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MEXICO IN THE WORLD

The Aerospace Industry in Mexico and the French Touch

The Lifestyle Mexicans Versed in the Glamorous Task of Making Us Laugh and Cry

MEXICO’S AEROSPACE A High-flying Industry

Negocios para exportadores

VII - 2014


T

he government of Mexico has set out to transform our country based on five major national goals: to have a peaceful, inclusive, well-educated, prosperous and globallyresponsible Mexico. In order to build the prosperous Mexico we long for, we must generate sustained high economic growth that results in more and better jobs that will improve the quality of life of our population. Mexico has a solid foundation on which to attain these goals: healthy public finances; a manageable debt level; a budget with no fiscal deficit; a responsible and autonomous monetary policy, as well as adequate international reserves. Our macroeconomic stability and institutional strength are enriched by a wide sociopolitical consensus that favors important transformations required to boost the development of our country. Through the Pact for Mexico, two constitutional reforms have been approved: one in education that will enhance the quality of teaching, and another in telecommunications, radio broadcasting and economic

competition that will open up the sector and ensure competition throughout our economy. Furthermore, the Congress is analyzing a financial overhaul to increase the level of credit and make it more affordable. Mexico offers certainty and confidence to investments, a business climate favoring productivity and competitiveness, and an ambitious plan to further develop infrastructure. Moreover, the country’s strategic geographic location and optimal legal framework for international trade, through a network of trade agreements with 45 countries, give us access to a potential market of over one billion people. Mexico’s exceptional economic and geographic conditions, as well as the talent and quality of its human capital, make it the ideal destination for new productive capital to flourish. This is the time to invest in Mexico. Investors will find the government of Mexico and ProMéxico to be allies committed to the success of projects that create quality jobs and prosperity for the country.

Enrique Peña Nieto President of Mexico


Table of Contents July 2014 21

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Business Tips

Mexico in the World

Mexico’s Aerospace Industry: Building an Innovation and Technology Platform for the Next Generation

The Aerospace Industry in Mexico and the French Touch

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cover feature

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a high flying industry

archive

Mexico’s Aerospace

10

From ProMéxico

12

Briefs

56

figures

Mexico’s Partner 26

Bombardier

36

Antair

46

Altaser

28

Airbus Group

38

Prysmian Group

48

TechOps

30

Monterrey Aerospace

40

Elimco-Prettl

50

Alaxia

32

Fokker Aerostructures

42

Carlisle Interconnect Technologies

52

Hydra Technologies

34

Aernnova

44

Incertec

54

3D Robotics


courtesy of la tallera siqueiros

The Lifestyle

The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

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Mexicans Versed in the Glamorous Task of Making Us Laugh and Cry

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The Lifestyle Briefs

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Agustín Hernández:

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Querétaro for Foodies

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archive photo

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courtesy of luisa gómez

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archive

omar bárcenas

Gravity-defying Emotions

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Titanic

Brought a Wave of Gifted People to the Surface

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Modern Mexico Embraces its Colonial Legacy


Para exportadores

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Oportunidades en China: foto

archivo

Un enfoque de inteligencia comercial para los países de la Alianza del Pacífico

De ProMéxico

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74

76

breves

El Diálogo Empresarial México-Estados Unidos: encuentros para impulsar la competitividad

archivo

80

Los esquemas de certificación en comercio exterior

Filipinas renueva sus lazos comerciales con México

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Administración de las ideas: Consejos para implementaciones exitosas

fotos

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archivo

foto

y la competitividad empresarial


ProMéxico Francisco N. González Díaz CEO Karla Mawcinitt Bueno Image and Communications General Coordinator Sebastián Escalante Bañuelos Director of Publications and Content sebastian.escalante@promexico.gob.mx Copy Editing Felipe Gómez Antúnez Jorge Morales Becerra Contreras Advertising negocios@promexico.gob.mx Cover Photo Courtesy of Airbus Group

Editorial Council consejo editorial Ildefonso Guajardo Villarreal Francisco de Rosenzweig Mendialdua Enrique Jacob Rocha Francisco N. González Díaz Embajador Alfonso de Maria y Campos Castelló Luis Miguel Pando Leyva Francisco Javier Méndez Aguiñaga Rodolfo Balmaceda Guillermo Wolf Jaime Zabludovsky Gabriela de la Riva Adolfo Laborde Carranco Silvia Núñez García María Cristina Rosas González Ulises Granados Quiroz Karla I. Mawcinitt Bueno

Negocios ProMéxico es una publicación mensual editada por ProMéxico, Camino a Santa Teresa número 1679, colonia Jardines del Pedregal, delegación Álvaro Obregón, CP 01900, México, DF Teléfono: (52) 55 5447 7000. Portal en Internet: www.promexico.gob.mx; correo electrónico: negocios@promexico.gob.mx. Editor responsable: Gabriel Sebastián Escalante Bañuelos. Reserva de derechos al uso exclusivo No. 04-2009-012714564800-102. Licitud de título: 14459; licitud de contenido: 12032, ambos otorgados por la Comisión Calificadora de Publicaciones y Revistas Ilustradas de la Secretaría de Gobernación. ISSN: 2007-1795. Negocios ProMéxico año 7, número VII 2014, julio 2014, se imprimió un tiraje de 14,000 ejemplares. Impresa por Cía. Impresora El Universal, S.A. de C.V. Las opiniones expresadas por los autores no reflejan necesariamente la postura del editor de la publicación. Queda estrictamente prohibida la reproducción total o parcial de los contenidos e imágenes de la publicación sin previa autorización de ProMéxico. Publicación gratuita. Está prohibida su venta y distribución comercial. ProMéxico is not responsible for inaccurate information or omissions that might exist in the information provided by the participant companies nor of their economic solvency. The institution might or might not agree with an author’s statements; therefore the responsibility of each text falls on the writers, not on the institution, except when stated otherwise. Although this magazine verifies all the information printed on its pages, it will not accept responsibility derived from any omissions, inaccuracies or mistakes. July 2014.

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Negocios ProMéxico at negocios.promexico.gob.mx.

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BRIEFS

From proméxico. Mexico is flying high in the aerospace sector. Many multinational companies have recently established in the country, convinced of the talent and capabilities of Mexican human capital, strategic geographical position, logistics, and infrastructure development, as well as its ease of doing business, among other competitive advantages. Today, the Mexican aerospace industry is comprised by 287 companies and renowned research and development centers. The sector generates more than 32,600 high-quality jobs; and this figure is continuously rising: according to INEGI, from De-

cember 2012 to December 2013, personnel engaged in the manufacture of aerospace equipment grew by 9.3%. The development of specialized training centers in our country has been key to this success. Mexico is moving towards the consolidation of an aerospace industry for the future. The government, academia and industry are driving remarkable efforts, in order to create a triple helix that can boost the sector’s growth in the country for the upcoming years. This edition shows precisely the development of the sector in this regard. When talking about opportunities in the aerospace sector in Mexico, the sky is the limit.

Welcome to Negocios!

Francisco N. González Díaz CEO ProMéxico


BRIEFS

BRIEFS AUTOMOTIVE

schaeffler goes for more

photo

lucy nieto

German automotive component maker Schaeffler will invest approximately 100 million USD to establish a second production plant for its LuK brand in the state of Puebla. The new facility will produce torque converters for export to the company’s production sites in the US and Japan. www.schaeffler-group.com

INFRASTRUCTURE Tijuana airport, on the northern border with California. The new additions to the site will include a bridge within the terminal connecting the Mexico side of the airport with arrival facilities on the US side of the border. www.aeropuertosgap.com.mx

Brazilian steel maker Gerdau Corsa is completing construction of a new production plant in the central state of Hidalgo. The 600 million USD site is projected to produce one million tons of semi-finished products and 700,000 tons of structural shapes annually when completed. www.gerdaucorsa.com.mx

www.hitachi.com

Gerdau Corsa Grows Stronger

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Hitachi Builds a New Plant in Mexico Japanese multinational corporate group Hitachi plans a 90 million USD investment to build a manufacturing plant in Estado de México. The new site will produce cast metal parts for the region’s automotive industry. This new plant, third for the company and fifth for Hitachi Automotive Systems Group within Mexico, is being established to support the production of vehicles in Mexico and to further strengthen the supply for the car makers throughout the Americas using Mexico’s preferential trade agreements. The new plant will begin production of pistons for automotive parts as well as aluminum diecasts in May 2015. Further expansion of production is to be expected in the future.

METALLURGICAL

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AUTOMOTIVE

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Mexican airport operator Grupo Aeroportuario del Pacífico (GAP) plans an investment of approximately 380 million usd in its 12 airports

between 2015 and 2019. Projects include unifying the two terminals of the Guadalajara airport as well as runway repaving, construction of access roads, acquisition of passenger transport vehicles, and other upgrades at various airports. GAP will invest 13.8 million usd in upgrades at the

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Improving Airports


BRIEFS

BRIEFS METALLURGICAL

AUTOMOTIVE

Investing to remain a leader Mexican steel maker Altos Hornos de México (AHMSA) plans investment of 370 million USD in Mexico operations. Projects to receive funds include completion of the company’s new El Fénix steel plant in the northern state of Coahuila, acquisition of new equipment and the opening of new mines.

SKG’s first in the Americas Japanese motor producer Shinano Kenshi Group (SKG) plans to open a manufacturing plant in the state of Guanajuato in 2015. The site, which will be the company’s first of its kind outside of Asia, will host the production of precision electric motors for automotive, medical and other applications. The new factory will start production with a working staff of nearly 100 people in an initial space of 4,000 square meters. SKG has targeted annual revenue of 20 million USD by the year 2018 for its Mexico site. www.shinanokenshi.com

photo archive

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www.ahmsa.com

LOGISTICS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Refreshing Welcome

Going for Latin American Market equipment manufacturer Nordyne. The new manufacturing infrastructure will be used to produce air conditioning equipment.

photo archive

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Mexican industrial park operator Parque Industrial Amistad Aeropuerto plans investment of approximately 15 million USD in its facility at Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila, to accommodate US cooling

www.amistadmexico.com

www.virginmobilelatam.com

Deploying Wings

photo archive

photo courtesy of sempra energy

Investment in the Pipeline

www.ienova.com.mx

recent reforms in Mexican telecommunications law designed to increase competition in the sector.

AEROSPACE

ENERGY

IEnova, the Mexican subsidiary of US natural gas utility Sempra Energy, plans investment of 1.2 billion USD in energy industry projects in Mexico. The projects, some of which will be carried out in partnerships with Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) and British Petroleum, include gas and ethane pipelines as well as a wind energy generation park.

Virgin Mobile Latin America, subsidiary of UK-based Virgin Group, plans investment of 41.5 million USD to enter the Mexican and Brazilian markets over the next two years. Virgin seeks to take advantage of

US aerospace components maker UTC Aerospace Systems will invest 300 million USD to expand operations at its affiliate location in the northwestern city of Mexicali. The site will produce weight-reducing acoustic panels from composite materials for aircraft. utcaerospacesystems.com


A high-flying industry

by jesús estrada cortés

The journey undertaken by the aerospace industry in Mexico has been simply extraordinary. Following the coordinates set out in a National Flight Plan and boosted by the “triple helix”–a joint strategy involving business, government, and universities– the sector has recorded annual growth rates of 17.2% in the last nine years and in a short time has emerged as one of the most competitive players on the global market. As if that were not enough, the pilots are now plotting a new course to fly even higher in the coming years. With a history of operations dating back several decades, in the past ten years Mexico consolidated its position as a stellar player in the aerospace industry.

Exports rocketed from 1.3 billion USD in 2004 to almost 5.5 billion in 2013. The main driver of this growth has been the 287 firms and support bodies in the aerospace industry operating in the country, located in 17 federal entities generate 43,000 direct jobs, out of which 32,600 are highlevel professionals. The future vision for the industry aims at even further growth. “By 2015 we will be capable of generating 52,000 jobs, while exports will exceed 7.5 billion USD and national content in components will be over 30%,” explains Vladimiro de la Mora, president of the Mexican Federation of Aerospace Industries (FEMIA). The plan anticipates foreign sales reaching 11 billion USD by 2020, with the generation of 100,000 jobs and

photo archive

Having dazzled with its constant growth over the past decade, the Mexican aerospace industry is taking flight towards new ambitious goals and setting its course for taking advantage of the potential of the human talent and local supplies existent in Mexico.

Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

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July 2014

national content in the industry supply chains of over 40%. De la Mora adds that Mexico is currently ranked 15th in the list of global suppliers to the industry; the plan is to enter the top ten by 2020. How are these goals to be achieved? “It will be thanks to the triple helix: the government, with strong support from the authorities and universities, talent training, and companies that see that this kind of industrial work can be done in Mexico,” something that is actually reflected in the growth in foreign direct investment. With the vision of joining forces in a triple helix, a comprehensive plan was created and implemented: the National Flight Plan, which has provided the foundation for developing Mexico’s national strategy for the aerospace sector (ProAéreo). The most recent version of the National Flight Plan sets out the scope of each helix. The development of talent by the universities and training centers has been key to the evolution of the industry. Mexico is the most significant source of talent in the Americas, with over 110,000 graduates from engineering and technical programs each year. In addition to recent graduates, the country can rely on highly-trained personnel with decades of experience in the automotive, electronics, and medical device industries, among others –that are closely linked to advanced manufacturing. Vladimiro de la Mora believes that talent development and rapid generation of experience among newly trained professionals are the two great challenges the aerospace industry is facing. “The challenge is how to develop the specific expertise for this sector from among the engineering graduates,” he points out. “We have to continue to work to swiftly train these young people, this demographic dividend we have. We have to achieve that in less than forty years,” he adds. To achieve that goal, it is necessary to continue to invest in colleges and laboratories and to bring over “experienced people to teach us.” According to ProMéxico, there are 21 educational institutions in the country offering 52 programs in aerospace education, including core courses, highschool qualifications, technical courses, advanced technical-university courses, professional qualifications, engineering degrees –mostly aeronautics and aerospace– and several Master’s programs.

July 2014

photo courtesy of bombardier

Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

International companies like Bombardier, Grupo Safran, General Electric (GE), Honeywell, and Eurocopter have found the ideal conditions in Mexico for developing design and engineering centers, laboratories, and production lines capable of adapting rapidly to take on complex jobs to develop new generations of engines, components, and airframes.

In order to align the industry’s needs with training availability, a working group was established to work on the Integrated Strategic Aerospace Education Program, defined by the “triple helix” and coordinated by a committee representing bodies such as FEMIA, the Mexican Space Agency (AEM), the Mexican Aerospace Education Board (COMEA), ProMéxico and the Ministry of Public Education (SEP), among others. Industry trends In the industry strand of this helix, the Mexican aerospace sector makes for an interesting mix: almost 79% of the in-

dustry is engaged in manufacturing, 11% in maintenance, repair, and operations (MRO) activities –which includes, for example, plants where aircraft landing gear is repaired– and the remaining 10% covers firms working on research and development (R+D), according to De la Mora. International companies like Bombardier, Grupo Safran, General Electric (GE), Honeywell and Eurocopter have found the ideal conditions in Mexico for developing design, and engineering centers, laboratories and production lines capable of adapting rapidly to take on complex jobs to develop new generations of engines, components, and airframes. The National Flight Plan sets out the global trends in the aerospace industry and how some of them are already reflected in Mexico, such as commercial supply of engines. In Mexico, firms like GE and Honeywell are engaged in new engine R+D, in particular the GenX turbine, which makes fuel savings of almost 15% and reduces the carbon footprint by 30%. Design tests were carried out at the GEIQ center in Querétaro, where the next-generation LEAP-X turbine is also being developed. In addition to R+D, numerous multinational companies also assign their aircraft engine MRO activities to Mexico. Firms like Honeywell, GE, and Snecma –together with their respective supply chains– base most of the processes and

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Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

In addition to R+D, numerous multinational companies also assign their aircraft engine MRO activities to Mexico. Firms like Honeywell, GE, and Snecma –together with their respective supply chains– base most of the processes and capacities required to develop engines, from concept and design to manufacture and repair, in Mexico.

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capacities required to develop engines, from concept and design to manufacture and repair, in Mexico. Another global trend in the industry is the search for alternative fuels, in the face of international price rises and environmental concerns. On July 1, 2012, International Standard ASTM D7566 for the use of biofuels mixed with conventional jet fuel came into force, stipulating that commercial aircraft must have the capacity to fly using biofuels. The Mexican airline Interjet was the first company on the continent to make commercial flights using biofuel, placing the Mexican aviation industry in the vanguard. Meanwhile, Aeroméxico completed the first transatlantic flight in a wide-body aircraft using bio-jet fuel –the first flight of its kind in the world. Development of restricted and dualuse high technology is another global trend. As a result of Mexico’s entry to the principal export control regimes –the Wassenaar Arrangement, the Nuclear Suppliers Group and the Australia Group– increas-

courtesy of airbus group

ingly profitable and strategic investment projects have arrived in the country, which possess a high potential to promote competitiveness through technological and economic compensation. The projects under development include combat aircraft, unmanned vehicles, next generation materials, and knowledge process outsourcing (KPO) services for the aerospace and defense sectors, including software design and other industrial processes. Another global trend is the development of new materials and nanocomposites, with the aim of making airplanes lighter and quieter. In this field, research centers and specialist laboratories operating in Mexico include the Mexican Materials Research Corporation (COMIMSA), the Research Center for Advanced Materials (CIMAV) and the Institute for Materials Research (IIM) at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The dynamics of research has led the industry to develop new materials. An example of that is National Helicopters and Aerial Vehicles (HELIVAN), which is develop-

July 2014

Cover Feature | Negocios ProMéxico

ing graphene17, a carbon fiber that is 200 times stronger than steel and is used in the aerospace and defense industries. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have experienced meteoric growth in the past decade. They are seen as crucial in the transformation of international defense systems, offering effective solutions without risking pilots’ lives. It is expected that the military-use UAV market in the US will grow at a compound annual rate of 12% to reach 18.7 billion USD in 2018. In Mexico, a number of firms have focused on the manufacture and development of UAVs. An analysis of trends in this area shows that Mexico has the capacity for specialized manufacturing, talent for R+D, and the international agreements relating to dual-use technologies required to become a key supplier in this market. Developing suppliers Vladimiro de la Mora puts forward development of local suppliers as the other major challenge facing the aerospace industry to complete its value chain. “The

July 2014

challenge lies in assisting small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to enter the industry. It is a highly certified sector and we need to examine what kind of incentives and support can be generated so that SMEs can gain certification and acquire the financial capacity to produce samples without impacting on the capital that underpins their operation,” explains De la Mora. “In Mexico we have geographic and cost advantages; we are just a couple of hours from the largest market in the world, the US, and our labor costs are very competitive,” De la Mora affirms. In his view, these advantages have permitted the development of industrial sectors where Mexico is now a leader on the international stage, like the electronics and automotive industries. The interesting thing is that many suppliers in these industries are already successfully dealing with the aerospace industry, including, for example, Grupo Kuo, whose aerospace division is a supplier for the giant Bombardier. De la Mora adds: “Right now we are working on a study of the value chain to determine where the areas of opportunity lie in the manufacturing processes and find ways of responding to them. The Ministry of Economy asked us to identify the most important areas in order to approach the major players in the sector on a global scale and convince them to set up in Mexico.” Government backing This is just one example of the joint work between industry and government, which is the third strand in the triple helix of the aerospace development strategy. De la Mora remarks that FEMIA works with the government to set up a laboratory for the industry. “It was decided to locate it in Querétaro. As an association we carried out a survey among our members to see what was most needed on the basis of what is currently being done in the country,” he explains. Meanwhile, the Mexican government has set up a number of programs to boost international trade activities, eliminating or reducing bottlenecks, and thereby contributing to the efficient integration of local and global supply chains. These programs include IMMEX, an instrument that permits the temporary import of goods required for an industrial process or service aimed at the manufacture, ad-

aptation, or repair of goods from abroad for their subsequent export (or provision of export services), without paying general import taxes, value added tax or, where applicable, antidumping duties. That means import activities are wholly tax-free. Draw Back is a program that enables beneficiaries to recover the cost of the taxes paid on importing inputs, raw materials, components and parts, packaging and containers, fuels, lubricants and other materials used in the exported product, or for the import of goods that are returned in the same condition, as well as goods used in repairs or alterations. The National Flight Plan shows that the Mexican government has also progressed in trade facilitation. The Ministry of Economy established a program for gradually reducing tariffs; the implementation of a tariff simplification policy is bringing the country’s tariff levels into line with those of its trading partners, including the US. Thanks to that measure, savings of over one billion USD for companies have been generated. Customs and trade facilitation includes the simplification and streamlining of customs clearance procedures, review of domestic standards, and homogenization with international standards, among others. Furthermore, tariff classification 9806.00.06 was created to provide tariff benefits for imports of inputs for the aeronautics sector in Mexico to increase its competitiveness. That tariff classification allows tarifffree imports for assembly or manufacture of aircraft or aircraft parts, as well as for goods intended for the repair or maintenance of aircraft or aircraft parts, benefitting MRO activities. The strategies and actions deployed by the triple helix benefit all the sectors, agents, and activities in an industry that has set its course and plans to further develop two of its key strengths –human talent and local supplier capacity– to achieve the success anticipated in its flight plan for 2020. What is more, that route can also lead to large-scale achievements, like completing the full assembly of an aircraft in Mexico. To remove any lingering doubts, Vladimiro de la Mora reiterates the advantages Mexico offers: “Proximity to the US, support from the government, and economic stability. There is stability in the exchange rate too, which is a significant factor for the aerospace business.” N

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Negocios ProMéxico | Cover Feature

Business Tips | Negocios ProMéxico

Regional ecosystems

Mexico’s Aerospace Industry: Building an Innovation and Technology Platform for the Next Generation

Baja California

Recent years have seen the development and consolidation of several aerospace clusters in Mexico. Particular vocations trigger hubs of competitiveness: that is, regional ecosystems of high-level innovation and coordination that operate in tandem with a national vision. The following are the most important regions for the Mexican aerospace industry from the perspective of exports and coordination between the clusters.

