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Seattle University THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

SUMMER 2011

LIVING THE

MISSION SU PREPARES CITIZENS OF THE WORLD

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VARNISH

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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HIGHER GROUND Student Alex Tsway ascends a wall of rocks during a bouldering climb at Larrabee State Park in Bellingham, Wash. The outdoor excursion is part of the many offerings of SU’s Outdoor Adventure Recreation program. Info: www.seattleu.edu/recsports/oar.

SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 3

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Seattle University Volume 35 • Issue Number 2 • Summer 2011 S TA F F Editor Tina Potterf Art Director/Senior Designer Terry Lundmark, ’82 Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor Editorial Assistant Maura Beth Pagano, ’12

18

Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Diana Chamorro, ’11, Stacy Howard, Karen Lynn Maher, ’00, Maura Beth Pagano, ’12, and Kelly Stone, ’09 Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published quarterly in fall, winter, spring and summer by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

College of Nursing’s Patrick Murphy is profiled on page 18.

4 / In Memoriam

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Seattle University THE MAGAZINE OF SU ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

DEPARTMENTS

features 20 Mission Driven An important part of the “SU experience” is engagement with the world. One way of doing this is through short-term, mission-focused immersion trips.

25 Apply Within

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Letters

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Come Join Us

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Did You Know?

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Perspectives

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On Campus SU Style / 16 Faculty Snapshot / 18

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Many students and recent graduates are finding internships are the best way to get in the door and land a job.

Alumni Voice In Memoriam / 32 Bookmarks / 33 Class Notes / 34 Being Scene / 37

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The Last Word

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ON THE COVER

Self-discovery, connection to the mission and a greater awareness of the world around us are just some of the takeaways from SU’s short-term immersion trips.

Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

ILLUSTRATION BY BERNARD MAISNER

SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 1

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LETTERS

“I feel a profound pride in having attended an institution that can change a person and provide a foundation for the balance of one’s life.” Robert Vitro, ‘57 An SU education source of accomplishment and pride Enjoyed the spring issue of Seattle University Magazine, particularly the school pride article. Recalling the Chieftain’s glory days was great fun, especially the team Elgin Baylor led to the NCAA finals, the Super Bowl of college basketball. Certainly a source of pride. I feel a profound pride in having attended an institution that can change a person and provide a foundation for the balance of one’s life. My story is somewhat different from most. I was on my own at age 15. Went to sea as a merchant seaman. Had other entry-level jobs. Was drafted during the Korean War and discharged Dec. 8, 1952. I attended my first class at SU Jan. 5, 1953. I naturally had trepidation. After all, I was entering a territory foreign to me filled with people obvi-

Seattle University Magazine welcomes letters to the editor on subjects raised within the magazine. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Please include a name, address and daytime phone number with all correspondence. Send to: Letters Editor Seattle University Magazine Seattle University 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 E-mail: sumagazine@seattleu.edu

ously much smarter than myself. But after four years at SU I emerged with a BCS, selection to Who’s Who among students in American universities and colleges. I was president of the Gamma Omega chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi and was recruited on campus by General Electric Company where I spent almost 30 years experiencing a successful, rewarding career. Moreover, during 1959, I took an educational leave from GE and was accepted as a teaching assistant by the University of Washington, where I earned an MBA. Not bad for a street kid from the docks of Seattle. All I can say is thank you so very much, Seattle University. Robert (Bob) Vitro, ‘57 Cupertino, Calif.

Remembering a Great Teacher and a Great Person Just a note of condolence and appreciation for the late Joseph Gallucci [In Memoriam, Spring 2011]: I had the honor of taking one or two classes from him back in the early 1970s, when he was a professor in the music department. First of all, he was a brilliant instructor and talented pianist. When he taught music history, he knew his material inside and out; he rarely ever referred to notes when he lectured, nd his insight into the construction of music made you stop and listen. And once in a while, during class, he would sit at the piano and play whatever came to mind. One morning he had heard a song on the radio as he commuted to campus from Tacoma. Somehow, the song excited him enough

that he just had to sit down and play it on the piano. The song was the theme from the film, Love Story. First, he played it the way he heard it and then in a variety of musical styles. That day it sounded as if he had been playing this song for a long time. Secondly, he had to have been the sharpest, most dapper-looking man on campus, well-groomed, nails manicured, suits and ties classically styled with matching socks and well-shined shoes. But then he decided teaching music was no longer a personal challenge. He would go to law school and become a lawyer. Dr. Gallucci was a simple and brilliant man, a very exciting, social and decent human being and a great teacher. Thanks for the opportunity to express my appreciation for Dr. Gallucci. Richard James Coleman, ’74 Honolulu, HI

Correction In the spring magazine’s Come Join Us events page, it was stated that Quadstock was celebrating its 27th year. We aged the outdoor concert festival. This year marked the 22nd year of the event, sponsored by Student Events and Activities (SEAC). Read more letters at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

2 / Letters

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COME JOIN US

july

FILIPINO ALUMNI CHAPTER FOURTH ANNUAL SUMMER BARBECUE

Robert D. Putnam speaks winter quarter

2011– 2012 CATHOLIC HERITAGE LECTURES

Religion and Politics Esteemed academic and religious scholars coming to SU for Catholic Heritage Lectures By Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 This fall marks the return of Seattle University’s Catholic Heritage Lectures (CHL). The 2011–2012 series, brought to SU by the offices of Academic Affairs and Mission and Ministry, will explore the intersection of religion and secularism in America. The lectures will take a look at topics related to the current state of religion and politics in the United States, and will also seek to unravel our nation’s long and fascinating history of both religious diversity and religious intolerance. The series will welcome esteemed academic and religious scholars to campus such as Patricia O’Connell Killen, PhD, who will kick off the series this fall. Killen, vice president of academics at Gonzaga University, focuses her studies on religion in the Pacific Northwest, identified as having a high population of nonreligious or nonpracticing individuals. Her work also explores the role of Catholicism and the Catholic university within the phenomenon of secularization. Winter quarter brings Harvard University’s Robert D. Putnam, a professor at the Kennedy School of Public Policy. Professor Putnam is the co-author of American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us. His work explores the relationship between religion and involvement in political life and secularism. Plans are in place for the spring 2012 speaker to be Professor John Dilulio, Jr., the first director of President George W. Bush’s Office of Faith-based and Community Initiatives. He is also the Frederic Fox Leadership Professor of Politics, Religion and Civil Society and a political science professor at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of several books, including 2007’s Godly Republic: A Centrist Blueprint for America’s Faith-Based Future. All lectures are free and open to alumni. For more information on the speakers and locations, visit www.seattleu.edu/missionministry/.

Saturday, July 9 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mercer Island Park on the Lid All SU alumni, their family and friends are invited to this annual event, which brings together good food, good friends and good outdoor, family-friendly activities. Information and directions: (206) 296-6127 or e-mail alumni@seattleu.edu.

august

EIGHTH ANNUAL ALBERS ALUMNI AND FRIENDS GOLF TOURNAMENT Monday, August 8 12:30 p.m. (registration at 10:30 a.m.) Glendale Country Club, Bellevue Join alumni, faculty and friends at this annual event to raise money for scholarships to benefit students of the Albers School of Business and Economics. The Glendale Country Club is located at 13440 Main St. in Bellevue. Information: Rob Bourke at (206) 296-2277 or e-mail bourker@seattleu.edu.

september O’BRIEN OPEN GOLF TOURNAMENT

Monday, September 12 Time TBA, The Golf Club at Redmond Ridge, Redmond Get ready to tee off on the greens in Redmond for a benefit in support of the men’s basketball program. The Golf Club at Redmond Ridge is located at 11825 Trilogy Pkwy. NE in Redmond. Information: (206) 398-4420 or e-mail sempadig@seattleu.edu.

12TH ANNUAL COSTCO SCHOLARSHIP FUND BREAKFAST Thursday, September 22 7 to 9 a.m., Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue Plan now to join us for the annual fundraising breakfast to support the Costco Scholars program for student scholarships. The Meydenbauer Center is located at 11100 NE 6th St. in Bellevue. Information: (206) 296-6106 or www.costcoscholarshipfund.org.

For more information on alumni events, contact Alumni Relations at (206) 296-6127 or visit www.seattleu.edu/alumni/.

SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 3

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DID YOU KNOW?

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU.

SEN. PATTY MURRAY VISITS CAMPUS

PHOTOS BY JOHN LOK

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U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, one of the Senate's leading voices on education policy, met with President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., staff and students on campus this past spring to learn more about the new Seattle University Youth Initiative (SUYI). Murray is a former president of the Shoreline School Board who served in Washington's legislature before her election to the Senate. Murray's daughter, Sara, is a graduate of the School of Law. The senator visited campus in March after Father Sundborg announced the initiative, which brings together the campus community to improve the academic achievement of low-income youth in the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood, provides support for vulnerable families and strengthens the university’s educational programs. The youth initiative is a partnership with parents, the Seattle School District, the City of Seattle, faith communities and community organizations. President Sundborg and Sen. Patty Murray tour the SU campus before the senator met with Youth Initiative Director Kent Koth.

To learn more about the Seattle University Youth Initiative, visit www.seattleu.edu/suyi. Read the President’s Report at www.seattleu. edu/marcom/presidentsreport_2011/.

THE GOOD WORD

A FLAME THAT KINDLES OTHER FIRES Here is an excerpt from the latest Good Word column, penned by University Chaplain Patrick O’Leary, S.J.:

“...the Society of Jesus seeks to keep the fire of its original inspiration alive, to be a flame that kindles other fires...” Read the Good Word column in its entirety at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

4 / Did You Know?

