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L/C

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2

Round 3

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6

B

A

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Star is Born

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A [Reality TV]

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M A G A Z I N E

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Seattle University

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SPRING/SUMMER 2013

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Illustrator Sarah Hiraki, ’12, lands starring role at Seattle dot-com empire

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

Page OFC

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6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C

B

A

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Page IFC

ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

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The Bollywood Project dancers enchanted the crowd at this year's International Dinner, a celebration of cultures and a feast for the senses. The annual dinner is a culmination of International Week at SU.

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DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

Page Intro A

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L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

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Seattle University Volume 37 • Issue Number 1 Spring/Summer 2013 STA F F

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Editorial Assistant Emily Downing

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Contributing Writers Annie Beckmann, Jason Behenna, Emily Downing, Caitlin King, Mike Thee

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Brand Director Mary Olson Vice President/University Advancement Mary Kay McFadden

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Assistant Vice President/Alumni Relations Susan Vosper

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Seattle University Magazine (ISSN: 15501523) is published in fall, winter and spring by Marketing Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Periodical postage paid at Seattle, Wash. Distributed without charge to alumni and friends of Seattle University. USPS 487-780. Comments and questions about Seattle University Magazine may be addressed to the editor at (206) 296-6111; the address below; fax: (206) 296-6137; or e-mail: tinap@seattleu.edu. Postmaster: Send address changes to Seattle University Magazine, Print Communications, Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090. Check out the magazine online at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Page Intro B

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College of Education Adjunct Professor Stephanie Guerra helps young women express themselves through the literacy and writing program she leads at the juvenile detention center.

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Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment-related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services and Equal Opportunity Officer, Gerald V. Huffman, RINA 214, (206) 296-5869 or e-mail huffmaje@seattleu.edu.

ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7 GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Photographer Chris Joseph Taylor

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Art Director Terry Lundmark, ’82

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Editor Tina Potterf


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

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MAGAZINE

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Seattle University

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11

Athletics

28

Alumni Voice

34

Bookmarks

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Class Notes

40

In Memoriam

42

The Last Word

The cooks at the Arrupe Jesuit Residence are whipping up more than just good eats for SU’s Jesuits.

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20 The Power of Words College of Educaton Adjunct Professor Stephanie Guerra helps incarcerated young women find their voices through creative writing.

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24 Bridging the Gap

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Seattle University is now home to the newest Middle College, an alternative to a traditional high school.

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Faculty Focus

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8

16 Cooking Up Something Special

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On Campus

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5

Sarah Hiraki lands a coveted job at Seattle-based Cheezburger and a starring role in reality TV.

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Come Join Us

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4

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12 A (Reality TV) Star is Born

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Did You Know?

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2

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features

DEPARTMENTS

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Web extras and special features at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 1

ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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ON THE COVER Sarah Hiraki, a 2012 graduate in the College of Arts and Sciences, has parlayed her experience as an illustrator into a job that combines her artistic side with her love of all things reality TV.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

DID YOU KNOW?

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A compilation of fun facts, news bites, events and more connecting you to SU. B

A

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PHOTO BY ERIC BADEAU

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LEADERS OF THE WAC

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Seattle University’s women's basketball capped a stellar season with the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) regular season title. The women finished the season 18-9 (15-3 in the WAC) and secured their second consecutive NCAA post-season berth. The team lost to Idaho in the WAC championship game in Las Vegas but was selected to play in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament on their home court at the Connolly Center. Led by Coach Joan Bonvicini, the team finished the season undefeated. "To be able to win the regular season title outright is not only great for the program but also great for the university," says Bonvicini. Way to go, team!

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Page 2

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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2 / Did You Know?

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A Matteo Ricci College student peruses the interactive exhibits at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Visitor Center.

When a Matteo Ricci College class called “Global Poverty: Causes and Solutions” visited the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Visitor Center earlier this year, students were surprised to discover it wasn’t a museum. Instead, they found a series of interactive exhibits that address with optimism many of the world’s biggest challenges such as poverty, health and education. Those unfamiliar with the Gates Foundation learned the globally expansive nonprofit—with satellite offices in China, India and Africa—has more than 900 employees at its Seattle headquarters and is a foundation rooted in the Northwest. Matteo Ricci alumna and Assistant Professor of Humanities Serena Cosgrove, who teaches the visiting class, pointed out a photo of SU President Emeritus William Sullivan, S.J., who officiated at the wedding of Melinda French and Bill Gates on the Hawaiian island of Lanai in 1994. “There was so much information to take in,” said sophomore Jennifer Liu, “but the main idea is clear: we can make a difference. The field trip helped me understand that all you need is an idea to start changing the world.”

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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MATTEO RICCI COLLEGE GOES GLOBAL


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

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Professor Jeanette Rodriguez, PhD, of Theology and Religious Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, is the 2013 recipient of the McGoldrick Fellowship. Named for Father James McGoldrick, a legendary Jesuit who was known for his genuine care for students, the fellowship is awarded to faculty members who exemplify the values of a Jesuit education and the spirit of Father McGoldrick. Founder of Seattle University’s Center for the Study of Justice in Society and an internationally recognized scholar on Latin American theology and religion, gender and cultural diversity, Rodriguez has held a number of key leadership positions. They include serving as president of the Academy of Hispanic Catholic Theologians, as a national council member for the Catholic peace movement Pax Christi and executive committee member of the European Network of Genocide Scholars. She is currently on the board of directors for the National Catholic Reporter. As the 2013 McGoldrick Fellow, Rodriguez will receive a one-quarter sabbatical.

