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WINTER 2010

Connecting Seattle University Alumni and Friends

, SU STYLE It’s happily ever after for couples whose love blossomed at SU ICS# 100559 • Seattle University 2011 Winter Seattle U Magazine - 52pg PAGE FC 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • House SWOP

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STAFF Editor Tina Potterf Strategic Communications Director Casey Corr Senior Designer/Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82 Graphic Designer Troy Russell Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

CO N T E N T S

Contributing Writers Mike Bayard, S.J., Annie Beckmann, Diana Chamorro, Annie Katrina Lee, Barbara Mulvey Little, Maura Beth Pagano, ’12, and Mike Thee Copy Editor Sherri Schultz Proofreader Geri Gale

ADMINISTRATION President Stephen Sundborg, S.J. Vice President for University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden Associate Vice President for University Advancement Mark Burnett, ’84

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Assistant Vice President for Marketing and Communications Soon Beng Yeap Assistant Vice President for Development Sarah Finney Assistant Vice President for Advancement Services and Annual Giving Linda Hulten

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 1550-1523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University M a g a z i n e , Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

FEATURES 12 Love & Marriage Seattle University proves to be the place for quality education and love, which has bloomed for many couples who met here, fell in love and married.

20 Intellectual and Architectural Gem The Seattle University community is embracing the new Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons— its technology, meeting spaces and coffeehouse-style café.

24 Thanks to You Donors have once again given generously in support of Seattle University and its students.

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnamera or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s assistant

Check out web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

vice president for human resources and Equal Opportunity Officer, Jerry Huffman, University Services Building 107, (206) 296-5870 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

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Volume 34 • Issue Number 4 • Winter 2010

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D E PA R T M E N T S 2 4

Letters

36 Alumni Focus

People Paul Lawrence, ’89, is a sports agent representing some of the NFL’s biggest names; Chris Ronk, ’04, hits a high note with the Chapel of St. Ignatius choir.

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ON THE COVER

Ayu Othman, ’98, helped create a video game targeted at women who also enjoy a good romance novel; Annie Katrina Lee of the Alumni Board of Governors encourages alumni to get involved.

39 Alumni Events

Campus Observer The basketball season will soon heat up at Seattle University, as the men’s and women’s programs look to build on last season’s successes; SU names new associate provost for global engagement.

40 Bookmarks 41 Class Notes 44 In Memoriam 47 The Good Word

Curly, ’67, and Judy McNamee, ’67, on their wedding day at their reception at Sand Point Naval Air Station, Sept. 18, 1971. The couple met their freshman year at SU. PHOTO COURTESY OF JUDY AND CURLY McNAMEE

Letters Seattle University Magazine welcomes letters to the editor on subjects raised within the pages of the magazine. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Please include a name, address and daytime telephone number with all correspondence. Send to: Letters Editor, Seattle University Magazine Print Communications, Seattle University 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 Fax: (206) 296-6137 E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu

48 A Change is Comin’ To quote William Blake, “In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy.”

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letters

Girl Power SUMMER 2010

Connecting Seattle University Alumni and Friends

I was very excited to read your article on the Rat City Roller Girls BiofitSeattle Bite e U [“Cruisin’ for a Bruisin,’” summer 2010]. This group has come so far in Seattle and stands for so many great things, including empowering women. While I did not know Anna Stevens, aka “Ima Handful” of the Sockit Wenches, I do know some girls I met at the School of Law who are certainly worth mentioning. Jessica Creager, ’09, aka “Pris Toff,” is also an alumna of the Rat City Roller Girls, playing for the Throttle Rockets throughout her time at Seattle University. Also, Raven Healing, who graduated from the law school in 2009, was, and likely still is, a mascot for Rat City Roller Girls team Grave Danger. I just wanted to highlight these other awesome women. Alumni taste success in food and drink ventures

Monica Hartsock, ’09 Huntington Beach, Calif.

A Writer’s Life Thank you for the glowing review of Marlene’s Piano [“Bookmarks,” summer 2010]. It meant a lot to me to have my novel reviewed in the alumni magazine, which will help me present the book at Elliott Bay Book Co. and other Seattle locations, as I have in Chicago and Spokane. When I graduated from Seattle University in 1999, I was one of the first English/creative writing majors. My seminars with Dr. [Sharon] Cumberland, Father [Emmett] Carroll and Father [David] Leigh, and my work in the Writing Center with Larry Nichols, made me a better writer of poetry and fiction and a better student of life. I realized that I wrote not only to express myself but also to give readers insight into their own lives and hopes, much like Marlene playing music for Depression audiences. I’m very glad that you enjoyed my book and appreciate the support from Seattle University Magazine and the university.

Honoring Our Veterans Since the Civil War the United States has had more than 40 million veterans. The most highly decorated living veteran, according to some historians, is a graduate of Seattle University’s ROTC program, Maj. Gen. Pat Brady, class of 1959. Maj. Gen. Brady served our country for 34 years and is the 12th most decorated veteran of all time according to one list, and fifth according to another. In addition to the Congressional Medal of Honor he has earned more than 70 awards, including the Distinguished Service Cross, our nation’s second-highest award, two Distinguished Service Medals, six Distinguished Flying Crosses, two Bronze Stars, 53 Air Medals and the Purple Heart. Gen. Brady was a Dust Off (Helicopter Ambulance) Pilot for two years in the Vietnam War. He flew more than 2,500 combat missions and evacuated more than 5,000 friendly as well as enemy wounded. He has written his first book, Dead Men Flying (with Megan Brady Smith), which documents the great humanitarian effort in Vietnam spearheaded by the Army Aeromedical evacuation that rescued many souls. Seattle University and its alumni should take great pride in its ROTC program and its graduates. Mike Flannigan, ’58 Lakewood, Wash.

Online Chatter A comment submitted to Seattle University Magazine online from College of Nursing alumna Jessica Goglin, ’72: Alumni greetings! I was a classmate of Gen. Peter Chiarelli, Class of 1972. Congratulations to him for his Alumni of the Year Award [“Alumnus of the Year,” spring 2010]. Our country is so fortunate to have such a stellar general serving all of us. Recently, I listened to Pete’s conversation on National Public Radio (NPR) about the overall mental and physical health of today’s U.S. soldier. A very interesting conversation. I am a graduate of the College of Nursing and served my country as a U.S. Navy nurse during the Vietnam War. SPRING 2010

Connecting Seattle University Alumni and Friends

Growth, progress and alumni changing lives

punctuate 75 years of education and nursing at Seattle University

Jill Charles, ’99 Chicago

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Love Story

(and Other Notes) e es)

Love is in the air at Seattle University, as is evident in our cover story on couples who met and fell in love at SU and are married today. The story covers only a fraction of the many couples whose love developed while undergrads (or grad students) at SU, of course. Check out Seattle University Magazine online for a more detailed list of couples, along with photos and more. While you’re there, be sure to check out our web extras, including a profile of Hong Chhuor, ’05, who has been instrumental in community involvement and development of the Capitol Hill neighborhood, as well as stories on the new Catholic Heritage Lectures program at SU and the dedication of the James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership. Thanks to all of you who participated in our online readership survey. Your thoughtful opinions and feedback mean a lot and will help guide us as we move forward with the redesign of our print and online formats. There’s still time to share what you’d like to see in a revamped magazine, such as new or expanded sections, and how the magazine can play more of a role in engaging alumni. I’d love to hear your suggestions on story ideas and content changes. Submit your suggestions, ideas and more to me at sumagazine@seattleu.edu, or drop a line the old-fashioned way: Attn: Tina Potterf, Seattle University Magazine, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., Seattle, WA 98122. Thanks for reading. —Tina Potterf, editor

Alumni:

Alumni: Have an interesting story to tell? Have antointeresting tell? Want sound offstory on a to story Want to sound off on a story you’ve read in the magazine? you’ve read in the magazine?

We want to hear from you. We want to hear from you. Send story ideas, including first-person essays, for Send story ideas, first-person essays, consideration to including sumagazine@seattleu.edu. for consideration to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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People PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Paul Lawrence, ’89, represents some of the biggest names in the NFL, including Tracy Porter of the Super Bowl–winning New Orleans Saints.

Star Agent Paul Lawrence, ’89, carves out a successful career as a sports agent

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resh off a midday workout, Paul Lawrence, ’89, stretches out on a leather couch in his house, which doubles as home base for his business. His cell phone sits on a nearby coffee table, just far enough away to be not too much of a distraction but still within reach. He’s always on call, and sure enough, moments later the phone rings. It’s an anxious client—a football player who’s fretting about whether he’ll soon be cut. Lawrence offers a reassuring word and suggests

a diversion for the player to help keep his mind off his employment status. It’s a glimpse into the life of a sports agent, whose day-to-day duties, Lawrence says, are unpredictable. “Some of these guys want your help on everything … making sure they got the right price on a car or how many suits they should have,” Lawrence explains. “We’re a concierge service half the time, we’re a counselor the other half of the time.” Based in Snohomish, Wash., north of Seattle, Lawrence is a partner with

Maximum Sports Management, which represents roughly 50 professional athletes, most of whom are football players. Lawrence’s own 10 or so clients include Pro Bowl receiver Larry Fitzgerald and Pro Bowl safety Adrian Wilson, both of the Arizona Cardinals, as well as cornerback Tracy Porter of the Super Bowl-winning New Orleans Saints. When asked how he became a sports agent, Lawrence says Seattle University factored prominently. As an SU student, Lawrence played

4 | People

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“I get the most joy out of hearing how I impact my clients’ lives. Then I know I’m doing something good.” Paul Lawrence, ’89, sports agent

on the basketball team and also worked at the Connolly Center, which the Seattle SuperSonics were using at the time for some of their practices. Over time he struck up a friendship with Sonics player, and current Portland Trail Blazers coach, Nate McMillan, who would go on to be the godfather of Lawrence’s son. One thing led to another and Lawrence created a popular T-shirt featuring McMillan and Sonics Gary Payton and Kendall Gill. His knack for marketing was discovered, and before long he made his first significant foray into the world of professional sports by working for defensive tackle Sam Adams of the Seattle Seahawks. But there’s more to the story. A big part of Lawrence’s career trajectory, he says, can be traced not only to his days at Connolly, but also to the education he received at SU. When he first arrived as a transfer student, his intention was to major in business, but in talking with his academic adviser he became increasingly interested in public administration and ultimately went that route. “I’m not the guy who wants to sit there and read the book and say,

‘OK, this is the answer because the book says it’s the answer.’ Well, why can’t this be the answer? Just because nobody’s thought of it? But it could be the answer. Public administration opened my eyes to that type of questioning.” Looking back fondly on the courses he took and the professors who taught them, Lawrence says, “I still remember [political science] Professor [James] Hogan. He was my favorite professor there,” he says, adding with a laugh, “He’ll be shocked to hear that.” Lawrence says the leadership and interpersonal skills he honed at SU serve him well in his profession. “Public administration prepares people to be city managers, mayors, senators. It’s a lot of shaking hands, saying the right things, knowing when to talk, knowing how to talk. Well, I’m in a talking business,” he says. “We negotiate a lot of contracts, but to get the clients, you’ve got to know how to talk to the clients.” Lawrence describes the lengthy courtship during which he and his client decide to go into business together: “Lots of conversations.

Once you really learn and understand the nuances of football, then you’re just saying, ‘OK, what kind of person are you?’ The only way you find out what kind of person somebody is, is by spending some time talking to them. I’m on the phone a lot.” New Orleans Saints player Porter says there’s so much more to his relationship with Lawrence than football. “Most guys talk to their agents only when they need to. [Lawrence and I] talk every day.” What began as a business relationship, Porter continues, has grown into “a close friendship, to him becoming a father figure.” When told of Porter’s comments, Lawrence responds, “He said that?” before adding, jokingly, “I’m gonna kill him!” There’s no mistaking what words like Porter’s mean to Lawrence. “I get the most joy out of hearing how I impact my clients’ lives,” he says. “Then I know I’m doing something good. They could be the star or just a guy on the team or a guy looking for a job. When they say, ‘My agent—I know he cares about me,’ you can’t describe how fulfilling that is.” —Mike Thee

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People PHOTO BY MIKE KANE

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Chris Ronk, ’04, has been an important and active member of the choir at the Chapel of St. Ignatius since he first joined 10 years ago.

The Singing Mortician Chris Ronk, ’04, lifts spirits and voices as a member of the Chapel of St. Ignatius choir

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or the past 10 years, Chris Ronk, ’04, has been a fixture in the choir at the Chapel of St. Ignatius. His voice can be heard most Sundays at the 11 a.m. Mass, where he worships through song with his smooth baritone cantering psalms, the Litany of Saints or verses of a hymn. If you’ve been in the chapel during choir practice in the two hours before Mass and heard the

choir members burst out in laughter, it was likely generated by Ronk and his playful nature. Yet his joie de vivre and quick wit belie a serious personal faith mission to comfort those who mourn. By day, Ronk is a mortician. The road to his current vocation cut through Seattle University, where he earned a degree in sociology in 2004 (he’s also working toward a degree at

the School of Theology and Ministry). He followed this with mortuary school, a career direction that surprised his Portuguese grandmother, who, according to Ronk, was one of the reasons he chose it. His grandmother and her sister, Mary, had often taken Ronk to the cemetery when he was younger to visit their departed husbands. These visits taught him that death is a natural part of life.

6 | People

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“When it’s Easter Vigil and everyone in the congregation is singing the ‘Gloria’ together, with handbells and all the instruments, nothing tops that high for me.” Chris Ronk, ’04

When Mary passed away while Ronk was a teenager, he found comfort in helping plan her funeral. Shortly thereafter, he read a book about the funeral industry that set his life’s trajectory. This was a very different path for Ronk, whose early career plans were focused on becoming a lawyer. Over time he realized his calling was to help families going through the grieving process after the death of a loved one. Having learned from the Jesuits about consolation and desolation, he knew it was the right decision. When his personal need to be ethical with grieving families was not supported in his work at traditional funeral homes, he found another way. “I really feel like I landed where I belong,” says Ronk of his work today at a nontraditional funeral company called A Sacred Moment. The company specializes in in-home

services and green burials, which preclude the use of chemical preservation; biodegradable coffins or shrouds are used instead. As a funeral director, Ronk performs life celebrations and in-home funerals. He explains that in-home services give families the time and the processes necessary to help them come to terms with mortality. While his work is a meaningful and important part of his life, Ronk also finds purpose in his role with the chapel choir. A passion for music was nurtured in Ronk’s childhood by his mother, a singer who played piano at home and in church. Before long he was singing, and when he had the chance to audition for the chapel choir, he didn’t hesitate. Since joining the choir his freshman year Ronk has been an active and engaged member of the group, says Bill McNamara, campus minister for liturgical music and the choir director. “Over the past decade he has been a cornerstone of the choir community and has immersed himself in every possible leadership opportunity,” says

McNamara, adding that Ronk has served as a cantor/psalmist, section leader, retreat leader, Taizé planner, member of the music selection team and graduate intern. But he has brought much more to the choir than just a tireless devotion and moving voice, adds McNamara. “More than just being involved, Chris has been committed to the mission of the choir, bringing his unique blend of talent, humor, wisdom and pastoral presence to his fellow choristers and the wider university community through service at countless Sunday Masses and special liturgies,” McNamara says. “It’s hard to imagine chapel choir without Chris in our ranks.” The chapel choir allows Ronk an outlet to express himself creatively while engaging his spirituality. “When it’s Easter Vigil and everyone in the congregation is singing the ‘Gloria’ together, with handbells and all the instruments, nothing tops that high for me.” —Barbara Mulvey Little

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Ready, Set, Play Coaches and players gear up for exciting basketball season ahead

With returning players and an infusion of new talent, both the men’s and women’s basketball programs are looking for a strong showing in Division I.