With experience accumulated over more than four decades of manufacturing activity, Baja California is home to 76 companies in the aerospace industry, which together export 1.5 billion USD each year. The target for most of these exports is the US, with the rest going to Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and other countries. Sales in this state have

shown continued growth since 2002. On the basis of the joint strategy developed by industry, universities and government, Baja California will focus its innovation capacities on knowledge process outsourcing (KPO) services for the aerospace and defense industry and will incentivize its potential for development in airframe systems and power plants.

A combination of advanced technological exports, talented engineers, competitively priced and skilled workforce and an effective legal framework for the protection of industrial property have positioned Mexico as a premier manufacturing hub, poised to evolve into a next generation technology development platform of great strategic value.

Chihuahua International México, Honeywell Aerospace and EZ Air Interior Limited) and more than 37 certified suppliers. In this state, more than 42 firms generate 13,000 direct jobs and some 1.5 billion USD of foreign and domestic invest-

Sonora Located in Mexico’s northeast, this state is home to one of the largest and best integrated aeronautics machining clusters in the country. Sonora has become a center of excellence in the manufacture of blades and components for turbines and aircraft engines (casting and machining processes, among others). There are more than fifty companies and support bodies in the state, and it exports around 190 million usd. Sonora also produces a significant level of human resources, with 29,203 graduates in engineering and technology. The Sonora Institute for Advanced Aerospace Manufacturing (IMAAS) was recently created in the city of Hermosillo in response to the growing demand for trained technicians from the recent investment and expansion by aeronautics sector companies.

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ment. Among other capabilities, companies in the state focus on composite materials, sheet metal, aerostructures, forging, casting and thermal and surface treatments. The state also possesses major engineering and design

centers, run by Grupo Safran, Zodiac Aerospace and Honeywell Aerospace. In 2013, exports from Chihuahua passed one billion USD. The principal destinations for its exports are the US, Germany, France and Canada.

The national strategy for the aerospace industry is paying dividends in knowledge transfer: Mexico’s aeronautic sector is gradually evolving into a strong innovation and technology platform for the next generation. The national strategy remains focused on turning Mexico into a destination that supports the complete aircraft life cycle from design and engineering to part manufacturing and assembly, aircraft maintenance, and recycling and/or refurbishment of end-of-life aircraft. Mexico’s aerospace strategy is unparalleled anywhere in the world. It promotes the country’s capacities as a competitive manufacturing partner, becoming an affordable destination for innovation and technology development on a project by project basis. The next stage in the development of Mexico’s aerospace and defense (A+D) industry, therefore, is the identification and development of R+D commitments within the country’s aerospace clusters.

Querétaro With thirty companies and support bodies in the aerospace sector generating exports valued at 693 million USD, Querétaro has established itself as a strategic hub for the global aerospace industry. Some of the companies operating in the state include Bombardier, Grupo Safran (Messier-BugattiDowty and Snecma), Eurocopter, Brovedani Reme, Elimco Prettl Aerospace, Galnik, GE Infraestructure, Crio, NDT Export México and ITP. Querétaro’s success is due to the close relationship

between the state government and industry and support mechanisms that have triggered strategic projects like the Aeronautic University in Querétaro (UNAQ), where the study programs (from basic diploma to postgraduate) have been designed around the firms’ requirements. Since 2006, 2,851 students have graduated, a figure expected to increase to 6,500 by 2016. Also of note is the Aeronautical Testing and Technologies Laboratory (LABTA), a unique project in Latin

America that comprises three research centers that unite their expertise to present a comprehensive range of laboratory tests and services. The Querétaro Aerocluster comprises thirty manufacturing and supply companies for structures, parts and components, three MRO companies, five design and engineering centers, three innovation and development centers, five service companies, three education institutions and a network of innovation and research.

Nuevo León The state of Nuevo León is well known for its industrial development and leadership in advanced manufacturing. Thanks to its geographical location, combined with its highly qualified human capital and supply network,

it is one of the best places to do business in Mexico and the rest of North America. With multi-sector industrial experience of more than 100 years, the state has 28 companies in the aeronautics sector, with exports totaling

651 million USD per year. One of the keys to the economic success of Nuevo León is the quality and excellence of its highly competitive educational institutions, from which over 6,000 engineers graduate each year.

July 2014

photo courtesy of airbus group

Thanks to its industrial and advanced manufacturing capacities, Chihuahua is one of the states with greatest potential for development in the aerospace and defense sectors. Chihuahua has five OEMs (Cessna, Beechcraft, Textron

by luis archundia*

July 2014

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Negocios ProMéxico | Business Tips

The country has become an aerospace juggernaut in a relatively short time due to its sophisticated knowledge and innovation-driven human capital. Mexican universities produce more engineering graduates than any other country on the continent. On a per capita basis, Mexico graduates three times more engineers than the US. In fact, more than 110,000 engineers graduate every year from science and technology programs in Mexico. There are currently 287 aerospace companies and related entities operating in Mexico employing some 32,600 highlyskilled professionals. The bulk is concentrated in five states and the vast majority is registered with the Performance Review Institute’s National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program (NADCAP) and hold Aerospace Standard 91000 (AS9100) certification.

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A combination of advanced technological exports, talented engineers, competitively priced and skilled workforce, and an effective legal framework for the protection of industrial property have positioned Mexico as a premier manufacturing hub, poised to evolve into a next generation technology development platform of great strategic value to the global aerospace industry. A case in point is the level of integration of Mexican engineering expertise with global operations. Bombardier Aerospace has already employed 200 engineers at its facilities in Querétaro, to provide support to the company’s production sites in the country. This group of engineers interacts on a daily basis with other engineering teams around the world. With their help, Bombardier Aerospace is capable of managing all aspects

courtesy of bombardier

related to electrical harnesses, and is the pioneer in México for the manufacture of composite aircraft components, using innovative production techniques. Aerospace supply chains are morphing. Burgeoning manufacturing clusters are upgrading the technological content of their activities and developing a dedicated technology platform. With the global aerospace industry shifting to an intense activity in commercial aircraft development and manufacturing to offset losses derived from defense budget cuts, many companies are seeking competitive and innovation-oriented destinations like Mexico. Apart from its cost-effective manufacturing, Mexico is increasingly seen as an emerging development platform for next generation technologies. Changes in the global production chain bring a demand for new players to

July 2014

Business Tips | Negocios ProMéxico

emerge in the global ecosystem capable of generating affordable innovation for the aerospace industry. To meet this demand, one of the national government’s priorities is the continuous development and progressive evolution of the Mexican aerospace industry. As a result of this strategic approach and following the Roadmap of the Aerospace Industry designed by ProMéxico’s Business Intelligence Unit, a more ambitious and strategic innovation policy is being developed by both the government and the industry to encourage aerospace clusters in Mexico to undertake R+D activities and integrate systems and subsystems. Setting up world-class research infrastructure is vital to achieving this, given the inclusion of new technologies in new aircraft models. High technology companies tend to cluster around knowledge-producing institu-

July 2014

tions and the innovation-driven aerospace sector is no exception. For this reason, and in line with the national industrial strategy, the Ministry of Economy has identified Querétaro and Baja California, among other states, as potential poles of innovation to develop an effective technology potential. Firms are encouraged to go beyond manufacturing and assembling operations and undertake more complex activities, boosting Mexico’s capacities as a relevant player in this worldclass high technology industry. One specific example is the recent setting up of RIIAQ (Aerospace Research and Innovation Network Querétaro), a manufacturing and innovation network comprising 29,000 jobs and located in the central Mexico industrial cluster in Querétaro, Mexico’s industrial heartland. The network of collaborative innovation was launched in 2009, and has been built stage by stage. The first challenges were to obtain company buy-in and develop the education and R+D system to support it. Its current challenge is to establish flexible public policies to support new companies coming into Querétaro, local SMEs and industrial R+D. The development and consolidation of aerospace clusters is often done in stages; the first is to build the manufacturing capacities of companies that will form the supply chain. But also, innovation capacities have to be developed in the targeted region. The RIIAQ consists of aerospace companies such as Aernnova, Bombardier, ITR, GE, Safran Dowty Messier and Alaxia Aerosystems in conjunction with academic institutions and federal and state governments. Emerging from a National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) initiative to stimulate the formation of strategic alliances between public and private actors in priority areas for knowledge, research and the creation of new capacities for the aerospace sector, the RIIAQ is an institutional and interdisciplinary network in the scientific and technological development of the aerospace industry. It is also a collaboration platform to achieve excellence in research and innovation through interaction and sharing of common goals. Mexico is a leading producer of jet engines. It has the largest GE research and design center outside the US and Canada –in Querétaro–, where around 1,300 engineers work on projects like the GEnx turbine used on Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner

Mexico is a leading producer of jet engines. It has the largest GE research and design center outside the US and Canada –in Querétaro–, where around 1,300 engineers work on projects like the GEnx turbine used on Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner and the Airbus A380. and the Airbus A380. In 2015, GE plans to open a new 30 million usd facility, right on the heels of one opened early this year at a cost of 20 million usd. The new wing will house GE’s aviation program with roughly 1,000 staff. Another useful example to illustrate innovation advances by Mexican homegrown talent is 3D Robotics (3DR). This company was founded in 2009 and operates in both California, US and Baja California, Mexico. 3D Robotics develops innovative, flexible and reliable personal drones and UAV technology for everyday exploration and business applications. 3DR’s UAV platforms capture breathtaking aerial imagery for consumer enjoyment and data analysis, enabling mapping, surveying, 3D modeling and more. The company’s technology is currently used across multiple industries around the world, including agriculture, photography, construction, search and rescue and ecological study. 3DR is committed to bringing the power of UAV technology to the mainstream market. This company’s success story is being replicated by a new breed of young Tijuana visionaries who are betting on entrepreneurship and innovation by creating a mind hub aiming to work with US aerospace companies and other sophisticated technology industries across the border. To sum up, Mexico is more than just cost-effective manufacturing and is certainly more than an assembly line. The country is ready to evolve as a next generation technology platform for the global aerospace industry. We are flying to our destiny. N *Business Intelligence Unit, ProMéxico.

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico in the World

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Mexico in the World | Negocios ProMéxico

courtesy of grupo safran

The aerospace Industry in Mexico and the French Touch

The French Touch In 2013, the French aviation industry represented 42.5 billion euros generating 170,000 direct jobs. It is important to mention that 75% of production is exported, being a key piece in the country’s trade balance. Almost 900 million euros are destined for research and development activities; this has allowed an important rise in technology development in a knowledgebased economy.

In the last three decades, the world economy has undergone many changes. Several local economies have been forced to be part of the globalization and the markets corrected their path by developing regional strategies or “nearshoring.” The global aerospace industry is a clear example of this trend. by guillermo garza garcía*

Following the decline of the aviation industry between 2008 and 2009, during 2012 and 2013 there has been a trend towards consolidated growth. This recovery is due largely to the increase in air traffic and the establishment of the middle class in emerging or developing economies. This market has been an important driver for airlines to report sizeable profits. This trend has been vital for countries like China and India to have developed a clear strategy for the aviation industry and consider the overall manufacture of an aircraft in the next few years in order to compete with companies like Airbus and Boeing and even Bombardier and Embraer, to mention a few. Mexico has been an important factor in this global transformation. Sharing 3,000 kilometers of border with its northern neighbor, Mexico has firmly established as an attractive destination to accommodate key industry players. The US is the most important market in this sector with 543 billion USD, some 59% of the global market. According to the US Department of Trade, Mexico is its sixth largest aerospace supplier. In just a decade, Mexico has developed an industrial platform of 287 companies in this sector, involving the creation of more than 35,000 jobs. The sector has recorded an annual growth rate of 17.2% during the last nine years. These figures would have been unimaginable ten years ago.

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The French aviation industry set its sights on Mexico some years ago and has developed a common strategy that has enabled access to the North American market.

The French aviation industry set its sights on Mexico some years ago and has developed a common strategy that has enabled access to the North American market. Worth noting is that in 1990 Labinal began operations in Chihuahua. However, a decade later several French companies or consortium divisions like Grupo Safran, as well as Zodiac and Radiall, among others, have expanded to other states around the country. Grupo Safran has been operating in Mexico for more than twenty years with a dual purpose: to be closer to its clients in North America and to win market share in a zone that is clearly thriving. The group has ten centers in the country, with more than 5,000 employees. Grupo Safran is the primary employer of the aviation sector in Mexico. High-flying Mexico Today, the Mexican aviation industry is in consolidation with great challenges and areas of opportunity. On the heels of the success of Mexico’s automotive industry, there has been much emphasis on the development of a local supply chain that enables the creation of a local industrial fabric through the generation of joint ventures and strategic partnerships with foreign companies. Collaboration between government, academia, and industry has been crucial for the sector to shine. The overwhelming success related to training and skills development has also been very important. Many programs have been promoted for the purpose of ensuring that the industry has a permanent supply of skilled personnel with high added value. Mexico has the potential and conditions necessary to be a major player on the world stage of the aviation industry. Ever more companies strive to become part of this success, and to participate in the flight they embarked on. N

*ProMéxico’s representative in Paris, France.

July 2014

July 2014

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

courtesy of bombardier

In 2008, the company announced that its Querétaro facility would be responsible for the manufacture of the major composite structures for its new Learjet 85 aircraft program, bringing an additional investment of 250 million usd to its Mexico operation.

Bombardier: Pioneers to Leaders In less than a decade, Canadian aerospace giant Bombardier has gone from pioneer to leader in Mexico’s burgeoning aerospace industry.

by graeme stewart

The rise of Canadian aerospace company Bombardier in Mexico has been nothing short of breathtaking. Not content with gaining a foothold in Mexico by opening its aerospace facility in Querétaro in 2005, the company has continued to grow thanks to a total investment of 500 million USD in its central Mexico plant. With some 1,800 mainly Mexican employees, Bombardier is now as synonymous with Querétaro as the local football team, Querétaro FC. Its benefit to the local economy has been huge, but if Bombardier has been good for Querétaro, then so too has Querétaro been good for Bombardier. That is a fact freely acknowledged by Joelle Cournoyer, the company’s Vice President of Operations in Mexico. “We have been very impressed with our Mexican workforce. They are young, enthusiastic, and eager to learn. Couple that with the fantastic cooperation we receive from state and federal governments and you can see how we have been so successful in Mexico,” she says. Cournoyer recalls Bombardier’s close connections with Querétaro began in 2005 when the company announced the city’s selection as its loca-

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tion for additional manufacturing capacity with an initial investment of 200 million USD. One year later, Bombardier began manufacturing the flight control for the Q400 turboprop, as well as the aft fuselage for the Global family of business jets. In 2008, the company announced that its Querétaro facility would be responsible for the manufacture of the major composite structures for its new Learjet 85 aircraft program, bringing an additional investment of 250 million USD to its Mexico operation. And in 2011, a mere five years after starting its Querétaro operation, Bombardier announced a further 50 million USD investment for the manufacture of the aft fuselage for its new Global 7000 and Global 8000 business jets. Cournoyer can’t hide her glee at Bombardier’s Mexican success story. “Our decision to set up in Querétaro has been a great success. When we were looking around for an additional manufacturing facility, Mexico was a stand out because the country had a good economy and was a member of NAFTA, as was Canada. There was a large labor force available and strong support from federal and state govern-

ments. All these factors were big plusses, great advantages for us. Setting up in Querétaro is a decision we have never had cause to regret,” she says. The VP admitted that the advantages of NAFTA have been considerable and important in Bombardier’s success in Mexico. “It can’t be denied that being able to benefit from better tariffs for goods and services, labor mobility, allowances, policies encouraging local investments, and more have helped us enormously. For example, we recently, had the successful completion of the new Learjet 85’s first test flight.

