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M O N DAY M O R N I N G SEPTEMBER 17, 2001

25¢

Weather Morning clouds and fog changing to partly sunny. High, 66; low, 51. D 6

K ING , S NOHOMISH , P IERCE COUNTIES AND B AINBRIDGE I SLAND 50¢ IN I SLAND , K ITSAP AND T HURSTON COUNTIES 75¢ ELSEWHERE

Nation yearns for normal under shadow of war

Anti-terror ‘crusade’ could be long one, Bush says

Markets, baseball open today; election tomorrow

SEATTLE TIMES NEWS SERVICES BY TOM RAUM

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — As signs mounted yesterday that Washington is on an imminent war footing, President Bush pledged a “crusade” against terrorists as top administration officials zeroed in on Saudi exile Osama bin Laden and Afghanistan’s Taliban militia for possible retribution for last week’s terrorist attacks. “No question, he is the prime suspect. No question about that,” Bush said, brushing off a reported denial of responsibility by bin Laden. Administration officials asserted on TV talk shows yesterday that nations that harbor terrorists would face the “full wrath” of the United States. They emphasized that the battle against terrorism would be long and would include legal, diplomatic and economic offensives as well as military action. Vice President Dick Cheney disclosed that after suicide hijackers slammed planes into the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon on Tuesday, PLEASE SEE

B E T T Y U D E S E N / T H E S E AT T L E T I M E S

War ON A 2

The desire for a return to normal was exhibited in Seattle as well as New York yesterday, though in different ways. Above, members of Las Estrellitas perform Philippine folk dances at the Wallingford Wurst Festival in Seattle. At right, New Yorkers who live near the World Trade Center wait to be escorted home to retrieve pets and possessions. The dancers in Seattle are, from left, are Jessica Salvador, Jolene Spangler and Kimberly Villaron.

TERROR IN AMERICA

COMPLETE NEWS COVERAGE ON A 2-10

Military would have shot planes down Bush gave ‘difficult’ order to keep airliners away from Washington airspace. A 2

War without borders

J E F F Z E L E VA N S K Y / T H E A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Terrorists elusive because they fight for a cause, not land. Close-up, A 3

Biological, chemical weapons Their use by terrorists a frightening prospect. Close-up, A 3

Last GI to leave Vietnam among Pentagon dead Max Beilke was the last U.S. soldier to leave that war, in 1973. A 4

Nationwide ripple effect

Absence of those killed, missing is felt in many ways. A 4

Immigrant shot to death

Hate crime suspected in Arizona. A 5 For continuing coverage:

WASHINGTON — President Bush yesterday urged Americans to return to work today and put the U.S. economy back on track as he sought to nudge the nation back to a semblance of normalcy after terrorist attacks left more than 5,000 people dead or missing. “We need to go back to work tomorrow, and we will,” Bush said after returning to the White House from the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland, where he held a virtual war council with his advisers. “But we need to be alert to the fact that these evildoers still exist. “Today, millions of Americans mourned and prayed, and tomorrow we go back to work,” Bush said. “Our nation was horrified, but it’s not going to be terrorized; we are a nation that can’t be cowed by evildoers.” U.S. stock markets, shut down by the attack on the World Trade Center near the heart of the world’s financial center in New York City, geared up to reopen today. Airlines restored service suspended after the attacks, and Major League baseball prepared to resume games. The U.S. Postal Service will again be able to ship the nation’s mail in the belly of passenger airplanes, possibly as early as today, Federal Aviation Administrator Jane Garvey said. In the Seattle area, voters will go to the polls tomorrow in primaryelection contests ranging from Seattle mayor to Snohomish County legislative races that ultimately could determine whether the 49-49 split in the state House of Representatives will continue for another year. At Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, airline service continued to inch toward more normal levels. Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air said yesterday they expect to be operating 75 percent of their schedules today. Horizon officials said the commuter line resumed limited PLEASE SEE

Normal ON A 9

Life-and-death choices in rush down stairwell ◆ YOU’RE ON the 87th floor when a plane hits your building. Safety is at street level. Do you dare take the elevator or run for the stairs? Do you stop to help someone or rush on by?

BY SCOTT GOLD

Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK — Adam Mayblum enjoyed the storms that rumbled off the Atlantic. As they lashed his windows and strafed the steel beams, Adam would scoff: You think that’s power? I’m on the 87th floor of the World Trade Center. That’s power. During the worst storms, the cords on his window shades would appear to sway a few inches, but it was an illusion. They ac-

Primary election tomorrow Time: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Place: Your polling place is listed on your voter-registration card. If you can’t find your card, call your election office: • King County, 206-296-1608. • Snohomish County, 425-388-3444.

Absentee ballots must be postmarked or delivered to the county elections office by midnight tomorrow. On the Internet, visit www.seattle times.com/html/electionmain for information on the candidates and issues. Initial results on Election Night will be posted there and updated regularly.

tually hung straight, held steady by gravity. It was the tower that swayed, to absorb the weather. When Adam felt the first rumble Tuesday morning, he glanced at the cords. They were oscillating like a pendulum, 3 feet in both directions. He shot from his desk, turning his back on breakfast and e-mails to face the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. Outside, paper fluttered through the air — “gently,” he

Index

Northwest Life

would say later, “on a breeze.” He looked down at the tiny people staring up at him from 876 feet below and offered them a New York retort: “What’re you looking at?” They were looking at terrorists ripping apart the World Trade Center. It was 8:45 a.m., and American Airlines Flight 11, bound for Los Angeles, had just PLEASE SEE

F section

Business

C section

Sports on TV, radio

Classified ads

E section

TV

F6

Times phone numbers

A2

Weather

D6

Comics

F 4, 5

Crossword puzzle

F5

Dear Abby

F6

Deaths, funerals

B6

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B4

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B section A2

Tower ON A 6

D5

Copyright 2001 Seattle Times Company 70% of The Seattle Times newsprint contains recycled fiber. The inks are also reused. Please recycle when you are finished with it.

25¢ IN KING, SNOHOMISH, PIERCE COUNTIES AND BAINBRIDGE ISLAND; 50¢ IN ISLAND, KITSAP AND THURSTON COUNTIES; 75¢ ELSEWHERE

3 ROP


Sept. 17, 2001