se asocia para innovar, particularmente con otras empresas y con universidades. Prevalecen un nivel alto de desconocimiento y un índice bajo de aprovechamiento de los programas de innovación, lo que ofrece una gran oportunidad para definir mecanismos que garanticen que la información sobre los programas llegue al mayor número de empresas y de ese modo se fortalezcan todas las cadenas de valor ligadas a la innovación.

Cooperación bilateral para el fomento a la innovación Como parte de la visita del Presidente Obama a México en mayo de 2013, se creó el Foro Bilateral sobre Educación Superior, Innovación e Investigación (FOBESII), con el propósito transformar a América del Norte en una región del conocimiento. Una de las metas específicas del FOBESII es fomentar el uso del conocimiento de la región para desarrollar proyectos productivos de innovación de alto impacto en cadenas productivas estratégicas para el comercio bilateral. Asimismo, con esta iniciativa se busca desarrollar plataformas tecnológicas binacionales a partir de mecanismos que faciliten el diseño de estrategias de mediano y largo plazos en investigación, formación de talento especializado y procesos de apoyo a la innovación. De esta manera, se busca generar una visión compartida de largo plazo en torno a los principales retos educativos de investigación y de innovación en los temas económicos y sociales prioritarios para Estados Unidos y México. Así, la innovación persistirá como un componente clave para el despunte de la industria, la productividad y la competitividad de México. N *Director de Asuntos Jurídicos, Corporativos y de Ciudadanía, Microsoft México.

85


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

foto

archivo

Innovación y comercio electrónico en México

La innovación tiene un papel crucial para desarrollar nuevos modelos de negocio, sobre todo si se consideran los intercambios que se realizan a través de plataformas digitales y dispositivos móviles. El comercio electrónico se ha convertido en un componente representativo en casi todo el orbe. La innovación es un elemento central que no puede aislarse de este proceso. por mariana morán villavicencio*

La compra y venta de productos o servicios mediante dispositivos electrónicos y redes informáticas no es novedosa. Las transacciones que se han registrado en el mundo como parte del comercio electrónico muestran un enorme nicho de oportunidades para compañías de distintos giros y tamaños, las cuales requieren instrumentar servicios, desarrollos y aplicaciones cada vez más especializados. Las tecnologías digitales se han consolidado como uno de los motores más importantes de la economía actual. Son un factor clave que genera crecimiento económico, inciden en la productividad nacional y promueven la generación de más empleos. De este modo, las tecnologías digitales han impactado a las pequeñas y medianas empresas (pymes) en la expansión de sus operaciones y en procesos de internacionalización hacia otros continentes. Las tecnologías vinculadas con el comercio electrónico inciden de manera directa en los planos económico y social, por lo que no es extraño que cada vez más industrias estén apostando por impulsar experiencias de negocio basadas en plataformas móviles, como tampoco es extraño que exista un consenso cada vez más generalizado sobre la importancia de conocer los hábitos de compra y las expectativas de los “consumidores digitales” en distintas regiones del planeta. Según estimaciones de Euromonitor International, en 2018 el comercio electrónico representará casi una quinta parte del valor de las ventas del sector comercio a nivel global. De acuerdo con eMarketer, en 2013 el comercio electrónico registró un crecimiento anualizado de 21.1% en todo el mundo; tan solo en América del Norte, los ingresos del comercio electrónico superaron los 1.29 trillones de dólares ese año.

86

Según pronósticos de la agencia de investigación de mercados Kantar Worldpanel, casi 50% de la población mundial tendrá acceso a Internet en 2017. A finales de ese año, el número de teléfonos celulares conectados superará al número de habitantes que tiene el planeta, por lo que se puede esperar que crezcan de manera importante las transacciones comerciales a través de esos dispositivos.