Querétaro’s input to the Learjet 85 project is the fuselage manufacturing and wing assembly. Of specific note is Querétaro’s participation in the development of advanced composite technologies and materials for the Learjet 85’s fuselage. We are very happy with the quality of those composite parts and are now concentrating on refining our production process,” Cournoyer says. Bombardier has sponsored several environmental projects in Querétaro but it is the educational links between the company and colleges in the area that Cournoyer finds par-

July 2014

ticularly pleasing. “One other thing that pleases me greatly is how we have integrated into the fabric of Querétaro society and we now have links to several institutions of higher education. We have collaboration agreements with the Aeronautic University in Querétaro (UNAQ) and the nearby Technological University of San Juan del Río to develop aerospace training programs and we also have collaboration agreements that include thesis projects, working internships, recruitment programs and job opportunities at the Valle de México University, the

July 2014

National Polytechnic Institute, the Technological Institute of Querétaro, the Autonomous University of Querétaro and the Tecnológico de Monterrey,” Cournoyer says. In conclusion, Cournoyer states: “When we started in 2005, we were aerospace pioneers and now we are working to become leaders in our field in Mexico. We are very proud to be in Querétaro and we plan to continue our success for the benefit not only of this federal entity but also of the whole country.” N www.bombardier.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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Airbus Group and Mexico, partners on board Both supplier and client, however we look at it, Mexico is a key hub in the global business of Airbus, a company with an annual turnover of 57.6 billion Euros and a workforce of 139,000 employees worldwide. by omar magaña

The relationship between the current state of the aerospace industry in Mexico and the expansion of the Airbus Group out of Europe and towards other strategic regions is increasingly evident. On the one hand, Mexico is a major production hub in the chain of inputs and services required by the constituent entities of the global corporation –Airbus, Airbus Defence and Space, and Airbus

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Helicopters. On the other, the firm is a major player in Latin America, while a large number of low-cost airlines –which use Airbus aircraft– have increased their participation in domestic markets in a sustained manner. Frédéric Garcia, CEO of Airbus Group Mexico, confirms that in the past six years the number of suppliers based in Mexico has tripled and is expected to double between now and 2020. Those projec-

tions, in his view, are independent of the decisions to be taken by the corporation with regard to the final assembly plant it recently set up in Mobile, Alabama, in the US. “In our view, Mexico is a very significant country in terms of procurement; in fact, our experts have identified the country as one of the leaders worldwide in that area,” he states. According to Garcia, Airbus Group Mexico currently

courtesy of airbus group

employs 400 people directly, while some 5,000 jobs in the country indirectly depend on the operations of the pan-European giant of the aerospace industry. It is worth emphasizing that in May, 2014, Airbus Defence and Space Mexico won recognition as a “Best Place to Work” for the fourth time in the ranking drawn up by CNN Expansión and Top Companies. Mexico’s mark as a supplier country is found in a number of Airbus models including Airbus Helicopters which manufactures in Querétaro the door structures for its A320 family, and Grupo Safran, which produces the cabling for the A380 in Chihuahua, and, again in Querétaro, components for the aircraft’s braking system. Other providers located in Chihuahua include Zodiac, which is responsible

July 2014

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

for the emergency slides, and Honeywell, which delivers parts for the turbine systems. Elsewhere, turbine parts are manufactured in Nuevo León and components for aircraft structures in Sonora. To that must be added the potential positive impact of transferring Airbus’s final assembly lines to North America, which would imply, as the company has indicated in recent months, a gradual increase in the demand from suppliers in the southern US and north of Mexico. Meanwhile, Mexico will continue to be present at a key moment for the corporation at which it is further boosting the internationalization of its procurement. According to forecasts from Airbus Group Global Sourcing Network, by 2020 around 40% of the group’s purchases will be made in countries outside of Western Europe. To that must be added the growing demand for aircraft resulting from the current expansion of low-cost airlines: a large volume of the A320 family and also of wide-body aircraft such as the A330, A350 and A380. Garcia describes the situation as follows: “There are a number of factors to explain the increasing share of Mexico in the Airbus Group supply chain. One is the growth in demand for aircraft itself. As a group we have a consolidated order backlog as of December 2013 worth 687 billion euros and a large percentage of that is allocated to procurement.” Mexican bodies for business promotion and support have done their bit, Garcia acknowledges, in terms of public policies to develop the aerospace industry in Mexico as a strategic sector. “We have maintained an excellent relationship with ProMéxico, for example, over many years. They were involved from the

July 2014

start in our project to establish a plant in Querétaro and their support has been very valuable in bringing those plans to fruition.” Aerospace industry on the up According to a number of market projections, Mexico will purchase 634 aircraft over the next 20 years. Most of these will be single-aisle models, like the Airbus A320, but a number of wide-body craft are also under consideration. “We are not mistaken in claiming that air traffic increases, on average, at double the rate of a country’s growth, which is a good indicator for Mexico over the next few years. The demand for air travel in the country will grow at a significant rate,” Garcia considers. He continues: “In this context, low-cost airlines like Volaris, VivaAerobus, and Interjet have determined that the new generation of Airbus aircraft, which provide efficiency savings and low fuel consumption, are suitable for that sector of the air transport market.” Indeed, one of the aspects Airbus Group is mostly promoting around the world is

Mexico will continue to be present at a key moment for the corporation at which it is further boosting the internationalization of its procurement. According to forecasts from Airbus Group Global Sourcing Network, by 2020 around 40% of the group’s purchases will be made in countries outside of Western Europe. its investment in research and development to offer the market products with a reduced environmental impact, modernizing air travel and boosting the use of alternative fuels. In October 2013, the Mexican company VivaAerobus, part of the IAMSA group, made history by signing a contract with Airbus Group for the largest ever order of aircraft for a Latin American airline. The purchase order is for 52 aircraft –40 A320neo and 12 A320ceo– which represents a full renewal of the fleet, a transition that will be complete by the end of 2016. Meanwhile, in 2012, Volaris and Interjet have placed orders for 44 and 40 aircraft respectively. Moreover, Airbus Defence and Space recently demonstrated its A400M aircraft to Mexican authorities. “We have

received very positive opinions from users and now the decision lies with them –but we firmly believe this is an aircraft highly suited to Mexico’s needs, above all in terms of civil protection,” says Garcia. At the same time, the company’s plans to set up two maintenance bases have been revealed, one in the center and another in the south of the country, which would service some twenty CN235 and C295 aircraft. So it is that Mexico and Airbus have found the right formula to remain partners in flight on a journey that, according to many forecasts, points to the consolidation of the Mexican aerospace industry as a key player on the sector’s global stage. N www.airbus.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of monterrey aerospace

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

monterrey aerospace: high fliers A company based in Apodaca, Nuevo León is responsible for a good number of Mexican components finding their way into the top flight of helicopter models. Its strategy is based on working with quality and meeting the most demanding standards. by omar magaña

bonding for bonding structural and non-structural metals, spot welding of aluminum and steel, and application of chemical treatments on aluminum and component assembly. Having control of the entire chain and doing so under the strict standards of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) makes Aerospace Monterrey a reliable company that is able to meet high priority requirements.

Monterrey Aerospace has become the foremost original equipment manufacturer (OEM) in the Nuevo León aerocluster, sending finished products to the US for use in the military sector. Despite the workload represented by completing delivery of 24 airframes for Boeing’s Apache AH-6i –a light combat and reconnaissance military helicopter– as well as MD Helicopters’ commercial

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models MD500E, MD530F, MD600N and MD520N, for which Monterrey Aerospace is the principal supplier, the company is participating in industry fairs such as ProMéxico Global in order to present itself to potential customers and expand its portfolio of domestic suppliers. Teresa Galindo, General Director of Monterrey Aerospace, explains that its independence with regard to the

MD Helicopters corporation, located in Mesa, Arizona, allows the Mexican firm to promote its own capabilities in the development of parts for the aerospace industry, spread the quality of its manufacturing and the vertical integration achieved so far to win over more customers. The company under Galindo’s charge carries out machining and forming processes for sheet metal, metal

Eight years of vertical growth Monterrey Aerospace was established in Apodaca, Nuevo León –in the metropolitan area of Monterrey– in 2006. Its goal at the time, according to Galindo, was only to produce minor subassemblies for MD Helicopters but, by 2007, the company had already succeeded in developing a complete fuselage with parts imported from the US and others manufactured in Mexico. Currently, 62% of the parts for the fuselage of MD’s commercial models are manufactured in Monterrey and, in the case of fuselages for military use, Mexican content reaches 90%.

July 2014

“The idea is to continue to increase assembly of parts in Mexico. Currently, some suppliers are based in the US but we want to vertically integrate to increase Mexican content,” Galindo reveals. The goal, according to the company’s director general, is that by the end of 2014, Monterrey Aerospace increases the number of parts produced at its plant from 1,800 to 2,000. That will largely be possible thanks to advances in the MD Helicopters’ ongoing program to produce its own model for the area of defense. This shift will also mean an increase in the workforce of the firm from 150 to 180 people, as well as new challenges for the company and its human capital, which will have to develop capabilities that are not yet fully integrated into existing curricula in technical and engineering schools. Partners, Galindo says, “must have a good ability to learn new things and adapt to change swiftly.” Monterrey Aerospace has six month training plans for new technicians. In addition, it has formed links with the Polytechnic University of Apo-

July 2014

daca in the areas of innovation and product development. Military grade Together with the above, the Mexican company and its staff have a high level of responsibility and commitment with the US authorities, institutions, and protocols –such as International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR)–, since the project began production of airframes for armed helicopters. In 2010, Boeing and MD Helicopters signed an agreement to produce jointly and sell the AH-6i, a new version of the legendary Apache. The construction of the prototype began in 2009 in Mesa, Arizona. Boeing won a contract with the US armed forces that led to a commission for 24 airframes that is currently occupying part of the workforce at Monterrey Aerospace. “We have a license from the US State Department that authorizes us to manufacture these products,” Galindo confirms. That makes Monterrey Aerospace the first Mexican OEM to deliver final products for the military sector to the US and projections indicate the firm will continue to work on these

Monterrey Aerospace was established in 2006. Its goal at the time was only to produce minor subassemblies for MD Helicopters but, by 2007, the company had already succeeded in developing a complete fuselage with parts imported from the US and others manufactured in Mexico. Currently, 62% of the parts for the fuselage of MD’s commercial models are manufactured in Monterrey and, in the case of fuselages for military use, Mexican content reaches 90%.

airframes during 2015 and into 2016. After that, orders are lined up from MD itself, which intends to become a full competitor in the same sector. The next step is to involve other firms in the vertical expansion of the company. Teresa Galindo explains that the corporation is interested in more Mexican companies obtaining certification, so they can become suppliers. To date only two workshops –one

for coating processes and one that manufactures aluminum pieces– are on her books. Meanwhile, relationships with both state and federal governments have been fruitful, since “the triple-helix idea works perfectly for us. The government offers incentives for firms to keep going and over time increase their productivity,” concludes Galindo. N www.mdhelicopters.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Businesses of a Feather Flock Together Chihuahua’s rapidly expanding aerospace cluster has attracted Fokker Technologies, a company that knows the business inside out.

photos

courtesy of fokker aerostructures

by omar magaña

The state of Chihuahua has taken giant steps down the road to creating a solid, dynamic aerospace cluster. Four original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) –Cessna, Textron International, Beechcraft, and Honeywell– have set up shop in this northern state, along with over twenty related companies. One of these is Fokker Aerostructures, a Fokker Technologies business unit that specializes in light weight aircraft structures like tail assemblies, wing components and fuselage panels. Piloting Fokker Aerostructures in Mexico is José Luis Rodríguez Ramos, who has been president of the Chihuahua Aerospace Cluster since 2013. “It’s a win-win relationship,” he says. Rodríguez has witnessed at first hand the growth of Chihuahua’s aerospace industry over the last two decades and is a promoter of the aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) base that will be built here between 2014 and 2015.

Chihuahua’s consolidation as an aerospace industry hub in Mexico was a decisive factor in persuading Fokker Technologies, a global company of Dutch origin that has production centers in Rumania, Turkey, Canada, the US, Singapore, and China, to transfer some of its larger projects to Mexico –projects like the assembly of the empennage and moving parts of the wings of business jets for different well recognized customers. “Our strategy was to develop a world class plant that could compete with the Europeans and Americans in terms of quality but at a lower cost. We, as Fokker, agreed to bring in know-how from the Netherlands, where Fokker has existed for one hundred years. We brought in people with as much as twenty or thirty years’ experience to participate in a process we call training the trainers,” says Rodríguez. The 70,000-square-foot plant opened its hatches in March 2012. In attendance at the opening ceremony were Steven Soederhuizen, Operations Vice President of Fokker Aerostructures, and Hans Büthker, then President of Fokker Aerostructures and current CEO of Fokker Technologies. At the time, it was announced that Fokker had made an initial investment of 15 million USD. The plan was to begin with ninety person business units, consolidate a first working phase with five active projects, and expand from there in phases with plants with the same characteristics as the existing one during the coming years. Fokker Chihuahua in Cruise Mode Three of the five projects assigned to the Chihuahua plant are already at the sustaining stage, while the required num-

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July 2014

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

ber of products are on line and meet quality standards. These entail the assembly of rear wings, tails, elevators, and wing rudders for business jets. The fourth project –the assembly of composite floor panels for business jets– will get underway in September 2014. “The transfer of technology has begun. We have people in the Netherlands learning to assemble composites and the infrastructure is being readied,” says Rodríguez. The fifth project is related to the agreement on starting manufacturing empennages for a new customer into the Fokker Mexico Aerostructures Plant during the second part of this year. If there was ever any doubt about Mexico’s ability to produce goods for the aerospace sector, these have been dissipated. Several sources predict that by 2016 Chihuahua will be the chief pole of competitiveness in Latin America if it continues to promote high-tech industries and dual-use goods. Fokker, which is in the process of transitioning from a European to a global enterprise, has chosen Chihuahua as its production base to serve the North American market and, according to Rodríguez, the goal is to expand gradually and help the company reach its global sales target of one billion USD by 2020. In the shorter term, the Chihuahua plant needs to ensure the transfer of know-how “is successful and that potential customers like Bombardier and other companies located in Mexico come to trust and look up to us,” says Rodríguez. Fokker Chihuahua boasts AS9100C, EASA Part-21, and other certifications granted by its customers, and complies with regulations governing the sector in Mexico. And because its manufacturing processes are aligned with those pat-

July 2014

ented by its parent company, it enjoys the complete trust of the latter and its customers. Not only has Dutch know-how been transferred to Mexico but also Fokker Chihuahua has been given the freedom to adapt it and has striven for excellence with the help of strategic alliances with academic institutions and government agencies in Mexico. Furthermore, “because aerospace has been classed a strategic sector in Mexico, Fokker Aerostructures has access to municipal, state, and federal government incentives intended to foster the development of the industry,” says Rodríguez. The American Supply Chain The coming on line of the Chihuahua plant brought

with it the migration of the supply chain for the OEM’s, with Fokker Aerostructures now purchasing its raw materials –minor metal structures, laminates, thermal and processed components, paint, sealants, and riblets– within the NAFTA zone. “The idea is that Mexican companies will supply more of these materials in the future,” concludes Rodríguez. Right now, there is a constant toing and froing between Mexico and the US. The company has a purchasing office in Atlanta, Georgia, with the objective of the development of the supply chain in the US and Mexico. N

Fokker, which is in the process of transitioning from a European to a global enterprise, has chosen Chihuahua as its production base to serve the North American market and, according to Rodríguez, the goal is to expand gradually and help the company reach its global sales target of one billion usd by 2020.

www.fokker.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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courtesy of aernnova

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

delivered the best balance between competitiveness and proximity to the customer. Most of our larger customers are in Canada and the US, and Mexico was an excellent base from which to expand the business,” says Pérez. Yet Mexico’s strategic geographical location wasn’t the only reason Aernnova came here. In addition to quality infrastructure and trained human resources, the company was attracted by a “stable economy closely linked to the dollar and with few surprises. Other parts of the world didn’t offer that stability, the kind of stability that has enabled us to plan and act for the long term,” says Pérez. Aernnova’s two Mexican plants are in Querétaro and together cover an area of 30,000 square meters and employ approximately 750

Aernnova, All-in-one Aerospace Solutions Annual earnings of some 50 million USD make the Mexican operations of this Spanish-based aerospace company a major contributor to global sales. by antonio vázquez

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“A comprehensive solution” is how Aernnova Mexico defines itself. This aerospace company currently rakes in as much as 50 million USD a year and its goal is to triple revenues within the next three years. Aernnova has been around for less than a decade under its current trademark, although its roots can be traced back to Gamesa Aeronáutica, a Spanish multinational that was engaged in the aerospace sector since the 1980s and that also had a presence on the industrial and automotive markets, among others. In 2006, we had the chance to do something different, so we went out on a limb with the incorporation of Aernnova, a completely new company,” says Javier Pérez Alcaide, CEO of Aernnova’s Mexican operations. Aernnova designs, manufactures, and assembles air-

Why Mexico? According to Pérez, when Aernnova embarked on its internationalization process, it analyzed countries like India, Morocco, and China, but in the end opted for Mexico due to the advantages it offered over other contenders. people. Mexico, says Pérez, is a special case within the consortium because it offers its customers comprehensive solutions. And it can do that precisely because it has two plants, one for the manufacture of large structures and another that makes metal components. “We have complete control over the supply chain. The comprehensive services we offer give us a huge competitive edge and what is so unique about Aernnova is that we can design, manufacture and assemble structures and components, which

greatly simplifies logistics for customers because it means they only have to negotiate with one supplier. In other words, we offer a tangible advantage,” says Pérez. Bombardier, Beechcraft, Sikorsky, Bell Helicopter, and Embraer are just some of the customers that have availed themselves of Aernnova’s solutions. Pérez sees a promising future for the company in Mexico. “Foreign companies have come to Mexico and the market is expected to post considerable growth in the years to come. The main

challenge,” he says, “will be to consolidate the supply chain.” In the short term, Aernnova plans to focus on strengthening its two production lines in Mexico and its goal is to end the year with earnings of 70 million USD. “Three years from now, we aim to be generating revenues of approximately 150 million USD and haven’t ruled out the possibility of taking up new initiatives with a view to expanding the business,” concludes Pérez. N www.aernnova.com

craft structures and renders engineering services in the same sector. “Our core activities are the design and manufacture of aircraft and aircraft structures and the rendering of services for our customers,” says Pérez. In record time, the company began to expand beyond the borders of its native Spain, to the point where it now boasts eleven work centers in its home market, two plants in Mexico, one in Brazil, another in Rumania, and an engineering center in the US. Why Mexico? According to Pérez, when Aernnova embarked on its internationalization process, it analyzed countries like India, Morocco and China, but in the end opted for Mexico due to the advantages it offered over other contenders. “The main reason we chose Mexico was its location. It was the country that

July 2014

July 2014

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of antair

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

of influence: North of Mexico and the south of the US. “We’re going to see a lot more growth. Since 2004, Mexico’s aerospace industry has registered sustained annual growth of almost 20%, and, in 2012, the value of its products and services increased 5.4 billion USD, positioning Mexico fourth on the list of countries to receive the most foreign investment in this sector,” says Antair Administrative Director Mario Alberto Estrada. Antair operates out of the Venustiano Carranza de Frontera International Airport in Coahuila, where it has two maintenance hangars, one covering 566 square meters and the other 2,450 square meters, and a jet fuel storage facility with a capacity of 83,000 liters. That location is strategic to its expansion, since it means the company can render ser-

Antair Fuels Up for the Future If the aerospace industry can sustain current growth rates, demand for aircraft maintenance services and spare parts will increase. Antair is preparing for that eventuality.