8 | Campus Observer

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Under the leadership of Coach Joan Bonvicini, the women’s basketball team looks to build on its progress of last year toward a winning second season in Division I.

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he stage is set for a solid second season of Division I action for men’s and women’s basketball. Men’s basketball Coach Cameron Dollar and his team look for another strong season of play at KeyArena at Seattle Center this year. The program—with its rich past that includes legendary players such as Elgin Baylor and Clint Richardson— aims to return to its winning ways of last season. Coming off a 17-14 record, the men’s team were Independent Champions and the only reclassifying institution ever to boast a winning record in their first season back at the D-I level. This year’s group is looking strong, with the return of five players, including senior Cervante Burrell, who was a spark plug in the offense and was one of the team’s scoring

leaders. The team also will see eight newcomers boasting solid playing résumés. The schedule includes matchups against a trio of West Coast Conference schools and a battle with crosstown rivals the University of Washington on Feb. 22 at KeyArena. SU will take on three Pacific-10 teams this season, including Oregon State, whom they sizably defeated 99–48 in Corvallis last year, and in March will meet up with Stanford in Palo Alto, Calif. The women’s team, under the leadership of Coach Joan Bonvicini, is also looking for a strong showing this season. In addition to three returning veteran starters, including All-Independent Second Team selection Tatiana Heck, the team will have several new faces to add depth, athleticism and speed. It will be an

action-packed season as they square off with five WCC teams and five teams that participated in last season’s NCAA Tournament. The women will play most of its home games at Connolly Center, where they will host the Seattle U Thanksgiving Tournament Nov. 26–27, and some games at KeyArena. In addition to doubleheaders with the men’s team throughout the season, the women will host the Seattle U Holiday Classic from Dec. 29–30, featuring Gonzaga and Notre Dame, among others. —Diana Chamorro, ’11 MSAL

Don’t miss out on the action. For tickets visit goseattleu.com or call (206) 296-2835.

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“Global engagement is not about organizations; it is collaboration among people.” Victoria Jones

As SU’s first associate provost for global engagement, Victoria Jones will advance global education.

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Connections Across Cultures Victoria Jones will lead university’s global engagement initiatives

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hen Seattle University went looking for its first associate provost for global engagement, it was a strategic move to extend the university’s international reach and advance the global education of SU students. Victoria Jones took on the challenge. In this new role, Jones is involved in a range of global efforts and initiatives, including ensuring learning and safety when studying abroad. When it comes to education abroad, SU is among the top schools in the United States for program offerings. Jones is well equipped for the position. With a PhD focused on the social psychology of culture from Cornell University, her background spans international relations, business administration, social sciences and the arts. Most recently, she was associate dean of international relations in the College of Business at the University of Texas in San Antonio. She also taught international marketing and will continue to teach at Albers. Jones is at work on shaping a vision for SU’s expansion of global engagement. Here’s some of what she has in mind:

Q: What have you discovered about SU’s commitment to global engagement? Jones: I’ve joined a very strong team. There is excellent facultyled education abroad, and there are some wonderful courses on our campus. I see myself empowering and enhancing work already done, such as supporting and expanding faculty research. There’s also a need to increase international activities across campus. If our graduates aren’t at some time working for a multinational company, they’ll be partnering with or competing with one. Q: What do you see as some of your first priorities? Jones: It’s a three-point approach including programs, partnerships and policies. All are essential for a thriving international campus. For better communication, I’m developing an international database of scholars and practitioners so we can expand the ways and types of community involvement and share best practices. Building partnerships is key. Who in the community, for instance, works in

Read more with Victoria Jones at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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the area of poverty and could participate in a dialogue with SU researchers on the ground about causes and solutions? Partnership development depends on connecting people who are passionate about what they do. Q: It sounds as though your efforts will cut across many aspects of the university and extend far beyond. Is there any campus role you play that’s particularly pivotal? Jones: I am the champion of intercultural competence and the activities across campus and around the world that will give our students the passion and skills to make a meaningful global contribution. Q: Philosophically, you have said your global vision focuses on people as the core of organizations. How so? Jones: Global engagement is not about agreements between organizations; it is collaboration among people. Our partners are people who are motivated by a shared vision and who are inspired by the exponential possibilities of collaboration. —Annie Beckmann

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Lov STORIES BY ANNIE BECKMANN AND TINA POTTERF

Seattle University proves to be a potent matchmaker, planting the seeds of love (and later, marriage) for many alumni.

12 | Love & Marriage

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR, HEATH BRAUN AND FEATURED COUPLES

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“In our generation, marriage really meant something. It was a vow, and you felt like you were committed to one another.”

eMarriage & ROB LEGGE, ’69, MARRIED TO EARLINE (JONES) LEGGE, ’70

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irst glances across a room of strangers at freshman orientation. First dates at a basketball game or over coffee. First realizing you’ve found the one, who just so happens to be sitting two rows over in math class. All these “firsts” share one thing: they happened at Seattle University, which, in addition to educating whip-smart students, seems to be a place where love flourishes. Some couples are united by shared interests in athletics or the arts. Others enjoy the outdoors or waxing poetic on long hikes in the Cascades. And plenty of people will tell you it was God’s doing when they met their love match. Among Seattle University alumni, you meet all kinds of couples who found enduring love on campus. Their stories can be touching, amusing, even harrowing. What stands out is how

strong these marriages are, some for 40 years or more after the couple first caught sight of one another. A strong faith is a common thread among those who kindled their love at SU. When it comes to exchanging vows, many of these couples marry close to where they met. Each year, upward of 40 couples marry at the Chapel of St. Ignatius, which is typically booked months in advance for Saturday nuptials. To be married at the chapel, the bride or groom, or both, must be current students, faculty, staff, alumni, regents or trustees; most who marry here are recent alumni, graduates within the past five years. The following stories of love offer a glimpse at the role SU has played in bringing these couples together. You can read a more detailed list of married couples and profiles online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/. If your name and story aren’t included and should be, let us know.

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Nakamuras Taka Nakamura, ’98, and Jennifer (Manne) Nakamura, ’99

Jennifer, ’99, and Taka Nakamura, ’98, on their wedding day at the Chapel of St. Ignatius and (right) during a recent visit to the SU campus.

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ou wouldn’t imagine that core requirements at Seattle University could lead to marriage vows. But when you ask Taka Nakamura, ’98, and Jennifer (Manne) Nakamura, ’99, how they met, they’ll tell you it happened in January 1996 in Father James Reichmann’s philosophy class in the College of Arts and Sciences. “Taka was impressed when I said thank you in Japanese when he held the door for me,” Jennifer recalls. Outdoor activities, sports in general and basketball in particular, reading, watching movies and rock ’n’ roll— Aerosmith and Bon Jovi, among others—were among their shared interests. Taka was a sociology major and Jennifer, an international business major, was minoring in Japanese. “One of the things that attracted me to Jen was her understanding of my culture,” says Taka, a native of Shizuoka, Japan, roughly 30 miles from Mount Fuji. He first came to the United States to attend high school. While a student at Sammamish High School, Taka learned that SU was a sister school to Sophia University, a well-respected Jesuit university in Tokyo. That was enough to convince him to attend. Both Taka and Jennifer found themselves on the dean’s or president’s lists quite a few times at SU. Taka credits sociology professor Jodi O’Brien with creating opportunities for him to go to

graduate school. He completed a master’s degree in sociology at San Diego State University. After that, he returned to Seattle in search of work, but found a job that took him back to California. When she graduated, Jennifer stayed in Seattle as a buyer for Pacific Medical Center. She and Taka were able to maintain a long-distance relationship by talking on the phone and seeing each other every couple of months. “I had an engagement ring for a while, probably a good three months or so. Initially, I was going to propose to Jen when she came down to California for a Bon Jovi concert, but that didn't work out,” says Taka. “I thought about popping the question when I came up to Seattle for few days, but didn't have the moment. I finally proposed when she came down to California again for a visit.” It was a year before their wedding when Taka came home from work with two dozen roses and a proposal for Jennifer. Work required Taka to remain in California for the next year, although he flew to Seattle periodically to help with wedding plans. In August 2004, the couple married at SU’s Chapel of St. Ignatius. Today, Taka works at Amazon.com in transaction risk management, while Jennifer works part-time and is a stay-athome mom to the couple’s young son, William.

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McNamees Curly McNamee, ’67, and Judy (Bride) McNamee, ’67

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t was spring quarter 1964 at Seattle University, and freshman Judy Bride was chosen to be on a panel at the front of Father Alfred Brady’s theology class on Judeo-Christian origins. Little did Bride—and another freshman, Curly McNamee—know what a fateful day this would be. “That was kind of a ‘wow’ moment for me,” recalls Curly, “the first time I laid eyes on her.” “Of course,” Judy says, “I was totally oblivious.” Curly and Judy Bride McNamee, both class of 1967, may have celebrated their 39th wedding anniversary this fall, yet they remember well some of those early awkward moments before they started dating, including that first meeting in Pigott. “I had Jim Purcell, ’67, introduce me to her at the Chieftain. Then it was a case of me mustering up the courage to ask her out,” Curly says. “One day I saw her in the Liberal Arts Building [now the Administration Building] and was just about to ask her out ...” “When I ducked into the ladies’ room,” Judy says with a grin. For Curly, this meant a few agonizing minutes while he waited for her to emerge so he could ask her to a sock hop and a military ball. “That sock hop was our first date, on April 3, 1964, followed a week later by the military ball. We dated off and on—mostly on—through college,” says Curly. Both were political science majors and took a class together in which they were on opposing teams in a debate. Not so good. “He was a brains-do-not-appeal kind of guy,” says Judy, a summa cum laude grad who had been debating for eight years. “I was a little bit intimidated because Judy’s very smart,” Curly concedes. In September 1968 they became engaged, shortly before Curly, who had been an Army ROTC cadet at SU, went to Vietnam for a year. Holy Rosary Church in West Seattle was the setting for their wedding in September 1971. The McNamees like to say that knowing each other for more than seven years before they married meant few surprises. These two Seattle natives weren’t quite prepared, though, when their jobs—his with Travelers Insurance and hers with

Curly and Judy McNamee today, and at the military ball at SU back in the day.

— Kaiser Cement and Gypsum— took them to the Bay Area. d After five years they returned to the Seattle area, where Curlyy settled into a human resourcess managerial career of more than 28 years with The Boeing Company, and Judy managed the technology infrastructure at Seattle Public Schools for 23 years. They’re both active at SU, where Curly is past president of the Alumni Board of Governors and on the Board of Regents. “It’s been a terrific ride,” Curly says. “Fear and intimidation have worked really well for us.” Judy responds with an impish smile, then turns reflective about her happy marriage. “You have to look at life through the lens of how it will affect the other person,” she says. “Without sounding corny,” addes Curly, “it takes love, respect and a sense of humor.”

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McCanns the Legges

Jack McCann, ’69, and Mary (Fickett) McCann, ’70, and Rob Legge, ’69, and Earline (Jones) Legge, ’70

Jack, ’69, and Mary McCann, ’70, and Rob, 69, and Earline Legge, ’70, share plenty of laughs about their SU days.

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elationship gurus often say that respect is the key to a successful marriage, although common ground in spiritual matters plays a central role as well. Faith is definitely a factor for many couples who discovered each other as students at Seattle University. Just ask Jack McCann, ’69, and Mary (Fickett) McCann, ’70, and Rob Legge, ’69, and Earline (Jones) Legge, ’70. The foursome—who met their future spouses and one another during their undergraduate days here—remain good friends today and attend the same church, St. Philomena Parish in Des Moines, Wash. A pivotal point in their friendship was when the four took Vatican II together, says Mary, referring to studies on the second ecumenical council of the Vatican, which opened in 1962 and closed in 1965. Their professor was Father Frank Lindekugel, S.J., whom many affectionately called “Chalky” because he often leaned his back against the blackboards, getting chalk on his black cardigan sweater. “He had such a sanctifying presence,” says Mary. “He was prophetic. And a saint, really.” What brought them all to SU? Both of Earline’s parents were grads. It was the turbulent 1960s, and Mary knew she wanted to go to a safe, Catholic school. Rob’s older brother Don, ’66, was also at SU. And Jack found his way here in his sophomore year, after he spent a year preparing for the priesthood at St. Edward Seminary

in Kenmore, Wash. For this foursome, the walk down memory lane is rich with coincidence and long on support for one another. Mary, an education major, and Earline, a business major, met during freshman orientation. One day Earline dropped by the chapel in Marycrest to pray for a little guidance, especially with matters of the heart. Next thing she knew, she was at the bookstore, where she came around a bookshelf and literally bumped into Rob, another business major. The books they were carrying scattered all over the floor. They thought nothing of their encounter until 30 minutes later, when they again dropped their books as they collided while rounding a corner in the financial aid office. “God put us together,” says Earline. Meanwhile, Jack McCann, also a business major, was ruminating about a date for the upcoming ROTC ball. He decided to scope out a less formal dance in hope of finding one. In the crowded Chieftain gym, he and Mary met and started to dance. Abruptly, a fellow who had a crush on Mary cut in, and Jack was left without a partner. Jack opted to stay on the dance floor, concerned that if he left that spot, he might never find Mary again. Return she did. The two of them went to the ROTC ball together, and their courtship was underway. Both Jack and Mary vividly recall the night when Jack, in a

16 | Love & Marriage

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onor maid of h Earline is ding party, y. a d g bi r ed ck on thei lly pulled by the w ary and Ja yfu (Above): M (Right): Rob is pla edding day. w t. is gh h ri e on on th ght), Jack (far ri including

valiant attempt to get Mary back to her dorm before curfew, ended up in a car accident just short of campus. Mary dashed from the crash in time to be checked in by the housemother. Jack, meanwhile, was sitting in the back of a police car. He and another passenger had just about talked their way out of a ticket when a couple of fellows knocked on the window of the police car and commended the cops for ticketing Jack. A couple of weeks later, Earline and Mary decided it was time for Jack and Rob to meet on a double date. Jack took one look at Rob and said to Mary, “Oh no! That’s one of the guys from the car accident!” Today, as the four of them talk about dating, and then double dating, their laughter intensifies. Earline and Mary were each other’s maids of honor at their weddings to Rob and Jack. The Legges exchanged vows at St. Philomena Parish in 1969, and the McCanns in 1968 at St. Anthony Parish. Earline’s wedding was especially memorable; when Mary bent down to pick up Earline’s bridal veil from the box, Rob’s wedding ring, which had been on Mary’s finger for safekeeping, fell off. When Frank Costello, S.J., asked for the ring during the ceremony, Mary realized it was missing. She found the ring after the nuptials, however, and Father Costello, then a faculty member at SU, blessed it while the newlyweds signed their marriage certificate. Rob says it’s one of his favorite wedding memories. Rob says the four of them never forgot Father Louis Sauvain’s marriage class at SU. “In our generation, marriage really meant something. It was a vow, and you felt like you were committed

to one another,” he says. Rob and Earline have four boys, the oldest of whom is a priest, and one grandchild. Jack and Mary have seven children and four foster children; by Christmastime, they will have 17 grandchildren. With their sizable family, Mary discovered substitute teaching suited her best. She taught at St. Philomena School, St. George Parish School in Seattle, Holy Family School in Auburn and St. Bernadette Parish School in Burien. Jack was involved in his dad’s topsoil firm when he was still an SU student. He struck out on his own in 1974 with a couple of old dump trucks and formed a trucking and excavating company for site development. He developed sites for industrial parks, shopping centers and Boeing’s Paine Field in Everett. He sold the business, semi-retired in 1994, then started a land development company. When Jack and Rob were at SU, they worked the graveyard shift five nights a week as detention officers for the King County Juvenile Court. That established a career path for Rob, who became a juvenile probation counselor. After 41 years with King County, he’s now the senior member of the probation staff. One more fact that weaves these couples together: When not raising her boys, Earline has worked for Jack since the late 1970s. Today she serves as his office manager three days a week.