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

REV. AL SHARPTON TALKS EDUCATION REFORM For the final event of its 2010–11 Conversation Education series, the College of Education brought together a top-level panel to discuss issues facing education on a national level, including education reform. Panelists included the Rev. Al Sharpton and leading education advocates, researchers and policy analysts such as Chester Finn, Kati Haycock, Tyrone Howard, Denise Pope and Nick Hanauer. The speakers shared divergent viewpoints on the state of the U.S. public education system, a topic that is currently the focus of conversations nationwide. The three-part Conversation Education series began in the fall and included screenings of the documentaries Race to Nowhere and Waiting for Superman.

The Rev. Al Sharpton joined a panel of national leaders in education.

SU MAKES ITS MARK IN THE

PEACE CORPS

Seattle University is ranked No. 23 in the Peace Corps’ 2011 rankings of small colleges and universities (those with less than 5,000 undergraduates) for the number of alumni serving in the Peace Corps. “That Seattle University ranks high in the number of its alumni who participate in the Peace Corps comes as no surprise to those of us who have watched these young men and women grow in their commitment to service during their student years,” says Peter Ely, S.J., vice president for Mission and Ministry. According to the Peace Corps website, there are more than 200,000 volunteers serving in 139 host countries in areas including AIDS education, information technology and environmental preservation.

ROTC PROGRAM TOPS IN THE NATION Seattle University’s Army ROTC program has won the Outstanding Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps award. SU was selected best in the nation from among 273 Army ROTC programs. The award recognizes contributions made by cadets enrolled in the ROTC program and the commanding officers’ efforts to build the officer corps of the U.S. Army. This is the third time SU has won the award, having received the honor in 1997 and 2000. “We are very honored to receive this award,” says Lt. Col. Eric Farquharson, chair of the military science department in the College of Arts and Sciences. “The credit goes to the cadets, cadre and staff who have made this program what it is today. This award is about what a team can accomplish, not what a single person can do. I just feel honored and blessed to be on this team.” The award is sponsored by the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America, a civilian organization that promotes patriotism and a respect for the character and heroism of the founders and patriots of America. Read more about the honor at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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PERSPECTIVES

Home Sweet Home | By Kelly Stone, ’09

Dora Krasucki-Alex, ’74, ’00, brings to life her vision of a safe haven for women on the road to addiction recovery There is no other place that Dora “D” Krasucki-Alex, ’74, ’00, would like to be on a Saturday than the Mary McClinton home, a newly renovated house for women recovering from addiction. “This home has been a vision of mine for a long time,” says Dora, a neurobiology nurse who has worked in the field of chemical dependency for 35 years. “For me, I am in awe by God putting this all together. It’s overwhelming; this is truly a gift from God and I’m so excited.” The Mary McClinton home, located in the inner city of Seattle, can house up to six women at a time who can reside there for up to a year. “It’s about women learning to live in community with one another,” says Dora. While staying in the home, residents will receive intensive drug and alcohol treatment, as well as therapy. They will also be a part of

service work in the community and will have the opportunity to take classes in areas such as budgeting, finances and parental skills. There is a need for this type of housing for women, says Dora, who notes that women ages 12–24 are the fastest-growing population in the criminal justice and mental health systems, as well as in addiction and recovery treatment programs. The Mary McClinton home was made possible through the support that Dora received and the generosity of many donors who helped provide supplies and resources to make the house a real home. Donors who contributed to the project include GLY Construction and the Seattle Seahawks, among many others. In late spring the first two women moved into their new home, with others soon to follow.

The Mary McClinton home is the newest component of Seattle’s Matt Talbot Recovery Center, where Dora’s husband, Gregg Alex, ’00, is the executive director. The center offers an outpatient treatment program for the homeless and those with mental illness and substance addictions. Gregg has been with the Matt Talbot Center since it opened in 1985. He credits his wife for his commitment to his work in recovery issues. Through Dora, Gregg was exposed to the world of detoxification and treatment. “I wanted to do something about a growing problem,” says Gregg. Both Gregg and Dora received master’s degrees from Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry. Dora also went through SU’s Pastoral Leadership program, while Gregg completed a degree with an emphasis on chemical dependency issues.

(Above) A welcome gift awaits each resident / donated towels and linens. (Right) Dora “D” Krasucki-Alex sits in the community area of the Mary McClinton home.

6 / Perspectives

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PHOTOS BY MEL CURTIS

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“You need to be educationally and spiritually prepared for this type of work and I have been well trained to do what I do.” DORA “D” KRASUCKI-ALEX, ’74, ’00

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PERSPECTIVES

Dora and Gregg share a moment outside the Mary McClinton home in Seattle.

“The gift of an SU education requires that people look at the world around them, look at the needs before them and ask themselves, ‘What can I do to make a difference.’” GREGG ALEX, ’00

Dora’s training as a nurse began at SU and the College of Nursing, which she graduated from in 1974. In addition to her work in neurobiology, Dora is a certified multiple sclerosis nurse. She has a master’s degree in public administration. “The gift of an SU education requires that people look at the world around them, look at the needs before them and ask themselves, ‘What can I do to make a difference?’” says Gregg. Currently, Dora is on the board of the School of Theology and Ministry. In her work, she has been able to tap into her SU education. “You need to be educationally and spiritually prepared for this type of work and I have been well trained to do what I do,” Dora says. “I encourage people

to take the moral education, along with the excellent academic preparation that they’ve received, and never use one without the other.” The Mary McClinton home is the first of three phases Dora has designed to break the cycle of addiction. The second phase, which is in the planning stages, involves housing for women and their children; currently, the Mary McClinton home is for women only. The third phase is independent housing with the opportunity for home ownership. When asked what motivates them and their work, Dora says it’s “seeing people grow spiritually.” For Gregg, it’s a calling. “I know this is what I’m supposed to do,” he says. “It’s non-negotiable.”

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Against All Odds | By Stacy Howard Hajer Al-Faham, ’11, is making a difference while fighting cultural stereotypes PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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“I would much rather be telling my own story than have someone telling it for me.” HAJER AL-FAHAM, ’11

Hajer Al-Faham

For Hajer Al-Faham, life changed dramatically on Sept. 11, 2001. Al-Faham is a first-generation Iraqi who experienced firsthand heightened fears and stereotyping of Muslims that followed in the hours and days after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. In a matter of hours Al-Faham went from a popular eighth grader to invisible to her friends and peers. “Every friend I had stopped talking to me, teachers too,” she recalls. Al-Faham could have retreated but instead chose to face what she was subjected to head on. She occupied herself by volunteering and enrolled in Running Start, a program that gives high school students the opportunity to take college courses prior to graduation. Although she opted to skip her high school graduation ceremony because of the backlash she faced from some, she stayed focused on school and community service. “Volunteering helped me become more successful academically,” says Al-Faham, who volunteers at organizations including Everett Providence Medical Center Hospice, the Snohomish County Women-to-Women program and the King County Domestic Violence Unit. After earning a double scholarship to Seattle University, Al-Faham continued not only volunteering, but also for the first time in years became involved in activities on campus. She simultaneously served as president of the Muslim

Student Association and Jesuit Honor Society. “I knew U was committed to embracing diversity,” she says. “That’s why I had no concerns about being involved with both groups.” A 2008 trip back to Iraq inspired her to educate others about Islam. It was the first time she returned to her birth country since her family left a refugee camp in 1993. Though she was young when they fled, her memories are clear. “We went by foot, hitchhiked, whatever we could do to get to the Saudi Arabia border,” she says. “From the time I was born, we were on the run.” Saddam Hussein’s Royal Guard killed Al-Faham’s Shiite Muslim grandparents and uncles, then came after her father. With no options left, the family left everything behind and lived in the camp for four years before moving to the United States. As she looks to life after graduation, and now as an alumna of SU, Al-Faham is considering becoming a professor, a move inspired by a class on politics in Islam. “I was sitting in [Associate] Professor Erik Olsen’s political science class and thought I can do this someday,” says Al-Faham, who majored in political science and women’s studies. Associate Professor Olsen says Al-Faham is not only one of the most amazing students he’s had, but also one of the most amazing human beings he’s met.