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PHOTO COURTESY COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES PROFESSOR IS 2013 MCGOLDRICK SCHOLAR

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Professor Jeanette Rodriguez, PhD

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PHOTO BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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SHOWING REDHAWK PRIDE, THE JESUIT WAY

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You could say that school spirit met Ignatian spirituality when a group of SU Jesuits gamely showed off their new red threads. Faculty and staff are encouraged to cap off the work week by decking themselves out in SU colors for "Red Fridays” in support of SU Athletics and school pride as a whole. Father Matthew Pyrc got to thinking that there had to be a way for him and his Jesuit brothers to do their part, so he went online and found the red clerical shirts—turns out you can order clerical shirts in just about any color of the rainbow. Equally important, he found five other Jesuits willing to participate. And here is the result: Pictured (l-r) are Trung Pham (Fine Arts), Matthew Pyrc (Campus Ministry), Stephen Sundborg (President), Jason Welle (Education Abroad) and Mike Bayard (Campus Ministry).

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 3

ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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FUN FACT

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100,000

The (approximate) number of books sold annually at the SU Campus Store.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

COME JOIN US B

A

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FEFU AND HER FRIENDS

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Monday, August 5 Beginning at 12:30 p.m., Glenwood Golf Club, Bellevue Enjoy an afternoon of fun at the 11th Annual Albers Golf Tournament at Bellevue’s Glenwood Golf Club. The action begins at 12:30 p.m. and includes a silent auction, tournament prizes and steak dinner. Sponsorships and recognition opportunities available. Information: E-mail bourker@seattleu.edu.

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November 1–3 All day, in and around SU campus Time to celebrate our alumni and their families at this annual reunion as part of Family Weekend festivities.There will be special recognition of the Class of 1963.

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WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU Are you from an alumni class ending in 3 or 8? We are looking for alumni interested in helping to plan reunion activities for your class or SU affinity group. Contact Donna Whitford at donnaw@seattleu.edu with your e-mail address and phone number and tell us how you’d like to be involved.

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Friday–Sunday, May 17–19 7:30 p.m. (Friday) to 2 p.m. (Sunday), Camp Burton, Vashon Island The Magis Young Alumni Retreat is a three-day retreat for those in their 20s or 30s seeking a way to reflect on their current life circumstances while grounding them in a sense of faith. This Ignatian-style retreat includes facilitation by retreat directors, creative exercises, small-group sharing and plenty of free time. The retreat is open to persons of all faith backgrounds and will be led by Jack Bentz, S.J., Sister Cathy Beckley, SNJM, and Maria Ochoa of Magis. Register via e-mail at magis-rsvp@seattleu.edu or call (206) 296-2635.

SAVE THE DATE: REUNION WEEKEND

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MAGIS YOUNG ALUMNI RETREAT

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november

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Saturday, May 11 7:30 p.m., Pigott Auditorium Join the distinguished guest artists of the Miró String Quartet in their debut concert performance at Seattle University. Considered one of the world’s greatest string quartets, they have performed in some of the most prominent concert venues including Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. Tickets: $7 students, $10 faculty/staff and $25 general admission; info: (206) 296-5360.

ALBERS GOLF TOURNAMENT

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MIRÓ STRING QUARTET

august

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May 9-10, 12, 15-18 @ 7:30 p.m.; May 12, 19 @ 2 p.m. Lee Center for the Arts Award-winning Cuban American playwright Marie Irenes Fornes’ play, Fefu and her Friends, tells the story of a gathering of women at Fefu’s East Coast summer house, where they make plans to solve the social ills of the day. Fornes’ depiction of this playful and serious, sexy and crazy secret world of women calls into question how epistemologies are created and how they might be changed. Tickets: $6 students, $8 faculty/staff and $10 general admission; info: (206) 296-2244.

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may

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PHOTO COURTESY SU ATHLETICS

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Jim Whittaker, ’52, (right), with Athletics Director Bill Hogan, will be honored at the Red Tie Celebration for his accomplishments in sport and in life.

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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4 / Come Join Us

Seattle University Athletics Department presents a dinner and auction in celebration of notable athletic figures. Alumnus Jim Whittaker, ’52, will be honored at the event, which will also include highlights from SU’s athletic teams in the 2012–13 season. In 1963, Whittaker became the first American to summit Mt. Everest. Tickets and info: E-mail redtie@seattleu.edu or visit www.seattleu.edu/redtie.

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5 p.m., Grand Hyatt, Downtown Seattle

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Saturday, May 18

ON

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C E L E B R AT

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T h e S E AT T L E U


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ON CAMPUS B

A

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New bachelor’s degree amps up the technology element of design

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Digital Age of Design | By Annie Beckmann

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A concert poster for Quadstock designed by student Megan Newell, ’11.

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Page 5

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 5

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LAURA STALEY, ’13

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“I chose the digital design program at SU because I saw it as a unique way to study design through a social justice-based education.”