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Van Engelens Brady Van Engelen, ’02, and Anastasia (DeFelice) Van Engelen, ’02

Brady and Anastasia Van Engelen, ’02, on their wedding day, Sept. 2, 2006, and with their son, William.

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rady Van Engelen, ’02, and Anastasia DeFelice, ’02, met for the first time near the end of spring quarter during their freshman year. They would catch glimpses of one another as they crossed paths on their way to their math classes, which happened to be in adjacent classrooms. Initially, Anastasia made the first move—as friends—when she approached Brady at the Chieftain and introduced herself. But when he pursued her romantically, it took a few attempts before she accepted. When she agreed to a date, they went to

dinner on Capitol Hill and a movie. It didn’t take long for things to get serious. About a month later, when the two parted ways for the summer, they continued to communicate in a sweetly romantic fashion—they wrote letters. “E-mail was around, but I love old-fashioned letters,” Anastasia says. That summer Brady visited her in Sacramento, Calif., and they spent time getting to know each other on a trip to Lake Tahoe. By fall, and back at SU, they were dating each other exclusively. Brady was struck by Anastasia’s “big, beautiful brown eyes. And she has this outgoing personality and is easy to talk to,” The first real test of their relationship came after graduation. Brady, a business major who was in ROTC at SU, stayed in Seattle as an ROTC recruiter, while Anastasia, a communications and journalism major, was off to New York City for work. They continued their relationship long distance as Army training took Brady to Oklahoma and Georgia, then Germany—where he was

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Wedded Bliss stationed—before his deployment to Iraq. Though separated by thousands of miles, the two remained together through the best of times and the worst: while on duty in Iraq, Brady was shot in the head by sniper fire and seriously injured. Anastasia was there for him as he recovered at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. They would travel between Washington and New York to visit each other. “We’ve been through so much together; she was strong and steady, and I admired that,” Brady says. The long commute ended when Brady, who now works for Sen. John Kerry as a military legislative assistant, took a job in Washington, D.C., and Anastasia transferred from her New York office to D.C., and later accepted a public relations position with the National Retail Federation. Even before Brady’s proposal, Anastasia knew he was the one. “I didn’t want to go through anything else in my life without him by my side,” she says. The couple married Sept. 2, 2006, and lives in Chevy Chase, Md. This past December they welcomed their first child, William. Although their lives have changed, expectedly and happily, since the birth of their son— from happy hours and nights on the town to baby yoga and walks with William—the couple wouldn’t have it any other way. “We’re having so much fun,” Anastasia says. “William is really easygoing.” What’s their advice for a lasting and loving marriage? Start with communication—even if that means saying something your significant other may not want to hear. “If something is bothering me, I don’t bite my tongue. There’s no beating around the bush,” she says. For Brady, patience is not only a virtue, it’s a must. “Marriage is not easy. It does take some effort,” Brady says, “and patience is a prerequisite.” SU

When it comes to love and marriage, everyone sseems to have an opinion on what makes it work. While marriage has been on the decline in recent W decades, many still opt to take the plunge. Here eca are a few interesting facts on the topic: f • Getting ing hitched: In recent times the marriagee rate ra in the United States has fallen by more than from 77 marriages an one-third, o per 1,000 unmarried arrie women in 1970 to 50 marriages per 1,000 00 in 1996. • A smart move: Those with IQs and th high h higher education are more likely ikel to stay married than those with lower IQs and no college education. • The marrying type: According to the 2002 200 National Survey of Family Growth, more than 70 percent of men and women between the ages of 25 and 44 have been married. That figure climbs to 80 percent by the time they reach age 40. • Playing for keeps: Nearly 93 percent of Americans say they believe marriage is a lifetime commitment. • Going to the chapel: On average, up to 40 weddings are held each year at Seattle University’s Chapel of St. Ignatius. —Seattle University Magazine staff

Read more about couples who found love at SU and share your own love story at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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20 | Intellectual and Architectural Gem

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Intellectual and Architectural Gem The reviews are in and the new Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons is a winner In the fall issue we introduced readers to some of the distinctive elements of the new Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons. There are abundant spaces for study and discussion, a café that is in the vein of a hip coffeehouse, designated quiet rooms and effective use of outdoor space with seating and a rain garden. The interior and exterior mix the sleek and urbane with the traditional—one of the most striking elements inside the library is the double-helix staircase, a vestige from the original library built in 1966, which now serves as a focal point upon entering the main floor of the new building. There’s also an airy, openness that showcases the art, which pops off the walls, as well as the glass façade of the building that brightens the space with natural light. At 125,000 square feet, the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons is no shrinking violet, yet the space feels inviting, not lofty or cold. At the formal dedication of the library and learning commons this fall, President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., praised the many donors who made the project possible, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Ann Pigott Wyckoff; Rita Daubenspeck and her late husband, Harold; Dick and Betty Hedreen, who contributed much of the art that is in the building; and Trustee Anne Farrell, who chaired the library fundraising committee. “The opening of the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons transforms learning, teaching and the campus experience for our students,” says Father Sundborg. “Imagine all the personal formation, learning successes and empowering experiences that will take place here for years to come.” Here’s a peek inside. —Tina Potterf

PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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ABOVE: One of the striking elements of the library and learning commons—the double-helix staircase— remains. LEFT: The space offers several areas for students to tap into vast technology or to pull up a chair and do their homework on their own laptops. NEXT PAGE/TOP: A popular go-to spot in the new library is The Byte, the coffeehouse-style café where visitors can grab a quick bite or settle in with a hot or cold beverage. NEXT PAGE/BOTTOM: The library and learning commons offers many spots and alcoves for quiet contemplation and study. One of these spaces is the grand reading room, which has comfy, oversized chairs and striking artwork.

For more on the Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons, visit www.seattleu.edu/library.

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Thanks

TO YOU

Thanks to You, Our Donors, for Another Great Year If you haven’t visited Seattle University lately, it’s time to come back to campus. Thanks to the generosity of Seattle University alumni and friends, the doors to our new Lemieux Library and McGoldrick Learning Commons are now open. It’s been thrilling to share in the excitement of students and faculty as they enter this technology-rich 21st-century library for the first time. The commitment and dedication of our donors have propelled SU’s ascension as the premier independent university of the Northwest for academic quality, Catholic Jesuit inspiration and service to society. Donors contributed $12.1 million to Seattle University in fiscal year 2009–10, supporting progress of bold new initiatives including the following: • A Mental Health Court Clinic at the Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic • The Entrepreneurship Center Endowment in the Albers School of Business and Economics • An Associate Provost for Global Engagement • Initiation of SU’s Catholic Institute for Thought and Culture Our plans as we enter a new era of excellence will expand the scope and reach of faculty teaching and research and enhance our learning environment. Scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students will remain a critical factor of keeping Seattle University affordable to our diverse, energetic and socially committed student body. On behalf of the students we serve and all who are a part of this community, thank you. We are profoundly grateful for your gifts and your belief in the students and faculty of this great university.

Mary Kay McFadden Vice President, University Advancement

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB The names in the following honor roll reflect alumni, parents, faculty, staff, friends, corporations and foundations who generously contributed $1,000 or more to Seattle University during the fiscal year, July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. DIAMOND CIRCLE ($25,000 and above) Joel and Misty Andersen Nicolaos and Athena Arvanitidis Carl M. Bengtson Estate Frederick Brandauer and Marie Materi Bill and Paula Clapp Michael and Kathy Collins James Degel and Jeanne Berwick Dick and Chris DiCerchio Bill Eisiminger Linda and Bradley Fowler Ken and Lisa Geisen Ron and Nan Giuffre Eva Gordon Marcia and Pat Halligan Elizabeth and Richard Hedreen Leo Hindery, Jr. Jim and Timmie Hollomon Steve and Cathy Beth Hooper Catherine Mowry LaCugna Joseph LaCugna Rhoady and Jeanne Marie Lee Holli and Edgar Martinez Thomas E. Maxwell* John and Ginny Meisenbach Glen and Alison Milliman Donald L. Navoni James and Gaye Pigott Mark and Cindy Pigott Connie and Steven Rogel Stuart and Lee Rolfe Jon and Judith Runstad David and Sandra Sabey Theiline and Douglas Scheumann Mick and Marnie Schreck Howard and Sheri Schultz Jon and Mary Shirley Betty Shorett Martin and Mary Ann Simonetti Jim and Janet Sinegal Elbridge Stuart III and Debra Stuart Richard and Karen Tonelli Betty Woods H.S. Wright III and Katherine Ann Janeway Jeffrey and Korynne Wright Martha Wyckoff Ann Wyckoff Anonymous (6)

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999) William and Joanne Almon Michael Amato Carol Ann (Conroy) Barnickol and Karl Barnickol

Carl and Renee Behnke Maureen and Joel Benoliel Bruce and Ann Blume Clarice Bocek Harry and Pauline Buhler Jane and John Campbell Alan and Bonnie Cashman Robert Chang and Catheryne Nguyen Frank and Marilyn Clement Theodore and Patricia Collins John and Mary Jo Costello Patrick and Paula Costello Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curran Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Jim and Janet Dwyer Thomas and Susan Ellison LeeAnn Farrell Richard and Maude Ferry Janet Fisher Margaret Gabutero Joseph and Terri Gaffney Rick and Kandace Holley Henry and Mary Ann James Helen M. Jolly Colleen Kinerk Annie Lee Maureen Lee and Mark Busto Robie Livingstone Bruce and Peggy McLeod William and Lyanne Monkman Grace Nordhoff and Jonathan Beard Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O’Connor HJ O'Donnell Jr. and Mariette O’Donnell Marlys and Ralph Palumbo Marie A. Parker* Margaret Parry, CSJP James Parry, Jr. and Mary Partin Susan Payne Riley and Nancy Pleas Chuck and Nancy Porter John and Heidi Rabel Joan Razore Bryant and Nonie Reber Rick and Jennifer Redman B. Raymond and Linda Russo Tim and Shirley Ryan Jeff and Lara Sanderson Steven and Angela* Scalzo Shannon and James Schneider James Sexton Estate Dorothy J. Sexton* Richard and Joyce Simmonds Rev. Dr. Virginia and Gerald Sparling Stevens and Tricia Trainer Ruth Tressel Ruth and Bill True Harvey and Judy Wacht

Patrick and Mary Welch Ann Wyman David Wyman, Jr. and Linda Wyman Deehan Wyman Virginia Wyman Anonymous (5)

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) Dean and Vicki Allen Walter and Melinda Andrews Martha and Thomas Anfang Claire Angel Kent and Dana Bailey Gubby and Gillian Barlow Sanjay and Catherine Batra William and Mary Berridge Harlan Boyd Pamela Bradburn Alan and Kelise Burk Suzanne Burke Bill and Phyllis Campbell Kathleen and Charles Cannon Hon. Terrence and Diane Carroll Ross and Julie Case Alan Chaffee and Mary Raschko Sally Chambers Joseph Champoux Richard and Suzan Chavez Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Leo and Carol Costello Carolyn and John Cunningham IV Mark and Julie DeLaurenti Marilyn Dennehy Rebecca and Paul deVille Judith and William Doyle James and Mary Dunnam John and Marlene Durbin James Eblen Anne and Bob Farrell Patricia and Victor Feltin Wilfred and Rosaleen Finnegan Pierre and Jacqueline Gehlen Kathleen and Keith Hallman Jack and Myra Hanover Rob Harris Hazel Hayward* Buffie Hebert Pam Hom Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Michael Hosterman Steven and Sharon Huling Rick Jones Carolyn Kelly John and Patricia Kelly Jim Kenyon Anne and Lee Kilcup

W. H. Knight Jr. and Susan Mask Thomas and Agnes Lee John and Phyllis MacKenzie Mary and Joe Magnano Ed Marcuse Bill and Julie Marler Patrick McAleese Steve and Ashlie McConnell John Miller, Jr. and Marlene Miller Grace Elaine Munzer Larry and Mary Jo Nejasmich John and Jeanne O’Brien Brody O'Harran and Lisa Lederer Winston Pavitt Jim and Lanette Peterson David Pierre-Louis Judy Pigott Mark and Andria Pinkowski Steve Porter In memory of Rosemary Laura Ramsden Jim and Doreen Rigos Charles and Karen Riley Thomas and Nancy Roach Tom and Jeanie Robinson Ron and Anna Rosella Paul and Debra Sauvage Mimi and Gary Schulze James and Janice Scott Julie Shapiro and Shelly F. Cohen John and Elaine Shephard Jennifer Sik John and Rose Southall Clyde and Karen Summerville Gerald and Gloria Swanson Carl Swenson and Julia Buchholz William Swenson Stephen and Kristy Szablya Gerard (Jerry) Tardie Douglas Tellefson Jon and Cindy Tellefson Leonard Weber Mary Ellen and James Weber Vernon and Mary Williams Sheila Wyckoff-Dickey and Charles Dickey Judith Yeakel Anonymous (4)

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999) Susan Ahearn Courtney and Darren Allen David Allen Hon. Robert and Sarah Alsdorf Geoff and Judy Appleyard Robert and Clodagh Ash

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB, cont.

Dawn and Richard Bangert Arthur and Mary Fran Barkshire Richard Beers II and Jennifer Beers Paul and Lisa Bialek Veronica and Lawrence Bilder Sheila and Byron Bishop Irene Bjorklund and Michael Karn Robert and Susan Blethen David and Barbara Boerner Jim and Caroline Boitano Richard and Margaret Bossi John and Fran Bradley Colleen and Paul Brajcich Carolyn and Jeff Brandsema Joseph and Maureen Brotherton Michael and Michelle Burris Paul and Shelly Capeloto Thomas and Cynthia Captain Dorene Centioli-McTigue and Terence McTigue Chris and Rebecca Clements Thomas and Barbara Clerkin Christopher and Caroline Corr Walter Cougan and Margaret Ganong Rev. Dr. Richard and Carol Cunningham Melanie Curtice and Jill Mehner Karen and Thomas Cusick III Lucio and Marta Dalla Gasperina Rev. Bruce and Mary Davis Bertrand and Brooke de Boutray Dennis DeMille Karin Dufault Melissa and David Dugan Craig and Stephanie Duncan Brent Fernyhough Jim Fitzsimmons John Garner and Lizbeth Cardwell Jeff Grant Bert Green and Alexandra Brookshire Peter Grimm and Dawn Winters Russell and Corinne Hagen Rick E. Hansen Nathan Heitzinger Jon and Kim Hemingway John and Judith Hopcroft Ronald Hosogi Peggy Hudson Steve and Elizabeth Huebner Phil Irwin and Margaret Lake Joseph Ittes, Jr. and Janene Siers Annette and Steven Jacobs Kent Johnson James and Dianne Jorgensen Dinesh KC James and Donna Knight Kevin and Janice Krieger Michael and Jean Krsak Deirdre Kuring and Jesse Nunez Donald and Caroline Leuthold Daniel and Julie Little

Brody O’Harran, ’99, Josh Petersen, ’93, Matt Diefenbach, ’98, and Christian Wong, ’98, are alumni of Seattle University’s Sullivan Leaders program. All are President’s Club donors through their support of the new Father Jerry Cobb, S.J., Endowment they helped create this year.