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Added-Value Alliances To date, Antair has acquired experience in the repair and maintenance of Class 2, 3 and 4 jets –Pilatus’ PC12-47/E and Kodiak’s 100 model (2), Gulfstream’s G-100, Gulfstream’s G-II, G-III, G-IV and G-V; Cessna’s C550 and Dassault’s F10 (3), and G-V and Cessna’s C-680 (4)–, and in the repair and maintenance of Class 1 helicopters, including Eurocopter’s AS355N, AS350B3 and AS350B3e models, Tur-

When Eurocopter of Mexico and Turbomeca Mexico heard about Antair’s 2012-2013 expansion, they got in touch with the company, made the necessary visits, and promoted the alliances that resulted in the company becoming an authorized service center.

by omar magaña

In 2009, Antair, which has been rendering air taxi services for Altos Hornos de México and its subsidiaries since 1995, obtained permission from Mexico’s Civil Aeronautics Authority (DGAC, Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil) to set up its own maintenance shop. Shortly afterwards, between 2012 and 2013, the company decided to expand its facilities so it could not only service its own aircraft but also those of third parties. In May 2013, following the granting of certifications by Eurocopter of Mexico and Turbomeca Mexico (Safran Group), Antair became the first maintenance, service, and inspection center for the for-

vices both north and south of the border with the US. According to Estrada, “this is a period of substantial investment” and among Antair’s priorities are the acquisition of specialized infrastructure, training for its mechanics, and the forging of strategic alliances with manufacturers of rotary and fixed-wing aircraft and aircraft engines.

mer’s Ecureuil helicopters and the latter’s Arriel engines. The investment required to get this project off the ground has been substantial, to say the least, but necessary to keep up with Mexico’s aerospace sector, which is experiencing rapid growth, not just in the areas of aircraft manufacturing and assembly but in demand for maintenance and repair services. According to sector documents compiled by ProMéxico, Mexico has the potential to become a global pole for a full range of aircraft services. Antair has been quick on the uptake and is already taking steps toward becoming a market leader within its area

July 2014

bomeca’s Arriel 2B, 2B1 and 2D engines, Pratt & Whitney’s PTAA6A-67B/P, PT6A-34, PW-306C and JT15D-4 models, Honeywell’s TFE 731-40R200G and TFE731-2-1C, and Rolls Royce’s SPEY 511-8 and Tay Park 611-8. It also conducts altimetric inspections and has a nickel, cadmium, and lead-acid battery shop. When Eurocopter of Mexico and Turbomeca Mexico heard about Antair’s 20122013 expansion, they got in touch with the company, made the necessary visits, and promoted the alliances that resulted in the company becoming an authorized service center. “Antair has always been a company concerned with quality in its operations and in the areas of employee training and safety,” says Estrada. “When the Eurocopter and Safran executives came, they saw that everything was in order and we were able to para apply for and obtain certification.” The company is currently seeking to establish an alliance with Honeywell Aerospace for the distribution of its products, services and warranties in Mexico and has plans to enter into alliances with other avi-

onic companies similar to those it currently enjoys with Eurocopter and Safran. “A strategic alliance with manufacturers translates into added value for our customers because it’s a guarantee everything is done by the book,” says Estrada. Training as a Differentiator When Antair decided to start rendering third party services, it set itself the goal of becoming a market leader on the strength of its mechanics’ dedication to the job and level of expertise. “We are implementing an intensive training program. We have sixteen mechanics, with twenty years’ experience on average, applying for American licenses,” says Estrada. These licenses, combined with the validation of its shop and FAA authorization will enable Antair to focus its commercial efforts on the US, where it has the advantage of being a close service option that offers quality at competitive costs. Despite the outlays of 2009 and 2012 for the acquisition of machinery, the expansion of its shop and the swelling of its payroll from four to sixteen mechanics, Antair continues to spend considerable sums on sending its mechanics to aircraft maintenance centers and factories in the US and Europe for training. “Several of our technicians are specializing with a view to becoming Master Technicians,” says Estrada. To keep the company on an even growth trajectory on a par with that of Mexico’s aerospace industry, Antair will continue to spend on training, take measures to attract more investment, and make an incursion into other service areas, such as aircraft painting and non-destructive testing. N www.antair.mx

July 2014

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of prysmian group

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Durango in the blood Sometimes the elements that make things work are out of sight. That is the case of cables, without which it is impossible to conceive of aircraft flight. Mexico participates in the production of that invisible but essential item to reach the skies. by omar magaña

Prysmian Group and Draka operate two manufacturing plants in Durango, one of which is focused on the production of latest generation cables for the aerospace industry, with the technological characteristics demanded by OEMs to create lighter and more efficient units. Prysmian, a multinational corporation from Milan that is listed on the Italian stock exchange, is a global leader in the manufacture of cables for electrical and telecommunications infrastructure and industry, with global sales of seven billion Euros (2013) and operations in 91 plants in 50 countries. It is a connections giant to which Mexico –and in particular, Durango– provides human capital and commitment for its activities in the aerospace and automotive industries. The corporation has a sales office and warehouse in the Mexican capital to manage and sell the solutions in the country that make up its worldwide portfolio. In Durango, it operates the cable factory for the automotive industry –which it acquired in 2006 from International Wire Group and which has been active in the state since 2001– and the factory that since 2009 has produced much of the cabling that is used in the most modern Airbus aircraft. “Prysmian has long been a preferred supplier for Airbus

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in Europe, and the decision of the pan-European aerospace company to grow its operations in America is an invitation for Prysmian to start operations in Mexico,” says Ramon Pallares, General Director of the group for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. “The truth is that the project began in Mexico at the request of Airbus, which has us as one of its global suppliers,” he emphasizes. According to Pallares, Prysmian Durango’s sales are mainly to cover for Airbus’ cabling needs for its different programs, going from models A320 to A350, and the new A380, which is Airbus’s largest aircraft. Everything that is produced in Durango belongs to the new range of cabling designs based on technology that reduces weight and increases temperature resistance. Prysmian and Draka are Tier-2 companies that deliver their products to harness companies. That is true of their production in Mexico, which is destined for Labinal plants run by the French Safran Group in Mexico and Morocco; LAtelec, part of the French group Latecoere in Mexico and Tunisia; and Fokker in Europe. Inside The establishment of Draka and Prysmian in Durango marked the beginning of operations for the aerospace industry. In 2012,

July 2014

new investments, more infrastructure and contracts were available in the state as an effect of Airbus’ global growth and migration to America. “Airbus has been growing; it has been successful in Europe and Asia and that has created a synergy between suppliers. It has forced us to grow with them,” says Pallares, who expects that by the end of 2015 the firm will be operating at 100% of its installed capacity. The escalation of manufacturing levels by Airbus in the US will be a significant moment for Durango and its aerospace sector. However, Prysmian and Draka propose not only to advance in step with their current clients but also to expand their client portfolio. Pallares adds that they will attack the US market with renewed confidence, in order to win the trust of developers like Boeing, and compete with firms that are at the top of the game in the US market.

July 2014

Currently, Prysmian’s Mexico factories employ some 350 people –275 in the automotive sector and 75 in aerospace. “The human resources we have found in Durango are of very good quality, the experience in the automotive sector has been positive and that is why we decided to open a plant at this technical level,” Pallares explains. Part of those human resources have been sent to France to train in the production processes undertaken in a factory that holds EN9100 and ISO9001 certifications, as well as the certificates given by Airbus itself to suppliers. Context Pallares acknowledges that Durango is a good site to set up business, despite the fact that the state does not yet have an aerospace cluster like those developed in states like Baja California, Chihuahua, Querétaro, Sonora, and Nuevo León. “The support we have received

from the state government has been excellent. ProMéxico has also provided significant assistance,” Pallares remarks. Raw materials, however, are not sourced locally because the suppliers “are not even in America; most are located in Europe, since it was a product Airbus originally developed there,” says Pallares. However, the trend, he explains, will force them to gradually move towards this part of the world. These are companies that are already opening warehouses along the Mexico-US border and, as Pallares predicts, may set up production in this country. On the tendency of companies connected to the complex network of the aerospace industry to move to the Americas –and in particular Mexico– Pallares concludes that “it is becoming a very important sector for the country. Gradually, they will replace the industries at a lower technical level.” N

Prysmian Durango’s sales are mainly to cover for Airbus’ cabling needs for its different programs, going from models A320 to A350, and the new A380, which is Airbus’ largest aircraft. Everything that is produced in Durango belongs to the new range of cabling designs based on technology that reduces weight and increases temperature resistance.

prysmiangroup.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Elimco-Prettl Aerospace, Wired for Success The company’s plant in Querétaro, Mexico contributes to the one billion euros this multinational turns over every year.

photos

courtesy of elimco-prettl aerospace

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

by antonio vázquez

Two established firms merge to give rise to a third of even grander proportions. That is the simple formula adopted by Elimco-Prettl Aerospace, an international manufacturer of electrical wiring harnesses for aircraft that set up a plant in Mexico a few years back to supply its main markets: North America and Europe. “Mexico offers many advantages compared to countries like Spain or France. There is skilled labor, which, although trained in other sectors, in a different type of manufacturing, is good and competitive,” says Rafael Navarro, Elimco-Prettl Aerospace Commercial and Contracts Director At its Mexican plant, Elimco-Prettl Aerospace manu-

factures electrical wiring harnesses, which basically contain all an aircraft’s cables and can vary in length from fifty centimeters to ten meters. “The company’s line of business includes the design, manufacture, assembly, testing, and delivery of electrical wiring harnesses for military and commercial aircraft,” says Navarro. Shoring up its aerospace division is the economic clout of two reputable firms with experience in the industrial sector: Prettl is a multinational of German origin with over 10,000 employees, 33 plants in twenty countries, and a longstanding tradition in the automotive sector, primarily in the electrical and electronics side; while Elimco is a Span-

ish firm that has been working with companies like France’s Airbus for some time now. In fact, it was Airbus that encouraged both companies to broaden its horizons, creating a joint venture that has positioned itself on the aerospace sector in no time at all. “(Both companies) wanted to develop an aerospace line. In 2010, they entered into a joint venture with representation in Mexico, in the city of Querétaro to be precise. More than anything, it was a transfer of know-how from Elimco to Prettl and obviously we are focused on markets in Mexico, the US, Spain, France and Germany,” says Navarro. Elimco-Prettl views Mexico as a gateway to the North and Latin American markets. As for its decision to settle down in Querétaro, several factors played a part, namely the fact that Prettl has had a presence there for almost forty years.

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July 2014

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Elimco-Prettl views Mexico as a gateway to the North and Latin American markets. As for its decision to settle down in Querétaro, several factors played a part, namely the fact that Prettl has had a presence there for almost forty years.

“As chance would have it, Prettl had a history of operating in Mexico and so the merger came about. Being in Querétaro gives you enormous advantages: you’re well connected to other states like Guanajuato and have access to airports in Mexico City and Querétaro. Also, Prettl imports a lot of materials via Veracruz and Laredo, so these two factors –geographical location and existing infrastructure– were central to the signing of the agreement,” says Navarro. “However,” he adds, “an even more important factor was the boom Querétaro’s aerospace sector has experi-

enced. Over the last three or four years, the state government has been promoting the sector by organizing fairs, events and trade missions and offering tax, trade, and strategic incentives to companies like ours. It’s a set of conditions that, together, paint a bright development outlook.” Prettl Group reports annual global revenues of some one billion USD, with the Querétaro aerospace plant chipping in with sales of almost one million USD. This is a great number for a three year old company, moreover, earnings are expected to triple following the signing of some contracts that the com-

pany is about to formalize with two of the main Tier 1 companies in the world “The figures indicate we will continue to expand. The idea isn’t just to carry on consolidating and delivering on our promises but to hire more people in Mexico,” says Navarro. Prettl employs 2,200 people in Mexico, 99% of whom are of Mexican origin (the remainder is from other countries like Spain, Germany or the US) and according to Navarro, the company is committed to Mexico for many reasons. “We want to stay here and we will; in fact, Prettl Group is about to open a new plant in Querétaro, near the airport, in 2015, which would create some 800 jobs. We’d like to expand our aerospace operations to that plant, but we need to go step by step. This is the line Prettl Group intends to follow,” concludes Navarro. N www.elimco-prettl.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

courtesy of carlisle interconnect technologies

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Carlisle Interconnect Technologies employs some 3,300 people worldwide. In Mexico, it has a workforce of 500 people engaged in the manufacture of 4,500 products from its extensive catalogue for customers like Boeing, Airbus, Bombardier, Northrop Gruman, Lockheed Martin and Fokker Technologies.

Carlisle Interconnect Technologies: An Aerospace Giant The Mexican plant owned by this American manufacturer of high performance aircraft wire and cable, accounts for a sixth of the 650 million usd the company generates every year in revenues. by antonio vázquez

A catalogue of 20,000 products and global sales of 650 million USD a year make Carlisle Interconnect Technologies a giant on the international aerospace market. A couple of years ago, the company set its sights on Mexico, where it proceeded to

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acquire industrial facilities that today account for a sixth of its annual earnings. In Mexico, the Company has been operating since 1982 under Collectron’s Shelter Plan Program. “We are the largest manufacturer of aircraft wir-

ing in the world. Our aerospace division generates 650 million USD a year,” said Carlisle Interconnect Technologies President John Berlin in interview with Negocios. “Of this figure, 100 million USD is generated by our plants

in Nogales, Sonora,” adds Adolfo Centeno, Director of the company’s Mexican operations. Carlisle’s origins date back to the first half of the 20th century. Initially, it supplied the US Air Force and with the passing of time, it evolved into the company it is today –a leader in its market niche with manufacturing presence in the US, England, Switzerland, China and, of course, Mexico but sales all over the world. The decision to begin operating in Mexico was based on the strategic advantages the country offers. “Carlisle acquired facilities in Nogales, Sonora. Today, this plant manufactures aircraft wiring for the commercial, aerospace,

July 2014

military and communications sectors. Basically, we supply electrical wiring for aircraft flight control, display, sound, voice, lighting and data transmission functions,” says Berlin. “Special wiring that can withstand high and extreme temperatures,” adds Centeno. The quality of its products and the thoroughness with which the company oversees every phase of its production processes have qualified it for major industry certifications like the ISO 9001:2000 and the AS 9100:2004, among others. Carlisle Interconnect Technologies employs some 3,300 people worldwide. In Mexico, it has a workforce of 500 people engaged in the manufacture of 4,500 products from its extensive catalogue for customers like Boeing, Airbus, Bombardier, Northrop Gruman, Lockheed Martin and Fokker Technologies. Berlin and Centeno agree that the ready availability of skilled labor in Mexico and the code of ethics it complies with are a plus that the company has had the vision to exploit. Centeno states that professionally, Sonora has a large number of universities and technical schools that

July 2014

enable Carlisle to develop employees with a high degree of technical knowledge. Nogales has a population of 400,000 people and over 35,000 manufacturing employees. It has 110 manufacturing facilities from the Fortune 200, Fortune 500 and privately owned companies. According to local government figures, Sonora has more than 50 aerospace related companies. Plans for the future include the expansion of the Nogales plant from 9,000 to approximately 17,000 square meters –proportional to the projected increase in output, says Centeno. According to Berlin, this expansion is merely “phase one” of a five-year plan to double the capacity of its Mexican facilities. Centeno believes conditions for the growth of Mexico’s aerospace sector are ripe, especially in Sonora, proof of that being the number of manufacturers that are flocking to the region. “I’m excited to be in Nogales with Carlisle. Business has been good and the environment has been very favorable. Our future is here,” concludes Berlin. N www.carlisleit.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photos

incertec Puts its Faith in Sonora Incertec, a supplier of secondary processes for the aerospace industry, has approached Sonora with an offer of helping meet demand in its aerospace cluster and consolidate the state’s production chain. by omar magaña

In late 2010, the state of Sonora and its aerospace cluster sent out positive signals to Incertec, an American metalplating company. Clearly there were business opportunities to be had here. According to Jesús Cervantes, manager of Incertec’s plant in Empalme, Sonora, the company’s Minneapolis

headquarters had shown a growing interest in the thriving aerospace industry of this border state in Northwest Mexico. In the end, it was Mohammad who came to the mountain: in 2011 Incertec took a leap of faith with the opening of its plating unit, which currently renders services to some 40 customers,

90% of whom are related to the aerospace sector. “The plant was set up to develop the local market,” says Cervantes. It wasn’t about transferring projects or contracts initiated in the US; Incertec came to Mexico to meet the needs of companies producing this side of the border. The cost of the kind of secondary processes Incertec offers is relatively low but companies in Sonora, Chihuahua, and Baja California had to pay more for them –and some still do– because in the absence of a local provider, these had to be carried out in the US. “Since we’ve been here, our client portfolio has increased. One of the reasons some of these companies have opted to set up shop in Sonora is because secondary processes like the ones we offer are now available,” says Cervantes.

courtesy of incertec

Incertec’s portfolio features the Mexican plants of companies like United Technologies Corporation, Williams International, Radiall, Ducommun, Parker Aerospace, ITT and, according to Cervantes, the hope is that in the near future other French, American, German, and British companies will be attracted by a region that caters to the entire production chain. “All the processes original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) need can be found here: machined parts, chemical processes, non-destructive testing, thermal treatments, and paint.” One-Stop Shop Incertec’s contribution to Sonora’s production chain –which Cervantes considers fully consolidated– consists of type I, II and III anodizing, universal pre-treatments for steel, brass, castings, stainless steel, alumi-

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

num, electroplating and electroless, non-destructive testing, nickel, tin, copper and cadmium plating, and titanium etching –the latter nickel and anodizing being the processes in greatest demand at its Empalme plant. These processes and the non-destructive testing the company performs are Nadcap and AS9100 C certified. It also has four Boeing certifications, in addition to the certifications extended by its customers. “If you look for another company with the certifications and processes we offer under one roof, I doubt you’ll find it,” says Cervantes. Although its calling is the aerospace sector, Incertec’s Mexican plant also has customers in the automotive, electronics and commercial sectors. In the US, where it has been operating for over twenty years, it is a market leader, serving some 600 customers, including medical firms. Add to these services the smelting and machining processes available, says Cervantes, and Sonora can claim to be a one-stop shop for manufacturers. All they have to do is bring their plans, procure the necessary raw materials and they can go back home with their part. Trust-Backed Investments Since 2011, Incertec has channeled four million usd into its 2,500-square-meter plant in Empalme. Initially, says Cervantes, investing in Sonora required a “leap of faith.” Now all that remains is for the company to expand on a level pegging with growth in demand. In the short time it has been operating in Mexico, Incertec has found an ally in the federal government through initiatives like the Ministry of the Economy’s Program for the Technological Development of Industry (Prodiat), which provides funding for technical assistance, training,

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July 2014

certification, consulting services, and access to information and new technologies related to high-added-value activities. By year-end, Incertec will have an additional cadmium and nickel plating lines, and by the second half of 2015 it plans to use available plant space to introduce silver and gold lines, which will require an additional injection of 1.5 million usd. New contracts and more customers will also mean extra shifts and adding to its 32 strong workforce. Procuring raw material in Mexico hasn’t been a problem,

Although its calling is the aerospace sector, Incertec’s Mexican plant also has customers in the automotive, electronics and commercial sectors. In the US, where it has been operating for over twenty years, it is a market leader, serving some 600 customers, including medical firms. since Incertec has a strategic alliance with the American chemical giant MacDermid, which also operates in Mexico. Incertec continues to put its faith in Sonora and has opened the floodgates for others eager

to follow its pioneering example. “It makes us proud that the reason many have come here is because we’re here,” concludes Cervantes. N incertec.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

Altaser Flies High A team of just twenty people is behind one of the companies with the brightest futures in Mexico’s aerospace sector. Over the next five years, Altaser aims to achieve an ambitious annual sales target of 10 million usd.

photos

courtesy of altaser

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

by antonio vázquez

Barely five years have passed since it began operating and already this Mexican company looks set to become a major player in the aerospace sector. “We started out in a small 900-square-meter building and before the year was out, we had to move to our new facilities, where we have 3,500 square meters with the option to expand to 5,000,” says Altaser Director Arturo Ávila to illustrate how fast the company has grown. Located in the city of Chihuahua in North Mexico, Altaser has a background in manufacturing. The company is an extension of Grupo

Copachisa, a conglomerate specializing in the manufacture of inputs for buildings and industrial facilities. In 2010, the group’s investors decided to diversify and, after conducting a series of studies, opted for the aerospace market, which was totally alien to them at the time. A year later, Altaser was incorporated and as soon as it set up shop in 2012 it began producing machined parts. Very early on, it obtained certifications like the AS 9100, a quality management system specific to the aerospace sector. “We are certified by the US government, which means

Of such a high quality standard are the company’s manufacturing processes that it had only been operating for three months when Honeywell began placing orders for premachined parts for its aerospace division and is now a regular customer. we can do business with companies like General Electric and Bombardier. Around the same time as we obtained certification, we joined the TechBA business acceleration program, which made a difference practically overnight by helping us focus our efforts on the market niche we wanted to target,” says Ávila. Altaser’s area of expertise is the manufacture of machined parts for aircraft. These are parts made from very hard metal alloys, like titanium. “The harder the metal, the more precise the part –this is where we are competitive and where the greatest opportunities for the Mexican market lie. We make parts for engines and landing gear. We also manufacture structural parts in hard aluminum,” says Ávila. Of such a high quality standard are the company’s

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manufacturing processes that it had only been operating for three months when Honeywell began placing orders for pre-machined parts for its aerospace division and is now a regular customer. In just two years, Altaser has put together a catalogue of 105 part numbers. Production volumes vary from five to 350 parts a month, with hubs, shafts and cases topping the list of its most popular products. Approximately 90% of its annual output currently ends up on export markets. According to Ávila, the company’s rapid growth can be attributed largely to three main factors. The first of these is a project for the forging of ties with educational and technological institutions and the support the company has received from the National Council of Science and Tech-

nology (CONACYT). The second has been the quality of the human resources that have joined the company’s rank and file. And the third has been a business plan geared toward exploiting the market for high-precision machined aircraft parts. “There are several advantages to operating in Mexico, particularly Chihuahua. One of these is that skilled labor is readily available,” says Ávila, adding that another is the state’s geographical location. “We are four hours away from the US border by road. If we have to ship products immediately, we can. We are in a zone where there are a lot of established industries and the foreigners who visit us don’t even miss home because we have excellent hotels, airports and services here.”