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“I challenge our students by asking what they can do as artists or designers to make a difference. I’m really a bridge to what service-oriented projects we can do as artists for a community,” she says. In addition to classes with a servicelearning component, students create an annual fundraising campaign for local nonprofits and design and sell sustainable items such as reusable shopping bags. Laura Staley, a senior who will be one of the first digital design graduates in 2013, speaks of how her digital design skills and knowledge make positive and constructive contributions. “I chose the digital design program at SU because I saw it as a unique way to study design through a social justicebased education. There are few digital design programs out there, let alone at Jesuit institutions, so I feel very lucky,” says Staley. Megan Newell, a 2011 Fine Arts grad with an emphasis in digital design, is now a graphic designer with Liberty Bottleworks, an eco-friendly manufacturer of recycled aluminum water bottles. She designs custom bottles for clients and says she’s proud to be working for such an environmentally friendly organization in her hometown of Yakima. “My experience with service learning in the digital design program helped me find a purpose to my work and I learned the value of using my skills to support others,” says Newell, who created publicity for Battle of the Bands and Quadstock as a graphic design intern with the Student Events and Activities Council.

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What’s more, these respected employers frequently hire those SU design interns once they graduate. That’s just one aspect that makes the new bachelor’s degree a big draw. It’s an intensive balance of design and artistic exploration combined with social responsibility in a rich, liberal arts environment. The way Fine Arts Associate Professor Naomi Kasumi sees it, visual language is universal. “Digital design is not about computers but a way of thinking,” says Kasumi, who teaches in the program. “We’re aided by technology, yet the computer is just a tool. You’re not a carpenter simply because you have a hammer in the same way that having a brush doesn’t make you an artist.” Digital design candidates participate in a two-year course with a portfolio review at the end of their sophomore year. Students who pass the review then go on to complete the digital design degree. For the major, students explore the history of design. Kasumi teaches classes in typography, design and color and graphic design. Over time, students tackle web design, video, interactive graphics and digital imaging taught by Fine Arts Assistant Professor Alexander Mouton, who joined the faculty in 2009 to bring digital media to the program. When she arrived at SU in 2003, Kasumi realized she had a blank canvas to develop the new program. That was one of its enticements for her. She quickly realized the need to understand what was distinctive about a Jesuit education and one at SU in particular.

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You realize there’s impressive learning going on in Seattle University’s Digital Design program when you consider that major Seattle-area companies such as Boeing, Costco, Microsoft and Starbucks and New York City’s Marvel Comics and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) have all had student interns from the program.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

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6

ON CAMPUS B

A

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The Value of a Liberal Arts Education | By David Powers

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ILLUSTRATION BY DANIEL BAXTER

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DAVID POWERS, DEAN, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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“It is clear that employers do value what we provide, very much, to the point of wanting more of it...”

6 / On Campus

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David Powers is dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

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beyond professional engagement. While we should mention employability advantages, I believe we also should maintain the high ground of the greater good of liberal arts education. Our message can be rightly positioned as "of course this will help you get a job and of course it will help you succeed in job transitions across your career and of course this will help you go farther professionally than you could otherwise,” but that's the beginning, a part of a richer experience, part of the broader picture of citizenship and service and wholeness and a full life in the 21st century. We educate within a set of higher order values toward a communal greater good. We train the mind to be critical, flexible and expansive beyond the constraints of the present. The liberal arts imbue depth and creativity into our inner and outer worlds. They allow those who are open to them to better see and understand the possibility of things both within and beyond ourselves, our community and our world. I think it is time to be more active in proclaiming the value of what we

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Things move and change more quickly in a world where it is often more difficult to avoid information and to avoid communication, than it is to access it. In that context, liberal arts education is more important and more valuable than ever. We have a responsibility of communicating that value, a value that clearly includes but goes well beyond employability. The American Association of Colleges and Universities conducted a nationwide survey of many different stakeholders in American education, including a subsample of employers. Part of that survey specifically gauged employer interest in liberal education learning outcomes. Sure enough, 70 percent of employers wanted colleges to place more emphasis on science and technology, but there was more. Seventy-five percent of employers wanted more emphasis on ethical decision-making, 81 percent of employers wanted more emphasis on critical thinking and analytic reasoning and 89 percent of employers wanted more emphasis on written and oral communication. It is clear that employers do value what we provide, very much, to the point of wanting more of it, so we need to make sure students, prospective students, parents and all the members of our communities and constituencies understand that. Now, these opinions of employers are good news—though news that shouldn't be surprising—and parents and students alike receive comfort from hearing about employability. But we know it does more than that, we know that a liberal arts education is a means to a richer, fuller life well

offer because it is of great value for self, others and the world and because conventional wisdom—perhaps better termed “conventional opinion”—seems to be turning away from or against the liberal arts, in the face of all evidence to the contrary, at the worst time for our future. With the persistence of economic troubles our value is being increasingly missed in an unreasoned contraction of fear. I believe that it falls to us as the keepers of this tradition to combat that. Our students are in an age when information of any quality is accessible anywhere at any time. Accessing information is incredibly easy. What is much harder is to understand information, to determine the quality of it, to learn things deeply and think about them critically and then to know how to move forward creatively, ethically, for a greater good. Solid communication skills and the ability to generate new knowledge are more important than ever. Today’s job market shifts dramatically every six or seven years. A liberal arts education provides transferable skills across a career, but it also creates a lasting thirst for knowledge and a breadth and depth of mind and spirit that serve our graduates well in every facet of their lives.

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The current generation of students, for as long as they can remember, have been able to access virtually any information that exists, of any quality, at any moment. This is the result of the increasing pace of technological change, particularly in communication.


6 5 4 Round 3 2 1 L/C

B

A

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 7


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

FA C U LT Y N E W S B

A

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PHOTO BY JORDAN STEAD

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Jacqueline Helfgott is a leading force in criminal justice education.