Why we give:

“When I think about the things that are most important in my life, they all intersect with Seattle University. My best friends are from here. I’m not where I’m at without Seattle U.”

Brody O’Harran, ’99

Senior Sales Manager, National Performance / Microsoft

“My wife and I give to SU to further its mission of leadership and service to the community. I give particularly out of a recognition of the investment Seattle University made in me in the form of being a Sullivan Leader. Josh Petersen, ’93 CEO / The Robot Co-op

“Both Seattle University and Father Cobb provided me with opportunities I don’t think I would have had if I had not chosen SU or had SU not chosen me.” Matt Diefenbach, ‘98

Principal and Client Relations / Turnstyle

“I love Seattle University… I got a really unique educational experience. That’s the reason why I’m still so committed to Seattle University and I’ll always want to be involved with its programs.” Christian Wong, ’98 Owner / Chocolati

26 | Thanks to You, Our Donors

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Geraldine Madeira Dave and Mary Anne Madsen Michael J. Malik, Sr. Trust Cisco Malpartida Smith Stephen and Catherine Malshuk Gerry and Barbara Maurer May McCarthy John and Catherine McDowall Hank McGee and Victoria Kill Henry McGee III and Celia McGee Stan and Kathleen McNaughton Jim and Lynn Merlino Alexandra and Ross Mickel Sheldon Midgett Paul and Nancy Milan Joseph Monda Anita Morgan Antonio Munoz-King Dan and Joyce Murphy Eric Nooyen George and Gloria Northcroft Edward O’Brien and Terryl Hackett O’Brien Paul and Karyn Pasquier Carol and John Penny, Jr. Sarah Perry and Bill Ramos Tony and Patty Philippsen Lawrence Plummer Christopher and Katheryn Porter Andy and Carrie Read David and Margaret* Read Robert Rebar Katherine and Scott Renschler David Rothrock and Kirsten Johnson Joseph Sambataro, Jr. Steve and Joyce Sander Deborah Santana Kathleen and Thomas Schafer Mary and Robert Sepulveda Adrian Smith and Deb Waldal Valerie and David Sorensen Erin Swezey and Tim Leary Randall and Mary Terashima Terrance Thomas II and Sandra Thomas Vincent and Christine Tobkin Barbara and Orrin Vincent, Jr. Jerry and Gail Viscione Catherine Walker and David Fuqua Tim Ward and Cheryl Uyeji Chuck and Keely Weidenbach Bill Weis and Marilyn Roy Walter and Denise Weller Robert Yunker and Claire Lytell Joe and Mary Zavaglia Ralph Zech II and Cynthia Zech

6

Lynne Berry Diane and Rick Betts Joseph and Linda Blaschka William and Helene Bradley Rev. Robert and Berlena Brock Ulysses Cheng John Clarkson and Elizabeth Gilchrist Isiaah Crawford Bob and Grace Cumbow John and Margaret Cunningham Forrest and Mary Dill John and Susan Eshelman Michael and Carolyn Evered Steven Fantello Theresa Gallant and Edward Bulchis Jack Harvey Paul Hengel Mary Hermsen Lorraine Hougham Lt. Col. (Ret.) Audrey Hudgins Gerald Huffman Richard Ice Mimi Krsak Maximus and Marylou Leone Jeffry and Andrea Levy Russell and Raven Lidman Steven D. Looney and Dana L. Frank Hon. Terence Lukens and Rev. Ann Lukens Col. David and Patricia Maddock Henry Mao Mary Kay McFadden Brian and Peggy McMahon Joan and Richard Merritt Reid and Amelia Nabarrete Masakazu Nakamura Terence and Laurel Oates Mark Olson and Renee Korda Tad and Nancy Papineau Josh and Anne Petersen Joseph Phillips and Mary Sebek Joan Pratt Patricia Radle John Rindlaub and Sarah Uzzell-Rindlaub Sharon Sakamoto and Ron Takemura Paula Selis and Jonathan Fine David and Linda Strout Ted Surina Marilyn Sylvester Rev. Karen and Brian Taliesin Dianna Uchida Greg and Joan Van Pelt Jim Walsh Wallace and Alicia Wong

DEANS' CIRCLE ($1,000–$1,890)

FOUNDER'S CIRCLE ($1,891–$2,499) David and Concetta Anastasi Massimo Backus David and Lucinda Berkey

Mariam Abarientos Harry and Grace Acuna Janet Adkisson Richard Agnew

Elizabeth and Thomas Agosti Janet E. Ainsworth and Michael Reed Ike Alhadeff Stuart and Fay Allen Guy and Kathy Alloway Robert and Margaret Alston Greg and Marybeth Alwood Carl and Tami Amala Jason Amala Carol and Robert Anderson Christopher and Nancy Anderson Rev. Loren and June Arnett Kevin and Patrice Auld Joan Bader Dayton and Jeannie Balinbin Jodi and Adam Baral Mary Bartholet Mark and Oleta Beard Craig and Vicki Beetham Len Beil and Stella Ley John and Deborah Bender Patricia and Charles Bendock Jane Beno and Michael Edwards Anders M. Berg Jr. Mary Helen and David Bever Douglas and Beth Biette Judith and Donald Billings Charlie Billow Mary Alice and Don Binder Richard Bird, Jr. and Laurie Prince Richard and Jeanne Birmingham John and Victoria Bjorkman Don and Mindy Black Karen and Rockne Blair Nina Blaylock Verle Bleese Alfred and Jan Blue Jack and Maralyn Blume Cheryl and Joel Bolger Heidi Bond William and Marguerite Borgert James Boyd Bob and Jane Braukus Jeffrey Brennan Robert and Eileen Brennan Hon. Bobbe and Jonathan Bridge Lisa Brodoff and Lynn Grotsky Mark and Laoise Brogan Colleen and Guy Brown Eric and Lisa Brown Shelly Brown Reiss and Michael Reiss Patricia and Christian Buchsel Gary and Diane Buckley Tim Burner and Camille Gearhart Mark Burnett Gayle Bush and Mary Ellen Hudgins Frank and Carlene Buty J. Kevin Cahill Sharon and Neil Callahan Katherine Camacho Carr and F. Dean Carr

Bridget Carney Gary and Christin Carpenter James Cary Delores Cavanaugh Mary Ceccarelli Kristin Cheney Michael and Marilyn Cherry Maggie Chon Annette Clark Bruce and Paige Clark Susan Clifford Jamroski and Gregor Jamroski Carol Cochran Steven Cohn and Laura Scheyer Julie and Dan Coleman Susan and William Conklin Thomas and Judith Connor Dick and Bridget Cooley Michael and Becky Costello John Coughlan Calvin and Lois Crow Jose Cueto and Anita Prietto Stephen and Catherine Cummins Paul and Lisa Dally Francis Daly Marcia and Arlan Danne Howard and Dolores Davis Michael Davy Mary Jo Dedomenico and Douglas Mollet Margaret and William DeForeest Jr. Richard and Maureen DeGroot Fred DeKay and Kathleen Mohn-DeKay Joe and Pat Desimone Daniel DeYoung Dana Diederich and Shawn Temming Steve and Shirley DiJulio Gregory and Beverly Dimartino Victor and Diana DiPietro Richard and Jacquelyne Doane James and Camelia Dobrick Susan and Lawrence Donohue Durga Doraisamy John and Diana Dougherty John and Mary Douglas Nancy and Thomas Drechsel Dan and Marilyn Dubitzky Brian and Gayle Ducey Robert and Robin Dullea James and Gaylé Duncan Charles Dupuis James and Peggy Dynes Christopher and Carolyn Eagan Brian Earl Erin Eddins Vickie Grahn Edmondson and Frank Edmondson Jr. Sheila Edwards Lienhart and Ross Lienhart

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB, cont.

Rev. M. Dee and John Eisenhauer John and Doris Ellis Tom Elzey and Maggie Smith Azita Emami and Massod Madani Bill and Mary Epping Alice Erickson Pat and Barbara Fahey Frank and DeAnn Feeman Aaron Feit Ellen Ferguson Hal and Carolynn Ferris Rick and Patti Fersch Sarah and Kevin Finney Kathy and Mark Fishman John and Judith Fitterer William and Melody Fleckenstein George Flood* Phyllismary Flood David Foley Parker and Carol Folse William and Deryn Fulton Yusaku Furuhashi Bart and Hilke Gallant Tom and Susan Galligan Marvel and Ty Galvin T. Patrick and Sandra Gillis Eileen Glasser Wesley and Mark Wesley

Coral Golub Karen K. Gottberg and Marty Cole Mark Gould and Lisa Dobson Gould William and Cynthia Gould Ralph and Carolyn Graves Grace Greenwich Willie Gregory II and Alice Gregory Kirk Greiner and Jackie Cyphers Greiner Scott Grimm Peter and Deanna Gumina Pauline Guppy Reed and Wynne Guy Cary and Maureen Halpin Timothy Hamm Grace Han Stanton Neil and Gini Harmon Michael Hart Jane and Sigfred Haugland Kathleen Haugland Hinson Hon. Michael and Sylvia Hayden Thomas and Katia Healy Elizabeth and Matthew Hedlund Carl and Heather Hedreen Brian and Margaret Heeb Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan James Henriot

Why I give:

“Through support of basketball, I’m fully expecting to see the continued increase in local and national public awareness of the high quality institution that we are.” Rick Jones, ’95 JD Founder and managing partner/ Goldberg & Jones, PLLC

Albert and Susan Hideshima Kenneth R. Hill John and Kendal Hines Frederick Hines, Jr. Ken and Pattie Hitch William and Sarah Hogan John and Lisa Hooper Steve and Patricia Hopps Joseph Howard, Jr. Mitzi Hu Jarlath Hume and Irene Mahler Thornton and Maud Humphries Katy and John Hunter The Most Rev. Raymond G. Hunthausen Susan and Andy Hutchison Dave and Dianne Irwin Charles Isaacson Susan and Charles Jackels Beth Jackson Lori Claudon James and Jeffrey James R. Derek and Dianne Jaros Craig Jelinek Margaret and James Jimenez Hon. Charles and Dana Johnson Eric and Cathleen Johnson Kenneth and Marilyn Johnson Timothy Jones Lily Kahng Danica and Victor Kaloper Susan and Gary Kaysinger Thomas Keel and Christine Foster Jeff and Michelle Keller Mary Kendrick Gartshore and Peter Gartshore Richard and June Kennedy Jason Keyes Bob and Mary Jo Kilian Christian Kim and Nhi Pham Dale Kingman Charles Kirchner and Gillian Allard Laura Klingenstein Sean Klosterman Stephen and Eileen Knoff Bruce and Carol Koch William Koenig Constance and Ray Krontz George Krsak Michael Kucha and Tammy Roe Marianne LaBarre Paul and Denise LaBissoniere Bruce and Brigid Laing Norma Jean and Eric LaRock Bob and Maxine Larson Franz and Grace Lazarus Sharon Lee Timothy and Tina Lee Y. C. Lee Butch and Pamela Leonardson Marcia and Robert Lewis Ka-Cheung Li and Muriel Tsang

Julie Lim and Lloyd Herman Deborah and Terence Limb Steve and Susanne Lindell Molly Linden Shawn and Nicole Lipton Bob and Sarah Long Robert and Susan Lorbeski Brian and Betsy Losh Arthur and Suzanne Lowell Paula Lustbader Glenn Lux Juliana Macaller Patrick and Kathleen Mahoney Hiro and Linda Makino Donald and Melissa Manning J. Richard and Janet A. Manning Doreen A. Marchione Mark and Terry Markuly Judd Marten John and Marion Martinolich Kara and Ken Masters Susan and Jay Matt Cecilia Matta and Casey Riske Harry and Gisele Matthews James and Judith McAteer Michael and Dorothy McCoy Ellen McGovern Gordon McHenry, Jr., and Dorina Calderon-McHenry John McKay Nancy and James McKenney John McKiernan William and Michelle McKinnon Frank and Pam McKulka Joseph McMonigle Rev. Clinton McNair Curly and Judy McNamee Joseph and Patricia McNamee Bronwyn McNutt Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. McTaggart Mary McWilliams Jeff and Debe Meder Jean Merlino Chip and Leslie Meserole Steven and Rebecca Mikami James Miller and Gretchen Vogel Miller Robert and Phyllis Miller Jason Mills Roger Mills and Linda Robertson David and Colleen Milne Mark and Susan Minerich Prashant Mishra Richard and Dawn Mitchell John Monahan Justin and Anne Moon Douglas and Janet Moore Matthew and Anne Moran John and Jerene Morford William and Barbara Morkill Rev. Kathryn and Steven Morse Al and Joanne Mullally

28 | Thanks to You, Our Donors

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Ella and Larry Nacht Lt. Col. Lawrence and Louise Naehr Victoria and David Nickinovich Maureen Niland Russell and Gwen Nomi Anne Northrup and Ralph Hawkins Maurine Nyman and Charles McArdle John Ochs Roger and Sheron O’Connell John O’Halloran James and Marjorie O'Hara Susan Oistad Diane and Michael O’Leary Eileen Olson Ernst and Kathy Oosterhof Carol Orr James and Cynthia Oster Richard and Diane Pedack Joseph and Joelie Pehanick Mary Lee Peters Mary Petersen Catherine Peterson Joseph and Bonnie Phair Jeffrey Philpott and Jeanne Donovan Donald and Dottie Piasecki Gerard and Kristine Pigotti Peter and Nancy Pitarys Joanna Plichta Boisen and Matthew Boisen Jim and Cheryl Podolny John and Kathy Popko Karen Porterfield David Powers and Amy Chasanov Marilyn Price Barry Provorse Harry Purpur and Karen Scherrer Purpur Gregory Quinn and Nancy Quinn-Nerdrum

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Michael and Victoria Quinn Michele Radosevich and Hon. Dean Morgan Laurene and Edward Raleigh Rev. Michael Raschko Bob and Lisa Ratliffe Tony and Mitra Ravani David Read Robert and Kathy Reeder Laura and James Rehrmann Ferd and Kathy Reichlin Carole Ressler Stephen and Karen Ridlon Patricia and Keith Riffle Daniel and Rose Riley Kim Roberson Norman Rockness Floyd and Judy Rogers David and Shelley Rolfe Albert Rosellini, Jr. and Vicki Rosellini John and Christine Rostas James Roth Mary Ann and Lester Sauvage Jeffrey and Carol Sayre Margaret and Fred Schacht Cynthia and Gregory Scheiderer Sue Schmitt Lauren and George Schuchart, Jr. Michael Sclafani G. Michael and Kathleen Selivanoff Jan (Kelly) and Jay Shaw Jennifer Shaw Walter Shields Paul and Patricia Shipman Ruth E. Shipp-Dart Diane Siderius-Kocer and Daniel Kocer