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PERSPECTIVES

Community Voice | By Tina Potterf

Sherry Williams, ’09 MPA, puts a public face to Swedish Hospital A glance at Sherry Williams’ résumé reveals a rich and eclectic professional profile. It starts in the banking industry, when Williams was recruited from her hometown of Boston to join a management training team at a Seattle bank. Within a year she realized banking wasn’t her calling. Instead, she opted to explore a burgeoning interest in volunteering, which led to meetings with Seattle leaders and in turn to career opportunities in outreach and community engagement. After a sixyear stint with the Snohomish County Public Utilities District, she landed a job as part of the team behind the 1990 Seattle Goodwill Games. Her work with the games paved the way for what she calls “the best job ever” as director of executive service for the United States Olympic Committee in Colorado Springs, Colo. “The Olympics were a defining moment in my career,” says Williams, a 2009 graduate of SU’s Master of Public Administration program. “It was an incredible experience and an opportunity to learn from so many different people from all over the world.” By 1992, she was on to Atlanta to join the organizing group for the 1996 Summer Olympics, where she was part of a team tasked with recruitment, placement and training of the game’s 40,000 volunteers. When the Olympics were over, Williams moved with her family to the Netherlands Antilles, where she lived for two years while her husband taught at the International School of Curaçao. She embraced the culture by teaching ESL and doing contract work for the University of

the Netherlands. As her husband’s teaching assignment in Curaçao was coming to an end, she came across a job posting for a position that closely aligned with her employment history and skills: Providence Medical Center in Seattle was looking for a director of community services and volunteers. “The Sisters of Providence’s mission and values were very close to my personal values, so the position was a positive match,” says Williams, who was hired in 1999. When Providence was acquired by Swedish Medical Center a year later, Williams’ role expanded to director of volunteer services for three hospital campuses and an emergency department. During this time she decided it was time to go back to school to earn a master’s degree, which brought her to SU and toward an Master of Public Administration. “I had all of these [professional] experiences and skills I had gained, but I felt it was time to put a degree behind it,” she says. “I wanted an institution of merit and social value that was recognized not only locally, but also nationally.” After a restructuring of departments at Swedish, Williams’ professional life took another turn when she was asked to help create a new community affairs position as part of external affairs at the hospital, which she did in 2009. Today, she serves as the director of community affairs, a role that puts

her out front raising the profile and presence of Swedish in the community, offering health and wellness resources to citizen groups, institutions and churches, where outreach in the past was splintered. As part of this work, Williams has developed or managed special projects, including the Global to Local Initiative, collaboration with community clinics and Checking Our Pulse, an exhibit at the Northwest African American Museum showcasing health leaders and healers in the African American community. Additionally, Williams continues to be engaged with the university through her involvement with the SU Youth Initiative, athletics and servicelearning projects and, with Swedish, as a community partner for the First Hill Streetcar project. When discussing the rewards of her work, Williams cites the gratification that comes with telling “the Swedish story.” “It’s not about the number of patients we serve, but how we serve our patients,” she says. Because volunteerism and outreach have factored heavily in Williams’ professional and personal life, she encourages others to make the time to make a difference. “We’re all busy. But even the busiest people in the world can make the time to better themselves and others,” she says.

Sherry Williams, ’09 MPA, is a community advocate by profession and by choice.

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PHOTO BY MIKE KANE

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“We’re all busy. But even the busiest people in the world can make the time to better themselves and others.” SHERRY WILLIAMS, ’09 MPA, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS / SWEDISH HOSPITAL

SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 11

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ON CAMPUS

Youth Advocate | By Annie Beckmann Eddie Lincoln makes a difference as the new Bailey Gatzert School Success Coordinator

When he reflects on his education at Seattle University, Eddie Lincoln, ’05, fondly recalls his first community-based learning in a communications course taught by Assistant Professor Jeff Philpott. It was a pivotal educational experience for Lincoln, who realized he wanted to have an impact on the community, although he wasn’t yet sure what role he would play. With the recent hiring of Lincoln as SU’s new Bailey Gatzert School Success Coordinator, the Seattle University Youth Initiative gains momentum. The community-wide concern that too many children face severe challenges to learning is the impetus that will drive the SU Youth Initiative, which starts with the Bailey Gatzert neighborhood near SU. President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., described Lincoln as “a natural leader who is deeply committed to empowering youth in our community” when he publicly announced the youth initiative earlier this year. As a success coordinator, Lincoln is tasked with improving the potential of area youth so they can be successful at school, have greater access to higher education and achieve their best as adults. He spends four days a week at Bailey Gatzert and one day a week at SU. “At SU, my role involves recruitment on campus, building lasting relationships with faculty and reaching out to student groups to get more volunteer

tutors. The fact that SU has servicelearning projects and students who really want to make a change is amazing,” Lincoln says. “At Bailey Gatzert, Principal Greg Imel is very open and we’re building a relationship of trust. We’re starting with kindergartners and first-graders.” If Lincoln’s name is familiar, it’s because he grew up in Rainier Valley, graduated from O’Dea High School and transferred from Eastern Washington University to Seattle University in 2002. It’s also because of his memorable basketball career. At O’Dea, he was named state player of the year in 2000. He served as the SU basketball team captain from 2002 to 2004, and coached the team in 2005. Lincoln sees plenty of room to grow in his career as the youth initiative gradually expands to encompass Washington Middle School and Garfield High School. Engagement and partnerships among SU, Bailey Gatzert and the community are multifaceted and longterm. The first step is to put in place a support network and structure for elementary students at Bailey Gatzert. “Our goal is to have our students excel academically, for their scores to rival their counterparts across the

Read more about the Seattle University Youth Initiative at www.seattleu.edu/suyi/.

district,” he says. “Once they have achieved that academic feat, our next goal will be to find ways for them to exceed that standard.” Recently Lincoln spoke to a group of Garfield High School students who came to SU for a lesson on the history of social change movements. When a few of the 11th graders started to grouse about some of their tough teachers, he seized the moment and turned it into a rally cry for learning the most from their teachers. Jodi Kelly, interim dean at Matteo Ricci College and one of Lincoln’s mentors when he was an SU student, says the university is much richer for having hired him in this capacity. “Eddie Lincoln is exactly the person I would want as a role model for my own children and the students at Bailey Gatzert,” she says. “His long suits are loyalty, compassion, tenacity, discipline, an ability to love. Add to that an engaging personality and a smile that makes you believe in the goodness of people and you've got Eddie Lincoln.” A graduate of Houston’s Thurgood Marshall School of Law, which routinely ranks among the nation’s top five law schools for its number of African American graduates, Lincoln says he was particularly interested in the political side of law shaped by legislation. “Once you educate yourself, you can talk about social change in your community,” says Lincoln. “You can educate that community and it snowballs.”

Eddie Lincoln’s job is all about improving the potential of Bailey Gatzert students.

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Seattle University Awards Honorary Degree to Global Landmine Activist PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Tun Channareth is an internationally known landmine activist.

At SU’s graduate commencement ceremony, Tun Channareth was honored for his fight for social justice. In 1982, as a soldier resisting the Khmer Rouge regime, Tun Channareth had his life change in an instant. He stepped on a landmine near the ThaiCambodian border and lost both legs. Since then he has made it his life’s

mission to travel the world as an antilandmine activist. Seattle University recognized Channareth’s tireless and important work by awarding him an honorary degree in June. In 1997, Channareth was chosen to

My Mother’s Dream Restored After decades of silence between us, one evening in April I found myself conversing with an uncle I barely know about a part of my mother’s life I was clueless about. The uneasy topic: How had the World War II internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans affected him, my mother, their brother and parents? All I knew was that my mother, Joanne Misako Oyabe Watanabe, and her family had been uprooted from their Seattle home and incarcerated in Minidoka, Idaho, following Japan’s 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. The family was torn apart as my Uncle Jits

accept the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL). As an ambassador for ICBL, he urges governments around the world to get rid of landmines. In 2006, the year the United Nations declared April 4 the International Day for Mine Awareness and Assistance in Mine Action, an estimated 15,000 to 20,000 people were killed or injured by landmines, according to a UN report. Nearly 20 percent of the victims were children. “Tun Channareth has reached out with compassion in service to other landmine victims while working tirelessly to rid the world of these insidious weapons,” says President Stephen Sundborg, S.J. Channareth was nominated for the university honor by Albers School of Business and Economics professors whose students had worked with him during a recent service-learning trip to Siem Reap, Cambodia. “Every day, in large and small ways, Mr. Channareth lives out the values of our university,” says Father Sundborg. “He is a true person for others.”

By Teresa Watanabe | Guest writer and daughter of Joanne Watanabe

went to Tule Lake in California with his parents, while my mother and Uncle Pat headed east for education. The separation turned out to be long lasting. “There was no more togetherness,” Uncle Jits said. “Having a sister and brother didn’t mean that much anymore. They were just relatives, doing their own thing.” That shattering conversation and the realization of deep, lasting emotional harm to my mother’s family were prompted by Seattle University’s decision to award honorary degrees to my mother and the other Japanese

Americans who were students there at the time. Until Lori Bannai, legal writing instructor at the School of Law, contacted my sister, I had no idea that my mother had even attended Seattle U. I am thrilled that her little-known academic and intellectual life will be recognized, her educational dreams finally restored. For my mother did more than cook a mean beef stew, sew wonderful quilts and faithfully attend to her husband, parents and eight children. She was a voracious reader with a curious intellect who distrusted authority and was never afraid to question conventional wisdom.

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Honorary degrees for Japanese American students forced to leave SU during World War II At the undergraduate commencement ceremony on June 12, Seattle University conferred honorary bachelor’s degrees on a group of Japanese Americans who, in 1942, were required by federal order to leave the university. They were forced to abandon their studies when they were incarcerated by the U.S. government following Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor. Honorary degrees were given to the following individuals: John Fujiwara | Although he was unable to complete a college degree, he found success as a photographer for the Boeing Company. Ben Kayji Hara | Soon after his incarceration, he volunteered with the Army and served overseas. He died in Tokyo in 1945. Shigeko (Iseri) Hirai | Hirai was able to complete a nursing degree. She moved to Chewelah, Wash., where she farmed seed potatoes with her husband. Dr. May (Shiga) Hornback | Dr. Hornback moved to Montana to avoid incarceration. After earning a PhD she became a nursing professor at the University of Wisconsin.