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ICS# 130130 • Seattle University 2013 Spring Seattle U Magazine - 48 pg. 9” x 11” • 175 lpi • PDFX1a • G7_GRACoL • 60# Orion Satin

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Charles Tung

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presented, “Modernist Heterochrony: Evolutionary Developmental Biology an Aesthetic Form” at Generation M: Resetting Modernist Time

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(Arts and Sciences)

in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The international conference brought together a select group of 24 scholars whose focus is early 20th century literary studies. Assistant Professor CYNTHIA MOELOBEDA (Arts and Sciences) gave keynote addresses at Gettysburg Lutheran Theological Seminary and the Krista Foundation annual meeting. She also was invited to Columbia University’s Earth Institute to present at its consultation on “An Ethic of Sustainable Development.” Moe-Lobeda is the Wismer Professor for Gender and Diversity in theology and religious studies. Associate professor BILL O’CONNELL (Education), in counseling and school psychology, co-authored the article, “The Hope

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Experiment Banning Affirmative Action” was cited by the American Educational Research Association in its amicus brief before the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. Associate Professor CHARLES TUNG

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Associate Professor JUNE JOHNSON BUBE (Arts and Sciences) published the third edition of her global studies argument reader, Global Issues, Local Arguments. The book explores contemporary controversies including the global response to pandemics. Assistant Professor FRANCISCO GUERRERO (Arts and Sciences) is featured in “Chamber Music” at Seattle’s Frye Art Museum. His is one of 36 commissioned pieces relating to a musical composition based on the poetry of James Joyce. Associate Professor of Lawyering Skills DEIRDRE BOWEN’S (Law) article, “Brilliant Disguise: An Empirical Analysis of a Social

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FACULTY / news and notes


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Matt Isaac

and Aaron Brough of Pepperdine has been published in the Graziadio Business Review. Assistant Professor ERIC WATSON, S.J., (Science and Engineering) was awarded a Cottrell College Science Award from Research Corporation that will fund his undergraduate research projects for the next two years. Associate Professor MARK TAYLOR (Theology and Ministry) and Master of Divinity student Alissabeth Newton will present a paper at the annual meeting of the Pacific Northwest American Academy of Religion/Society of Biblical Literature. Their paper is, “Playing with Pictures of Paradox: Children and Jesus Christ in

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partnered with alumna Hillary Lauren, ’09 (biology) to write an article on the impact of invasive slugs in the Pacific Northwest. The article, “Ecological Effects of Invasive Slugs, Arion rufus, on Native Cascade Oregon Grape, Mahonia nervosa,” was published in Northwest Science. The article, “For Sale by Owner for Less than its Worth,” co-authored by Assistant Professor MATT ISAAC (Albers)

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justice—she even toured Walla Walla Penitentiary—and decided to switch majors to psychology and society and justice. However in graduate school at Penn State, she was able to combine art with criminal justice when the criminal justice professor she worked for as a teaching and research assistant told her that his wife, an art professor at Penn, was looking for someone to teach art classes for the Pennsylvania Prison Society at the Bellefonte County Jail. Soon she volunteered and facilitated art

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Justice, Criminal Psychology, Volumes 1-4 and No Remorse: Psychopathy and Criminal Justice, out this fall. With this latest book, co-authored with Elaine Gunnison, associate professor and director of the graduate program in criminal justice, the authors provide a comprehensive exploration of the core issues around offender reentry highlighting the tension between reintegration, stigma of a criminal record and public safety. The book features success stories and views and perspectives

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and Healing Response Team Program Model: A Social Work Intervention for Clergy Abuse” that was published in the Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics. SEAN MCDOWELL (Arts and Sciences), director of the University Honors program, recently published articles on contemporary Irish poet Tony Curtis and 17th century Irish poet Andrew Marvell. Assistant Professor BRIDGET WALKER (Education) and her colleague Douglas Cheney from the University of Washington published a guidebook and assessment tool to help schools become more effective learning environments. Assistant Professor LINDSAY WHITLOW (Science and Engineering)

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She takes her sketchbook with her everywhere and draws whenever the inspiration strikes. Drawing helps Helfgott decompress and slow down.

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of community corrections officers and ex-offenders. While Helfgott has established herself as a force in the criminal justice world, what some may not know about her is that she started out in college as an art major. Her plan shifted when she began taking courses in psychology, criminology and criminal

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department involving policing practices including a study of police interactions with the mentally ill. A 1988 graduate of the University of Washington, Helfgott earned her master’s and PhD from Penn State University. She is the author of books including Criminal Behavior: Theories, Typologies and Criminal

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Jacqueline Helfgott, PhD, teaches classes with names such as “The Psychopath” and “Murder Movies and Copycat Crime.” In her spare time, which is at a premium, she sketches— people, places, things—as a member of Urban Sketchers Seattle and runs marathons. Even with all of this going on, her main focus is her scholarly work: she is a frequent guest to lecture at prestigious conferences throughout the United States and internationally and is a published author. As an expert witness Helfgott is called upon to speak about criminal behavior and the ability of criminal justice agencies to predict dangerousness and supervise and manage ex-offenders for court cases. As chair and professor of Seattle University’s criminal justice department, Helfgott has a longstanding connection to the Seattle Police Department and the local criminal justice community. A participant in the recent Seattle Police Consortium, Helfgott also has served on the Governor-elect’s Justice Advisory Board and has been involved in collaborative projects with faculty and students in the criminal justice

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Drawing on an Illustrious Criminal Justice Career | By Tina Potterf


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JACQUELINE HELFGOTT, CHAIR/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CRIMINAL JUSTICE [Above sketch by Helfgott of Monroe Prison]

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“Drawing makes you stop. It puts you in this state. You have to pay attention to the people and places around you.”