Edward Skone and Rebecca Zerngast David Skover Mike Sletten and Joanne Warner John N. Smith Ronald Smith and N. Sue Hasbrouck Walter Smith Lilyan and Donald Snow Louis and Isabella Snyder Nancy L. Sorensen Ronald and Angelique Souza Mary Spillane and Hans Brouwer Marilyn Stahl and Dirk Giseburt Alex Stalker Bernard and Joyce Steckler Louis and Janice Stevenson Joseph Straus and Mary Shima W. Jeremy and Susan Stringer Althea Stroum and the late Samuel Stroum Glenn and Kimberly Sullivan Jack and Marion Sullivan Stuart and Barbara Sulman Richard and Sharon Sundberg Steven and Sandra Swanson Darryl Swenson Patrick and Angelika Tam Michael and Erlinda Tardif Nick Tarlson and Mauna Arnzen Mike Templeton Luth and Narciso Tenorio Frances and Bob Terry Jeffrey Thomas and Evelyn Lindenthaler Phillip and Jeanne Thompson Camilla and Thomas Tilford Charles and Camille Tillinghast Michael and Sara Torre

Tuan Tran Patrick and Catherine Treseler William and Judith Tsoukalas George and Mary Ellen (Doran) Unzelman Eugene and Catherine Voiland Regina Wachowski Antoinette Wagner, ’64, and Robert Perpall Art and Eva Wahl Daniel and Cari Wall Sylvia and Harry Watson Gerald and Sharon Watts Eugene and Marilyn Webb Bruce and Bobbie Weber Susan Weihrich Robert and Barbara Welsh Ana and Brad White Peter and Karen Wickstrand Deborah and Freddie Wilds, Jr. Debra Wiley Kenneth and Gretchen Wing Charlie Winters Robert and Carolyn Wolfe Beverly Wong Jan and Frank Jan Christian Wong Duane and Teri Woods Thomas Workman William and Carol Wurts Barbara and Lee Yates Gail Yates Kai-Ping Yiu Hon. Mary Yu and Sue Secker Ralph and Helen Zech Eugene and Kim Zipp Anonymous (5) *Deceased

RECENT GRADUATES PRESIDENT’S CLUB Mariam Abarientos Daniel Ahn Joyce Allen Jennifer Ancona M. Leigh Anderson George and Kathleen Balagtas Elizabeth Beckmann Brett Beetham and Thanh Tran Theresa and Steven Binger Samuel Bokor Jennifer Bosa Matthew and Colleen Bromen Stephen and Jennifer Brooks Laura and Charles Cacek Patrick and Catherine Callans Darrell Charles William and Kathryn Collins Marc and Katherine Cote Jeffrey and Gretchen Cox Samuel Daddow Ruben de Anda and Mike Kaminski

Shane Dir Miriam D’Jaen Ome and Lara Etue Colleen and Robert Fox Linda Frothinger and Mark Bauhs Margaret Garrett Travis Glover Ryan Hamachek Nikela Harris David and Jennifer Hecht Kevin Heiderich Joel Higgins Patrice Hughes Holly Jensen Jodie Jones David Keenan Lee Wen Kuo and Rudy Heijden David Lance Jonathan Larson Suzanne Le Joshua and Joan Lee

Jerphy Lee and Hannah Yau Lee Steven Lombardi Tara Lunde Jeffrey and Robin Lyons Calvin and Julie Lyons Molly McEachran Susan McPhee Peter Mears Michael Miller Rob Nielsen Ryan Ohashi Janna Oswald Jin Yong Park Tiffany Pascua Maria-Isabel Periabras Tyler Pigott Sarah Polk Alan and Linda Portugal Kayla Preston David Prouty Matthew Ramirez

Claire Richardson Teresa Riggio Nathan Roberts Alyson Scott Deacon Carl Smith Cindy and Gary Snyder Eric Stroo Carly Summers Nicola and Ben Templeton Todd and Monique Thackray Joseph Thompson Karin and Karl Tolgu Pauline Torrella Erika Tyler Derrick Tzau Jean Paula Viduya Daniel and Cari Wall Hollis Wear Sharon Williams Christopher Wong Amy Zimerman

SU Magazine Winter 2010 | 29

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PRESIDENT’S CLUB, cont.

FOUNDATIONS DIAMOND CIRCLE ($25,000 and above)

Seattle Foundation Seattle International Foundation The Berwick Degel Family Foundation The Sherman Fairchild Foundation, Inc. Better Way Foundation Shinnyo-En Foundation Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Stuart Foundation Charles Simonyi Fund for Arts & Sciences The Teagle Foundation, Inc. China Friendship Foundation Tillie and Alfred Shemanski Charitable Trust Testamentary Trust College Spark Washington Val A. Browning Charitable Foundation College Success Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation Fred H. and Mary S. Dore PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE Charitable Foundation ($10,000–$24,999) The Frost & Margaret Snyder Foundation The Anderson Foundation Grousemont Foundation Byron & Alice Lockwood Foundation Herbert B. Jones Foundation Clement Family Foundation Independent Colleges of Washington Dorsey & Whitney Foundation JAMS Foundation Elbridge & Debra Stuart Family Foundation Jansing-Cook Foundation Jon & Mary Shirley Foundation The Ferry Family Charitable Foundation Jumpstart for Young Children, Inc. Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund King County Bar Foundation FJC Foundation Kresge Foundation Foundation of the National Student Nurses' Association Lee Family Charitable Lead Annuity Trust The Marcia S. Halligan Trust The Grove Foundation The Martinez Foundation Koeplin Family Foundation M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Lucky Seven Foundation Moccasin Lake Foundation The O’Donnell Foundation Nesholm Family Foundation PEMCO Foundation Inc. The Norcliffe Foundation Qwest Foundation Opus Foundation The Radford Foundation PACCAR Foundation Riley & Nancy Pleas Family Foundation Research Corporation Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program Schultz Family Foundation Wyman Youth Trust

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999)

FOUNDER’S CIRCLE ($1,891–$2,499)

Bank of America Foundation Dupar Foundation George P. Hardgrove Foundation Juniper Foundation KPMG Foundation Leona Hickman Charitable Trust McKinstry Company Charitable Foundation New York Life Foundation Petunia Foundation Prairie Foundation The Prudential Foundation Rolfe Family Foundation Schulze Family Foundation State Farm Companies Foundation Tom & Sue Ellison Foundation Wahle Family Foundation Wheeler Charitable Trust

The Ash Family Foundation BNSF Foundation Horrigan Foundation Inc. Inland Northwest Association of General Contractors Norman Archibald Charitable Foundation Northwestern Mutual Foundation Peter Berkey Foundation Shell Oil Company Foundation

SILVER CIRCLE ($2,500–$4,999) Bilder Foundation, Inc. Bishop Family Foundation Brookshire Green Foundation Chevron Matching Gift Program Deloitte Foundation The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation Merrill Lynch & Company Foundation Nike Employee Matching Gift Program Plum Creek Foundation The Presto Foundation The Pride Foundation Sambataro Family Foundation

DEANS’ CIRCLE ($1,000–$1,890) Alpha Sigma Nu The Auld Foundation Citigroup Foundation Ireene Barnett Foundation JS Turner Family Foundation O’Connell Family Foundation Seattle Christian Foundation W Foundation William W. Kilworth Charitable Foundation Anonymous (1)

CORPORATIONS DIAMOND CIRCLE ($25,000 and above) Andersen Construction Company Anderson Daymon Worldwide Archdiocese of Seattle BECU The Boeing Company Bon Appétit Campbell Soup Company Compass Group Costco Wholesale Corporation Crunch Pak Dorsey & Whitney LLP Expeditors International of Washington First Quality Georgia-Pacific Corporation

Kellogg Company Kimberly-Clark Corp. King County Bar Association Leiner Health Products Microsoft Corporation Nice-Pak Products, Inc. PACCAR Inc PepsiCo, Inc. Pharmavite LLC Puget Sound Energy Schiff Nutrition GRP Inc. Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving Seyfarth Shaw, LLP Sun Products Corporation United Way of King County

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE ($10,000–$24,999) Areva T&D Inc. Arthur Schuman Inc. Atigeo LLC Bank of America Bass Educational Services, LLC Beckman Coulter BelGioioso Cheese Borghese Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce Chateau Ste. Michelle CHEP Equipment Pooling Systems City of Seattle Clorox Company

Colgate-Palmolive Company GoldToeMoretz Greatergiving, Inc. Gull Industries, Inc. Harvest Manor Farms Intuit Jelly Belly Candy Co. Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Co. Johnson Controls, Inc. Kelsen, Inc. Lakeside Industries Mastronardi Produce Limited MCM, A Meisenbach Company Mortenson Construction

30 | Thanks to You, Our Donors

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Novak Construction Oberto Sausage Company Olde Thompson Pacific Coast Feather Company Perkins Coie LLP Philips Healthcare Point B Precision Aerospace Services, LLC Procter & Gamble REI, Inc. Ricardo Beverly Hills Robinson Construction Sabey Corporation Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Sealy, Inc. Seattle Pacific Industries Sugar Bowl Bakery Synod of Alaska NW Presbyterian Church (USA) Trident Seafoods Corporation Unilever Home & Personal Care, USA United Stationers Supply Co. US Bank Wabash College Washington Center for Nursing Washington Dental Service Washington Women In Need Wells Fargo Bank Whalen Furniture Manufacturing Anonymous (1)

GOLD CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) AeA—American Electronics Association Alaska Airlines All Star Directories, Inc. Allied Marketing, Inc. Almax Company American Express Amgen, Inc. Aon Corporation Archdiocese of Anchorage The Benaroya Company BNBuilders, Inc. Bullivant Houser & Bailey, PC Buyken Metal Products Inc. Carters Inc. Casio, Inc. Champoux Farms, Inc. Chandos Construction Clise Properties, Inc. Complete Restaurant Repair, LLC Coughlin Porter Lundeen DWI Holdings, Inc. Farmers New World Life Insurance Company Foss Maritime Company Freeport-McMoRan, Inc.

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Gethsemane Lutheran Church GLY Construction H.J. Heinz Company Hanes Brands, Inc. Hydraulic Repair & Design Jackson Dean Construction Kells Irish Pub & Restaurant Kenyon Company KPMG LLP Ledcor Industries, Inc. Lenovo USA Madison Development Group LLC Marine Resources Group Marler Clark LLP PS McKinstry Company Michelin North America Miller Nash LLP Mithun Partners Morey's Seafood Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC Mulvanny G2 Architecture National Center for State Courts National Park Service Northwest Atlantic Partners Novartis Consumer Health Pacific Market International LLC Pactiv Corporation Peninsula Packaging Company Premera Blue Cross ProSports Club Providence Medical Center Request Brand Foods, Inc. Rigos Professional Education Programs Inc. Rotary Club of Emerald City (Seattle) Seattle Preparatory School Seed Intellectual Property Law Group PLLC Sellen Construction Company Society of the Friends of St. Patrick Sony Pictures Entertainment SRAM Corporation SRS Energy, LLC Surgical Associates PLLC Swedish Medical Center Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc. Talking Rain Beverage Tarantino Sausage Trubion Pharmaceutical, Inc. Unilin Group Vacation Internationale Vander Hoek Corporation Washington State Bar Association West Coast Paper Company Woodcock Washburn LLP Wright Runstad & Company

Why I give:

“I feel very strongly about supporting children in foster care. The Fostering Scholars program at Seattle University offers a college education to young people who are often overlooked. Seattle University is making a difference.” Bridge Stuart The Stuart Foundation / supporter of Fostering Scholars and New Principals Program

SILVER ($2,500–$4,999) 4Culture AtWork! AVM Biotechnology The Barbri Group Brother International C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc. Cardno WRG Coinstar Inc. Divco Canada Limited Dole Food Company Empire Resorts, Inc. Enroute Systems Corporation Express Credit Union Foster Pepper PLLC GEICO Insurance Gibbs Houston Pauw Humanities Washington Ignition Partners, LLC

Insulite Roof Tile, LLC JETS K & L Gates LLP Kenworth Truck Company Nine Stars International Nordstrom, Inc. NY Pizza Company, Inc. OCS, Inc. P&M Products, LLC Pacific Northwest Equipment Inc. PEMCO Mutual Insurance Company Philips Consumer Lifestyle Port of Seattle PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP RAFN Company Reser's Fine Food SCIDpda Shuman Produce Silver Cloud Hotel Sisters of Providence

SU Magazine Winter 2010 | 31

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CORPORATIONS, cont.

Thompson & Knight LLP T-Mobile USA, Inc. Tree Top, Inc. United Parcel Service, Inc. Wright Hotels Inc. Zevenbergen Capital Investments LLC

FOUNDER'S CIRCLE ($1,891–$2,499)

Reckitt Benckiser Regatta Tropicals Ltd. RMC Constructors The Standard Insurance Company Tyson Foods, Inc. United Way of Bergen County Wyeth Consumer Healthcare

DEANS' CIRCLE ($1,000–$1,890)

American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers Apache Mills Apio, Inc. Association of Corporate Counsel, WA State Chapter Bayer Healthcare Copiers Northwest Inc. Earthbound Farm Ernst & Young Flexon Industries Inland Northwest Association of General Contractors Jones Dairy Farm Mahlum Architects Military Chaplains Association Nura Health Care Technologies, LLC NW Next Leaders Council Palm Bay International Perrigo Project Lead The Way, Inc.

Albert David Pearls & Gems Inc Allergan Inc. Alpine Fresh, Inc. Alps Language School Aspen Beverage Group Bainbridge Island Ace Hardware Bull Moose Construction California Churros Corporation Carney Badley Spellman, PS Chicken of the Sea International Chocolati Coca-Cola North America Collegiate Insurance Resources Connelly Law Offices Crider, Inc. Darigold, Inc. Davis Wright Tremaine LLP Dean Foods Dairy Group Dell Inc. Deloitte & Touche, LLP

Ewing & Clark Inc. Expedia Inc. FujiFilm USA Gilroy Foods and Flavors Grand Waliea Resort Green Diamond Resource Company Green Mountain Coffee Greenberg Glusker Group Health Cooperative Groupe SEB—Rowenta Health Net, Inc. Hershey Foods Corp. Hollander Home Fashions Huhtamaki International Beauty Products Inc. Iris USA, Inc. Jarden Branded Consumables JVC Krasnow Saunders Cornblath, LLP Krsak Family LLC L.G. Isaacson Co., Inc. Little Farm Frozen Foods, Inc. Minami Tamaki LLP Navarre Corporation Nestlé USA Newport Presbyterian Church Nintendo of America Inc. Pacific Northwest Conference UCC Phillips Real Estate Services, LLC PJM III, LLC

Regence Blue Shield RG Barry RGEN Solutions Ruiz Food Products Saputo Cheese USA Sayre Law Offices PLLC Schwabe Williamson & Wyatt Seattle Children‘s Hospital Sheraton Seattle Hotel & Tower Solo Cup Company Solutionz, Inc. Sorrento Hotel Sterling Savings Bank Tillamook Cheese Trace Register Tri-Nar, Inc. Ventura Foods, LLC Voss, Cook & Thel, LLP Warehouse Demo Services WFF Facility Services World Wide Imports Inc.