Colette (Yoshiko) Kawaguchi | Incarcerated at Camp Minidoka in Idaho and today lives in Seattle. Lillia Uri (Satow) Matsuda | Following her incarceration, Matsuda was able to complete a nursing degree. For many years she worked as a nurse in Illinois and Seattle. June (Koto) Sakaguchi | Sakaguchi moved to Colorado to finish her nursing degree. Mitsu Shoyama | Shoyama earned a nursing degree at St. Boniface Hospital in Manitoba, Canada, and went on to a long nursing career in Kamloops, British Columbia. Caroline (Kondo) Taniguchi | She continued her nursing education in Colorado and worked at several hospitals in Chicago as a medical records specialist. Madeleine (Iwata) Uyehara | Uyehara continued her studies toward a nursing degree in Colorado and later worked at a blood bank before moving to Milwaukee to raise her son. Joanne Misako (Oyabe) Watanabe | Years after her incarceration at Camp

Minidoka, Watanabe returned to Seattle, where she raised eight children. (Read more about Watanabe and her family, as shared by her daughter, Los Angeles Times staff writer Teresa Watanabe, below.) Tom Yamauchi | Yamauchi had a successful career with Boeing and the Northrop Corporation. “Honoring these men and women further affirms our long and special relationship with the Japanese American community,” Father Sundborg says. Before World War II a community of Japanese Americans lived on what is now south campus. Famed sculptor George Tsutakawa’s Centennial Fountain sits in the heart of campus. Fujitaro Kubota, a Japanese immigrant who was also incarcerated at Camp Minidoka, designed nine gardens on our campus. In April 2006, the university dedicated its Japanese American Remembrance Garden, designed by Fujitaro Kubota’s grandson, Allan, as a tribute to the community that once thrived here.

She shared her love of learning with us through weekly library runs and introduced us to everything from the writings of Taylor Caldwell on the lives of the saints to dense foreign policy takeouts on the Trilateral Commission. Long after the war, Mom would sometimes hint at her longing for higher education with tales of wonderful times at Webster College in St. Louis, where she went from Minidoka. She never finished, choosing to marry instead, but she would talk about having “the time of my life” there.

“She was smart,” Uncle Jits said of my mom. “She just never got credit for it.” Now she will, thanks to Seattle U. I can imagine her beaming at the thought of receiving, at long last, a university degree. And that fills me with gratitude and delight. But healing the family’s wounds is another matter. Uncle Pat never returned to the West Coast, instead settling in Connecticut and then Florida. I last saw him 30 years ago; he passed away in January. I have stronger memories of my Uncle Jits and his family, but once

my mother died in 1994, our contact virtually ended. Life goes on. Uncle Jits—Gerald Oyabe—moved to Mercer Island and opened a beauty school and two salons. He believes the internment helped Japanese Americans win respect for their resilience in rebuilding their lives. Maybe so. But, brought together even fleetingly by Seattle U, at least I will start sending Uncle Jits and his family Christmas cards.

For more on this year’s recipients visit www.seattleu.edu/commencement/.

Teresa Watanabe is a staff writer at the Los Angeles Times. SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 15

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SU Style looks at what’s “in fashion” on campus.

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MARIA ZAZYCKI Assistant Director of Donor Relations and Special Events / MBA student WHO instilled in you your fashion sense? My older sister, who is an art teacher. In high school, she and I would spend weekends shopping for clothes at thrift stores. This was the late 1980s, long before thrift store shopping was hip. We’d find vintage cardigans and retro sundresses for 99 cents. I definitely found a different sense of style through these excursions.

WHAT is your most cherished item of clothing? I especially love clothes gifted to me by friends. I’m in love with a pair of black felted arm-warmers from my friend TJ. They are the perfect combination of warmth and practicality. Whoever designed the first arm-warmer is a genius!

WHERE do you shop for clothes and accessories? I love to shop local. Retrofit Home on Capitol Hill; Velouria, Laura B and Market Street Shoes in Ballard. And my all-time favorite clothing store is Anthropologie. It’s not local, but the clothes are so unique. Whether it’s a hidden pocket here or a bit of contrasting fabric there, their clothes make even a rainy Monday feel like a party day.

WHEN did you develop your signature style? I go through a new sense of style every five years or so. I definitely attribute my current sense of high-volume color to living in cloudy Seattle for the past decade. I often wonder if I had landed in sunny California would I be wearing black every day?

HOW would you describe your look? I actually don’t think much about it. I often describe myself as a walking contradiction. I think my look is just me— wacky, yet practical, and filled with a good sense of humor.

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Diana Chamorro, Chamorro,’11 ’11 MSAL MSAL Championship Field...of Dreams | ByBy Diana

Seattle U soccer programs ready for competition

PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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MEN’S SOCCER HOME SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER Saturday, Sept. 10 vs. Washington @ 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 vs. Gonzaga @ 4 p.m. OCTOBER Friday, Oct. 14 vs. San Jose State @ 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16 vs. Sacramento State @ 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21 vs. New Mexico @ 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 23 vs. UNLV @ 1 p.m. WOMEN’S SOCCER HOME SCHEDULE SEPTEMBER Friday, Sept. 23 vs. USF @ 4p.m. Friday, Sept. 30 vs. Gonzaga @ 4 p.m. OCTOBER Sunday, Oct. 2 vs. Boise @ 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9 vs. Hawaii @ 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28 vs. Montana @ 3 p.m.

For the Seattle University men’s and women’s soccer programs, another exciting season is just around the corner. Before long, it will be time to lace up cleats, don jerseys and get ready for a full season of action at SU’s Championship Field. The season ahead has both squads boasting rosters full of talented student athletes. This year the men’s and women’s teams are Division I eligible, so fans can expect some great matches. For the men, Coach Brad Agoos—in his sixth season with the team—has added height and speed to this year’s lineup. The Redhawks, who currently compete as members of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (MPSF), will vie for their first conference title and the MPSF’s automatic bid into the tournament. Agoos will look to senior Brandon Hamer for his leadership

on and off the field. Hamer had a standout season, named to multiple all-tournament teams and capping last season by earning MPSF All-Academic accolades. Goalkeeper Jake Feener returns to build on his freshman campaign, where he saw success and experienced the demands of Division I play. The squad, who will have several new faces competing for time on the field in 2011, will need to fill the void of graduating senior Sean Morris, who was drafted in the MLS Supplemental Draft by the Seattle Sounders FC. On the women’s side, Coach Julie Woodward has a mix of fresh talent and veterans ready to compete with teams including perennial powerhouse the University of Portland and crosstown rivals the UW. Last season saw standout contributions from the newcomers, including offensive leader sophomore

Emma Levy, who tallied six goals and four assists. While the offensive game saw the younger players taking on larger roles, it was the defense that guided SU to a 12-5-2 record, including a sevengame unbeaten streak. SU’s defense will be anchored by an experienced backline, featuring a pair of seniors in goalkeeper Madison Goverde and central defender Jordan Salisbury. The duo will look to lead the team and fill the void of graduating senior Kara Kuttler, who leaves behind a scoring legacy as one of SU’s top 10 all-time goal scorers. Both teams saw continued growth and development over the spring season. Led by competitive and experienced coaching staffs and dedicated and talented student athletes, the men’s and women’s soccer teams are ready to field a successful season ahead. Be sure to catch them in action. SU Magazine Summer 2011 / 17

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Faculty Snapshot / Patrick Murphy | By Annie Beckmann Meet an assistant professor in the College of Nursing who teaches interdisciplinary courses in pharmacology You began at SU as an adjunct professor in biology in 2005. How did you find your way to the College of Nursing? Murphy: Our former dean had the foresight to recruit faculty from related disciplines to support SU’s nursing programs. In my content area (pharmacology), for example, the volume of information nurses are expected to know—both from ethical and legal perspectives—has profoundly expanded over the past half-century. Because there are so many medications used today, we teach students not just how to memorize facts, but also to think mechanistically about how drugs work in the body. How did your research change when you joined the nursing faculty? Murphy: I was able to bridge the gap between basic science and nursing/clinical science, break down some stereotypes and help students see the bigger picture of the discovery process. All the

students in my laboratory come to understand the significance of how certain biochemical reactions impact an asthmatic patient, for example. Here at SU, we’re able to have students involved in the full spectrum of research activities and we’re asking meaningful questions that heavily involve student researchers. Is this undergraduate research? Murphy: I don’t believe in undergraduate research. What I’m in favor of is research with full contributions from all lab members. By removing the label of “undergraduate,” it indicates the research continues and that we’re initiating research questions bigger than any of us. I currently have 13 undergraduates from nursing, biology, chemistry, biochemistry and physics conducting—and sometimes running— a half-dozen interrelated projects. Results from three of these are currently slated to be published in a new mediaonline journal named JoVE (Journal of Visualized Experiments).