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York City Marathon later this year. She also indulges in her other passion: sketching. She takes her sketchbook with her everywhere and participates with the Urban Sketchers Seattle’s monthly sketch crawl outings. “Drawing makes you stop. It puts you in this state. You have to pay attention to the people and places around you.” Check out her some of her work at the Urban Sketchers Seattle blog at www.seattle. urbansketchers.org/.

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“This gets them thinking about ways to apply restorative justice to their work,” she says. This will be offered in the future as a new Core course that will be co-presented as a special topics elective for criminal justice undergrad and grad students. In her downtime Helfgott puts sneakers to pavement for long distance runs. In the past four years she’s participated in 10 full marathons—and many half-marathons, 10Ks and 5Ks—with plans to run in the Seattle Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon and New

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classes at the jail. The experience provided the spark that ignited her interest in bringing art into Washington prisons when she moved back to Seattle in the early 1990s through a program she developed and coordinated at the Washington State Reformatory (WSR) and Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) called the “Creative Expressions Project.” The program, which ran weekly at the women’s prison from 1993–97 and at WSR from 1993–2010, involved prisoners in creative projects including publication of seven volumes of a ‘zine, Sounds of a Grey Metal Day, creation of one of the Pike Place Market’s “Pigs on Parade,” several Metro bus stop murals, children’s murals for the YMCA and more. Last summer Helfgott designed the course, “Restorative Justice Behind Bars,” which she co-taught with Associate Professor of Sociology Madeline Lovell that involved Seattle University graduate students taking a class at the Monroe Correctional Complex in Snohomish County with University Beyond Bars prisoner-students. The students worked in groups to develop proposals for ways to implement restorative principles within the criminal justice system and prison subculture.

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Tina Zamora

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CORRECTION: In the Faculty & Staff News and Notes in the winter issue of the magazine, Katherine Schlick Noe was listed as a professor under the College of Arts and Sciences. She is a professor in the College of Education. We regret the error.

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Accounting Association. The mission of the journal is to publish research, commentaries, instructional resources and book reviews that assist accounting faculty in teaching and that address important issues in accounting education. Professor LILY KAHNG (Law) presented her paper, “Race and Gender Inequality in Tax Subsidies for Owner Occupied Housing” at the 2012 Annual Law & Society Meeting and the International Socio-Legal Feminisms FemTax Workshop.

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positions with WaMu, Mellon Analytical Services and Russell Investments. Additionally, she is the founder of Make Passion Possible, a nonprofit incubator that supports young adults in launching new entrepreneurial ventures. Faculty member TINA ZAMORA (Albers) has been named associate editor for issues in Accounting Education, one of three primary publications of the American

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Søren Kierkegaard and Godly Play [a Montessori based program of children's faith formation].” The chapter “Citizens, Kant and Corporate Responsibility for the Environment,” by Assistant Professor MARC COHEN and Professor JOHN DIENHART (Albers) and edited by Denis Arnold and Jared Harris, will be published in Kantian Business Ethics: Critical Perspectives. SUE OLIVER (Albers) is the new executive director of the Entrepreneurship Center. Oliver brings to the position more than 25 years of management and marketing experience, including management

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FACULTY / news and notes, continued


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Former Seattle Mariners John Olerud (left) and Dan Wilson trade stories with the crowd at the annual Meet the Redhawks fundraising dinner to benefit Seattle University's baseball program.

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For more on the team and ticket information, visit www.GoSeattleU.com.

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have been added to the facility in the past three years. Plans are in the works for a new scoreboard and an improved sound system. This season, the baseball team is shooting for one of the eight spots in the Western Athletic Conference Tournament in Grand Prairie, Texas, where the winner receives an automatic berth into the NCAA tournament.

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JOHN OLERUD, FORMER SEATTLE MARINERS FIRST BASEMAN

Dan Wilson and John Olerud. “I like to support baseball whenever I can and the Seattle University baseball team is supporting great causes and doing amazing things in the community,” Olerud says. The group of supporters known as the Diamond Club has also played a major role in assisting the city of Bellevue with improvements to Bannerwood Stadium to be NCAAcompliant (Bannerwood is where the team plays its home games). New dugouts and bullpens, a fresh paint job and new windows for the press box

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“I like to support baseball whenever I can and the Seattle University baseball team is supporting great causes and doing amazing things in the community.”

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Five sports were added: men’s and women’s tennis, men’s and women’s golf and baseball. The tennis and golf programs were slated to begin competition in the fall of 2008. As for baseball, more time was needed to reestablish a program that had been a significant part of the Seattle University Athletics Department before being dropped as a varsity sport in 1986. The baseball program needed to start from scratch, as there was nothing left over from the earlier days, not even a baseball. Equipment had to be purchased, a coaching staff hired, a roster assembled and a field to play on. With all that needed to be done to build the program, it was decided that the baseball program would return to competition in the 2009–10 academic year. Donny Harrel was hired as head coach in the summer of 2008 and he immediately got to work on establishing a new baseball program. The alumni who had played baseball in the past, along with the parents of SU players, had a significant role in helping the program grow. For example, alumni such as Ed and John O’Brien, Pat Gillis, Bill Tsoukalas and Mike Gibson helped secure well-known guest speakers at the season-opening Meet the Redhawks fundraising dinner, starting with Tommy Lasorda in 2011, continuing with Cal Ripken, Jr. in 2012, and this year featuring former Seattle Mariners

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In the fall of 2007, Seattle University decided to increase the amount of sports offered by the school as a way to improve the athletic program’s profile when it completed the NCAA Division I reclassification process.