En México, 44% de los internautas ha comprado algún producto y/o servicio por Internet en sitios nacionales y 37% gasta entre 401 y 1,000 pesos cada vez que acceden a Internet a realizar alguna compra. Asimismo, según datos de AMIPCI, los productos que más se comercian en línea en México son música y películas –lo que repercute directamente en el posicionamiento de las industrias creativas en el país. En el caso de México, según datos de la Asociación Mexicana de Internet (AMIPCI), durante 2013 el comercio electrónico en el país tuvo un valor de mercado de 9,200 millones de dólares, lo que equivale a un crecimiento de 42% respecto a 2012. Cifras de PwC indican que México tiene

más de 50 millones de usuarios de Internet, y se espera un crecimiento importante de esa cifra para 2017. Respecto al uso de Internet y el desempeño de las empresas en México, según cifras del Índice Qualcomm de la Sociedad de la Innovación (QuISI), 56% de las compañías en México están conectadas a la red –en comparación con 95% a nivel mundial. Esto indica que aún hay oportunidades para que más empresas se incorporen en este modelo de negocio. Pero, ¿cuál es la relevancia de las plataformas digitales en México? Según QuISI, en México se realiza un importante porcentaje de transacciones por Internet; 78% de las personas adultas realiza negocios por Internet, mientras que 66% de las empresas conectadas utiliza la banca electrónica. En México, 44% de los internautas ha comprado algún producto y/o servicio por Internet en sitios nacionales y 37% gasta entre 401 y 1,000 pesos cada vez que acceden a Internet a realizar alguna compra. Asimismo, según datos de AMIPCI, los productos que más se comercian en línea en México son música y películas –lo que repercute directamente en el posicionamiento de las industrias creativas en el país. El comercio electrónico tiene un impacto importante en las ventas de las empresas. Según cifras de Euromonitor International, el comercio electrónico representó 7% de los ingresos de las principales cadenas comerciales durante 2013, y se prevé que esta cifra aumente a 19% para 2018. A la par del auge del comercio electrónico, vale la pena destacar el incremento de las transacciones bancarias y el uso de las plataformas digitales para realizar trámites gubernamentales. QuISI revela

Octubre 2014


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

que 32% de las empresas en México aún no usan banca electrónica, pero se estima que con seguridad comenzarán a utilizarla entre 2014 y 2015. Asimismo, el número de empresas que realizan trámites gubernamentales en línea asciende a 65%, pero el resto de las empresas que aún no migran a estas plataformas lo hará en breve. Además, se prevé que cada vez sean más empresas las que incorporen aplicaciones big data y de cómputo en la nube. Dada la importancia del comercio electrónico para la economía mexicana, se han formulado estrategias y políticas públicas para fomentar las tecnologías de la información (TI) y el desarrollo de mecanismos innovadores, así como el uso de tecnologías con alto valor agregado. Desde 2002, la Secretaría de Economía (SE) ha implementado una política pública que permite aprovechar las oportunidades del sector de TI, derivado del impacto transversal del sector, tanto en el mercado internacional como nacional, con el fin de llevar a México hacia una economía basada en el conocimiento. Asimismo, México ha participado en encuentros internacionales vinculados

Octubre 2014

con el comercio electrónico desde hace más de una década. Durante 2005, a través de la SE, el país ocupó la presidencia del Grupo de Manejo de Comercio Electrónico en el Foro de Cooperación Económica Asia-Pacífico (APEC). En el marco de las negociaciones de este grupo, se concluyó que era necesario promover un mecanismo que brindara confianza a los internautas en México al realizar transacciones en línea. En este contexto, la SE en coordinación con la AMIPCI, desarrolló un proyecto innovador basado en la generación de sellos de confianza. Los sellos de confianza se otorgan desde 2007 a los sitios en Internet de empresas, organizaciones, instituciones y personas que están comprometidas con la generación de confianza en línea. Tienen como propósito fomentar la confianza de los usuarios en Internet, asegurando un adecuado manejo de datos personales, además de incrementar el comercio electrónico en el país. Desde 2007, la AMIPCI se sumó a la World Trustmark Alliance (WTA) que reúne a distintos proveedores de sellos de confianza en el mundo. Esta alianza