Your research examines the importance of DNA in determining how a person responds to drugs and has the potential to improve health and minimize unpleasant side effects. Can you explain more? Murphy: My work centers on pharmacogenetics and molecular chaperone proteins. Pharmacogenetics explores how DNA affects an individual person’s response to drugs. Molecular chaperone proteins are essential biomolecules inside every cell that coordinate your body’s response to physiological change and cellular stress. Studying the interplay between drugs, DNA and proteins is a hallmark of modern biomedical research. What drugs are you investigating? Murphy: We’re looking at a class of medicines called glucocorticoids. They’re among the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States that treat diseases ranging from asthma and cancer to psoriasis and arthritis.

news & notes FACULTY AND STAFF ACHIEVEMENTS Jeffrey Anderson, professor of the College of Education’s Master in Teaching program, received an award from Duke University for his contribution to the project, “Engaging All Learners through Service-Learning (EASL),” funded by the Corporation for National and Community Service. Part of a total project cost of $80,264, the $39,649 sub-award Anderson received supports the Seattle University EASL

project. The goal of the project is to increase the depth and reciprocity of local community and school partnerships in support of teacher preparation for service learning in K–12 schools. Mike Bisesi, professor and director of the Center for Nonprofit and Social Enterprise Management in the College of Arts and Sciences, wrote a commentary that appeared in the Seattle Times on how the

10th anniversary of the Nisqually earthquake, which rattled Seattle and the surrounding area on Feb. 28, 2001, should serve “as a reminder that disasters are community problems.” Gary Chamberlain, professor emeritus of theology and religious studies, wrote an article titled, “The World Nursing Crisis” that was published in the March 28 issue of America magazine. Bill O'Connell, an associate professor

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Patrick Murphy teaches student Olivia Buonarati how to prepare an acrylamide gel, which is used to separate proteins by their molecular weight.

who teaches in the College of Education’s counseling and school psychology department, co-presented at the annual American Counseling Association Conference in New Orleans. The peer-reviewed presentation was titled, “Hallelujah, Halleluyah, Alleluia: Strengthening the Supervisory Relationship while Broaching Spiritual Issues in Counseling.” Kimberly Thomas, director of the Premajor Studies program, gave

a presentation on entering the workforce vs. entering graduate school at the College Success Foundation Career Institute. The College Success Foundation supports scholarship programs for low-income, high-potential youth. Jason Wirth, associate professor of philosophy, has written an essay on Buddhist ecology for a website that averages 5,000 hits a day. You can read Wirth’s essay, which addresses

Compiled by Mike Thee, as published in the faculty/staff online news source, The Commons.

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the environmental crisis, at Ecological Buddhism’s blog: ecobuddhism.org. Barb Yates, longtime professor and chair of economics in the Albers School of Business and Economics, was granted the honorary rank of Professor Emerita. Yates, who has served on the Albers faculty since 1970, retired at the end of the 2010–11 academic year. Read more faculty and staff achievements at www.seattleu.edu/commons/.

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SHORT-TERM IMMERSION TRIPS PROVIDE TANGIBLE AND LASTING CONNECTIONS TO SU’S MISSION BY TINA POTTERF

Students help in the construction of houses in a service trip to Tijuana, Mexico.

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Assistant Professor Mary Graham of the College of Education spends time with children she met during the Nicaragua immersion trip during spring break.

hen Andre Springman heard the young woman’s story, he walked away with a new perspective. The encounter happened at Heritage University, a small private university in Eastern Washington, where Springman met a second-year student who at age 22 was a mother of two children, a full-time student and part-time instructor for the GED program. He was taken by her openness to share her circumstances and inspired by what she has accomplished against all odds. “She overcame great barriers to pursue her education and give back to her community,” he says. This was just one of several meetings and exchanges in homes, with community members and migrant workers that contributed to a week that Springman calls “life changing.” The first-year student was among a collective of Seattle University students who made the trek east from Seattle to Wapato, Wash., as participants in the Dignity, Justice and Work program sponsored by the Center for Service and Community Engagement. A hallmark of a Jesuit education is engagement with the world through experiences that enable students and alumni to learn by doing. One important way this is accomplished is through shortterm, mission-focused trips that take students out of the classroom and immerses them in another city, country or culture. For many students, college is a time for exploration, self-discovery and learning through lived experiences. These are often the outcome of study or service abroad trips. SU’s Education Abroad program and international placements consistently are among the top in the country; students have the opportunity to fully engage in another culture academically via long-term programs and creditbased courses throughout the world. But there are also opportunities for exploration by way of intensive, short-term, trips such as the Wapato immersion, that serve to enhance the academic strengths and mission of the university. These immersion trips often occur in a week during winter or spring breaks that take participants— typically from 10 to a dozen or more, depending on the immersion—to Nicaragua, Belize, Tijuana,

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ANDRE SPRINGMAN, ’14, FIRST-YEAR STUDENT

Mexico, or a locale just a few hours from home (for most of the trips, participants sign up or volunteer for a spot and pay their own way). The rural immersion was of interest to Springman, ’14, because he wanted to give a face and a story to the recent spate of media reports about immigration and better understand the issue. “It’s about having students…talk about issues of immigration within the context of their own state,” says Kelly Benkert, program coordinator for the Center for Service and Community Engagement. The experience has given Springman a greater awareness, he says, of what is going on in the world, even if the “world” is a few hours drive from Seattle. It has raised in him questions about the connectedness of issues such as employment rights, social justice and politics. In addition to their visit at Heritage University, students met with men and women who work in the farms and apple packing plants in the small town near Yakima. They heard the stories and saw firsthand the long workdays of the migrant workers and the strong and unabated sense of community and importance of family that fuels their drive. The trip offered ample time for reflection. “The migrant workers’ stories were very personal and the people were more than happy to share,” Springman says. “I learned many great things about the world that I would have never learned had I not had this experience.” These short, but intensive, immersions can enhance professional formation and build on the academic offerings at SU, says Victoria Jones, associate provost for global engagement. “As a complement to the academic side of the university, these kinds of trips provide a wonderful

hands-on way of exploring the university mission,” says Jones. Campus Ministry oversees many of the missiondriven immersions including outreach to Belize, where participants work with childcare centers, schools, health clinics and a day center for the elderly. Alumni have the chance to spend a week in Belize doing service work in an immersion that was started in 2005 by Professor Emeritus Gary Chamberlain and 2004 grad Lauren Lake. In describing the purpose of the immersion, which takes place in February/March, Lake says, “Our hope was to have a consistent presence in Belize between SU interns and nursing students and the immersion trip there by Campus Ministry so that every few months the organizations in Belize would have new supplies and volunteers.” During the group’s last trip, alumni assisted at organizations including the YMCA/YWCA and at local schools. Volunteers also worked at Mercy Clinic and Mercy Kitchen, where they served the elderly poor and provided health care, meals and food delivery to those who are homebound. Participants also worked alongside Jesuit volunteers and SU students who are there in longer service stays. “Our group had a very meaningful experience in Belize. We learned a lot from the local community leaders who shared some late evenings with our group discussing issues with the youth in Belize,” says Lake. “The trip emphasized our desire to continue working in these ways in the world, locally and internationally. Many of the group members have kept in touch with our contacts in Belize and are hoping to serve in Belize again in the near future.” One of SU’s longstanding immersions is in

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Seattle University students help set a foundation for a home during a recent trip to Tijuana.

Nicaragua, which was initiated in 2001 for faculty and staff (SU has been involved with initiatives and engagement with our peer Jesuit university in Managua years prior). Faculty and staff spend the week exploring issues of global justice in a developing country, meeting with leaders and educational colleagues in Managua and further strengthening the mission of Jesuit higher ed. Buzz Hofford is resident district manager for SU’s food services provider Bon Appétit and went on the trip to Nicaragua this past spring. During the week stay he and his SU colleagues visited schools, coffee farms and cooperatives and met with various community leaders. It was an experience

he won’t soon forget. “This is the type of trip I will be processing for a long time to come,” Hofford says. “Perhaps the most rewarding and surprising aspect was the connection I made with my university colleagues. In the hustle and bustle of the work week, we never find time to sit, chat and really get to know one another. Having the opportunity to converse with highly intelligent folks on a variety of interesting topics was something I really valued.” Exposure to another culture that trips such as these provide is invaluable, Hofford says, to appreciate not only what we have but also what we may be missing. “In order to create a just and humane world, we

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need to appreciate its diversity and beauty and recognize how much we can learn from people in other cultures.” Joining Hofford on the trip was Jim Hembree, senior director of development. Hembree wanted to participate in the immersion “because it is a great example of how Seattle University can work together with Jesuit institutions and nonprofit organizations around the world to benefit international learning and research.”

shared by enough people, actually influence coffee markets and affect the way small coffee producers in Nicaragua do their work. It’s an illustration that in a global economy we are all connected.” Jocelyn Tidwell works as the administrative coordinator in the University Planning office and will graduate in December 2011 from the College of Education with a Master’s in Adult Education and Training. An interest in connecting her future work in education with diverse populations whose native

JIM HEMBREE, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

The experiences he had during his time in Nicaragua, including at the Jesuit University of Central America, will benefit his work engaging alumni and benefactors about SU’s global partnerships. “It helps to be able to draw on personal experience when having those conversations,” he says. In the coffee growing region of Matagalpa, Hembree says the group experienced one of its most uplifting and powerful conversations of the entire trip. “We met with the leaders of a women’s cooperative who had organized themselves in the struggle for access to coffee markets and for health and education in their rural, mountain communities,” he says. “… It felt like being at the well spring of liberation theology, like entering into a deep and swift moving current of thought that continues to nourish humanitarian work today.” The Nicaraguan immersion inspired Hembree by showing how an international network of schools, colleges and universities can share a common commitment for academic excellence in service and in helping the poor and the marginalized. What surprised him most? “Realizing how profoundly the little choices I make every day can impact people a half-world away,” Hembree says. “For example, my taste preferences in coffee, if

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language is not English was among the factors that propelled her to do this year’s immersion trip to Wapato. Tidwell has participated in service-oriented trips in the past through programs such as Habitat for Humanity. “Even though Seattle and Eastern Washington are geographically close, culturally they are pretty distinct,” Tidwell says. “I think an immersion trip structured like this is experiential learning at its best.” She recalls a meeting with a student named Teresa at Heritage University, someone she got to know prior to the trip through e-mail correspondence. When they met in person and the two began to talk, Tidwell found they shared many commonalities. When Tidwell asked Teresa what she would say to the issue of undocumented immigrants, “I felt her voice tighten…and she replied, ‘People are people and a piece of paper doesn’t change their needs or the way they deserve to be treated,’” says Tidwell. “That’s the message I promised I would share.” Whether it’s a short-term trip half a world away or one a close drive from home, those who have had the chance to expand their worldview and perspectives through immersions encourage others to do the same. “An immersion trip…creates a kind of sacred space in which we encounter each other, our international hosts and issues of global justice,” says Hembree. “I believe exposure to another culture helps broaden our horizons.” Read more on SU’s immersions at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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APPLY WITHIN Internships provide more than a foot in the door for job seekers By Annie Beckmann

In this sluggish economy, SU helps students secure internships, which is a smart way to jump-start a career. The university rallied in response to a rising need for more robust career guidance and the effort has paid off. Today, students and alumni can find free career advice at webinars, through the Redhawk Network, in one-on-onecounseling sessions and at job-fair style events such as the Career Expo. More than 100 local employers now fill internships with SU students each year, according to Gayatri Eassey of SU Career Services. From Amazon to the YMCA, internship opportunities for students include major companies, nonprofits, retail, media, health care, government and sports teams. Costco Wholesale, World Affairs Council, Expeditors International and Weyerhaeuser are among the leaders.