PHOTO BY ERIC BADEAU

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A Home Run | By Jason Behenna


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[Reality TV] Star is Born

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Illustrator Sarah Hiraki, ’12, lands starring role at Seattle dot-com empire

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12 / A [Reality TV] Star is Born

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tray chronicled by the caption “copy cat” is just one of the site’s many gems—it also boasts a number of notable Internet sites including FAIL blog, a comedic recount of numerous mishaps made by mankind, And Know Your Meme, a website committed to identifying cultural memes, among others. The company behind these touchstones of popular culture garnered enough attention to warrant a Bravo reality TV series, appropriately titled LOLwork, which gave Hiraki her 15 minutes of reality TV fame. Likened to shows such as The Office or Workaholics, LOLwork—which ended its run late last year—offers a close-up look at the desk job drama at Cheezburger’s Queen Anne offices, where a film crew shadowed the Cheezburger staff as they took on day-to-day workplace tasks and encountered awkward office scenarios created by the cast’s distinctive personalities. Toss in team dynamics and those aforementioned personalities that can generate moments of high drama and you’ve got reality TV gold. For Hiraki, the youngest member of the staff, a normal day at the office ranges from illustrating web pages to finding the funniest cat video to feature on the site’s homepage. These days Cheezburger contracts her for the

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It’s hard to imagine a camera crew filming your first “real world” job, post-graduation. Even harder yet is to find yourself as a main player in a reality TV show cast. But Sarah Hiraki, a 2012 Fine Arts graduate with an emphasis in digital design at the College of Arts and Sciences, can add both unique experiences to her growing résume. Following graduation Hiraki was hired as an art director and Photoshop“nerd”-in-residence for the wildly popular Seattle-based dot-com company Cheezburger, home of I Can Has Cheezburger?, the humor-driven startup centered on the cultural phenomenon LOLcats. While at its core Cheezburger caters to everyday cat comedy for pet lovers—a cat lying in a copying machine


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Sarah Hiraki, ’12

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As a teenager, Hiraki spent hundreds of hours illustrating online. At that time it was just a hobby. “I didn’t have a lot of friends, so I’d get on LiveJournal, a website for angst-y teenage girls and publish avatars,” says Hiraki, a West Seattle native. Using screenshots from different TV shows and movies, she’d design 100x100 pixel LiveJournal icons. She began to compete in online contests with her designs. She later enrolled at Seattle University—her older sister Emily, who also attended SU, inspired her to do so—as an English major. But her dislike for reading or writing anything longer than 140 characters led her to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary Arts with an emphasis in digital design.

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Know Your Meme site and she freelances full time. When Hiraki’s developing a new design project, she’s likely listening to her favorite music. Her eclectic playlist— she’s into Chillwave, Toro y Moi and anything that Kanye West touches—plays in the background while she works. And because 90 percent of her time is spent designing and cartooning, she also devotes a lot of time to TV watching. Participating on LOLWork gave Hiraki the chance to marry her love of reality TV with her chosen career as an illustrator. When asked about appearing on a TV show for the first time, Hiraki says the experience was overall enjoyable. The filming took place over eight weeks and it was up to the “cast” to do their own hair and makeup to be camera ready. While being a reality TV star was by accident, the 22-year-old Hiraki’s main focus is on her day job as an illustrator.

“I’m already a professional artist, I’ve already been on television. At this point, I’ve got nothing to lose.”


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Sarah Hiraki hard at work at the Cheezburger headquarters in Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood.

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 15

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about [colleague] Tori?‘ And I was saying, ‘Can you remind me who that is?’” To an outsider, Hiraki may appear relatively reserved and not an obvious candidate to share a portion of her life on a national television show. “At first sight, she seems very quiet and proper in many ways; however, I discovered that she has such a character,” says Naomi Kasumi, associate professor in the department of Fine Arts, who taught Hiraki in digital design. “With Sarah, her sense of humor is brilliant and witty.” Once the show wrapped, Hiraki had enough experience to build a successful freelance career, which she now pursues full time. While some illustrators draw or sketch draft concepts, Hiraki’s process is 100 percent digital, working with a mathematical series of vectors and visualizing on the fly. “While she was in my design sequence, she grew so fast as a very creative and talented designer,” says Kasumi. “She worked hard to gain technical skills.” Her technique allows her to work twice as fast, enabling her to keep a steady stream of side projects at all times. Take her role as the lab coat-donning co-host of Know Your Meme, a website dedicated to documenting Internet phenomena or the illustrations she generated for the viral video “Cool Things to Find,” a quirky music video parody on an Australian safety public service announcement that Hiraki and some friends, including former LOLwork castmate Forest Whitaker, put together. “That’s what I really love doing. You build it and you send it out to the world and then you have 2 million views,” Hiraki says. What lies ahead for the burgeoning onlinestar? She’s currently scripting a new web series of humorous advice for girls. Hiraki hopes her natural sense of humor, which seeps into just about everything she illustrates, will help her as she works to break into comedy. LAUGH OUT LOUD “I’m already a professional artist, I’ve already Check out the LOL antics of cats, been on television,” she dogs, critters, humans and more at says. “At this point, I’ve icanhas.cheezburger.com. Want to see got nothing to lose.” some of Sarah’s designs? Visit her And she hasn’t site at http://sarahhiraki.com/. closed the door on a possible return to TV.