From its conception, Altaser has thought big. So ambitious is it that it aims to turn over as much as 10 million USD a year in sales in five years’ time. In the short term, another expansion is on the horizon and manufacturing contracts for 2015 that will help triple sales have already been secured. “The National Development Plan provides for major investment in the sector, which is good news for Mexico’s aerospace industry. Mexico has people with a lot of know-how, skilled workers with over forty years’ experience in aerospace-related sectors. That is what gives us an edge over other regions like Asia and is an advantage we need to capitalize on,” concludes Ávila. N altaser-aero.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

photo

courtesy of techops

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

When operating at maximum capacity –in phase one of the overall project–, TechOps México will be able to service up to nine aircraft simultaneously. The plan is that four of these lines will be allocated to the Delta fleet, two to Aeroméxico and the rest made available to third parties.

Maintenance in a Big Way Two titans of the commercial aerospace industry have joined forces to develop the largest MRO of its kind in Latin America. They have selected Querétaro on the basis of the state’s established muscle in the sector. The future appears bright. by omar magaña

The main hangar at Querétaro Intercontinental Airport occupied by TechOps’ center of excellence for maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) is big enough to fit two Boeing 747s, the largest aircraft assembled to date in the world. That gives an idea of the scale of the project embarked on in March 2014 by the heads of the two parent companies, Delta Airlines and Aeroméxico, and the President of Mexico, Enrique Peña Nieto. As a result of its size, technology and service capacity, TechOps México in Querétaro is already considered the largest of its kind in Latin America. As its CEO, Miguel Ángel Uribe, puts it: “An investment on this scale by Grupo Aeroméxico in alliance with Delta –one of the largest firms in the US and worldwide– is unprecedented.” Uribe recalls that, in their day, Aeroméxico and the now defunct Mexicana de Aviación were pioneers of MRO services in Mexico. TechOps México represents a new stage in the Mexican aeronautics sector, with an investment of 55 million USD by Delta

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Airlines and Aeroméxico in infrastructure, technology, training programs for technicians and the creation of a 100,000 square meter facility. When operating at maximum capacity –in phase one of the overall project–, TechOps México will be able to service up to nine aircraft simultaneously. The plan is that four of these lines will be allocated to the Delta fleet, two to Aeroméxico and the rest made available to third parties. TechOps México has installed equipment for metrology processes and nondestructive testing. It has workshops for machining, doors, composite materials, cadmium-plating and alloys, electrical and electronics and painting cells for removable parts of the fuselage, among others. Part of the investment was spent on ensuring the center is environmentally friendly. “We installed approximately 8% to 10% translucent material in the roofs and doors of our hangars, allowing more natural light to enter and reducing our consumption of electric power,” Uribe points out.

processes we have undertaken, the quality is unbeatable while the cost structure is aggressively competitive worldwide,” Uribe confirms.

TechOps México in Querétaro also makes use of LED lighting technology and has installed its own racks of solar panels, which not only generate up to one megawatt (MW) of power each year –the largest in the industry–, but also provide shade for the site parking lot. The center of excellence also incorporates a rainwater collection and recycling system. The commitment made at the start of the center’s operations was that by the end of 2014, five of its nine lines of work would be running. Uribe reveals that to date, seven

lines are already active and in 2015 the center will reach its maximum capacity, with nine lines in operation. Achievements grounded in training The decision to establish TechOps México at Querétaro Intercontinental Airport, to one side of the Querétaro Aerospace Park, is no coincidence. Here, Delta Airlines and Aeroméxico have found a strategic ally: the Aeronautic University in Querétaro (UNAQ). “UNAQ’s investment in training programs has been

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strong. We have two priority and very extensive programs; one is Education to Employment (E2E) where students are trained as skilled aviation technicians, starting from zero right up to the development of hands-on and on the job training (OJT), enhancing their skills and finally formalizing the process related to the license grants. The other program is the recurrent and continuous training for license renewal,” says Uribe. Thanks to that partnership, more than two hundred technicians are undergoing training on the maintenance

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of the Boeing 737s, McDonnell Douglas models 80 and 90 and EMB 170/190 aircraft the MRO will focus on. “We hope that in a couple of years’ time we will begin to develop capacities with Airbus, as well,” adds Uribe. Adding UNAQ-trained technicians to those that joined the firm from Aeroméxico and other Mexican companies, TechOps México can now boast 800 technicians in a total workforce of 1,173 employees. TechOps México has been granted 145 certifications by the US Federal Avia-

tion Administration (FAA) for repair stations and the equivalent from the Mexican Department of Civil Aviation (DGAC). Uribe says that the new structure will allow TechOps México to guarantee improved delivery times to Aeroméxico, Delta and third operators, which to date have made positive remarks about the level of service and cost structure offered by TechOps México. “It is an alliance that has helped us to strengthen clientsupplier communication and, in the most recent review

The missing link Miguel Ángel Uribe believes that TechOps México is the final link in a virtuous circle in the aerospace industry in Querétaro. The parent companies saw that the state already possessed a suitable airport, centers specializing in airframe manufacture and repair of aircraft parts, the UNAQ technical school and a DGAC center for certification of aircraft parts. There was just one missing link: a center of excellence for major airframe repair. “The overriding objective was to fill a gap in the market and in Querétaro, where there was no MRO for airframes, in particular. In line with the vocation of the state, where great work has been done to attract firms of global quality, we have completed the aerospace industry circle,” Uribe concludes. N

www.deltatechops.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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courtesy of alaxia

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

Alaxia, Passing the Learning Curve The KUO group is determined to become an agent of change within Mexico’s aerospace industry and is putting its money on Alaxia. by omar magaña

Alaxia was one of the Mexican companies out in force at the International Aerospace Exhibition in Berlin this May. A subsidiary of KUO, a Mexican group that has been in operation for over forty years, the company is interested in keeping up to date with all aspects of the burgeoning aerospace industry, a sector it has been engaged in since 2009. “It was thanks to Raúl Cuevas, our commercial manager, that we were able to make contact with customers and there was a lot of interaction with Tier 1 and Tier 2 European companies. We brought back some designs, which we’re quoting, and looking at the possibility of doing business with them,” says Alaxia CEO Héctor Simental. Alaxia’s plant is in Querétaro, a state that, according to the National Flight Plan and Route Map drawn up by ProMéxico in 2013, has focused on products and processes for the machining of complex components, the manufacture of aerospace structures, engine components, brake systems, jet engine MRO, landing gear MRO and manufacture,

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technical treatments and the manufacture of components for complex materials. The manufacture of components, precision mechanical sub-assemblies and light assemblies for customers like Bombardier, EATON and United Technologies Corporation is Alaxia’s area of expertise. Each of these companies has certified Alaxia in systems like the AS9100, which are not only essential to operate in the sector but also are paving the way for the forging of strategic alliances based on trust. Thanks to these certifications, prospective customers “immediately understand that we’re familiar with the industry, that we know what it’s all about and that we can easily reach an agreement,” says Simental. The fact that Alaxia was present at the recent exhibition in Germany goes to prove its management is doing everything in its power to establish the company as a leader in its particular link of the supply chain, from analyzing the outlook for Querétaro’s aerospace cluster and strengthening institutional

ties with government and educational bodies to making the necessary investments. “What is significant here is that people were trained to understand this and familiarize themselves with the industry’s processes and products, so we could render the services needed and gain a certain advantage,” says Simental. ProMéxico, he says, is an invaluable go-between because it puts a portfolio of prospective international customers at the disposal of companies like Alaxia. The expectation is that Alaxia will soon establish itself as a leader in the sector, given that only a handful of companies specialize in the manufacture of sub-assem-

blies and getting involved in this line of business requires hefty investment in machinery and certification processes, not to mention sweeping changes in an organization’s corporate culture. Throughout the remainder of 2014, Alaxia plans to work on improving its quality processes, the development and delivery of new products, establishing relations with new customers and promoting the creation of a national supply chain, particularly in the area of special processes. Suppliers and Other Links in the Chain The aluminum, titanium and plastics Alaxia requires to manufacture its products come from sources autho-

July 2014

rized by its customers, mainly in the US and Europe. Most of the required special processes, like the application of paint and coatings, are also performed by foreign companies. It is special processes like these that Alaxia wants to see moved to Mexico, as their current presence and capabilities are limiting the type of work they may receive. The company, says Simental, has gathered information on shops in Chihuahua, Sonora and Querétaro that carry out the secondary processes required. Alaxia has also initiated work with suppliers located directly in Querétaro. Most of Alaxia’s output is shipped to Bombardier’s facilities in Querétaro and

July 2014

the plants owned by its other customers in the US, Canada, France and Poland. As for its ties to other actors in the sector, the company has some highly respected allies, like the Aeronautic University in Querétaro (UNAQ), Tecnológico de Monterrey (ITESM), the National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) and several research centers. “We get together at least once every two months to assess our progress on various fronts, especially education,” says Simental. Alaxia is a member of the Mexican Federation of Aerospace Industries (FEMIA) and Queretaro’s aerospace cluster. As such, it constantly

The expectation is that Alaxia will soon establish itself as a leader in the sector, given that only a handful of companies specialize in the manufacture of sub-assemblies and getting involved in this line of business requires hefty investment in machinery and certification processes, not to mention sweeping changes in an organization’s corporate culture. has its ears pinned to the ground for initiatives that could have a positive impact on the sector. “As a member of FEMIA, we are familiar with the government’s plans, which span the next ten years and aim to create over 10,000 new jobs in the sector with the setting up of new plants,” concludes Simental, whose

optimism about the future of Querétaro’s aerospace cluster is based on the competitive advantages the state offers, not least the infrastructure created by the cluster itself and the skilled labor that has spilled over from an ever-expanding automotive industry. N www.kuo.com.mx

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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Hydra Technologies, Unmanned Innovation In less than a decade, this Jalisco-based company has set the bar on the international aerospace market with hi-tech creations. by antonio vázquez

Mexico’s aerospace sector would be inconceivable without Hydra Technologies, a company that took the market for unmanned surveillance systems by surprise in 2005 and, less than a decade later, has won several

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international accolades for innovation in that niche. Hydra Technologies specializes in designing, manufacture and servicing of unmanned aerial surveillance systems that employ

state of the art technology. Efficient and accessible, these craft are gradually doing away with the need to import similar vehicles. Likewise, the abundance of skilled labor in Mexico has translated into added value, allowing the company to offer technical support of the highest standard and reduce dependency on outsiders. The first of its species in Mexico, Hydra Technologies has today more than 15,000 flight hours under its autonomous wings and its systems have been tested and approved by the country’s security forces. Ehecátl and Gavilán remain the company’s flagship products but it is currently accumulating flight hours with a view

courtesy of hydra technologies

to getting its most recent model, the S45 Báalam, certified. Hydra Technologies has won numerous international awards, including the Al Aube Contributor Award presented by the Washington-based Association of Unmanned Vehicles International (AUVSI) and the Mexican Aerospace Industry Federation’s Leonardo Da Vinci Award, to name just two. Operating out of Mexico has been advantageous for a company like Hydra Technologies. Aside from its strategic geographical location, which guarantees easy access to the US market, Mexico has a highly specialized workforce, while the aerospace industry has developed a solid supply chain in recent years.

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Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

“We have managed to consolidate Mexico’s aerospace industry and position the country as a developer of its own technologies and solutions,” says Hydra Technologies’ Commercial Relations Director Eleana Núñez, who sees nothing but clear skies ahead for the sector. Aerospace is one of the most rapidly expanding industries worldwide and unmanned surveillance vehicles account for a large slice of the market. “The market for this technology is expected to grow to approximately ten billion usd by 2018. Although the military accounted for a substantial portion of growth in the past, these units are now used

July 2014

in a wide range of civilian applications, like the mapping of forest fires and the monitoring of weather conditions and telecommunications. According to several different sources, they could potentially be used in agriculture and for public safety purposes. In the future, 90% of the market for unmanned surveillance vehicles will be for applications that aren’t necessarily related to the military,” says Núñez. To secure a lion’s share of this promising market, Hydra Technologies has created synergies with educational and government institutions and works closely with universities and research centers like the Cinvestav research center at the Instituto Politéc-

nico Nacional (IPN, National Polytechnic Institute) and the Larcase avionics research lab at the University of Quebec in Canada. In conjunction with agencies like ProMéxico, Hydra Technologies has represented Mexico at international fairs, including Farnborough in the United Kingdom and Le Bourget in France. “Our plans always consider growth in applications on the domestic market,” says Núñez of a company that began with just twelve employees and now has over eighty professionals working on a series of added value projects. N

The first of its species in Mexico, Hydra Technologies has today more than 15,000 flight hours under its autonomous wings and its systems have been tested and approved by the country’s security forces.

www.hydra-technologies.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Mexico’s Partner

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3D Robotics, An Automatic Takeoff In less than five years, this Mexican company has positioned itself as a leading international manufacturer of drones. by antonio vázquez

Launched in late 2010, 3D Robotics manufacturing plant in Mexico took off just at the right moment. What began as a micro, two-person enterprise is today a company with over 115 employees and industrial facilities spanning 12,000 square feet. Jordi Muñoz Bardales, a man barely in his thirties, is one of the creative minds behind the company, which spe-

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cializes in the manufacture of automatic pilots and drones. “He [Jordi] had the idea of experimenting with electronics years ago. He wanted to stabilize small aircraft using low cost video game controller sensors. At middle school, we started out putting together computers, in high-school we shared our knowledge of microcontrollers. Then he designed his first open-source

automatic pilot and made his first sale. All that took place in Jordi’s apartment, which became the first store,” says Guillermo Romero, general manager of 3D Robotics Mexico. The launch platform for Jordi’s first project was the DIYdrones.com site, where he sold drone electronics kits. Over time, his product caught the attention of American investors and, in a matter of a year or so, 3D Robotics was born. By 2012, it was registering sales of 2 million usd. “We became a subsidiary. The company received the support of foreign investors, which enabled us to post growth of 100% in 2012 and the same again in 2013. Everything we sell via our website is produced at our factory in Tijuana on the border with the US,” says Romero.

argelia bravo

In addition to its Tijuana facilities in the border state of Baja California, 3D Robotics has offices in San Diego, California, giving it easy access to international markets. “Our entire output is exported to the US and from there to the rest of the world. Practically every country in the world has purchased from us. For instance, we know our products have reached islands in the Pacific we didn’t even know existed. Everything is produced in Tijuana,” says Romero. What exactly is it that 3D Robotics makes and what are the applications of its products? The company has two lines: automatic pilots and drone vehicles. In its autopilot line, 3D Robotics has an extensive product catalogue that ranges from GPS devices, electronic

July 2014

Mexico’s Partner | Negocios ProMéxico

compasses and telemetry radios to peripheral components and automatic pilots themselves, which are control boards installed on unmanned vehicles, both ground and airborne. “Take-off”, “go to this coordinate”, “take photos from this angle”, “map this area”, are some of the instructions that can be given remotely using this technology. The company also manufactures drone vehicles, which are devices that perform tasks too complex or dangerous for human beings, like monitoring unsafe areas, civil protection duties during natural disasters and geographical surveys, to name just a few of their applications. Unlike other companies in its field, 3D Robotics was not hatched by a business incubator but evolved from an innovative growth strategy geared toward offering its customers – which include NASA– technology of the highest standard. According to Romero, projects like 3D Robotics can prosper only when the right conditions are met. In Mexico, it has been easy to find those conditions. For one, the country’s geographical location has made it possible to connect its Tijuana factory with its sales office in San Diego almost in real time, while Mexico has the human talent, the skilled professionals needed to steer its exponential growth in the right direction. “3D Robotics offers the most competitive prices. We are the lowest cost option on the market and offer high quality devices. We don’t compete with Chinese manufacturers, there will always be clones, but we win because we are based in innovation. We design new technology and high quality electronics at a competitive cost. The openhardware model behind our products makes competition

July 2014

“Our entire output is exported to the US and from there to the rest of the world. Practically every country in the world has purchased from us.” says Romero.

to be very strong, that’s why we are constantly learning and designing the best product for the industry,” says Romero. In the future, Romero envisages a world in which drones will be used for everything by everyone. A scenario in which 3D Robotics plans to be present. “We will have several kinds of drones for different business, environments and uses. This customized drone market will be ours for the taking because our manufacturing philosophy is lean operations, specialized craftsmanship, high flexibility and rapid product changes,” concludes Romero. N 3drobotics.com

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Negocios ProMéxico | Figures

infographic oldemar

A GLOBAL LEADER

The Complete Guide to the Mexican Way of Life

There are 287 companies and support entities in the country, most of which are NADCAP and AS9100 certified.

Mexico´s aerospace industry has recorded

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The Lifestyle

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**Source: ProMéxico.

July 2014

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The sector is expected to export 12.26 billion  in 2020, with a 14% average annual growth rate.*

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The Lifestyle Briefs

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Agustín Hernández: Gravity-defying Emotions

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Querétaro for Foodies

It didn’t take long for Mexican talent to transcend borders and conquer Hollywood, proving that good cinema isn’t a question of nationality, but of sense and sensibility. 62

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Titanic Brought a Wave of Gifted People to the Surface

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Modern Mexico Embraces its Colonial Legacy


The Lifestyle Briefs

FOLK ART

ART

London Wraps Up in Mexican Shawls

Mexican Art to Travel the World

Made in Mexico. The Rebozo in Art, Culture and Fashion features a total of 75 traditional Mexican shawls, or rebozos, from private and state owned collections. Hosting the exhibition is London’s Fashion and Textile Museum, which, incidentally, was designed by the Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta. The face of the exhibition is the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo (1907-1954), who made the rebozo famous in the 20th Century, although some of the shawls on loan date from as far back as the 18th Century. In London, 92-year-old Lady Irene (Everts) Lojan, daughter of the Belgian diplomat Robert Everts (1875-1942), was able to admire the collection her father started in the 20th Century, including the 18 rebozos her family donated to the Franz Mayer Museum in Mexico City several years ago. Traditional and modern, made of silk and cotton, the rebozos on exhibit include four belonging to the Legorreta family, three owned by the Mexican-American singer songwriter Lila Downs and a giant nine-meter-long rebozo called “aroma of mourning”, which forms part of an installation by the artist Mauricio Cervantes.

Four Mexican projects from different parts of the country received awards at the 9th Latin American Architecture and Urbanism Biennial (BIAU) and another 26 Latin American projects were selected. The “House of Ideas” library, the San Pablo Academic and Cultural Center, the Alfonso Reyes residential building and La Tallera Siqueiros art studio all took home accolades. Located in Tijuana, Baja California, the “House of Ideas” library by CROStudio is built along a canal that crosses the Camino Verde district and has an innovative design spread over platforms that open up onto interior and exterior landscapes. In Oaxaca, Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha made aesthetic and structural modifications to the San Pablo Academic and Cultural Center, a group of colonial buildings owned by the Alfredo Harp-Helú Foundation.Meanwhile, at La Tallera Siqueiros in Cuernavaca, Morelos, a team spearheaded by the architect Frida Escobedo opened up the courtyard of the artist’s studio and rotated a series of murals so they could be seen from an adjacent square. Last, but by no means least, Gabriela Etchegaray and Jorge Ambrosi were presented with an award for the design of the Alfonso Reyes residential building in the Condesa district of Mexico City. An initiative of the Spanish government in collaboration with various Latin American institutions, BIAU has consolidated itself as a window onto the future of architecture and urbanism.

casa de las ideas / courtesy of crostudio

ftmlondon.org

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MUSIC

Mexican Flautist Wins Indie Award

ART

www.independentmusicawards.com

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July 2014

Mexico’s cultural representations around the world will shortly be renamed Octavio Paz institutes after this acclaimed Mexican author who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1990. The proposal, put forward by the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs (SRE), will apply to representations in the US (Miami, San Antonio, Washington, Los Angeles and New York), Costa Rica (San José) and Spain (Madrid). This year marks the centenary of the birth of Octavio Paz and the decision to rename these institutions is part of an SRE policy to take Mexican art on an international tour. Preference will be given to artists with projects of a high standard and that transmit social messages congruent with the cultural policies of the host countries. For example, artists like Betsabeé Romero will be designing a contemporary Day of the Dead altar for Denmark.