internacional tiene como objetivo central contribuir al desarrollo y promoción del comercio electrónico, de las transacciones en línea, así como de la resolución de controversias entre los negocios realizados en línea. Los países pertenecientes a la WTA son Alemania, Argentina, Austria, Corea del Sur, Estados Unidos, España, Filipinas, Francia, Italia, Malasia, Malta, México, Polonia, Singapur, Taiwán, Tailandia y Viet Nam. Conscientes del impacto y crecimiento de este modelo de negocios en México, ProMéxico está trabajando en el desarrollo de estrategias dirigidas a promover el componente vinculado con el comercio electrónico, con el propósito de impulsar las actividades de las empresas y fomentar su internacionalización. Esta estrategia se enfoca a detectar oportunidades de negocios y apoyar a empresas mexicanas con capacidad exportable con el propósito de que adopten, incursionen o mejoren sus plataformas de comercio electrónico. N *Subdirectora de Innovación y Proyectos Estratégicos, Unidad de Inteligencia de Negocios, ProMéxico.

87


Negocios ProMéxico | Para Exportadores

foto

cortesía de presidencia de la república

De México para el mundo, orgullo que se exporta por proméxico

El 5 de septiembre de 2014, en el marco del congreso del Consejo Empresarial Mexicano de Comercio Exterior, Inversión y Tecnología (COMCE) celebrado en Mazatlán, Sinaloa, se entregaron varios reconocimientos a empresas, instituciones y organizaciones que operan en el área de comercio internacional en México. El Presidente Enrique Peña Nieto entregó el Premio Nacional de Exportación a empresas, instituciones y organizaciones que gracias a su esfuerzo, constancia, creatividad, calidad e innovación han logrado competir, incrementar y diversificar las ventas de bienes y servicios en el exterior. Las empresas, instituciones y organizaciones galardonadas son 100% mexicanas y contribuyen a la difusión global de la oferta exportable mexicana. Las entidades que recibieron este premio son:

Empresas exportadoras (medianas industriales) Botas Caborca S.A. de C.V. León, Guanajuato. Exporta calzado a Estados Unidos, Italia y Japón, entre otros países.

Empresas exportadoras (Pequeñas industriales) Dunes Relaxed Fashion S. de R.L. de C.V. Zapopan, Jalisco. Exporta ropa a Estados Unidos y Canadá.

Empresas exportadoras (grandes agropecuarias) Exportalizas Mexicanas S.A. de C.V. Culiacán, Sinaloa. Exporta productos horti-frutícolas a Estados Unidos y Canadá.

Empresas exportadoras (grandes industriales) Helvex S.A. de C.V. México, Distrito Federal. Exporta grifería, muebles y accesorios para baño a 18 países. Empresas exportadoras (pequeñas y medianas agropecuarias) Alimentos Nutracéuticos La Meza S.A. de C.V. Corregidora, Querétaro. Exporta frutas deshidratadas a Estados Unidos y a Europa.

Empresas IMMEX Rassini Frenos S.A. de C.V. San Martín Texmelucan, Puebla. Exporta frenos y árboles de transmisión a Estados Unidos y Europa. Empresas exportadoras (pequeñas y medianas comercializadoras) Distribuidora Hortimex S.A. de C.V. Culiacán, Sinaloa. Exporta productos horti-frutícolas a Estados Unidos, Canadá y otros países. Editorial Limusa S.A. de C.V. México, Distrito Federal. Exporta libros a países de América Latina. Empresas exportadoras (grandes comercializadoras) SuKarne S.A. de C.V. Culiacán, Sinaloa. Exporta carne de ganado y aves a Estados Unidos, Rusia, Japón, entre otros países. Empresas exportadoras de servicios Grupos Metales Incorporados S.A.P.I. de C.V. San Juan del Río, Querétaro. Exporta servicios de edificación y desarrollo de ingeniería a varios países de América Latina. Empresas prestadoras de servicios Central Star Logistics Operadora S.A. de C.V. San Juan del Río, Querétaro. Exporta servicios de logística a Estados Unidos. Instituciones educativas Universidad Anáhuac del Sur S.C. México, Distrito Federal. Tiene programas sobre negocios internacionales y exporta varios programas académicos. www.pne.economia.gob.mx

88

Octubre 2014


Profile for sebastian_escalante

Revista Negocios ProMéxico, October 2014  

It's all about Creativity Creative Industries in Mexico

Revista Negocios ProMéxico, October 2014  

It's all about Creativity Creative Industries in Mexico

Advertisement