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As soon as she got to SU, she landed a job designing for the student newspaper The Spectator and became a resident assistant in the arts community Campion 9, where she became an active member of SU’s art scene. At the same time she gained professional experience. She took on a graphic design internship at the Washington State History Museum and as a visual intern at retailer Anthropologie. She even wrote a book, My Mother was a Fox, My Father was a Rabbit about bi-racial families told through forest animals. Inspired by fan art, and the intersection of pop art and design, Hiraki looks up to artists including Oliver Voss, a German pop art cartoonist and sculptor, and likens her aesthetic to Eric Carle, a children's book author and illustrator. If one thing’s clear, Hiraki’s time at SU was absolutely essential to her career development and kept her grounded. “I'm really glad I had the opportunity to study as much history and literature as I did [through the Core requirements],” says Hiraki. “I work almost completely digitally, but having perspective on my art roots is indispensable.” The road from Seattle University to Cheezburger started simply enough: Hiraki, like most graduating seniors, began to scour the help wanted ads for a job. She discovered the opening at the dot-com through Craigslist. After seeing that her cute-art aesthetic was a natural fit, she applied and scored a job interview, where she was filled in on the plans for the TV show that was about to begin shooting. That was an added bonus for Hiraki, with her love of all things reality TV. Soon after interviewing with Cheezburger, she was hired on as the site’s art director, responsible for creating original content and helping to build the site’s visual experience. “It was a bizarre process because as soon as I got there, they were like, ‘OK, we’re ready to film,’” she says. “They were asking me, ’How do you feel


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Something Special

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Get to know the trio of cooks who whip up good eats at the Arrupe Jesuit Residence

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16 / Cooking Up Something Special

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BY ANNIE BECKMANN


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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 17

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ELIZABETH TRAYNOR

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fter cooking for the Jesuits at Seattle University are SU students who discover that washing dishes isn’t so for 17 years, Margaret Garrett chuckles whenever bad when you get to eat dinner and cookies, too. Natch Ohno, S.J., exclaims, “Oh, my favorite!” While each cook took a different path to the Jesuits’ Father Ohno offers this excited proclamation kitchen, they all arrived with well-tuned gastrono matter what the meal. nomic skills. Garrett’s destiny solidified when she Head cook Garrett along with coworkers Mary Odegaard became a cook for fish processors, Yukon River tugs, and Kip Kniskern are the trio of culinary aces at the Arrupe mineral exploration camps and Prudhoe Bay oil Jesuit Residence on campus. They have the distinction of field camps in Alaska for 17 years. Then she heard about the knowing what it takes to win compliments from a crowd job at SU. of hungry priests. Odegaard has a range Among the 28 Jesuits of cooking experience who dine at Arrupe that spans more than some have discerning 30 years and includes palates, others dietary whipping up breakfast restrictions. Yet univerand lunch for more sally they appreciate than 100 tots at Casa home-cooked meal. cade Children’s Corner, As Rector Pat Howell, a South Lake Union S.J., says, “The problem day-care provider, and with going out to managing the kitchen dinner is that you miss at Women’s University the best meal in town.” Club in downtown Arrupe meals are Seattle. When she heard served buffet style, a bit about the job at Arrupe, of a logistical challenge she knew it would be a for the cooks because great fit. not all the priests are Kniskern did The trio of cooks (l-r) Margaret Garrett, Mary Odegaard and Kip Kniskern, greet the available to dine at the campus Jesuits with good food and friendly faces. restaurant work until same time. he became assistant “It’s not like a restaurant or a home meal where kitchen manager for on-campus food agency Bon Appétit everybody eats together. So when I nail it and everything is for a few years prior to joining the staff at Arrupe. He would ready at just the right time—making that happen is what’s respond to calls from the Jesuits’ kitchen when Garrett and most enjoyable for me,” Kniskern says. Odegaard needed backup help, so it struck him as a good There’s plenty of give-and-take among the cooks and each match when the job became available. has certain responsibilities. Odegaard and Kniskern split Each meal they prepare features choices of entrees along their days. Odegaard, now in her 14th year cooking for the with side dishes. The cooks agree that roasted caramelized Jesuits, is the designated “lunch lady.” Kniskern, the relative carrots, burgers and BLTs fly out the kitchen door. newcomer with six years as a cook at Arrupe, handles the “They can’t have enough BLTs. I could be making them dinner shift. Rounding out the team, Garrett cooks lunch all day long,” says Odegaard. and dinner three days a week. She also orders all the food, Dressed salads with unexpected ingredients such as buys kitchen equipment and keeps the breakfast tray filled pine nuts, blueberries and arugula are big hits. Speaking with scones and muffins. Joining the cooks in the kitchen of greens, Garrett plants a huge garden in her West Seattle


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“You can’t get a more compassionate and appreciative audience than a houseful of priests.”