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Mexican Art to Travel the World

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Mexican flautist and composer Alejandro Escuer was the unanimous winner of an Independent Music Award in the Best Contemporary Classical Music Album category. The album, Alejandro Escuer Flying: Música para flauta y electrónica, produced in 2012 by Cero Records and the Mexican Center for Music and the Sound Arts, features tracks by Escuer and composers like Rodrigo Sigal (Mexico), Matthew Adkins (England), Gabriela Ortiz (Mexico) and Michael Matthews (Canada), among others. Produced by Music Resource Group, every year the Independent Music Awards program receives hundreds of submissions from musicians from all over the world. The aim of the program is to promote and honor talent that contributes to the progress of music, based on content, innovation and impact, with winners being chosen by 40 judges from the international film and television scene and music critics like Ann and Nancy Wilson, Suzanne Vega, Arturo Sandoval and Laurie Anderson. Other awards Escuer has won include the 2010-2013 Career Scenic Creators Award, the Rockefeller Foundation Award, the Fulbright-García Robles Scholarship and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) Arts Award and Scholarship.

www.bienalesdearquitectura.es

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courtesy of fashion and textile museum

The Lifestyle Briefs

www.sre.gob.mx

July 2014

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Agustín Hernández: Gravity-defying Emotions Challenging and emotive. These are two words that could be used to describe the work of Agustín Hernández Navarro, a Mexican architect who has called on science to create gravity defying buildings that evoke Mexico’s Pre-Colombian roots.

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send his thesis –a project for a cultural center deemed bold, original and innovative by the experts– to the artist Diego Rivera, who had nothing but praise for it. Paradoxically, by breaking with the architecture of his day, Hernández has rescued the symbols, identity, culture, traditions and history of Pre-Colombian Mexico. The salvaging of this ancestral knowledge has gone hand in hand with a conscientious choice of materials.

omar bárcena

rebuild all things mechanical and electrical but it wasn’t long before he realized his calling was to build monumental things that could be admired for their beauty and perfection. Studying Architecture at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) allowed him to do just that. The faculty molded his rebellious spirit into a forthright character even before he left its classrooms. He even had the audacity to

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Some consider Agustín Hernández a Romantic, a poet of architecture. He considers himself neither: just an architect but definitely not a builder. Born in Mexico City in 1924, Hernández grew up surrounded by materials, plans and buildings. He would accompany his mother to construction sites and listen to tradesmen talk about bricks, cement, spaces, lines and curves. Curious to know how they worked, he would take apart and

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by antonio vázquez

It was a leap back to the past that heralded a vision of a Mexico of the future in each of the magnificent buildings that personify the architect’s aesthetic. Yet Hernández has never identified with one particular school of architecture, not even the one he himself created. “I’ve never claimed to have a defined style, neither in architecture nor sculpture. It would be too easy. Now that there are so many construction materials and techniques to choose from, I’m more interested in experimenting. Following a style would bore me,” he said in interview in 2002. Architect of projects like House in the Air (1991) and the Calakmul Corporate Center (1994), it was the Military College that posed his greatest challenge –and brought him the greatest gratification. Based on Monte Albán, the ceremonial center of the Zapotec civilization in Oaxaca, the building was applauded by the military authorities of the day as a “historic feat”. In 1970, he defied the laws of gravity and geometry with his own studio. Built in a woodland area of the Bosques de las Lomas district of Mexico City, the building towers more than 40 meters in the air. “This studio has everything I’ve ever looked for in architecture: in it, structure, form and function come together as one,” says Hernández, who has won awards for his work in his native Mexico, Argentina and Bulgaria. N

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Mexicans Versed in the Glamorous Task of Making Us Laugh and Cry

Elpidia Carrillo in An Unexpected Destiny

We’ve seen them fall in and out of love. They’ve moved us to tears and laughter, on screen and from behind the scenes. Since the birth of the film industry, Mexico has contributed to the classics of world cinema. One of the first Latin actresses to make it in the big industry was the diva Dolores del Río, who, in the 1920s, was the female version of Rodolfo Valentino, the “Latin Lover” of the silent movies. Del Río appeared in several of Hollywood’s early talkies and is said to have had a sordid affair with the actor and director Orson Welles. Another Mexican, the comedian Mario Moreno, more popularly known as “Cantinflas”, has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1956, he joined the cast

of the Michael Anderson film Around The World in Eighty Days, based on the eponymous Julio Verne novel. In it, he played the part of Passepartout, which he demanded be adapted to his Latin traits. “Cantinflas” also shared credits with the big stars of the period like Shirley MacLaine, Marlene Dietrich, Buster Keaton and Frank Sinatra. Even Charles Chaplin praised the work of the socalled “Mime of Mexico” and is quoted as saying he was the best comedian alive. But gone are the days when Mexicans were limited to playing Latin parts. Today they are so versatile they can take on any role and have even started creating a celluloid history of their own. These are just some of the names that are floating on Hollywood’s firmament of celebrity actors and filmmakers.

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by laura santos

courtesy of festival internacional de cine de guadalajara

Parácuaro, a town in Michoacán in Central Mexico, is known as the “Villa of Springs”. It was here that Elpidia Carrillo (1961) was born. She left home at the tender age of ten to make a living, but surely never imagined she would become a famous Hollywood actress. It all began one day when she was walking down the street and received a strange invitation: to appear in a film. So it was that at 13 she began her acting career in the Rafael Corkidi film Pafnucio santo. The course of her life changed from that moment on. Elpidia continued working in the movies and took up dance, until she had another stroke of luck –which actually had more to do with her talent– and was invited to appear in the Tony Richardson film The Border with Jack Nicholson and Harvey Keitel. Her performance opened the door to Hollywood productions and she landed her first lead, starring alongside Richard Gere and Michael Caine in John Mackenzie’s The Honorary Consul, based on the eponymous Graham Greene novel. Perhaps her best-known role, though, is as the survivor, Anna, in Predator, with Arnold Schwarzenegger.

It didn’t take long for Mexican talent to transcend borders and conquer Hollywood, proving that good cinema isn’t a question of nationality, but of sense and sensibility.

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Alfonso Cuarón in An Oscar Underarm

July 2014

Alfonso Cuarón (Mexico City, 1961) is the filmmaker of the moment. In 2014, he won an Oscar for Best Director with the feature film Gravity, making him the first Mexican director –and one of only a handful of Latin American directors– to receive such recognition. Gravity was but the culmination of a solid career: Cuarón had already been nominated for an Oscar in 2006 for Children of Men and in 2002 for Y tu mamá también. He started out directing independent films in Mexico; his international career kicked off in 1995 with

July 2014

A Little Princess, based on the Frances Hodgson Burnett novel. His big-budget movies include Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban, the third installment of the popular children’s story that is packed with references to the director’s Mexican childhood, like the sugar-coated skulls on sale at the Honeydukes store in Hogsmeade that are typically eaten on the Day of the Dead in Mexico. Alfonso’s son, Jonás, and his brother, Carlos, are also writers and directors and have co-written some of his films.

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

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The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

Patricia Riggen in A Woman’s Gaze The women of Guadalajara are said to have the most beautiful eyes in all of Mexico. That can be debated, but there can be no denying Patricia Riggen (1970) has an eye for producing beautiful films. Riggen began her career writing documentaries for television in her native Guadalajara. She later moved to Mexico City and in 1998 went to New York to study a Master’s in Directing and Screenwriting at the University of Columbia. Her first short film, La milpa, was screened at over 30 film festivals and received 20 awards.

Under the Same Moon, her first feature-length film, deals with families divided by emigration and debuted at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation. She also directed the musical Lemonade Mouth for Disney Channel. Its first two television screenings were watched by over 12 million viewers. Her most recent project is Girl in Progress and stars Eva Mendes, with Espinoza Paz playing the part of a Mexican folk musician.

Emmanuel Lubezki in The Golden Goat Oftentimes the work of cinematographers is overshadowed by big-name directors, but Emmanuel Lubezki (Mexico City, 1964), alias “El Chivo” (The Goat), has managed to shoot his way out of obscurity and into the light. Lubezki has worked dolly-to-dolly with acclaimed directors who have welldefined aesthetics: Tim Burton, the Coen brothers, Alfonso Cuarón and Terrence Malick. In his case, six was a charm and after five nominations, in 2014 he finally took home an Oscar for Best Photography with Gravity. “The Goat” started out doing photography for independent films in Mexico, which he combined with shooting commercials, allowing him to familiarize himself with equipment he probably wouldn’t have come into contact with otherwise. His breakthrough came with A Little Princess (1995), which earned him his first Oscar nomination. Here, Lubezki revealed his gift for capturing the essence of a story with a photography that oscillates between fantasy and reality. A photographer with a signature all his own, Lubezki demonstrated his gift for lighting once again in Tim Burton’s Sleepy Hollow (1999), with shadowy sets that lend the film an aura of make-believe and mystery.

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Salma Hayek in The Woman of the Port Salma Hayek (1966) once confessed amid fits of laughter that she is typically referred to as an Italian-style beauty in the US. “You can tell they haven’t been to Veracruz,” was the response of the actress with Lebanese roots who was born in the port town of Coatzacoalcos in South Mexico. Hayek made her debut in a soap called Teresa that has virtually achieved cult status. In 1991, she began appearing in Hollywood productions, but only really got the attention she deserved in 2002, when she played Frida Kahlo in Frida, a film that she also produced and that earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. An accomplishment only two latin women, besides Hayek, have achieved: Katy Jurado in 1954 and Adriana Barraza in 2006. As a producer, Hayek is also known for Ugly Betty, a sitcom based on a Colombian screenplay that has traveled the world and whose first three seasons were a hit in the US. A paragon of beauty and sophistication, Salma’s name means “peace” or “calm” in Arabic.

Kate del Castillo in The Charm and the Voice In 1991, a young actress with bushy eyebrows made her debut in the Mexican soap Muchachitas. Her name was Kate del Castillo (Mexico City, 1972). Twenty-two years later, in 2013, People magazine was to name her one of the “25 Most Powerful Latinas”. In 2002, del Castillo went to the US to study. That same year she starred in the series American Family and became a household name in that country. In 2005 she made her incursion into Hollywood with Juan Carlos Valdivia’s American Visa, where she shared the limelight with the Oscar-nominated Mexican actor Demián Bichir.

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One of the voices of the Disney film Cars (2006), del Castillo has shared the big screen with the likes of Antonio Banderas, Jennifer López, Kevin Kline and Alec Baldwin, among other famous actors. Together with Eugenio Derbez, she played the lead in Patricia Riggen’s film, Under the Same Moon, but is arguably best known for La reina del Sur (2011), a series based on the eponymous book by the Spanish author Arturo Pérez Reverte. The series was broadcast during primetime by the American network Telemundo and was seen by millions of viewers in 86 countries and translated into 17 languages.

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Negocios ProMéxico | The Lifestyle

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Querétaro for FoodieS

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Freixenet is one of the largest vineyards in the region. Housed in a rambling old Mexican hacienda with high ceilings, its most interesting feature has to be its cellars, an impressive 25 meters below ground level. If you’re in any way curious, they’re open to the general public. Freixenet’s star product is its sparkling wine, produced using the traditional or champenoise method, which consists of a second fermentation in the bottle. This winery also does a commendable job promoting wine culture by giving courses and organizing competitions. It has an annual calendar of activities but the date everyone circles in the calendar is the grape harvest in August. In Tequisquiapan you’ll find La Redonda, a boutique winery that produces three labels: Redonda, a collection of young whites, rosés, reds and sparkling wines, Orlandi, whose tannins are intensified by the American oak barrels they are matured in, and premium Sierra Gorda. These are aged wines that are best married with roasts of large game and strong cheeses. Close to Freixenet, in Ezequiel Montes, is Viñedos Azteca, a winery that has taken it upon itself to propagate Mexican traditions, not just winegrowing but Mexican horsemanship too. Their wines are made the traditional way under the watchful eye of enologists José Antonio Llaquet and Jesús Cardoso. Pretexto is their most successful label, a coupage boasting a harmonious blend of red wines like Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Syrah and Malbec.

The wines produced in the central Mexican state of Querétaro have earned international recognition and are gradually winning over connoisseurs in other parts of the world.

by laura santos

Arid on the surface, if you look closer, the semi desert is teeming with life, staining the tree tops crimson and sealing the important moments with the clinking of a wine glass and a toast to good health. Cheers! We are in Quéretaro, a central Mexican state with regions where the days are hot and the nights are cold, allowing the grapes to ripen without losing their acidity. Here, grapevines grow alongside aromatic Peruvian peppertrees, whose seeds are known as pink pepper. El Marqués, Tequisquiapan, Ezequiel Montes, Colón and San Juan del Río are the municipalities of Querétaro where the pace of

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The Lifestyle | Negocios ProMéxico

life is punctuated by wine and cheese. Here it doesn’t matter so much if you don’t make it on time, as long as you arrive with a good appetite and leave with a pleasant aftertaste lingering on your palate. Of all the “New World” wines, Querétaro’s have perhaps made the greatest impression beyond our borders, with Freixenet and La Redonda forming part of the Mexican delegation at Drink Outside the Box, an event held by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on March 4, 2014 at the Talleyrand Hotel, which belongs to the American embassy, in Paris, France.

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WHERE TO BUY Freixenet Carretera San Juan del Río Cadereyta, Km 40.5, Ezequiel Montes, Querétaro,
Mexico
 www.freixenetmexico.com.mx

Viñedos La Redonda Carretera San Juan del Río Ezequiel Montes, Km 33.5 Querétaro, Mexico www.laredonda.com.mx

This region also likes to keep up with the latest trends. For example, in 2011, Los Rosales in Tequisquiapan introduced Misiones Chapelet, a project for the production of quality organic red wines. Every aspect of the process is scrupulously overseen, producing wines that bring out the characteristics of their signature Tintorera grape, known for its strong, enduring notes. The best way to learn about Querétaro’s wines is to join a tour of the Wine and Cheese Route. We guarantee you’ll be an expert by the end and will be able to testify to the fact that Mexican hospitality isn’t just a myth. N

Viñedos Azteca Carretera San Juan del Río Cadereyta, Km 40.4 Querétaro, Mexico www.vinedosazteca.com

Viñedos Los Rosales Carretera San Juan del Río Ezequiel Montes, Km 27 Querétaro, Mexico misioneschapelet.com

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The difference with the independent productions I’ve worked on in Mexico and other projects in Latin America and Europe is not knowing if the financing will come through, although you have more freedom. In cases like that, I find a way to get the film made. Every film, from the biggest production to the smallest, wants to tell a story and it’s the passion of the teamwork that goes into it that makes a film. I’ve learned a lot from both. I worked on Little Boy, which had a budget of 27 million Usd and All is Lost by Robert Redford, which was made with 10 million. After that came two films that cost 2.5 and 3 million Usd, respectively. Filmmaking is becoming standardized in the sense that we’re all seeking to make more efficient use of resources. The economic situation is complicated for us all, but anyone with a good story and a small team can go far. It’s all about who has the best story and the most original way of telling it.

Titanic Brought a Wave of Gifted People to the Surface One of those talents was Luisa Gómez de Silva. An invitation to work on the James Cameron film revealed the makings of a great producer. by patricia peña

Luisa Gómez de Silva has always been a fan of romantic comedies, but she never imagined she’d get to make them in real life. Her career in film began like a script for a short film that transformed into a cult feature: one minute she was behind her desk at a local newspaper in her native Baja California and the next she was on the production team of one of the largest box-office busters of all time: Titanic. After that, there was no turning back. This busy producer now has twenty or so films and about the same number of television series and commercials under her lifebelt, as well as three documentaries and three short films.

Luisa’s schedule is so packed she barely has time to spend with her family, but she finds her work so satisfying that she has started her own production company, Baja Estudios, which is currently working on a television series for Latin America, a drama and two romantic comedy ideas for audiences in the US and Mexico. —How did you come into contact with the world of film? I was about to graduate from university and was working for a newspaper. I needed time to finish my thesis, so I asked for a leave of absence, but when I was informed the job was 24/7, I had to

resign. I needed work and a friend told me they were looking for people on Titanic [which was filmed in Baja California]. I didn’t want to be an extra, but I was told I might be able to do something else due to my experience in other areas. So I sent in my résumé one weekend and the next Tuesday I had an interview that lasted three hours. Today, 19 years later, I’m still working in the movies. —What was your first job on Titanic? I started out as an assistant in the art coordination area. Then the Australian woman in charge had to resign and I took over as coordinator for the final stretch of the film.

—It was a big leap from a local newspaper to a mega international production… I didn’t realize the magnitude. The art coordinator resigned in December and I had to see the film through to the final cut. It was like studying a whole new professional career, especially in terms of the handling of language, vocabulary and logistics. I was 22 and learned everything from basic skills, like folding napkins and hanging drapes, to making stained glass and performing administrative tasks. —After Titanic, how did the other big productions arrive on your doorstep? Due to Titanic and the film’s success, the things I learned and the contacts I made while working on it. I got to know big celebrities who looked me up later. Tomorrow Never Dies wanted to do a second unit and the producer took me along as an administrative supervisor. From there, I started acting as a liaison between the studio in Baja California and the productions that wanted to come to Mexico, like Tomorrow Never Dies, Pearl Harbor and Commando. I left when my first baby was born and started rendering production services on a freelance basis. The same people I had worked with would ask me for in-

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formation, not just on locations in Baja California, but in Tijuana and San Diego. —The movies are fantastic, but it’s a cutthroat world. Do you know what it was they saw in you to make them come back for more? I’m from a state in Mexico where everyone is bicultural and hard working. On Titanic I was eager to learn and would raise my hand to help out no matter what the job. Century Fox called me to work in Los Angeles and it was like going back to school. At the end of the day, it’s what I still do. The “Titanic Generation”, as we call ourselves, were talented people with a lot of enthusiasm, who had a vague notion of filmmaking, small things, but that went on to do big things. —Which do you prefer, large productions or independent ones? Both. I’ve been very fortunate in that I’ve gotten to work with acclaimed directors on large productions, with the people at Walt Disney and Walden Media, and the Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu on Babel. Those were all big projects with a special dynamic: there were no budget concerns. Well, there are now. No one’s exempt (chuckles), but back then there weren’t.

—Old school or hi-tech? I’ve used both formats. It all depends on the photographer and the budget. Until not so long ago, digital was more expensive, but technology has become more simplified. As a producer I’d go with digital because you can shoot and shoot and shoot and it’s cheaper, but nothing beats 35-millimeter quality. —Are television productions worthwhile? Platforms like Netflix are spawning new projects. We’re witnessing the emergence of viewers who want a different kind of television. Movie folk are starting to sit up and take notice of certain Spanish-language series and foreigners are starting to turn their gaze to Mexico. There are web series being broadcast on a range of platforms. It seems that’s where the future lies. —You sound very excited. You have to be a bit loony to be in this line of work. It takes a lot of persistence. I was in journalism and I thought I liked it, but I wouldn’t go back. I’ve discovered my niche. My job has more to do with numbers. It might not be that creative, but it implies a lot of work. It means missing birthdays, graduations, Mother’s Days. You miss out on a lot, but my kids understand and it feels great to be able to share my success with them and do what I love doing. N

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Morelia pink quarry stone and celluloid

Modern Mexico Embraces its Colonial Legacy

Pink quarry stone buildings, cobblestone streets and architecture with an unmistakable French influence. That is Morelia, the capital of Michoacán, a state in West Mexico originally inhabited by the Purépecha. Founded in the 15th Century, this cultural city offers visitors an enviable choice of museums, restaurants, galleries and arts and crafts stores. Morelia’s Historic Center has been declared a World Heritage Site and it’s not hard to see why when you stand in the presence of breathtaking baroque

Negocios brings you six cities whose beautiful colonial architecture serves as a scenic backdrop to the bustling, cosmopolitan lifestyle of modern day Mexico. by antonio vázquez

Six cities, six stories… Mérida, Morelia, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Puebla and Zacatecas were all founded and built during the colonial period. Today, these are modern cities that have embraced their bicultural legacy. The fortified walls that once protected Mérida from pirate attacks now invite visitors to enjoy the city’s fantastic night life. Meanwhile, Morelia has consolidated

itself as an art and film destination and Puebla has become famous for its restaurants that break with tradition. The chilly air of San Cristóbal is quickly dissipated at any of the city’s boutique hotels and the labyrinthine streets of Guanajuato host international festivals year in, year out. Finally, we come to Zacatecas, whose history can be summed up in a piece of fine silver jewelry.