Why I give:

“It’s important to give back because there is no better way of spending your money. The money I give is directed to endowed scholarships, which is a great investment in terms of the students we produce and in advancing our mission. Giving provides a sustainable return on your investment.” Bruce Koch Chair and professor/Albers (accounting) Faculty and Staff Campaign chair, 2007–08/2008–09

32 | Thanks to You, Our Donors

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LEGACY SOCIETY Seattle University’s Legacy Society recognizes and honors alumni and friends who have remembered the university in their estate plans. These gifts may include a bequest, life income gift, life insurance or gift from a retirement plan. We gratefully acknowledge all of our Legacy Society members, who have generously committed to support the long-term mission and vision of SU. Rev. Dr. David Aasen Gloria Ysmael Adams Anthony J. Ahn, MD Maxime and Maureen Albi Robert and Margaret Alston Adele Alton Mary Lou L. Amen Rev. Loren and June Arnett Paul Ballard, MD Thomas F. Bangasser Mary Nigg Bartholet Michael J. Bathum Dr. Robert and Helen Batie Marsha and John Baumann Len Beil and Stella Ley Jean A. (Werner) Beland Mr. and Mrs. Philip Bellefeuille Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Benoit Jack and Maralyn Blume Clarice Bocek James and Georgana Bond William and Marguerite Borgert Dr. Hamida H. Bosmajian Richard and Sheridan Botts Pamela Bradburn Rev. Robert and Berlena Brock Lawrence N. Brouse Charles R. Brown Elena Brown Gary and Diane Buckley Kenneth Bumgarner Traci M. Burgler Suzie Burke Frank and Carlene Buty Frances B. Call Terence J. Callaghan Sharon and Neil Callahan Harry L. and Diane Carle Peter J. Carlozzi Paul Carlson and Judith Carlson Rev. William and Janice Cate Les and Mary Lou Cathersal Sally Franett Chambers Brenda Christensen and Thomas Barry Steve and Bonnie Clark Frank and Marilyn Clement Dr. Pauline Cline Theodore and Patricia Collins Perrin Cornell Robert and Frances Cronin William J. Cruzen and Steven Catching Michael G. and Shannon K. Crvarich Betty Cummins

Rev. Dr. Richard and Carol Cunningham Francis Daly Joy Daniels Brower Michael Day Cesar P. and Rosario T. DeGracia Betty and Marty DeLaurenti Mary Derig Angeline Dick James and Joan DiJulio David and Theresa Donovan James M. Donovan Judith and William Doyle Monica J. and Martin H. Duke John and Marlene Durbin Mary Kay Dyckman Dolores Libri Eagan, in memory of Allan J. Eagan Rev. James E. Eblen Bill Eisiminger Doris Eriksen Patrick M. and Barbara A. Fahey Frank and Barbara Fanger David Farkouh Lee E. Fickle Cecelia Fjellman David and Carmel Fleck Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fletcher Linda and Bradley Fowler Donna J. Franklin Joseph and Terri Gaffney Madeline B. Galbraith Sharon Galbraith Theresa M. Gallant Ken and Lisa Geisen Iva Gjerde Helen Goehring Carey M. Golden Lydia Alcala-Gonzales Eva Gordon Martin J. Granger Linda S. Green Dr. Huber K. and Mary C. Grimm Donald and Victoria Haberman Peg Haggerty Deborah J. Hardie Dr. and Mrs. John M. Harding Charles R. Harmon and Virginia C. Harmon Linn and Dorothy Harris Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hart Harold H. and Ernestine M. Heath Paul Heneghan and Barbara Brady Heneghan

James Henriot August Hoba, Stella G. Hoba, Donald W. Hoba, and Frederick A. Hoba Hon. Donald and Lynda Horowitz Alan T. and Sigrid D. Horwedel Eva B. Huntsinger David M. Irwin Sr. and Dianne H. Irwin John and Patricia Isaksen Gerri Derig Jackson-Bell David M. and Linda Johnson Kenneth and Marilyn Johnson Kent Johnson Helen M. Jolly James and Dianne Jorgensen Mr. and Mrs. H. Peter Kasama Leslie and Don Kazarian Melanie A. Kelsey Paul J. and Dana Kertes Anne and Lee Kilcup Colleen Kinerk Robert O. and Miriam Kinsey Sr. Dorothy (Dottie) Klingele, SP Bruce and Carol Koch P. Michael Koenig Gerald W. Koethe Nina and Tom Kornell Keith and Kathy Kragelund George Krsak Mimi Krsak Rosalyn Kwan Bob Labbé Ann F. Lackey Bruce and Brigid Laing Edward and Pat Lamb Georgia Lang Rhoady Lee, Jr., and Jeanne Marie Lee Michael Whitley and Marie Legaz Whitley Donald and Caroline Leuthold Maye L. Liebeck George V. and Mary K. Lombardi Arthur F. and Gloria Long Thomas and Mary Pat Lord Donald W. Luby Gene Lynn Edna J. Maguire Robert B. and Alice E. Maguire Laura Ellis Mahoney Ms. Laurie Mailloux and Mr. Paul Guedet Rev. William and Laurel Malcomson J. Richard and Janet A. Manning

Doreen A. Marchione Peter V. Marchuk, Jr. and Galina Marchuk Raymond Marik Norman C. Mattson Rev. Dr. Donald and Lynnea Mayer Philip D. and Mary McEachern Gordon McHenry, Jr. and Dorina Calderon-McHenry Dr. Ruth McIntyre and Dr. David McIntyre Nancy and James McKenney Carol Lynn McLaughlin Duncan McNab Curly and Judy McNamee Dr. Donna and Bill McNeese-Smith Helen Jo McNeil Sandra S. Mears John and Ginny Meisenbach John G. Menges Donald and Joan Merlino Michelle Harvey Merlino J. Colleen Michael Dr. Jacquelyn Miller John and Jerene Morford Eleanore S. Mortenson Grace Elaine Munzer Jeanne Murray Donald L. Navoni Philip and Carilyn Norris James H. O’Brien John P. O'Connell Charles and Doris (Cockrill) O’Connor James W. and Marjorie K. O’Hara Tim and Mary O’Keefe Betty J. Olson Anthony Palmer Robert Pankl Margaret P. Passanisi Carol and John Penny, Jr. Robert M. Petersen Ann Richard Pfingsten and C. Thomas Pfingsten Linda Plaag Casey Plank John and Heidi Rabel Patricia Radle Darlene Risse Raftis In memory of Rosemary Laura Ramsden M. Bernice Reilly Frances A. Richmond

SU Magazine Winter 2010 | 33

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LEGACY SOCIETY, cont.

Evelyn and Bruce Rick Winifred T. Rieck Johanna P. Roach Nancy M. M. Roach Patrick T. and Lee Ann Roach Thomas and Nancy Roach Sandy and Jodi Sanders Peter and Connie Scontrino Boyd and Mikki Sharp Ruth E. Shipp-Dart Anthony Simhauser, ’60 George and Mary Simmons John and Elizabeth Sloan Fred Sommer Geraldine Sorensen Nancy L. Sorensen John W. and Rose M. Southall Rev. Dr. Virginia and Gerald Sparling Dorothy Speidel Sam and Winnie Sperry Malcolm* and Mari Stamper Bernard M. and Joyce J. Steckler Donald L. and Betty I. Stern Marnie D. Stocker Carl Swenson and Julia Buchholz Colonel Marilyn J. Sylvester Marsha Tellesbo-Kembel Narciso and Luth Tenorio Dee M. Teodoro Patricia J. Terry and Michael Cooney Lou and Diane Tice Helen G. Topel

Peter L. Tountas and Michelle Bergh-Tountas Dr. Henry S. Uchida Sheila Umlauf Mary Ellen (Doran) and George Unzelman Floren J. and Mildred Van de Putte Paul and Roberta Van der Voort Cathryn D. Vanderzicht Eugene and Catherine Voiland Colleen M. Voiss Marian Volpe Gloria Lung Wakayama Rev. Richard Ward Peter J. Weber and Denise Bunchek Weber Arlene R. Wechezak Robert and Barbara Welsh June and Roger Whitson William N. Wilber Mary McLellan Williams Caroline Wilson Richard and Elaine Wilson Betty Woods Amy C. Worrell-Kneller and Byron Kneller Judith Yeakel Richard J. Yellam and Donna M. Yellam Robert J. Yunker M. Anthony Zimmerman, DDS and Dolores A. Zimmerman Anonymous (65)

Why I give:

“I give to Seattle University in acknowledgment of the significant and lasting gifts I received during my four years on campus long ago.” Ruth Shipp-Dart, ’51 Legacy Society member

*Deceased

ADMINISTRATION PRESIDENT Stephen Sundborg, S.J. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Timothy Leary PROVOST Isiaah Crawford VICE PRESIDENT FOR ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Marilyn Crone VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Jacob Diaz VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY PLANNING AND VICE PROVOST Robert Dullea

VICE PRESIDENT FOR MISSION AND MINISTRY Peter Ely, S.J.

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Charles Lawrence

VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT Mary Kay McFadden

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Jacquelyn Miller

VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY COUNSEL Mary Petersen

ASSOCIATE PROVOST, GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT Victoria Jones

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND BUSINESS AFFAIRS Ronald E. Smith

DEAN, ALBERS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Joseph Phillips

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, HUMAN RESOURCES Gerald Huffman

DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES David Powers

DEAN, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Sue Schmitt DEAN, COLLEGE OF NURSING Azita Emami DEAN, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Michael Quinn DEAN, MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE Michael Andrews DEAN, SCHOOL OF LAW Mark Niles DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY Mark Markuly UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN John Popko

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[As of November 2010]

UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE BOARD OF REGENTS CHAIR Maureen Benoliel EX OFFICIO/SU PRESIDENT Stephen Sundborg, S.J. BOARD MEMBERS

Mary Lou Amen Carol Ann Barnickol Maria Barrientos Mary Helen Bever Robert Brennan Maureen Brotherton Patricia Buchsel Suzanne Burke Christopher Corr John Costello Sr. Joyce Cox, B.V.M. Hon. Anita Crawford-Willis Marilyn Dennehy Paul deVille Anthony DiRe Janet Dwyer James Dykeman Kevin Eggers William Eisiminger Peter Ely, S.J. Thomas Elzey Michael Evered Ronald Giuffre

Brenda Gomez Jeffrey Grant Myra Hanover Timotha Hollomon Steven Huling James Jorgensen Anne Kilcup Diane Kocer Rosalyn Kwan Butch Leonardson Patrick Mahoney Curly McNamee Jeff Meder Marlene Miller Richard Mitchell Larry Nejasmich Carol Penny Susan Picht William Ramsden Connie Rogel Judy Rogers Kathleen Schafer Adam Serafin Rose Southall Paul Stoot Joseph Straus Kevin Suther Ven Thomas Kip Toner

Betty Woods VICE CHAIR

Stuart Rolfe SECRETARY

John Meisenbach EX OFFICIO/SU PRESIDENT

Stephen Sundborg, S.J. BOARD MEMBERS

Michael Bayard, S.J. Phyllis Campbell Scott Coble, S.J. Theodore Collins Marta Dalla Gasperina Thomas Ellison Anne Farrell Patrice Fersch Allan Golston

Helen Jolly Hon. Richard Jones Robert Jones Kenyon Kellogg Colleen Kinerk Hon. Ricardo Martinez Randy Massengale Michael Mastro P. Gerry Maurer Michael McHugh Andrew Mirkovich Enid Moore Jody Sheppard Mullally Charles Riley Thomas Roach Raymond Russo Mary Ann Sauvage Boyd Sharp, Jr. John Southall Samuel Sperry Roxanne Tam Nick Tarlson Michael Torre Ruth Tressel Peter Truex Greg Van Pelt Arthur Wahl John Walsh, Jr. Frederic Weiss

EMERITUS

Gregory Alex William Almon Robert Blethen Patrick Brady Robert Braukus Terrence Carroll Dorene Centioli-McTigue Paul Chiles Marilyn Clement Dennis Colleran Joseph Curtis John David Ralph Davis Theresa Gallant Anton Harris, S.J. James Henriot Shena Hinds Michael Hosterman Patrick Howell, S.J. Walter Hubbard, Jr. Dianne Irwin

ALUMNI BOARD OF GOVERNORS

BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR

Mark Wesley Deborah Wilds Kathleen Wright Martha Wyckoff Joseph Zavaglia Ralph Zech

Hon. Donald Horowitz Patrick Howell, S.J. Kent Johnson Patrick Kelly, S.J. Maureen Lee Michael McCarthy, S.J. Gordon McHenry, Jr. Carol Kobuke Nelson Nicole Piasecki Stephen Privett, S.J. Robert Ratliffe Rick Redman Peter Rose David Sabey Mick Schreck James Sinegal Stevens Trainer Jill Wakefield EMERITUS

Rhoady Lee, Jr. Ann Wyckoff

PRESIDENT

Sean Henderson PRESIDENT-ELECT

Christopher Canlas BOARD MEMBERS

Zachary Anderson Analisa Castaneda Shane Dir Joslyn Donlin James Gore Mary Henderson Josephine Hidalgo-Tamola

William Jolly Adam Jussel Daniel Kelley-Petersen Annie Lee Karen Lynn Maher Chad Marshall Jason McGill James Policar Alberto Stein Rios Lauren Sedillo Michelle Smith ALUMNI CHAPLAIN

David Anderson, S.J.

Great care was taken to ensure the accuracy of these lists. Please alert us to any errors or omissions. Contact Katie Chapman, director of donor relations, at (206) 296-2321 or e-mail chapmank@seattleu.edu.

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IN MEMORIAM

PHOTO BY HEATH BRAUN

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As co-founder and art director of PassionFruit Games, Ayu Othman has tapped into the popularity of video games among women.

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A Game of Romance Ayu Othman is co-founder of a Seattle-based video game company that targets the female gamer

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ou could say that Ayu Othman has found her true passion. Othman, ’98, who holds a degree in fine arts from Seattle University, is the art director and co-founder of PassionFruit Games, a video game company whose tagline says it all: “Games designed by and created for women.” Within weeks of her layoff from another gaming company last fall, Othman and a few also-laid-off colleagues came together to launch Seattle-based PassionFruit Games. This is more than your average video game startup—it’s about tapping into the growing female gamer market, a sizable chunk of the gaming industry (data suggests that upward of 40 percent of all gamers are women). “The Wii and other casual games opened the door [to the idea] that gaming is not gender specific,” says Othman. With PassionFruit Games, the main twist is that its creators are targeting female gamers who also like to cuddle up with a good romance novel. Yes, you’ve read that right. “We are trying to hook that romance audience,” Othman says. PassionFruit Games takes the sultry, pulpy plots and melodrama of the romance genre and applies them to the casual game niche. The results are evident in the company’s first release,

Tiger Eye, Part I: Curse of the Riddle Box, a PC- and Mac-compatible game released earlier this year. Tiger Eye is based on the book of the same name by paranormal romance writer Marjorie M. Liu, and is what is known in gaming circles as a “hidden object” casual game. As users uncover one object, they receive clues or keys to move forward to the next stage of play. The team brought the novel to life in vivid fashion, with the handsome, smoldering protagonist vying for the affections of the beautiful heroine. The “cheesiness” factor that some may equate with the romance genre is largely stripped from Tiger Eye, with character development and storytelling taking center stage. “A lot of casual gamers are not romance readers. We toned down [some of the novel] and everything is kept tasteful,” says Othman of the PG-rated subject matter. The focus is more on the hidden-object puzzle game side, with the romance as a subplot. “We believe we set the quality bar high for this type of romance genre game,” she says. Tiger Eye is currently available online at passionfruitgames.com, with plans to expand it to retailers in the coming months. PassionFruit Games is also working to acquire funding for the sequel to Tiger Eye.