It speaks to the university’s emphasis on academic excellence and leadership development that many SU students not only land competitive internships but also are able to fashion them into careers once they graduate. That was the case for Michael Leigh, ’07, a deputy U.S. Marshal who now recruits SU students for the Centralized Student Career Experience program, a cooperative education program that prepares potential deputy U.S. Marshals. SU is the only school in the state that participates in this national program aimed exclusively at undergraduate students. So far, seven SU students have completed the program and six have been commissioned as marshals. Leigh, the first SU student to go through

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PHOTO BY LINDSEY WASSON

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Miriam Mina, ’00, ’09 MPA (right), talks with a student at SU’s Career Expo. Mina works for Sen. Patty Murray.

the competitive program, was always interested In one of his first assignments in 2008, he joined in law enforcement and public service. As an the high-threat security team that transported undergraduate, he held leadership positions in convicted terrorist Ahmed Ressam to the U.S. student government and worked in campus Public Courthouse in downtown Seattle for re-sentencing. Safety. It was his U.S. Marshals Service internship, Ressam, also known as the “Millennium Bomber,” however, that convinced him to join the nation’s was apprehended in Port Angeles, Wash., in oldest federal law enforcement agency. Protecting December 1999, when he tried to enter the United federal court officials, executing arrest warrants, States by car ferry from Victoria, British Columbia. providing prisoner custody and transportation, After three years in Seattle, Leigh is now deputywitness security and fugitive investigations are in-charge of the Vancouver, Wash., satellite office. among a marshal’s typical duties. “The U.S. Marshals Service is a big agency with Leigh says sometimes it’s like a roller coaster ride. lots of opportunity. I’m just getting started,” he says. “One day I could be forcing entry into a home to Senior Jonathan Moran is ready to follow the same execute an arrest warrant and another day simply path to become a marshal. He, too, has worked in SU’s providing protection in a courtroom,” he says. His responsibilities cover a wide geographic swath—all of Western Washington from the Canadian to the Oregon border and from the Cascades west to the Pacific Ocean. Last year, he Kelley Goetz, ’09 trekked overseas to bring back U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert’s campaign finance director a fugitive who had been on the run for more than 15 years.

“It’s interesting how the values of SU ground you—learning to be flexible, quick on your feet and be your own person.”

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Samantha Stork, ’10, takes a moment with a friendly face at Seattle’s First Place, which serves families and young children.

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IMPROVING JOBS OUTLOOK The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) projects employers will hire 19 percent more new college graduates than last year. That’s the first double-digit increase in spring hiring projections since 2007, according to NACE, a nonprofit with membership of more than 3,100 colleges, universities and employer organizations. What do employers and college graduates want from each other? Here’s what the NACE discovered in 2010: The top five qualities and skills employers seek: 1. Verbal communication skills 2. Strong work ethic 3. Teamwork skills 4. Analytical skills 5. Initiative The top five criteria college graduates look for in employers: 1. Opportunity for advancement 2. Location of the job 3. Job security 4. High starting salary 5. Opportunity for personal development If you are an alum or a business looking to reach out to SU students as mentors or for internships, contact Career Services at (206) 296-6080.

Public Safety office. Moran says his application for the internship has been a yearlong process that includes an extensive background investigation, a medical exam, fitness test, three-hour interview and more. If he qualifies, the reward is a 16-week paid internship with full benefits, after which he would graduate from SU. Then, subject to a short probationary period, he would be able to become a marshal. “It gives you an opportunity to see firsthand if this is what you really want to do,” says Moran. “I was looking for something challenging and specialized. I want to make a difference and be someone who people can go to for help.” At SU, 52 percent of students in the Class of 2010 said they had done an internship of some kind, according to Eassey, and 39 percent of them said their internships lead to full-time jobs after graduation.

In 2011, the Albers School of Business and Economics Placement Center had more than 125 internship placements. “That’s way up from last year,” says Mary Lou Moffat, director of the Albers Placement Center, “and a real indicator of the economy.” Northwestern Mutual topped the list of companies with the most Albers interns this year, according to Moffat, followed by Amazon, Deloitte, Ernst & Young and UBS Financial. “The overall feeling from companies is hopeful,” she says. “Internships can be a great pipeline for strong full-time hires.” Take Kelley Goetz, ’09, who had an unpaid internship in U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert’s Washington, D.C., office and is now finance director in the Bellevue office for his reelection campaign. “It’s interesting how the values of SU ground you— learning to be flexible, quick on your feet and be your own person,” she says. “The importance of community engagement was an integral part of my education at SU and the desire to make a change in the world led me toward politics.” When Miriam Mina, ’00, ’09 MPA, completed her SU nursing degree in 2000, she became an unpaid intern in U.S. Sen. Patty Murray’s office, where she did considerable research on nursing shortages. In 2008, when she was wrapping up her Master of Public Administration at SU, she interned another five months for the senator. “I didn’t know much about politics because my background dealt mostly with the nursing field. I wanted to find out how policy was formed surrounding healthcare and what dictated the rules for the practice,” says Mina, who joined Sen. Murray’s office as a full-time staffer after she completed her MPA in 2009. She figured working for Sen. Murray would be a terrific way to apply her education and work experience. Social Security, Medicare and healthcare issues are now Mina’s specialties as a constituent services representative for the senator. She says the work is fast-paced and can change hour-to-hour, day-to-day. This past spring, Mina was back on the SU campus representing Sen. Murray’s office at the university’s Career Expo at Campion Ballroom. “I think it’s important for students to link into internship opportunities. It helps to bridge what you’ve learned in school and how it applies to the real-world setting,” she says.

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PHOTO BY DEPUTY MARSHAL CORY CUNNINGHAM

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As a deputy U.S. Marshal, Michael Leigh, ’07, also serves as a recruiter for the Marshals’ Centralized Student Career Experience program.

Many students—particularly those in fields such as nursing, social work and psychology—complete structured and supervised practicum coursework at social-services agencies and health care facilities in the Seattle area. In social work, as in nursing and psychology, the practicum is part of their required curriculum and can involve 450 or more hours over several quarters. By the time Samantha Stork, ’10, signed on to complete her required social work practicum at First Place, she already had a taste of her future. She had been a volunteer there as part of her service learning at SU. First Place serves Seattle-area families in crisis with young children. Today, Stork is a First Place case manager. “I enjoy working with parents and seeing progress as it happens because the children can feel it, too.” Stork credits her internship there for her eventual hiring. “I treated my internship like a nine-month long job interview. …By being an intern, the staff and directors had already worked with me, saw how I worked with others and saw what I was capable of,” she says. Few internships are open to graduates, although Career Services assists not only current students but also alumni with job searches, one-on-one job

“Whatever you do… do it with passion and enthusiasm.” Beth Oretsky, ’03 OSR student Wells Fargo Bank recruiter

advising, career changes, workshops and networking. SU’s free, web-based Redhawk Network [www.seattleu.edu/ redhawknetwork/] is the primary tool to offer employment opportunities for students and alumni. This past spring, Career Services launched a four-part job seeker career transitions series aimed at alumni, with a webinar version in the offing. At the spring Career Expo, Beth Oretsky, ’03, currently a student in SU’s Organization Systems Renewal master’s program, had some advice for the Career Expo crowd at Campion Ballroom. “Whatever you do…do it with passion and enthusiasm,” says Oretsky, a recruiter for Wells Fargo Bank. “I didn’t have an internship and I really wish I did.” Laura Paskin, director of communications and marketing in the College of Arts and Sciences, contributed to this story.

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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ALUMNI VOICE

Building a World-Class Alumni Relations PHOTO PHOT HOT TO BY CHR CHRIS IS S JJOSEPH OSEP PH T TA TAYLOR YLOR

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New AVP of Alumni Relations outlines priorities and plans for engaging alumni By Tina Potterf

As the new Assistant Vice President for Alumni Relations, Susan Woerdehoff has big plans. Top of mind—make Alumni Relations a world-class office with a world-class plan. Woerdehoff knows something about success in organizations after 20 years at Microsoft. And she knows something about Seattle University as a double alumna, earning a bachelor’s degree in psychology and communications in 1990 and a Leadership Executive MBA in 2010. Woerdehoff is tasked with leading the university’s efforts to enhance alumni engagement and connections with the university. “What I want to ensure we make a reality for all students and alumni is that you are a Redhawk and part of a family when you get here,” she says, “and you are a Redhawk and have that family with you when you leave.” Here’s more of what Woerdehoff is looking to do as she aims to take Alumni Relations to the next level.