Mérida an ancient city with a contemporary attitude The city of Mérida, in the Yucatán Peninsula of Southeast Mexico, combines colonial, renaissance-style architecture with a modern lifestyle and a taste of the ancient Maya civilization. Museums, boutiques, art galleries and restaurants are housed in stately limestone buildings, surrounded by walls that have protected the city since it was founded in 1542. The architectural gems of the so-called “White City” include Casa de Montejo, Palacio Cantón (now home to the Regional Anthropology Museum) and the cathedral. Every year between February and March, the streets of Mérida come to life with an eight day carnival featuring events like the Battle of the Flowers, where the merrymakers literally throw flowers at each other. For a traditional dish, we recommend the cochinita pibil (spiced, marinated pork) at Hacienda Taya, an old 17th Century hacienda that has been converted into an exclusive hotel. And if it’s night life you’re after, Cielo Lounge Bar, Amarantus and Mambo Café

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are some of the city’s trendiest spots. Nearby are the Tzabnah Caves, where you can see amazing natural rock formations and 13 cenotes. There are also plenty of places to practice extreme sports and enjoy the enormous diversity of flora and fauna in this region of Mexico.

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buildings like the former Capuchin Convent, the Museum of Colonial Art and the Church of San Francisco. The seventh art has found a fitting calling card in this city in the form of the Morelia International Film Festival, which has gone from strength to strength since 2003. For a night on the town, try the Skina Bar or Zitio, where strutting your stuff on the dance floor is mandatory. Or if you’re more sports inclined, Zirahuén Lake is great for mountain biking and for die-hard golfers, there’s the Zacapú Country Club.

San Cristóbal de las Casas chilly hospitality The bracing mountain air of San Cristóbal de las Casas makes you want to explore its picturesque streets, stopping only for a piping hot cup of coffee. One of the first cities built by the Spanish in America, the influence of indigenous groups can be discerned in its baroque architecture, which only serves to add to its aura of mysticism. The churches of Santo Domingo, San Nicolás and El Carmen, La Merced Convent and the Amber Museum are all must-sees on any visitor’s agenda. And after a long day sightseeing, we recommend you rest up at one of the city’s boutique hotels, like Hotel Bo, Casa de los Arcángeles or Casa Morada. Cold cuts, corn and cocoa based beverages and traditional candies with hot chocolate are the mainstays of the local gastronomy, complemented by a variety of Italian, French and Argentine classics to cater to the European tourists who flock to this colonial city in the highlands of Chiapas.

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Puebla food for the soul The legend goes that prior to the founding of Puebla in 1531, the Bishop of Tlaxcala, Julián Garcés, is said to have had a dream in which angels told him where to lay the first stone. Located in Central Mexico, this city conceived by angels is famous for its cuisine, baroque architecture and handicrafts. The home of the Serdán brothers –important figures in the Mexican Revolution of 1910– and the churches of San Francisco and El Rosario are just a few of the historic buildings that line its cobblestone streets, confirming its status as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. But it’s not just cultures that commune in Puebla. Past and present come together in its downtown area, where the ancient

Church of San Francisco rubs shoulders with the Convention Center, whose colorful gardens set the scene for modern designer boutiques, restaurants and cafés. Puebla prides itself on its cuisine, especially its mole, a thick sauce made with chili, chocolate and many other ingredients. The best place to sample it is at Fonda de Santa Clara, which has been serving it up for more than half a century. Another source of pride is the city’s Talavera pottery tradition. Easily identifiable by its characteristic blue and white motifs, collections of these unique pieces handcrafted exclusively in Puebla have been shown at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Guanajuato A rebel to be reckoned with

Oportunidades en China:

Un enfoque de inteligencia comercial para los países de la Alianza del Pacífico

Guanajuato takes its visitors by the hand and leads them through a labyrinth of tunnels, passageways and steep streets on an encounter with art, culture, architecture and history. Mexico wouldn’t be the nation it is today were it not for Guanajuato. Less than an hour away is Dolores Hidalgo, the town where a group of rebels planned an uprising that was to set the 1810 independence movement in motion. The Granary, the Juárez Theater and the University of Guanajuato were all built during the colonial era and lived their days of glory in a newly independent nation. Famous for its International Cervantine Festival, Guanajuato also hosts baroque, jazz and blues music festivals. After visiting the sights and museums and sampling the night life, the best way to wind down is in one of the city’s small, exclusive hotels, like Hotel Boutique 1850, Edelmira, Quinta Las Acacias, Hotel Alonso 10, and Hotel México Plaza, all of which have extensive menus starring the best of regional cuisine.

Entre 2009 y 2013 China se consolidó como el segundo importador de bienes en el mundo, solo detrás de Estados Unidos. Para 2013 las compras de mercancías de este país representaron 11% del total mundial. Por otro lado, en términos de dinamismo, China se colocó en tercer lugar (detrás de Bolivia y Perú), tomando en cuenta que sus importaciones crecieron 18% en promedio anual durante el periodo 2009-2013, cuando en el mundo el crecimiento fue de 10%. 86

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could be more representative of Zacatecas than a piece of fine silver jewelry. There are some 50 silversmith shops to choose from but we recommend Casa de las Artesanías de Zacatecas or Centro Platero de Zacatecas, where you can purchase unique signature pieces.

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One of the most beautiful streets in all of Mexico is Avenue Hidalgo in Zacatecas. As you make your way from Plaza de Armas, you’ll pass the churches of Santo Domingo and San Agustín, the Pedro Coronel Museum and the Juárez Garden before finally arriving at the cathedral, chiseled out of pink quarry stone. These well preserved baroque churches and buildings dating from the days of Porfirio Díaz era have earned Zacatecas UNESCO World Heritage Site status, but it’s unlikely they would even exist were it not for the wealth generated by the region’s mining tradition. A popular tourist attraction, but definitely not one for the faint hearted, is El Edén, an old mine in Bufa Mountain that churned out silver for almost four centuries. A train takes you 340 meters down into the bowels of the earth, to the very core of the city’s foundations. If you want a souvenir of your trip, nothing

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Zacatecas A Mine of History

El Diálogo Empresarial México-Estados Unidos: Encuentros para impulsar la competitividad

Consejos para implementaciones exitosas

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Los esquemas de certificación en comercio exterior

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Administración de las Ideas:

Filipinas

y la competitividad empresarial

renueva sus lazos comerciales con México

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de proméxico. Para México es fundamental impulsar los vínculos de cooperación y comercio con nuevos mercados y concretar una verdadera diversificación comercial. Aunado a ello, la atracción de inversiones productivas, así como la internacionalización de operaciones de empresas mexicanas son tareas muy importantes dentro de la política de desarrollo económico del país. En esta edición compartimos una reflexión sobre las oportunidades comerciales que ofrece China para Chile, Colombia, México y Perú, países partícipes en la Alianza del Pacífico, que deben profundizar su relación con este mercado. Mediante un modelo de inteligencia comercial elaborado por ProMéxico, se explica cuál es la relevancia de estos países considerando la complementariedad de sus productos y servicios, sobre todo para identificar con claridad cuál es la oferta exportable común, además de los casos de eslabonamiento productivo. También se incluye un análisis sobre la relación entre México y Filipinas, en el que se enfatiza la relevancia de este país como puerta de acceso a mercados

asiáticos. Filipinas se ha convertido en un destino sumamente competitivo para las inversiones de empresas mexicanas que deseen internacionalizar sus operaciones hacia ese país con el propósito de expandir su negocio en la región. Aunado a ello, se incluye una interesante reflexión sobre los nuevos esquemas de certificación en comercio exterior del país, los cuales están destinados a fomentar las buenas prácticas y procesos en materia aduanal con el firme propósito de facilitar el comercio e impulsar la competitividad de las empresas. Además de estos ensayos, se incluye una reflexión sobre la relevancia del diálogo empresarial de alto nivel existente entre México y Estados Unidos, mecanismo creado para impulsar la competitividad en la región e incidir en el diseño de políticas públicas en materia económica y de negocios. Por último, publicamos un breve análisis sobre la administración de las ideas, modelo en el que diversas empresas y organizaciones se apoyan para conseguir equilibrio y entregar resultados consistentes. Esperamos que los contenidos incluidos en esta edición sean de su interés.

¡Bienvenidos a Negocios ProMéxico!

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BREVES ELÉCTRONICA

SIEMENS SE AMPLÍA

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Siemens invirtió 30 millones de pesos en la ampliación de la capacidad instalada del taller de turbomaquinaria de su planta en Querétaro, a fin de atender la creciente demanda de insumos para la industria del gas, petróleo y generación eléctrica a nivel nacional. La planta de servicio a turbomaquinaria ubicada en Balvanera inició operaciones en 2006 con una superficie operativa de 2,600 metros cuadrados, tras esta inversión, incrementará su espacio a 4,000 metros cuadrados. www.siemens.com

TURISMO

GRUPO REAL TURISMO SE EXPANDE

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Grupo Real Turismo invertirá 1,500 millones de pesos en nuevos hoteles en 2014. El Grupo abrirá hoteles este año en Villahermosa, Cancún y Guadalajara. Para 2015 espera abrir dos más, uno en Monterrey y otro en la Ciudad de México. www.gruporealturismo.com

MANUFACTURA

FORESTAL

ABRE MANITOWOC EN MONTERREY

www.manitowocfoodservice.com

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Con una inversión de 40 millones de dólares, Manitowoc FoodService inauguró una planta de producción de equipos de cocina industriales en Monterrey, Nuevo León. La empresa emplea a 110 personas en su nueva planta. Se instaló en el Parque Industrial Finsa, en el municipio de Guadalupe, a donde trasladó desde Wisconsin, Estados Unidos, su línea de producción de máquinas de hielos, con el fin de atender de manera más eficiente a su mercado en América Latina.

MASISA CRECE EN DURANGO Con una inversión de 140 millones de dólares, la empresa chilena Masisa comenzó la ampliación de su planta en Durango que se convertirá en la planta de tableros de madera más grande y moderna de México. Esta ampliación generará alrededor de 4,000 nuevos empleos. La nueva planta permitirá crear centros de acopio en zonas marginadas y con pobreza de la sierra de Durango, por lo que será posible incluir como proveedores de Masisa a microindustriales de la región. www.masisa.com


Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

BREVES METALURGIA

El Diálogo Empresarial México-Estados Unidos:

ALYEX ARRANCA EN QUERÉTARO

Encuentros para impulsar la competitividad Con una inversión inicial de 9.5 millones de dólares, la empresa de extrusión de aluminio Alyex Aluminium, inició operaciones en el municipio El Marqués, en Querétaro. Actualmente la empresa emplea a 48 personas, pero en los próximos 14 meses se tiene programada una inversión adicional de 5 millones de dólares para proyectos de expansión y el incremento de su plantilla laboral a 75 plazas. La empresa se dedica a la fabricación de perfiles industriales como tubos, placas y otros especiales, para alrededor de 14 clientes de los sectores automotriz y eléctrico.

Por inicativa de organismos empresariales de México y Estados Unidos, empresarios de ambos países cuentan con un espacio para el diálogo y el intercambio de experiencias, con miras a impulsar la competitividad de América del Norte e incidir en el diseño de las políticas públicas en materia económica y de negocios en la región.

LOGÍSTICA

AUTOMOTRIZ

FINSA INVIERTE EN NUEVOS DESARROLLOS

BOSCH planea seguir creciendo

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Finsa, la desarrolladora de parques industriales, invertirá 200 millones de dólares en 2014. La mitad de esa inversión se destinará al desarrollo de infraestructura y el resto a la construcción de edificios para venta o renta. www.finsa.net

TURISMO

GRUPO PRESIDENTE SE RENUEVA

Robert Bosch Mexico invertirá 460 millones de dólares de 2014 a 2107, para ampliar la operación de sus plantas en Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, y Toluca, Estado de México, donde fabrica ductos para las principales armadoras de autos que operan en el país. Bosch ya firmó contratos con las nuevas plantas de Nissan, Honda y Mazda ubicadas en el Bajío, tanto para proveerles equipo de seguridad para las instalaciones de las fábricas, como la proveeduría de algunos componentes automotrices.

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www.bosch.com

Durante 2014 y 2015, Grupo Presidente invertirá un total de 50 millones de dólares en la remodelación total y parcial de sus unidades ubicadas en la Ciudad de México, Cancún, Guadalajara y Los Cabos. A la par, continuará con su proyecto de convertirse en una compañía operadora de hoteles multimarca, propiedad de terceros inversionistas. En 2014 esperaconcretar un total de cinco unidades.

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La primera reunión del Diálogo Empresarial México-Estados Unidos se realizó los días 10 y 11 de diciembre de 2013 en la Ciudad de México, en seguimiento al Diálogo Económico de Alto Nivel (DEAN) establecido por los presidentes Enrique Peña Nieto y Barack Obama a inicios de 2013. La segunda reunión de este tipo se celebró los días 8 y 9 de junio de 2014 en Washington, DC. Estos encuentros de trabajo entre empresarios –promovidos en paralelo por la Cámara de Comercio de los Estados Unidos y el Consejo Coordinador Empresarial (CCE) de México–, reúnen al sector privado de ambos países. Las recomendaciones que surgen de estas reuniones de trabajo fortalecen la relación bilateral en ámbitos de comercio e inversión. Sus esfuerzos se enfocan en áreas que permitirán impulsar la competitividad de América del Norte, incluyendo la colaboración coordinada para facilitar el comercio en la frontera, así como la integración regional, entre otros temas. En el último encuentro se analizó la relevancia del Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte (TLCAN) como un mecanismo clave que logró consolidar a la región como la zona comercial más competitiva del orbe. Se hizo hincapié en los beneficios del libre comercio y en las múltiples oportunidades para acceder a nuevos mercados internacionales. En este contexto, los esfuerzos gubernamentales binacionales han sido un elemento crucial. Aunado a esto, el activismo de diversas organizaciones en conjunto con la colaboración permanente del sector privado de ambos países, han ayudado a revitalizar el nexo entre México y Estados Unidos. Las recientes reformas estructurales emprendidas por la administración del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto –así como su importancia en la consecución de los objetivos

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por juan carlos gutiérrez

planteados en materia de competitividad y desarrollo– fueron un componente central en este intercambio de ideas. En este sentido, se coincidió en que las reformas incidirán en el crecimiento y desarrollo económico del país, al contribuir directamente en el bienestar de las familias mexicanas. Estas reformas han colocado a México en una perspectiva más positiva y cercana con la existente no solo en Estados Unidos, sino también en Canadá. El embajador mexicano en Washington, Eduardo Medina Mora, comentó que había “un enorme interés sobre las reformas que tiene México ahora, que van dirigidas a bajar los costos de transacción y las barreras de entrada. Esto coloca a México en una perspectiva muy diferente, mucho más a la par de sus socios y, en consecuencia, el espacio económico compartido puede verse con enorme optimismo”.

Las perspectivas son muy alentadoras. Tal como lo señaló hace varios meses el embajador de Estados Unidos en México, Anthony Wayne: “La relación MéxicoEstados Unidos es intensa. Nuestros países se han integrado profundamente, México es actualmente el segundo mercado de exportación y el tercer socio comercial de Estados Unidos […] tenemos una fuerte alianza económica, pero sigue existiendo un potencial sin explotar”. El diálogo y la concertación de primer nivel serán, sin duda, elementos que potenciarán la relación entre México y Estados Unidos, y ampliarán la visión del empresariado de ambos países, con el propósito de concretar nuevos proyectos e impulsar la prosperidad en la región. Se contempla realizar una próxima reunión en México durante el mes de diciembre de 2014. N

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Adicionalmente, en diciembre de 2013 las leyes de Impuesto al Valor Agregado (IVA) y de Impuesto Especial sobre Producción y Servicios (IEPS) tuvieron modificaciones importantes que establecen la obligación de pago de contribuciones a partir del primero de enero de 2015. Con el propósito de disminuir el efecto de esos gastos, el gobierno federal creó la certificaciones en IVA y en el IEPS mediante las cuales las empresas que están al corriente en el cumplimiento de sus obligaciones fiscales y aduaneras pueden obtener una certificación (bajo las modalidades A, AA y AAA), a efecto de aplicar un crédito fiscal consistente en una cantidad equivalente al 100% del IVA y del IEPS por la importación de mercancías sujetas a los siguientes regímenes aduaneros: • Importación temporal para elaboración • Transformación o reparación en programas de maquila o de exportación • Depósito fiscal para someterse al proceso de ensamble y fabricación de vehículos • Elaboración, transformación o reparación en recinto fiscalizado y de recinto fiscalizado estratégico

La solicitud de certificación en materia de IVA e IEPS podrá presentarse durante 2014 de acuerdo con las fechas establecidas en el calendario publicado. Para lo anterior se deberá considerar la circunscripción de la Administración Regional de Auditoria de Comercio Exterior (ARACE) en la que se encuentre su domicilio fiscal. En caso de no haber presentado la solicitud en el periodo correspondiente al domicilio fiscal, es posible presentar la solicitud en otros periodos. Sin embargo, cambiaría el cómputo del plazo para emitir la resolución. El procedimiento y opciones para la obtención de las certificaciones en comercio exterior puede tener variantes dependiendo de las características de cada organización, por lo que es fundamental analizar la situación jurídica y administrativa de cada empresa, y considerar la posibilidad de obtención de las certificaciones mencionadas, pues los beneficios que traen consigo inciden significativamente en la competitividad y carga administrativa de la empresa. N

Para obtener la certificación bajo el esquema NEEC las empresas deberán cumplir con determinados requisitos para comprobar el cumplimiento de las disposiciones en materia fiscal, aduanera y de seguridad.

*Asociado de Basham, Ringe y Correa, S.C. (www.basham.com.mx).

Los esquemas de certificación en comercio exterior y la competitividad empresarial

Los programas de certificación que se han instrumentado en el país fomentan las buenas prácticas y procesos en materia aduanal. Su objetivo central es muy representativo, sobre todo para facilitar el comercio e impulsar la competitividad de las empresas. por félix ponce-nava cortés*

Las funciones de la aduana moderna no se limitan a controlar, revisar y fiscalizar (física y documentalmente) el acceso o salida de mercancías en el país. La Administración General de Aduanas (AGA) también tiene otras funciones relacionadas con la seguridad nacional. La AGA es la autoridad responsable de vigilar la puerta de entrada de mercancías al país, en coordinación con dependencias y órganos de los tres niveles de gobierno que están involucrados en esta tarea. México ha asumido múltiples compromisos suscritos con la comunidad internacional. Ha implementado mecanismos

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para fortalecer la seguridad de la cadena logística del comercio exterior a través del otorgamiento de beneficios a las empresas que cumplan con estándares internacionales en seguridad. Uno de esos mecanismos es el Nuevo Esquema de Empresas Certificadas (NEEC), programa de certificación tutelado por el Servicio de Administración Tributaria (SAT), cuyo objetivo radica en la identificación de empresas confiables a partir de su cumplimiento fiscal, aduanero y también en seguridad. Mediante este programa las empresas podrán recibir beneficios para la importación y exportación de mercancías. Esto incluye las facilidades

y prontitud en los procedimientos de despacho ante las aduanas del país, elevando su competitividad. Para obtener la certificación bajo el esquema NEEC las empresas deberán cumplir con determinados requisitos para comprobar el cumplimiento de las disposiciones en materia fiscal, aduanera y de seguridad. El procedimiento de certificación requiere un trabajo exhaustivo en el que deben prepararse los perfiles y la documentación adicional requerida. Una vez presentada la solicitud, la autoridad tiene un plazo de 180 días naturales para emitir la respuesta correspondiente.