“We believe we set the quality bar high for this type of romance genre game.” Ayu Othman, ’98

—Tina Potterf

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Make the Most of Your Alumni Status

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Annie Katrina Lee, ’05, is a graduate of the Albers School of Business and Economics and currently serves as an executive member on the Alumni Board of Governors.

GET YOUR VOICE HEARD Alumni Relations has launched a new blog, SU Voice, for alumni to engage with the university and one another. Check it out at seattleu.edu/alumni/blog.aspx

o matter what your graduation year, it’s easy to become absorbed in your daily grind once leaving the comforts of Seattle University. After graduation we often throw ourselves into life opportunities that lead to exciting new beginnings, as Bon Appetít fare, Quadstock and casual encounters in Campion Hall recede into the past. A couple of years or a few decades can go by before we recognize the important role played by this institution in helping form the identity and values that brought us to where we are today. In fact, your SU education and degree can continue to work for you long after you walk across the stage at commencement. One way that can happen is through the many programs, events and activities available to alumni. In partnership with Seattle University Alumni Relations, the Alumni Board of Governors advocates for the alumni community by providing a variety of opportunities to help you stay connected. Here are just a few:

Men’s and Women’s Basketball Come cheer on the Redhawks in their second year competing in Division I. Gather your family and friends, embrace red and black attire, and join the fun at KeyArena at Seattle Center. (Check out the upcoming season schedule and get tickets at www.goseattleu.com.)

Annual Alumni Advent Mass and Christmas Reception The Chapel of St. Ignatius is one of the most popular spots to reconnect

with the Jesuit spirit and fellow alumni. Join us there at 4 p.m. on Dec. 12 for the annual Advent Mass, followed by a reception in Pigott Atrium.

Magis: Alumni Committed for Mission Need a little spiritual break? Magis: Alumni Committed for Mission provides diverse ways to incorporate the Jesuit mission into your life through spiritual retreats, speaker events, prayer services and service opportunities. Learn more at www.seattleu.edu/magis/.

Informal Happy Hour Networking-minded individuals may opt for an informal meet-up after work. Feeling social? Plan an informal happy hour in your area. We can use our networks to help spread the word. Send your suggestions to alumni@ seattleu.edu.

Social Networking Not enough time? Busy alumni can use technology to stay in touch with Seattle University and each other. Become a fan on Facebook (“Seattle University Alumni”), follow updates on Twitter (@seattleu_alumni) and connect on LinkedIn (“Seattle University Alumni” in groups). Join the 60,000-strong network of alumni around the world. We look forward to connecting with you. Got ideas for other ways to get involved? Let us know and we can work together to help make it happen. ––Annie Katrina Lee, ’05

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Alumni Events DECEMBER Sunday, December 12

Annual Alumni Advent Mass and Christmas Reception 4 p.m., Chapel of St. Ignatius Join alumni, members of the President’s Club and Legacy Society, family and friends for worship during the holiday season at the Chapel of St. Ignatius. A reception at Paccar Atrium (Pigott Building) will follow the Mass. Information and to RSVP: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumniRSVP@seattleu.edu.

DECEMBER

FEBRUARY

February 26–March 6

Friday, December 3

Thursday, February 10

Annual Christmas Choir Concert: A Festival of Christmas 8 p.m., St. Joseph Church, Seattle The Seattle University Choirs present their candlelit concert of Christmas music at St. Joseph Church. For this year’s performances, the choirs are joined by Indra Thomas, international opera star and one of the world’s foremost Aidas. A second concert is scheduled at 2 p.m. on Dec. 5. St. Joseph Church is located at 732 18th Ave. E., Seattle. Information: (206) 296-2340.

Catholic Heritage Lectures 7 to 9 p.m., Pigott Auditorium The Catholic Heritage Lectures presents Holmes Rolston III speaking on “Three Big Bangs: Matter-Energy, Life, Mind.” The next lecture is April 14. Information: (206) 296-2176.

Belize Alumni Service Trip Alumni interested in spending time in Belize doing service should consider this annual immersion experience. Information: (206) 296-5322 or e-mail Gary Chamberlain at gchamber@seattleu.edu.

Thursday-Friday, December 29–30

Women’s Basketball: Seattle U Holiday Classic Time: TBD; KeyArena at Seattle Center Cheer on the women’s basketball team as it plays Gonzaga, Notre Dame and Loyola Marymount in a two-day tournament. Tickets and information: (206) 296-2835. JANUARY Thursday, January 27

Albers School of Business and Economics Executive Speaker Series 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Join a discussion with Stephen Elop, president of Microsoft’s business division, a guest of the Executive Speaker Series. Information: (206) 296-5700.

MARCH Saturday, March 26

Saturday, February 12

College of Nursing Annual Alumni Brunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., SU Campus Reconnect with alumni and friends at the College of Nursing’s brunch. Information: (206) 296-6127.

9th Annual Alumni Crab Feed 5 to 11 p.m., Campion Ballroom The Albers Alumni Board and Alumni Relations invite alumni and friends to the ninth annual Crab Feed. Table sponsorships benefit scholarships for Albers students. Information: (206) 296-2277 or e-mail bourker@seattleu.edu.

Thursday, February 17

Spirituality on Tap: Vocational Discernment 7 to 9 p.m., LeRoux Conference Center, Student Center 160 Gather with young adults to consider questions of faith and spirituality. This event features a speaker focusing on vocation and spirituality who will guide small-group reflection and conversation. This year, Spirituality on Tap is part of the Living into Your Life Discernment Series. Information: (206) 296-2637.

APRIL Tuesday, April 5

Alumni Awards Celebration 5 to 9 p.m., SU Campion Ballroom Celebrate alumni and friends for their significant contributions to the university and community. The ceremony will also recognize members of the President’s Club and Legacy Society. Information: (206) 296-6127.

Check out more upcoming events at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

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Bookmarks View from the Tent: Thoughts from a Homeless Man by M. Barrett Miller, ’68 In View from the Tent: Thoughts from a Homeless Man, M. Barrett Miller, ’68, presents a compilation of letters written to him over several years by a homeless man named Atreus, who had lived in various shelters and on the streets of Seattle. Miller became acquainted with Atreus through his work with the homeless; Miller is the managing director of Let Kids Be Kids, a nonprofit organization committed to social justice issues, including poverty, homelessness and HIV/AIDS. For several years Atreus and Miller kept up their exchange. Miller writes, “Over time I would ask questions or hand him a question I had written out for his consideration. Sometimes I would get an answer and other times I would be ignored.” Miller says Atreus is “a man who was crushed by violence and loss. His reflections and stories will give hope to those people supporting others in similar situations, living in the outskirts of society.” Atreus’ letters are full of powerful insights about what it means to be homeless. In articulate prose, he vividly details his experiences on the streets and describes circumstances in ways that allow the reader into his world. Frequently Atreus writes of the lack of consistency in his life. It’s a life of continuously packing up and relocating to one temporary site or encampment after another. The transitory nature of his living arrangements means constantly adjusting to new surrounds and people. Through his writing, Atreus also touches on the opposition from community members who do not want homeless encampments set up in their neighborhoods. While he says he understands why some are wary or afraid of what he calls this “band of rovers” that shows up on their block, he opens up about how feeling unwanted takes its toll. In his letters, Atreus is adamant that he does not want to dwell on the circumstances that brought him to “this place” in his life. While he provides occasional clues about his life before homelessness, his past is mostly a mystery. While Atreus’ own history comes out only in bits, he opens up about another homeless man named James, who was once a shrimp fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico. When Hurricane Katrina hit, James lost everything. Although he was relocated to Seattle with a group of New Orleans–area residents shortly after the storm, James still struggles to get back on his feet. James’ story, and that of so many homeless individuals, shows that all it takes is one tragedy, one disaster, one mistake to turn a life upside down. Atreus writes, “Priests, Rabbis, Mullahs, showgirls, soccer moms, insurance salespeople … they may not be that much different from the lot of us.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released within the past two years by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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—Maura “Beth” Pagano, ’12

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class notes

Reminiscing at the Reunions Graduates of the Class of 1960 and the Class of 1970 came together late in the summer for a weekend of fun events and festivities on the SU campus. The weekend included social gatherings, dinner, Mass at the Chapel of St. Ignatius and tours of the campus. See more images from the event at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/ in the slideshows section. Class of 1960

Class of 1970

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Julie Smith, ’03, married Bryan Alexander in July 2010. The couple resides in Montana.

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Bob Seeley won the Canadian National Senior Men’s Age 75 Singles and Doubles Championship title in August 2010. The tournament was at the Vancouver Lawn Tennis and Badminton Club.

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Margaret Gaffney has been honored by the Northwest Immigrants Rights Project (NWIRP) for her volunteer work with the organization. After a teaching stint Gaffney earned a law degree and was an assistant Washington state attorney general and administrative law judge for more than 25 years. For the past several years she has been a full-time volunteer at NWIRP’s Eastern Washington office. Founded in 1984, the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project provides legal services and defends legal status for low-income immigrants.

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Wynn Erickson has released his 19th CD on iTunes, Winter Celebration 2, a collection of Christmas- and winter-themed

Walter “Kamika” J. Smith III, ’83, finished his 100th marathon when he completed Seattle’s Rock ’n’ Roll Marathon this past June. Smith, who lives in Kauai, Hawaii, ran his first marathon, the Emerald City Marathon, in 1983 while an SU student. Since then, he’s completed a marathon in all 50 states. In Kauai, Smith manages his family’s visitor attractions, the Wailua River Cruise to the Fern Grotto and the Smith Family Garden Luau.

music. Other collections by Erickson include organ preludes and fugues to Halloween music, easy listening and electronica.

Stryker Cavalry Regiment, stationed in Vilseck, Germany, and is currently deployed to Spin Boldak, Afghanistan.

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Don Bennett, JD, has been appointed executive director of the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB). In 2007, he joined the board’s staff as executive deputy director. Bennett, who was interim director of the agency prior to his appointment, brings to the position considerable executive management experience in state government. From 1997 to 2006, Bennett served as executive secretary of the State Personnel Board. In 2004–05, he was deployed to Iraq with the 81st Brigade Combat Team. Currently, he serves as state judge advocate, Joint Forces Headquarters, Washington Army National Guard, where he holds the rank of colonel.

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Lt. Col. Andrew Green is commanding the 4th Squadron, 2nd

Greg Beckman is a published author. His novel, The Drawing Boy, a coming-of-age story, is available at retailers including Amazon.com. (Look for it under his pen name, Gregor Eliot.)

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Mark Hart, MA, is a published poet. His work can be found at www.bodhisara.org.

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Kathleen Fiehrer was recently named marketing co-chair of Climate Savers Computing Initiative. She will also continue in her role as technical program manager for the organization. Climate Savers Computing is a nonprofit made up of computing and component manufacturers focused on improving computer energy efficiency.

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Sheldon “Shelley” Drogin, EdD, ‘97, and Doreen A. Harden-Cato, ’07 EdD, are using their SU College of Education degrees in executive roles at academic institutions teaching the art and discipline of leadership. HardenCato delivered the June commencement address to the graduating class of Leadership Institute of Seattle (LIOS) Graduate College of Saybrook University in Kirkland, Wash., an institution that is a leader in humanistic psychology research and education. Harden-Cato, who also received an honorary doctorate from Saybrook, is an international advocate for children’s rights. She is the former executive director of Seattle’s First Place, a school and social services agency serving children and homeless families. Drogin serves as the president of LIOS and as a vice president of Saybrook University (San Francisco).

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Rafael Calonzo and Andrew Brinkworth, ’97, both fine arts graduates, started a video game development studio, Tinfoil Fez Company. Patrick Norton was promoted to senior litigation support analyst at Cooley LLP. Previously he worked at DLA Piper LLP and Qualcomm. Another accomplishment for Norton: In July 2009 he rode his bike 1,100 miles over five days along the California coast, from San Diego to Monterey, to attend the Red Bull MotoGP U.S. Grand Prix at Laguna Seca.

Meredith (Colliander) Swallow, ‘08, is the recipient of the national MathMovesU Math Hero Award from Raytheon. Swallow, who teaches math at Seattle’s Billings Middle School, is the only teacher from Washington state to receive this honor, recognizing teachers who engage students in math through interactive and creative learning tools. The award comes with a gift of $2,500 and a matching grant for the recipient’s school. Swallow has taught math for seventh- and eighthgraders at Billings since 2008. In 2009, she helped launch an applied math course for seventh- and eighth-graders.

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Margaret Matthews, MIT, married Jason Pettit on Aug. 14, 2010, in Coronado, Calif.

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Chris Pesce, MIT, was featured in a NWjobs.com story profiling individuals who follow their passions and opt for fulfilling careers over lucrative ones. Pesce, a onetime copyright and trademark lawyer, decided to go back to school to get a Master’s in Teaching degree. His goal: to teach high school math, which he did for many years in Seattle’s public schools. Today he teaches at a small private high school on the Eastside.

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Sara Jean (Szalay) Gilbert received her master’s in higher education from the University of Denver and followed that achievement with a new job: assistant director of undergraduate admissions and orientation at Northern Arizona University. Gilbert and her husband, Chris, reside in Flagstaff, Ariz.

Lynn Kurata, ’71, joined her church group on a mission trip to Nairobi, Kenya. On the trip she performed eye exams on area schoolchildren.

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in memoriam

1948 Geraldine Cruickshank Ahnstrom died July 4, 2010. She was 87. Born Feb. 25, 1923, in Seattle to George and Katherine Cruickshank, Ahnstrom graduated from John Muir Grade School, Franklin High School and Seattle University. From 1943 to 1945, she served with the U.S. Marines and was a member of the Association for Catholic Childhood and Vasa Hope Lodge #503. In 1946, she married Russel P. Ahnstrom. She loved to attend horse races, including many at Longacres and Emerald Downs. She is survived by her daughter, Joann; her granddaughters, Megan and Katherine; her sister, Joann; and many nieces and nephews. Ahnstrom was preceded in death by her parents, her husband and her sister, Pauline.

was a lifelong Catholic who enjoyed spending time with his family, decorating his yard with handmade works of art and writing love notes to his wife. Forrester is survived by his wife; his sons, Lawrence, Andrew and Colin; his daughters-in-law, Sheryl, Heidi and Tracy; his five grandchildren; and his sister, Betty. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Lynn.

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Leslie (Les) Chinn died July 10, 2010. He was 84. Born June 20, 1926, Chinn was a graduate of Garfield High School and later Seattle University. He served as a Navy SeaBee during World War II. He is survived by his wife, Gladys; his son, Alan; his daughters, Elaine and Carole; his two grandchildren, Michael and Lauren; and his sisters, Irene and Edith. Chinn was preceded in death by his son, Arnie, and his brother, Howard.

Rodney Raymond Cottingham died July 21, 2010. He was 84. Born March 10, 1926, in Oak Park, Ill., Cottingham lived in Helena, Mont., and later Portland, Ore., before settling in Seattle in 1937. In 1944, he graduated from Ballard High School and then served in the Army Air Corps. When World War II ended, he returned home and met and married Dolores Wallace. After graduating from Seattle University with a civil engineering degree, Cottingham began his career in commercial construction and construction management for several firms. He retired from The Boeing Company in 1994 after several years in facilities management. In his free time, Cottingham enjoyed camping, traveling, dancing and spending time with family and friends. His love of dance was evident in his involvement with the Dancing Vigilantes and Checkerboard Squares square dance clubs, as well as the Dance-a-Round and Dancing Shadows round dance clubs. Cottingham is survived by his wife, Dolores; his daughters, Nancy, Cheri, Sally and Kim; his 11 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren; his two brothers, Ken and Wayne; and his sister, Donna. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edward and Helen Cottingham.