Q. Describe your SU experience as a student and as an alumna? Susan: There is a level of care and commitment here that you can’t find anywhere else. I was connected to my classmates, dorm mates and professors who provided a level of education— both in and out of the classroom—that was stellar. All of this helped me as I got my education but also informed who I wanted to be as an alumna.

Q. What attracted you to this position as AVP of Alumni Relations?

Susan: I knew I wanted to come

back to SU in some capacity to help develop the vision and success for the university’s next decade or, as I

like to say, next century of distinction. I had this feeling that something very special is still happening here, that the university is on the precipice of something great and that alumni are an important part of making the continued success of the university a reality.

to date there are three key things that will be important to focus on. One is refreshing our web presence. The second is a greater focus online and with social media efforts. And the third is defining and developing our career resources and networking capabilities.

Q. What are your immediate

Q. What are you most looking forward

priorities in your first six months? Susan: The first thing I want to do is listen, learn, assess and be a keen observer to understand the assets and traditions SU already has. The overarching goal is to develop a strategic plan and goals that have been well informed by the recent alumni survey. In all of my conversations

to in this new role?

Susan: A year from now, success would

be a strategic plan in place that people are passionate about and can get behind. With the data from the recent alumni survey, we are listening and paying attention to what alumni told us and plan to use that to inform how we move forward. I am really looking forward to putting it all together. Read more with the AVP online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Guest column by Karen Lynn Maher, ’00

Link Up with SU’s Career Resources PHOTO BY HEATH BRAUN

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“We recognize that this challenging economic time requires each of us to take charge of our career path. SU is seeking creative and new strategies to support the Redhawk family in this arena.” KAREN LYNN MAHER, ’00

Karen Lynn Maher is a member of the Alumni Board of Governors.

One of the priorities of your Alumni Board of Governors this year has been to offer ideas and provide encouragement on how the university can help alumni of all ages get jobs and develop their careers. We recognize that this challenging economic time requires each of us to take charge of our career path. SU is seeking creative and new strategies to support the Redhawk family in this arena. Some ideas we’ve explored are improving the alumni website, offering trainings on how to effectively use social media, connecting alumni to career coaches and job-seeking resources and sponsoring career-focused networking events. One example of a successful strategy was the “Recruit a Redhawk” Career Expo in the spring. The event was an opportunity for employers to connect directly with alumni, recruiting for the full spectrum of their companies’ needs, including part-time jobs and higherlevel positions. It was a highly successful event that brought out representatives from dozens of employers, including Boeing, PACCAR, Kraft Foods, Puget Sound Energy and Starbucks, and many students and alumni. Also this past spring, the university sponsored a fourweek seminar on job searching/career transitions. Of the 18 participants, 80 percent said the workshop made them

feel even more connected to Seattle University. Here’s what a few of them shared about their experience: “I am blown away and so completely grateful for the opportunity to participate. What a gift! I know that my job search will be successful because of it. Thank you so much.” “I am really excited to continue reconnecting with Seattle U.” Seattle University is available for you at any stage of your career journey. We want a lifetime relationship in which we give back to each other, with the university supporting you in times of need. You can give back by returning to campus to mentor students or by opening doors for students and alumni that enable them to find jobs and advance their careers. For more information on how you can get involved or for career services, contact the Alumni Relations office or Career Services at (206) 296-6080 or e-mail careerservices@seattleu.edu. Karen Lynn Maher, ’00, is a book-writing strategist and is on the Alumni Board of Governors Executive Committee.

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IN MEMORIAM

Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community whom we’ve lost. Share your memories of those we honor by visiting In Memoriam at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/. 1945

Huber Grimm (Feb. 18, 2011)

For 30 years Grimm was a physician for the Seattle University Athletic Department and inducted into SU’s Athletic Hall of Fame three times. He was an original member of the Seafair Clowns. Dr. Huber is the father of former provincial Robert Grimm, S.J.

1947

Frank McKenna Donaghy (March, 14, 2011) Mary Marshall (Feb. 22, 2011)

1955

Pat Arbow (Nov. 18, 2010)

1956

Mary Jo Kilian (Jan. 1, 2011)

1957

Mary Agnes Merm McKillop, RN (Sept. 11, 2010)

1960

William Mar (Dec. 16, 2010)

1966

Brian Templeton (Dec. 3, 2010)

1948

Jack Gordon (Nov. 30, 2010) Florence Marie Gilbert Pressentin (Jan. 22, 2011)

1949

Guy Emmett Trotter (Feb. 24, 2011)

1951

Paul Wein (Oct. 28, 2010)

1952

Roland Blanchette (June 12, 2010)

MAIL OBITS TO

Seattle University Magazine Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Seattle University Magazine now publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

1980

Sister Mary Ursula Lowe (Jan. 22, 2011)

1985

Ralph Bilbao, EdD (Jan. 2, 2011)

1989

Paul Lawrence, Jr. (Feb. 16, 2011)

1991

Marcia Greenwell (Jan. 1, 2011)

1994

John Christopherson, JD (Jan. 5, 2011)

2001

Rev. Kathleen A. Youde, MDiv (Nov. 21, 2010)

2004

Betsy (Elizabeth) Marie Arntz (Sept. 20, 2010)

2005

Marilyn Fullen, MDiv (Nov. 21, 2010) CORRECTION Under the faculty listings in obituaries in the spring 2011 issue, the last name of Dr. Joseph Gallucci was misspelled. Seattle University Magazine regrets the error.

2007

Andrea Janel Larsen (Nov. 14, 2010)

SU FACULTY Paul Luger (Jan. 19, 2011)

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BOOKMARKS

Off Locusts and Wild Honey by Brian Beattie, ’04 JD Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano, ’12 Brian Beattie’s Off Locusts and Wild Honey digs deep into the culture of the American South. More than just another murder mystery, Beattie’s debut novel takes a complex look at a small Alabama community and its residents. The action begins in Maiden County, Ala., when Eric Brandy, a local firefighter, responds to a two-alarm house fire. The blaze is thought to have been sparked by a methamphetamine operation inside the home, but the more Brandy examines the incident, the less the facts seem to add up. As he kicks in the front door and makes his way into the inferno, Beattie’s brilliant descriptions conjure the thick smoke and intense heat. Readers get their first taste of the author’s natural ability to craft rich, vivid prose.

Searching through the flames for any sign of life, Brandy finally emerges from the home, having saved a young girl. Although she is initially presumed to be the daughter of the homeowner, no one seems to know for sure who she is or what she was doing inside the house. She’s taken to an orphanage to recover, and just when it seems she’s safe, things start to get even more complicated. She refuses to talk, eat or interact with the other children. The mystery Beattie has woven in this novel is multilayered; the fire and its perplexing survivor are just the beginning. In the aftermath of the fire, the small-town drama begins to unravel. Problems of the past, such as the murder of a city councilman more than a decade ago, come to the forefront. Dirty laundry is aired, and

the lives of the many characters of Maiden County begin to intersect. In thrilling courtroom scenes, Beattie examines the themes of prejudice, class and family within Southern culture. The intricate relationships between the characters demonstrate just how deeply embedded these themes are. When the pieces of the mystery begin to fall together, when alliances form and fall, we see just how powerful these attitudes can be in shaping the values of the characters. Beattie, a native of the South and now a public defender in Seattle, has clearly referenced his own experience to create an impressive narrative and a story of courage— always intriguing, at times uplifting and, occasionally, profoundly heartbreaking.

The mystery Beattie has woven in this novel is multilayered...

EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.

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ALUMNI VOICE

class notes

Tsz Chun Lo, ’08 (electrical engineering) and Moonok Kim, ’08 (computer science), were married on July 3, 2010, at the Golf Club at New Castle. The couple met at SU and dated for five years. Kim is working on a master’s degree in computer science at Seattle University.

Ivy Y. Chiang, ’97, ’02, welcomed the birth of her second daughter, Lilienne Sam, on Nov. 18, 2010.

Kymberly Evanson (Evans) ’99, and Aaron Evanson, ’04, welcomed their second son, Jack Loren, on Sept. 8, 2010. Big brother Lucas was born in 2006 in Washington, D.C. Recently, Aaron became senior project manager for Method Homes, a modern prefab home building company in Seattle. Kymberly is an associate at the newly formed Pacifica Law Group, where she practices appellate, constitutional and governmental law.

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Richard “Dick” Manning, ’54, received the 2011 Helen Geisness Distinguished Service award from the King County Bar Association. The Seattle attorney and past president of the King County Bar Association (1995–96) also received the Gonzaga Law Medal at Gonzaga University’s commencement in May. Manning is a 1960 law grad of Gonzaga.

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Mary Joan Hoene has rejoined the New York City law firm Carter Ledyard & Milburn LLP as counsel in the corporate department. Hoene is former deputy director of the division of investment management at the Securities and Exchange Commission and has served in senior-level roles at several financial service firms. Hoene serves on the American Bar Association and is a member of the New York City Bar Association and the Compliance and Legal Society of the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. Additionally, she is an adjunct professor at Roger Williams University Law School and a frequent panelist and speaker at financial and legal industry conferences.