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Los procesos también constituyen un componente importante en este sistema, dado que conforman el conjunto de herramientas de una organización para entregar resultados consistentes. Lo más valioso de este modelo es que la gente se convierte en el eje de actuación de la empresa u organización. El capital humano es un componente clave para implementar el cambio, para equilibrarlo. En suma, los colaboradores –junto con cada uno de los líderes en una organización– se convierten en artífices de la solución.

Administración de las Ideas:

Consejos para implementaciones exitosas El modelo denominado Administración de las ideas ha servido para apoyar a varias empresas u organizaciones para que consigan cierto equilibrio y estén en posibilidades de entregar resultados consistentes.

por jorge valdés g. pmp*

Vivimos tiempos de aceleración extrema en prácticamente todos los ámbitos: la tecnología, la política, la educación y la comunicación. Las organizaciones, sus directivos e incluso los dueños de pequeñas y medianas empresas luchan por que sus organizaciones sobrevivan y trasciendan más allá de la visión original de sus fundadores, con el propósito de asegurar la continuidad de sus operaciones. Los líderes tienen un enfoque dirigido a optimizar el desempeño, eficiencia y resultados de sus respectivas organizaciones. No solo son guías que encausan cómo debe desenvolverse una organización y su equipo de colaboradores, también instrumentan estrategias y entregan resultados consistentes.

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Esto en el papel suena muy fácil, pero si consideramos que las organizaciones son sistemas abiertos, complejos y dinámicos, la realización de este propósito es mucho más complicada. ¿De qué medios se sirven estos aurigas corporativos? Administración de las ideas: un modelo centrado en la gente Se dice todo el tiempo y se lee frecuentemente que el capital humano es el activo más valioso de una organización. Esto es cierto solo si las organizaciones tienen mecanismos diseñados para aprovechar al máximo el talento de sus colaboradores. El centro del modelo de administración de las ideas está conformado por un subsistema de ideas que radica en cada

Para Exportadores | Negocios ProMéxico

persona o integrante del equipo. Si la organización tiene mecanismos apropiados, esas ideas pueden explotarse y ponerse a su servicio. La estrategia de una organización debe considerar las propuestas e ideas con el propósito de permearlas para alinear el rumbo de una organización. La relevancia de ciertos procesos, reglas de negocio y roles son de gran utilidad para el líder de la organización. Los proyectos son el conjunto de herramientas que tienen los líderes de negocio para concretar su estrategia. Los proyectos contribuyen a mantener el foco en la ejecución de la estrategia, es decir, en los procesos que contribuyen a materializar la visión estratégica de la organización.

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Características de una implementación exitosa No es un secreto que el proceso de cambio puede ser complicado e incluso traumático. Sin embargo, utilizando un enfoque apropiado, el cambio debe interpretarse como una oportunidad para el desarrollo de los colaboradores de una empresa u organización. Para concretar los cambios debe considerarse lo siguiente: 1. Contar con el apoyo al más alto nivel. Los cambios sustantivos requieren que la alta dirección esté de acuerdo con las propuestas presentadas. 2. Involucrar activamente a la gente que será impactada por el cambio. Esto implica que su punto de vista debe ser tomado en cuenta para distintos niveles de planteamientos: desde la verbalización de las oportunidades o debilidades, hasta la configuración de propuestas. 3. Identificar el campo de fuerza alrededor del cambio. En cualquier esfuerzo de esta naturaleza existe un campo de fuerza restrictiva y otro tendiente al impulso. Para propiciar el cambio deben fortalecerse las fuerzas promotoras del impulso. 4. Pensar en grande. Es importante tener en mente el fin, establecer la gran visión de hasta dónde se quiere llegar. Esto dará rumbo a los colaboradores y los ayudará a visualizar mejor el mundo al final del camino, lo que puede representar una fuente inagotable de motivación para el equipo. 5. Moderar el esfuerzo de cambio. Es importante acotar los esfuerzos de implementación, de manera que siempre se esté actuando en un nivel de alto impacto y baja complejidad. Esto asegura la entrega de resultados utilizables para la organización, minimizando los impactos de desviaciones y riesgos. Además al tener implementaciones de

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baja complejidad se genera una inercia positiva hacia el proceso de cambio. En suma, el Modelo de administración de las ideas es un modelo aspiracional destinado a balancear el desempeño de una organización. Su propósito es que las organizaciones o empresas estén orientadas a generar resultados consistentes, sustentables y repetibles. Para poder instrumentarlo, deben considerarse cuatro factores: 1. Entorno: Representa la influencia del entorno externo a la organización. 2. Gobierno: Relacionado con la toma de decisiones, la estructura organizacional, las políticas, reglas de negocio y estilos de supervisión, entre otras cosas. 3. Tecnología: Enfatiza la importancia de las tecnologías de la información, las metodologías de trabajo, maquinaria, procesos, formulas y todos los

elementos necesarios para entregar resultados. 4. Capital humano: Las habilidades, las competencias específicas, el talento y conocimiento, así como la motivación y expectativas de desarrollo son cruciales. Al momento de iniciar cualquier cambio, además de tomar en cuenta cada una de estas recomendaciones, deben considerarse los cuatro factores previos. Una vez revisado este tema, ¿considera que su empresa está equilibrada? ¿Valdría la pena buscar este equilibrio? N *Director General, TenStep Latinoamérica (www.tenstep.mx). Es Licenciado en Administración, certificado en PMP y Lean Process. Conferencista en foros de negocios. Ha trabajado en proyectos para GNP, Metlife, Grupo Invex, Grupo Televisa, Grupo San Pablo, entre otras.

La estrategia de una organización debe considerar las propuestas e ideas con el propósito de permearlas para alinear el rumbo de una organización. La relevancia de ciertos procesos, reglas de negocio y roles son de gran utilidad para el líder de la organización.

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Filipinas

renueva sus lazos comerciales con México Su ubicación estratégica, afinidad cultural con México, su mano de obra calificada y economía dinámica, hacen de Filipinas un destino atractivo para las inversiones de empresas mexicanas. por jason jovencio a. anasarias*

Una de las mayores preocupaciones para cualquier persona que realiza negocios en otro país es la adaptación cultural. Esto no es un problema para los inversionistas mexicanos que buscan un aliado para realizar sus negocios en Asia. Filipinas –país que se precia de ser una de las naciones más amigables de Asia– tiene múltiples similitudes culturales con América Latina, debido a su herencia colonial española. Los mexicanos se sienten como en casa cuando están con los filipinos debido a las semejanzas de ambos países, forjadas durante siglos. A pesar de que Filipinas y México establecieron relaciones bilaterales formales en 1953, las culturas filipina y mexicana se reunieron por primera vez hace casi 450 años –en 1565– durante la expedición de Manuel López de Legazpi, quien zarpó hacia Filipinas –desde Barra de Navidad, Jalisco– con un grupo de soldados mexicanos indígenas tlaxcaltecas. Durante los siguientes 250 años (de 1565 a 1815) Filipinas fue gobernada por los españoles a través del Virreinato de la Nueva España. Los antecedentes del actual comercio interoceánico se establecieron entre los puertos de Manila y Acapulco a través de la llamada Nao de China –conocida también como el galeón comercial Manila. Los galeones traían de Manila las riquezas de Asia a México, mientras que de Acapulco no sólo llevaban plata y oro del Nuevo Mundo, también dejaron una huella duradera en el idioma, la cultura, las tradiciones, la religión y la flora y fauna, así como en el estilo de vida de los filipinos. Hoy, años después de que los últimos galeones navegaron entre Manila y Acapulco, Filipinas y México están reactivando su comercio bilateral. Debido a su ubicación geográfica, la nación filipina se ha reinven-

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tado a sí misma como una importante puerta de entrada para las inversiones mexicanas en la región Asia-Pacífico. Alrededor de dos tercios de las inversiones totales de México en la región están ubicadas en Filipinas. Entre las empresas mexicanas que han invertido en Filipinas están Coca Cola FEMSA y Cementos Mexicanos (CEMEX); actualmente otras firmas mexicanas –como Imbera y KidZania– están considerando incidir en el mercado filipino. Las empresas mexicanas que deseen expandirse en la región Asia-Pacífico pueden encontrar oportunidades únicas en Filipinas. El país es un destino ideal para la inversión, debido a su ubicación estratégica como puerta de entrada al Sureste Asiático. En su entorno cercano se encuentran países como China, India, Vietnam, Corea del Sur, Tailandia e Indonesia, lo que convierte a este país en un centro logístico estratégico para participar en esos mercados. Cuando el mercado común de la Asociación de Naciones del Asia Sudoriental (ASEAN) entre en funcionamiento en 2015, las empresas mexicanas podrán acceder a través de Filipinas a un mercado de 600 millones de personas. Filipinas también ofrece una vasta planta laboral muy capacitada que habla inglés y es culturalmente adaptable con los requerimientos de las empresas de clase mundial. Esto hace del país un lugar atractivo para las industrias de manufactura, electrónica, maquila y externalización de servicios. A pesar de ser altamente calificada, la fuerza laboral del país sigue siendo rentable en términos de salario. Esta ventaja demográfica y de habilidades ha permitido a Filipinas un desempaño superior en la subcontratación de procesos de negocios (BPO por sus siglas

en inglés), una industria que desde 2006 ha crecido 46% cada año. Metro Manila obtuvo el segundo lugar entre los cien principales destinos de externalización en 2014, de acuerdo con el ranking publicado recientemente por la consultora de inversiones Tholons. De igual forma, Filipinas cuenta con una de las economías de más rápido crecimiento en el mundo contemporáneo. En 2013, la economía de Filipinas tuvo un crecimiento de 7.2% –el segundo más rápido en la región después de China–, a pesar de los desastres naturales producidos por el terremoto de Bohol y el Tifón Haiyan en la zona central de Filipinas. Este país ha

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registrado un crecimiento ininterrumpido durante 34 trimestres consecutivos en los últimos nueve años –los dos últimos a ritmo récord: 6.8% en 2012 y 7.2% en 2013. Las predicciones para el futuro son aún más brillantes. Goldman Sachs prevé que la economía de Filipinas –con 416,000 millones de dólares y que en la actualidad es la cuadragésima más grande del mundo– se convertirá en la décima cuarta economía más grande del mundo para 2050. Por su parte, entidades financieras como HSBC (The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation) estima que para 2050 Filipinas se convertirá en la 16ª economía más grande del mundo, la quinta mayor

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economía de Asia y la mayor economía en la región del sureste asiático. Las empresas mexicanas que buscan extenderse a la región Asia-Pacífico no necesitan buscar más. Filipinas siempre ha estado ahí para México. Sus lazos económicos y culturales se han enriquecido. El excelente desempeño de Filipinas registrado en los últimos años es una reminiscencia del pasado basado en el próspero comercio de galeones. Hoy en día ofrece nuevas oportunidades para aquellas empresas que buscan concretar negocios en Oriente. N *Exconsejero Económico, Embajada de Filipinas en México.

Las empresas mexicanas que deseen expandirse en la región Asia-Pacífico pueden encontrar oportunidades únicas en Filipinas. El país es un destino ideal para la inversión, debido a su ubicación estratégica como puerta de entrada al Sureste Asiático.

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Oportunidades en China:

Un enfoque de inteligencia comercial para los países de la Alianza del Pacífico Entre 2009 y 2013 China se consolidó como el segundo importador de bienes en el mundo, solo detrás de Estados Unidos. Para 2013, las compras de mercancías de este país representaron 11% del total mundial. Por otro lado, en términos de dinamismo, China se colocó en tercer lugar (detrás de Bolivia y Perú), tomando en cuenta que sus importaciones crecieron 18% en promedio anual durante el periodo 2009-2013, cuando en el mundo el crecimiento fue de 10%. por oscar león islas* y josé eduardo méndez**

China es un país con múltiples oportunidades comerciales. Tiene casi 20% de los habitantes del planeta. A pesar de que esta proporción disminuirá gradualmente en las próximas décadas, la población de China comenzará a declinar a partir de 2030 en términos absolutos. La demanda de productos y servicios en este país se respalda por su clase media –estimada en 157 millones de personas–, la cual es mucho más grande y consolidada que la de países como Estados Unidos. Para 2020 se proyecta que dicho estrato sume los 500 millones de habitantes, consolidándose como el mercado más importante del mundo. Es pertinente destacar que China ya superó a los Estados Unidos como el consumidor más representativo en el orbe en teléfonos celulares, automóviles y computadoras personales. Según cifras de la Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), para 2016 las economías industrializadas representarán solo 25% del crecimiento mundial total. China –junto con los países en desarrollo en Asia– aportará casi 55% del crecimiento económico mundial. Los países pertenecientes a la Alianza del Pacífico (AP) tienen como uno de sus objetivos centrales aumentar sus relaciones económicas y comerciales entre sí, pero con un énfasis particular con los países de dicha región. China tiene un papel representativo A pesar de que este país realizó importaciones provenientes de 229 países durante 2013, solo en los primeros diez países proveedores se concentró 60% de sus compras totales. Solo seis fueron regionales (representaron 41.6% del total) y cuatro fueron países fuera del continente (17.9% del total): Estados Unidos, Alemania, Suiza y Brasil. En 2013, 27.8% de las importaciones chinas fue de productos primarios (destacan el petróleo, minerales de hierro y cobre).

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El 72.2% restante correspondió a manufacturas (maquinaria y componentes para aparatos eléctricos y electrónicos). En este contexto, la participación de América Latina y el Caribe ha crecido. En 2013 esta región representó 6% de sus exportaciones y 6.5% de sus importaciones. La relación comercial es cada vez más importante, aunque aún se sitúa en un nivel bajo. Los países de América Latina y el Caribe exportan a China la mitad del número de productos que exportan a Estados Unidos, aunque siguen estando dominadas por productos primarios principalmente. Pese a la notable apertura del mercado chino desde su ingreso a la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC) –el 11 de diciembre de 2001–, China mantiene altas cuotas arancelarias en sectores que son de interés para los exportadores en América Latina y el Caribe. Por ejemplo, China mantiene aranceles medios aplicados superiores al 10% ad valorem en todos los subsectores agrícolas y agroindustriales, así como en los productos pesqueros y cárnicos. En productos de confitería, bebidas y tabaco, los aranceles varían entre 20% y 25% ad valorem. En cambio, los menores niveles de protección arancelaria media en China se encuentran en los sectores minero, forestal, químico y de hidrocarburos. Éstos –junto con el de las oleaginosas– representan el grueso de las exportaciones de América Latina y el Caribe a ese país. Inteligencia comercial para promover las exportaciones de la AP en China Se estima que en el periodo 2014-2017, el mundo crecerá a un ritmo promedio anual de 3.4%, mientras que Asia lo hará en 4.7%. Según estimaciones de Global Insight, China –a pesar de haber moderado su ritmo de crecimiento– crecerá a 7.5% anual. También se pronostica en materia de importaciones que las compras mundiales crecerán entre 2014-2017 a un ritmo promedio anual de 5.2%. Asia tendrá el mayor dinamismo en

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las importaciones, las cuales crecerían a una tasa promedio anual cercana a 6.4%, pero China destacaría con un ritmo de 8.8% en promedio anual. Este escenario muestra que Asia –con China en particular– tendrá un gran dinamismo. Este país es un socio comercial estratégico en América Latina y su vínculo comercial no debe seguirse minimizando. Países como Chile, Colombia, Perú y México –partícipes en la AP– no deben hacer a un lado las enormes oportunidades que representa este mercado. En algunos casos esta relación ya se ha potencializado. China es el primer mercado para las exportaciones chilenas. Es el segundo destino exportador de Colombia y Perú. Para México, China representó durante 2013 el tercer destino de sus exportaciones no petroleras (1.7%), después de Estados Unidos (79.7% del total) y Canadá (2.9%). Es importante enfatizar que desde 2012 se han llevado a cabo múltiples actividades de promoción comercial, de inversión y turismo por parte de cada una de las agencias y/o entidades de promoción de los países pertenecientes a la AP. En términos de promover las exportaciones de sus respectivos países, el esfuerzo deberá concentrarse en aumentar su cuota de mercado a China (2.5% del total de las importaciones que realizó Chinas durante 2013). En otras palabras, el número de empresas y productos exportados debe incrementarse, no solo de productos primarios, sino de manufacturas con mayor valor agregado. Para ello es

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El número de empresas y productos exportados debe incrementarse, no solo de productos primarios, sino de manufacturas con mayor valor agregado. Para ello es necesario identificar cuáles son las áreas de oportunidad con este país así como conocer cuál es el grado de complementariedad comercial de los países de la AP con China. necesario identificar cuáles son las áreas de oportunidad con este país así como conocer cuál es el grado de complementariedad comercial de los países de la AP con China. ProMéxico tiene un modelo de inteligencia comercial que detecta las áreas de oportunidad e identifica cuál es la complementariedad de la oferta exportable de los países de la AP con los productos que China requiere importar. En el caso de México, este análisis estadístico identifica dichas oportunidades por medio de cruces de oferta y demanda (productos a seis dígitos del sistema armonizado) en dos vertientes:

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1. Identificación de productos que se exportan al país de interés para concretar una estrategia que aumente la participación de mercado en el corto plazo. 2. Identificación de productos con nuevas oportunidades. Se refiere a los productos que compra el país de interés, pudiendo hacerlo de México (o de cualquier otro país de la AP) si se tiene la oferta exportable. Esta estrategia implica un trabajo de mediano plazo. Además de lo anterior, este análisis debe ser robusto. Las oportunidades detectadas tienen que ser estables en el tiempo, por lo que también se utilizan criterios que funcionan como filtros de temporalidad. Las opciones anteriores se complementan con factores como: • Análisis del arancel cobrado a México • Identificación de los países proveedores competidores actuales, así como el arancel cobrado • Identificación de fracciones con beneficio arancelario para México • Identificación de la oferta exportable calificada para dichas fracciones con oportunidad • Análisis de restricciones no arancelarias que pudieran aplicar • Información de contacto con el mercado (importadores, distribuidores y canales de distribución) En ese sentido, ProMéxico hizo el ejercicio para cruzar las oportunidades de exportación de los cuatro países de la AP con China. Aunado a lo anterior, ProMéxico y sus contrapartes en Chile, Colombia y Perú han organizado encuentros empresariales y de negocios para apuntalar su comercio.

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Conclusiones De acuerdo con análisis de la CEPAL, uno de los factores que limitan los flujos comerciales y de inversión entre los países de Asia y América Latina es su baja relación comercial intraindustrial. Según Osvaldo Rosales y Mikio Kuwayama –en su libro China y América Latina y El Caribe. Hacia una relación económica y comercial estratégica (2012)– deben redoblarse esfuerzos para que los países de la región se integren a las cadenas de valor y suministro de Asia. En este sentido proponen establecer asociaciones comerciales y de inversión, además de impulsar acuerdos comerciales que sirvan para integrarse a las cadenas de producción y exportación de empresas multinacionales en las que China tiene un papel fundamental como origen y como destino. Las agencias o entidades de promoción de los países de la AP están identificando casos de eslabonamiento productivo. La clave más importante de la integración comercial radica en que la AP permite la acumulación de origen entre los países miembros, de tal forma que los productos a manufacturar dentro del bloque se reconocen como si estuviesen hechos o manufacturados en un solo país. En este sentido, un producto que se elabore en Colombia con materia prima de Chile, puede ingresar libremente a Perú o a México, e incluso acceder en otros países o mercados con los que se tengan acuerdos en el marco de la AP, tal es el caso de Corea del Sur, China o Japón. N *Director de análisis de oportunidades comerciales, Unidad de Inteligencia de Negocios, ProMéxico. **Analista de oportunidades de negocios, Unidad de Inteligencia de Negocios, ProMéxico.

Marzo – Abril 2014


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Revista Negocios ProMéxico Julio 2014  

Mexico's Aerospace: A High-Flying Industry

Revista Negocios ProMéxico Julio 2014  

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