Mary Jo (Skoda) McMackin died Aug. 14, 2010. She was 82. Born to Oscar and Maude Skoda, McMackin attended St. Anne’s, Holy Names and Seattle University. She is remembered for her deadpan humor, sense of style, love of opera and generous heart. McMackin is survived by her husband, Edward; her sons, Tom and Matt; and a large extended family.

1951 John “Jack” Forrester died June 17, 2010. He was 81. Born in Seattle Dec. 12, 1928, to James and Hazel Forrester, he graduated from Seattle Prep in 1946 and then from Seattle University. He married his “dream gal,” Toody Webster, and the couple embarked on a long life together as he began what would be 48 years with Farmers Insurance Group. After retiring, the couple settled in La Conner, Wash. He

Janet Gervais died April 9, 2010. She was 81. After graduating from Seattle University, Gervais enjoyed a career working for the Washington Health Department until her retirement in 1990. She is survived by her sister, Jean Sheppard; her sister-in-law, Pat; her nieces, Diana and Donna; and her nephews, Steven and Brian.

John R. Kimlinger died June 30, 2010. He was 78. The eldest of 11 children, Kimlinger was born in Idaho Falls, Idaho, and raised

in Mount Angel, Ore. After graduating from Seattle University with a math degree, Kimlinger joined the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1954, and worked there as a computer scientist until his retirement in 1986. In 1967, he married Emily Anderson of Long Barn, Calif. After his retirement the couple returned to Long Barn and the Sierra Nevada mountains, where Kimlinger pursued his favorite hobby, trout fishing. He is survived by his wife; his three stepchildren; and his 10 siblings.

1954 Roderick Richard Kirkwood died May 6, 2010. He was 90. Born Jan. 11, 1920, in St. Paul, Minn., Kirkwood was known for his work in the design and development aspects of the building industry, a professional career that spanned 56 years—46 of those spent with John Graham and Co. Architects, Engineers and Planners. At John Graham and Co., Kirkwood started as a mechanical engineer, later rising to partner and then president of the company in 1976. One of his proudest career moments came during his time as a member of the design team for the Space Needle. Aside from his professional achievements, Kirkwood was active in various clubs and organizations such as the Rotary, Chamber of Commerce and Rainier Club. From 1973 to 1974, he was international president of ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers). Following his retirement in 1998, Kirkwood enjoyed spending time with his wife, Sharon, traveling and pursuing an interest in naturopathic healing. Kirkwood is survived by his son, Roderick; his daughter, Carolyn; his stepsons, Tyler, Troy and Todd; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Virginia, and his second wife, Sharon.

1956 Thomas Peter Cox died June 27, 2010. He was 75. Born in New York City, Cox attended Regis High School and later Seattle University, where he accepted a basketball scholarship. While at SU he met Grace Gallagher, his future wife, and the couple enjoyed a long marriage of 52 years. After

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service in the U.S. Army, Cox became a partner at the accounting firm of Deloitte Touche and then the chief financial officer for Timberline Software, from which he retired in 1996. An avid golfer, Cox belonged to the Portland Golf Club, for whom he served as president in 1996. He was also a parishioner of St. Thomas More Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife; his brother, Vincent; his daughters, Nancy, Anne and Kathleen; his son, Tom; and his grandchildren, Benjamin, Ian, Megan, Claire and Amanda.

1958 Lois Jane Zander Noonan died Aug. 1, 2010. She was 74. Born in 1936 in Towne Hoarde, Wis., Noonan moved to Seattle with her family in 1952. Two years later she graduated from Holy Names Academy followed by Seattle University. In 1964, she married Paul Francis Noonan in Washington, D.C. After years of teaching in Seattle, on the East Coast and in Europe, Noonan retired and later became a professional seamstress. Noonan is survived by her husband of 46 years; her children, Steve, Laura and Michael; her grandchildren, Reese, Carter and Hunter; and her sisters, Shirley and Donna.

the Auburn School District, he went to the Bellingham School District for what would be a lengthy career as a teacher and principal. During a career in the district that spanned nearly 32 years, Hammond had many professional accomplishments, including the development of a district-wide environmental education program and innovative programs for severely handicapped children. In 1992, he was honored with the Award for Professional Excellence by WWU’s Woodring College of Education. Posthumously, he received a Legacy Award from ReSources for his environmental education work and a community service award from the Western Washington University Alumni Association for more than 20 years of bagpiping at graduations. Throughout his teaching and administrative career he made many friends and helped many children and families. He was active in various community organizations and clubs, including the Bellingham Pipe Band, Lions Club and Kiwanis Club, and was a charter member of Phi Delta Kappa. He is survived by his wife; his daughters; his two grandchildren; and his twin sister, Sylvia.

1962 1960 Nancy McNamee died March 19, 2010. She was 72. McNamee cherished her friends and family. She is survived by her children, Anne, Jim and Kathleen; her son-in-law, John; her grandchildren, Jackson, Caroline and Ben; her sister, Malinda; and her brother John. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, Jim.

1961 Sidney James Hammond died Nov.13, 2009. He was 75. A graduate of SedroWoolley High School and Skagit Valley College, Hammond served in the U.S. Navy as a submariner, first class electrician’s mate on the Bugara in the Pacific Fleet, where he served from 1954 to 1958. After his time in the Navy, he used the GI Bill to attend Seattle University, where he met his future wife, Rose. The couple would marry and have four daughters, Margo, Lisa, Marta and Laura. Hammond had a long career in education. After initially teaching in

Gerald Duggan died June 13, 2010. He was 78. Born in the Bronx, N.Y., Duggan served in the Korean War and graduated from the Newark College of Engineering before going on to Seattle University, where he earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering. Until his retirement, Duggan worked as an engineer with Harris Corporation. He was an active member of Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church and volunteered with the Meals on Wheels program. He is survived by his wife of 56 years, Marilyn; his son, the Rev. Father Sean Duggan; his daughter, Jennifer; and his grandchildren, Christopher, Shawna and Jonathan. James Walloch died Jan. 30, 2010. He was 71. Born in Milwaukee, Wis., and raised in Bremerton, Wash., Walloch was the son of Martin and Josephine Walloch and a longtime resident of Longview, Wash. Following graduation from Seattle University, where he earned a degree in chemical engineering,

Walloch earned his MBA from Portland State. On Dec. 30, 1961, he married Rita Jean Toombs. Throughout his life he was an active member of the Catholic church and a member of the Knights of Columbus. For more than 30 years, until his retirement in 2000, Walloch worked for Reynolds Metals. He is survived by his son, Tom; his daughters, Charlene, Glenda, Jennifer and Angela; and his five grandchildren. Walloch was preceded in death by his wife, Rita Jean, and his brother, Thomas.

1964 Stephen Wandzilak died June 2, 2010. He was 68. Raised in Queens, N.Y., Wandzilak attended Archbishop Molloy High School before enrolling at Seattle University. Wandzilak lived much of his adult life in Maryland, where he taught physical education. Additionally, he dedicated 33 years to coaching various sports, touching many young lives during his long career. In his later years, Wandzilak enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Joan; his children, Stacy, Michael, Scott and Stephen; his son-in-law, Bryan; his brother, Thomas; and his grandchildren, Ethan, Kathlyn, Riley and Logan.

1968 Carolyn Margaret (Mary Timothy) Koreski, ’70 MEd, died July 11, 2010. She was 74. Koreski entered the Sisters of Providence in 1954, became a novice in 1955, and made her first profession the following year. Her final vows were Aug. 19, 1962. Her ministry accomplishments were many—elementary-school teacher, school counselor, patient advocate and sister representative. Koreski also taught at several schools in Washington state, including in Olympia, Seattle and Vancouver. Additionally, she was the first Sister of Providence to serve on staff at St. Helen Hospital in Centralia, Wash., after the facility was acquired by the Sisters of Providence Corp. in 1983. From 1985 until her retirement in 2003, Koreski worked at Providence Centralia Hospital as the Sisters of Providence representative and as a patient advocate. She is survived by her CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

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in memoriam

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brother, Michael; her sister, Maryann; and several nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. She was preceded in death by her mother, father, stepfather and one sibling.

1970 John “Jake” Jacobson died April 28, 2010. He was 62. Born in Santa Cruz, Calif., in 1948, as the only son of Dr. Julian Christian Jacobson and Edith Jacobson, he spent his early years in Santa Cruz, attending Holy Cross Grammar School. Following the death of his father, the family moved to the Seattle area. Jacobson attended Seattle Prep and Seattle University, where he earned a degree in business and finance. Professionally, Jacobson earned a name for himself in the computer industry through his work with Wang Laboratories. After a successful career at Wang, he served as executive vice president of CCI. In 2008, he moved to Fresno, Calif., and brought his business creativity and experience to the Lyles Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at California State University, Fresno. Here he was Entrepreneur in Residence, a position he had until his death. In addition to his professional acumen, Jacobson was an avid sports fan with incredible knowledge of all things related to sports. He is survived by his wife, Marion; his daughter, Lauren; his sons, Ian and Julian; his mother, Edith; his sisters, Kristan and Karen; his stepbrothers, John and Lawrence; and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

great pride in his grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Keyes is survived by his six children, Bob, Joanne, Denis, Diane, Thom and Jamie; his grandchildren; and his greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his sister, Mary; his first wife, Hazel; and his second wife, Kay.

1988 Rosemarie “Ree” Long, MBA, died Sept. 11, 2010. She was 54. Born in Woodstown, NJ, May 5, 1956, Long’s father worked for The BoeingCompany, which resulted in the family living in many cities over the years, including New Orleans, Satellite Beach, Fl., Huntsville, Ala., and later Seattle. After earning a bachelor’s degree from the University of Washington, Long earned her MBA from Seattle University, then moved to Florida. There she met Charles Robert “Rob” Long in Pensacola and they married Jan. 13, 1996. Most of Long’s professional life was spent working at Pensacola Junior College (now Pensacola State College), where she was Career Connection Coordinator on its Milton campus. While there she earned many awards, including the prestigious Golden Apple Award for Teacher of the Year. She was a passionate advocate for students and helped many further their education. In her free time she enjoyed her prized Mustang car, and soaking up the Florida sun and surf. She is survived by her husband, Bob; her brothers, Mike, Dan and Jack; and her stepchildren, Tom, Butch and Yvette.

drawn to Polson’s easygoing nature, gift of conversation and love of animals. She is survived by her husband of 42 years, Don; her daughters, Ursula, Francesca, Jessica and Anastasia; and her grandsons, Caleb, Giacomo and Oscar; as well as many extended family and friends. Polson was preceded in death by her parents, George and Bertha Dever; and her in-laws, Donald Polson, Sr., and Dolores Matzdorff.

2008 1st Lt. Robert Bennedsen died July 18, 2010. He was 25. Bennedsen was killed by a roadside bomb while on duty in Afghanistan. Bennedsen grew up on Vashon Island and was a standout athlete on both the football and wrestling teams. During his time at Seattle University, where he earned a degree in business, he was enrolled in ROTC and helped run the summer ROTC program at Fort Lewis, Wash. While in high school he served as a volunteer firefighter and in his free time enjoyed restoring cars. He is survived by his parents, Tracy and Scott, and his sister, Jamie.

1971

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Obituaries

James “Jim” Barnaby Keyes died July 4, 2010. He was 98. He graduated from Ballard High School and then started work during the Great Depression, retiring from the Railroad Express Agency in 1967. He returned to school at Seattle University and completed three bachelor’s degrees in four years. During his career as an educator, Keyes taught everyone from elementary-school children to community college students, all the while raising two foster children. In his retirement he worked for Catholic parishes and the lay Franciscan Ministry, traveled, played golf, attended Golden Beavers reunions and took

Patricia Anne Polson died Aug. 2, 2010. She was 62. Born March 9, 1948, in Whitefish, Mont., Polson earned an associate degree in nursing from Everett Community College in 1989, and a bachelor’s in nursing from Seattle University. She then worked as a registered nurse at Seattle’s VA Medical Center and later Harborview Medical Center. An accomplished knitter, Polson often knitted hats for her patients. In her free time, she enjoyed crossword puzzles, books and books on tape, and spending time with her family and friends. She loved to travel, especially to Montana, where she enjoyed camping and rafting. People were

Seattle University Magazine relies on family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends. If a newspaper obituary is available, we would appreciate a copy. Send notices to: Attn: Obituaries Seattle University Magazine Seattle University 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu www.seattleu.edu/magazine/

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the good word

Chance Meeting? Not a Chance

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re you ever amazed at the randomness of how couples meet? Catching the eye of your future husband from across the classroom or finding your college roommate’s girlfriend attractive, hitting it off and talking late into the night. Maybe it happens while sitting at a local coffee shop when someone walks up asking if the chair at your table is free. Purely chance events? Some may think so, suggesting that such meetings are just coincidence. Others assert that these occurrences are fate or part of a larger cosmic plan. An older, wiser Jesuit once remarked to me about coincidences, “A coincidence is simply God’s way of remaining anonymous.” In the randomness of that first glance, or in that chance meeting in the coffee shop, perhaps it really is God working hard, laboring anonymously, leading to a young man and woman meeting, finding love and eventually standing face to face professing their love for one another on their wedding day. God initiates this love and continues to provide grace day after day as this love grows. Several years ago my friend Roger Gillis, S.J., and I received an invitation in the mail from a couple whose wedding we would celebrate one year later. The cover of the invitation read, “We cannot direct the Wind but we can adjust our Sails.” Inside the card

“A coincidence is simply God’s way of remaining anonymous.” Mike Bayard, S.J. was a lovely picture of our friends sitting on a boat under a sail. Beneath the picture read: “A Celebration of Gratitude. Join us in celebrating the lessons we’ve learned this past year and our gratitude for the opportunity to grow and learn as individuals and as a couple.” Certainly, growing together in love is one aspect of what marriage is about. Part of this growth is being open to the grace and possibilities that

God provides along the way. Married couples are not alone on this journey. They travel together, encouraging and supporting one another; praying, loving and suffering with one another; crying and laughing with one another, all in the company of the One who is always with us, whose very name means “with us”: God. —Mike Bayard, S.J. Father Bayard is director of Campus Ministry at Seattle University

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A Change is Comin’ As fall enters its waning days and winter is set to make its icy entrance, our staff photographer Chris Joseph Taylor captured the vibrant colors of the changing leaves on campus. SU Magazine Winter 2010 | 49

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

A MOTHER’S LOVE INSPIRES A LASTING LEGACY Bill Ramsden, ’78, has established the Rosemary Laura Ramsden Endowed Scholarship to honor his mother’s memory and help future Seattle University students in business, education and nursing. “I wanted to create a lasting legacy in my mother’s name and also give back to Seattle University, where I got a great education that contributed to my success in my career,” he says. Bill also designated his gift by will for his scholarship fund, ensuring support for SU students far into the future.

Bill, ’78, and his wife, Janis Ramsden have included SU in their estate plans.

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Contact Seattle University, Planned Giving, at (206) 296-6974 or e-mail orrj@seattleu.edu. Visit our website at www.seattleugift.org.

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Seattle University Magazine Winter 2010