1971

Peter Bacho authored a screenplay that was selected as a finalist at the 2011 Beverly Hills Film Festival. The Seattle Public Library recently placed Bacho’s young adult novel, Leaving Yesler, on its Seattle Picks list.

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1979

Anne C. Christensen has e-published two books, Motorbikes and Murder: A Mystery and Patrick the Naughty Pony. She recently spoke at the Northwest Women’s Show on the topics of mysteries, adventure stories and e-publishing.

1983

Bridgett Chandler joined Camp Fire USA as CEO of the Puget Sound Council in January. Previously, she served for four years as the executive director of communications for Seattle Public Schools. In 2010, Chandler lost Bear Silverstein, her husband of 17 years. She and her daughter, Anna, live in West Seattle.

1986

Vicki Churchill, JD, was a recipient of the 2010 Outstanding Judge award from the Washington State Bar Association. The award recognizes outstanding service to the bench and contributions to the legal profession.

Angela Balinbin Navarro, ’04, and Garnet Navarro, ’03, welcomed their first child, Maya Clare Balinbin Navarro, on April 6, 2010. The family lives in Renton, Wash.

1989

James McConkey was named a principal of the law firm Miller Canfield in January. McConkey’s practice focuses on complex commercial litigation disputes with an emphasis on business, class action, consumer financial services, construction, insurance and environmental litigation matters. He resides in Des Plaines, Ill.

outstanding nurses and nursing leaders in the community. Butler, who is also a graduate of the UW, has been practicing in health care for 12 years and is board-certified in family practice. When not working, Butler enjoys spending time with her family, mountain climbing, snowboarding, sea kayaking and reading.

1992

Ross Farr, JD, joined the Seattle law firm Ogden Murphy in January. Farr’s practice focuses on employment law, complex administrative litigation and appeals. Previously, he served as a judicial clerk for the Washington State Court of Appeals and the Washington State Supreme Court.

Maura Whalen was honored at the 2010 Denny Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Stewardship. Whalen, co-founder of the Seward Park Playground Improvement Foundation, was recognized for helping raise more than $300,000 to augment a levy-funded playground improvement project at the Seattle park.

1996

Emily Butler, a graduate of the nursing program and a nurse practitioner, is a recipient of the University of Washington Nurses Recognition award, honoring

Jennifer Downs, ’09, and Spenser Harding, ’09, were married on July 11, 2009, at the Browns Point Lighthouse Park overlooking Puget Sound. The couple met in the third grade, dated since high school and during their undergraduate years at Seattle U. They reside in Southern California.

2001

2006

Rob Nielsen was elected to a twoyear term as president of the Crisis Clinic’s board of trustees. A nonprofit organization in King County, Wash., the Crisis Clinic offers a variety of services to those coping with emotional stress.

Mikayla Patella-Buckley, ’05 MIT, and her husband, Sean Patella-Buckley, welcomed their son, Atticus, on March 27, 2011. Mikayla teaches chemistry at University Prep in Seattle. The family lives in Mountlake Terrace, Wash.

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ALUMNI VOICE

LEGAL HONORS The Black Law Student Association at the School of Law recently honored two outstanding alumni and a committed friend of the law school. Awards were presented to (from left) the Honorable Frank Cuthbertson, ’93, of Pierce County Superior Court, Angela Rye, ’05, executive director and general counsel to the Congressional Black Caucus, and James Andrus, past president of the King County Bar Association and the Loren Miller Bar Association and a partner at K&L Gates.

A PILGRIMAGE TO SPAIN Alumni are invited to take “A Pilgrimage to Spain: In the Footsteps of Ignatius of Loyola,” March 14–25, 2012. The trip is sponsored by Seattle University and Spiritual Exercises in Everyday Life (SEEL), under the spiritual direction of Patrick O’Leary, S.J., Natch Ohno, S.J., and Gennyn Dennison. For more information contact Father O’Leary at oleary@seattleu.edu or Gennyn at garnetcross@msn.com.

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

Clementine (Lord) Lindley, ’02, and Andrew Lindley welcomed son Aidrian Joseph on April 12, 2010. The family resides in Billings, Mont.

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ALL PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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BEING SCENE 26TH ANNUAL ALUMNI AWARDS

A Night for Alumni Campion Ballroom was the place to be for the 26th Annual Alumni Awards celebration. The party got started predinner, with mingling and catching up for alumni and their families and friends, faculty and staff. The night was in honor of this year’s award recipients, which included Betty Petri Hedreen, ’57, named Alumna of the Year; Ezra Teshome, ’76 (community service); William Marler, ’87 (professional achievement); Anita Crawford-Willis, ’82, ’86 (university service); Toni Vezeau (distinguished teaching); and Ryan Schmid, ’07 (outstanding recent alumnus).

(Clockwise from top left): Alumna of the Year Betty Petri Hedreen stands with President Sundborg and Alumni Board of Governors President Sean Henderson; Anita Crawford-Willis shares stories of her time at SU; award recipient Ezra Teshome is congratulated by Arts & Sciences Dean David Powers; Toni Vezeau of the College of Nursing accepts her award; William Marler speaks to the crowd at Campion Ballroom; revelers celebrate the winners, including Recent Alumnus recipient Ryan Schmid.

Read about this year’s winners at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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THE LAST WORD

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The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more.

Vida lured Hogan to learn more about what he describes as the often confusing and contradictory ideas about dogs and their behavior.

38 / The Last Word

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Dog Training No Act for Thespian | By Annie Beckmann Over breakfast at a popular West Seattle haunt, David “The Dog Trainer” Hogan, ’00, becomes animated when talk turns to the reinforcement necessary to motivate dogs to behave on command.

behaviorist Jean Donaldson. But there’s another, dramatic flip side to “David the Dog Trainer”—David the Actor. Hogan first realized he was hooked on acting when he had the opportunity to sing “Mack the Knife” in The Threepenny Enter, stage left, Terence and Sarah Opera at SU. Until that first audition, DiMarco moved to Los Angeles for a Cardinal, who approach the trainer with short time in 2003 to see if Hollywood though, he figured he’d become a cop and noticeable enthusiasm. The Cardinals had chosen criminal justice as his major was in their future. While there, the are more than a little appreciative that at SU. couple adopted a boxer mix, Vida. Hogan’s visit to their West Seattle home Hogan started out as a dog groomer That changed after taking a few acting resulted in big changes in the soiling classes. Soon Hogan was cast in more proand then a dog walker before picking habit of their boxer, Cable. ductions. A class taught by SU Fine Arts up the scent for training. “David just came to the house Professor Ki Gottberg helped him develop “Vida inspired me to want to learn once,” says Terence, “and it gave us a a passion for Shakespearean drama. more,” he says. foundation that really helped.” The summer after graduation, he Soon Lily, a Lhasa apso, had been It’s a dream testimonial for a dog worked for Seattle’s Empty Space Theatre added to their family. Back in the trainer, yet not unusual for Hogan. as a stagehand. He began to build a Seattle area, Hogan trekked to Legacy What started as a way to support his substantial résumé in theater productions Canine Behavior and Training in acting career—Hogan is well known to Sequim, Wash., where he began his around Puget Sound, including roles with Seattle theatergoers for his many starring groundwork not with canines but Book-It Repertory Theatre, Washington roles on stage—is today a successful Ensemble Theatre, Village Theatre, with … chickens. “If you can clickerbusiness, “David the Dog Trainer,” Theater Schmeater, Repertory Actors train a chicken, you can clicker-train that employs his wife, actress Angela Theatre, Seattle Opera and Arts West. a dog,” he says. The clicker’s sound DiMarco, as operations manager, and Shakespeare continues to inspire becomes behavior reinforcement to a four others part time. Hogan routinely dog—essentially, a stimulus that leads Hogan, who appears frequently in Seattle meets one-on-one with his 30 dog Shakespeare Company’s Wooden O to food. clients, a little clicker in hand and freezeHogan’s hunger to understand more Theatre productions. This summer he’ll dried liver or jerky treats in his pocket. play Dromio of Ephesus in The Comedy about dogs took him to a six-week The dog act began when Hogan and training school with author and dog of Errors.

SEE FOR YOURSELF

PHOTO BY ROZARII LYNCH

PHOTO BY LINDSEY WASSON

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David Hogan appears as Dromio of Ephesus in Seattle Shakespeare Company’s The Comedy of Errors, with free performances this summer. Here are a few: July 10 @ Volunteer Park (Capitol Hill) July 20 @ Lynndale Park in Lynnwood, Wash. July 31 @ Seattle Center Aug. 6 @ Luther Burbank Park Amphitheater in Mercer Island

More Info: www.seattleshakespeare.org/ Hogan as Ambrogio in Seattle Opera’s production of The Barber of Seville.

Hogan with his boxer mix, Vida, at Alki Beach.

See a video of Hogan training at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

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2011 St. Ignatius Medal presentation to Jim and Janet Sinegal 28th Annual Seattle University Gala Saturday, October 29, 2011 The Westin Seattle Featuring a night of swing music by Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Gala chairs: Maureen and Joel Benoliel

Individual tickets are $500. All proceeds benefit student scholarships. For more information, call (206) 296-6301. www.seattleu.edu/gala

ICS# 110290 • Seattle University 2011 Summer Seattle U Magazine - 44pg PAGE OBC 8.5” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • NEW-SWOP • 80# Nature Web Matte

VARNISH

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Seattle University Magazine Summer 2011