evening's birthday celebration. Each Jesuit gets to choose his favorite birthday dessert. If you order a cake, be assured it will be homemade. No one receives an out-of-the-box birthday cake,” he says. Bayard doesn’t stop there, though. “I also appreciate Mary when she makes bratwurst and sauerkraut for lunch. She always lets me know when this is on the menu because she knows my Milwaukee roots and how I love my brats!” he says with unbridled enthusiasm. Garrett is definitely up to the challenge when she hears, for example, that Vice President of Mission and Ministry Peter Ely, S.J., has a fondness for Thai food and Indian curries. That’s what makes her work rewarding, she says. “I’m still learning, still creating even after 33 years of cooking for people and that’s really important to me. That personal joy I get when I make something I’ve never made before,” she says. “Plus, I know the love and joy I bring to my job is part of what makes this a home for the Jesuits. I’m not cooking at a restaurant, not a catering company. This is their home.” A few campus Jesuits like to hang out in the kitchen. Garrett has fond recollections of Visiting English Professor Hugh Duffy, S.J., when he was here from Ireland between 2006 and 2012. “I miss him! He came in the kitchen every morning, made oatmeal in the microwave and we’d talk,” she recalls. “Those were wonderful conversations we had.” Arturo Araujo, S.J., a native of Barranquilla, Colombia, would pop in the kitchen and make coffee with a sprinkling of nutmeg for Garrett before he said Sunday Mass at Christ the King Parish in North Seattle. She would have a Sunday brunch baked good ready to share and they’d take time to chat.

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yard, not only for herself but also for the Jesuit community. That makes salads all the more enticing, especially during the summer. Alumni and Men’s Basketball Chaplain Dave Anderson, S.J., rhapsodizes about all the healthy salads and what he says is the best Sunday brunch in town. Ask him for specifics, though, and he lauds the Friday clam chowder, Garrett’s famous breakfast scones and his favorite among birthday cakes, German chocolate. When Philosophy Professor Emeritus James Reichmann, S.J., turned 90 earlier this year, he requested lemon cake with lemon icing for his celebration. Funny thing about those birthday cakes. Just about every Jesuit has a preference, which Odegaard meticulously keeps track of because she’s the one who personally makes each celebratory dessert. Director of Campus Ministry Mike Bayard, S.J., gives special credit to Odegaard for her homemade birthday treats. “Just about every Wednesday morning, you can find Mary in the kitchen making the birthday cakes for that

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Each campus Jesuit has a designated spot to park his cloth napkin so it can be used for more than one meal.

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Pat O’Leary, S.J. (l-r), Mike Bayard S.J,. and Peter Ely, S.J., chat with longtime cook Mary Odegaard at lunchtime.


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Margaret Garrett is known for her prized breakfast scones. The recipe had its beginnings in a Julia Child cookbook, but Garrett did her own research and tinkering to make it her own. She discovered a scone with a better texture at the now-defunct café, Animals on 12th Avenue. “I was told to keep the butter as cold as possible before baking. That made a big difference,” she says. She continues to play around with the recipe by trying different flours, adding nuts and dried fruits and adjusting the flour-to-sugar ratio. Recently Garrett experimented with a way to cut down on the amount of butter needed by adding a little flaxseed meal.

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1 cup all-purpose flour 1½ cups King Arthur’s unbleached white whole-wheat flour ¾ cup Bob’s Red Mill flaxseed meal 2½ teaspoons baking powder ½ cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ cup cold butter (8 tablespoons) Zest of one orange 1/3 cup chopped toasted pecans 1/3 cup dried cranberries, soaked in hot water and drained well 1 cup cold buttermilk Cinnamon/sugar to sprinkle as topping Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In the Arrupe kitchen, Mary Odegaard gets chicken cutlets ready to bake for lunch.

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heck out the list of the Jesuits’ favorite sweet birthday treats at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Memories of Jesuits who have passed are no less vivid. The afternoon snack of choice for the late Francis Logan, S.J., was biscotti, according to Garrett. Even at age 100, he would skip this treat with his coffee, however, if he worried he might be gaining weight. The late William LeRoux, S.J., known for his resounding voice as well as his 40 years on campus, had a habit of making it known when he was especially happy with his dinner. “He’d open the kitchen door and in that booming voice of his he would announce, ‘That was mah-velous!’ It always made us feel appreciated,” Odegaard says. Garrett laughs about the warnings she continues to receive from former Fine Arts Adjunct Professor Jack Bentz, S.J., who returns to Arrupe occasionally from his home base at Gonzaga University in Spokane. “He says to me, ‘We’ve discussed this, Margaret. You don’t cook things I like when I have to go out for dinner,’” she says. Odegaard adds, “The Jesuits have such a good sense of humor, I love working here. We’re treated so well and I feel I have found my professional home.” Kniskern agrees. “You can’t get a more compassionate and appreciative audience than a houseful of priests,” he says.

Mix flours, flaxseed meal, baking powder, brown sugar and baking soda in work bowl of food processor or large mixing bowl. Cut butter in small chunks and place in bowl with well-mixed dry ingredients. If using a food processor, pulse to cut butter into dry ingredients until it resembles large crumbs. If using a large bowl for mixing, cut butter in with pastry blender. If there are still a few large pieces of butter, work them in by hand. Place ingredients from food processor in large mixing bowl and stir in orange zest, toasted pecans and well-drained cranberries. With fork, lightly stir half the buttermilk into bowl of ingredients, adding more as dough starts to pull together. Use your hands with a pulling and kneading motion to bring all the dough together. If it’s a little too dry, add a few more tablespoons of buttermilk. Form dough into log on floured counter or cutting board. Using knife or pastry blade, cut dough into five equal portions. Shape and pat one of the dough pieces with your hands into a round disk. Then cut into four equal triangles. Repeat process with remaining dough and place on two cookie sheets lined with parchment paper. Sprinkle a bit of cinnamon and sugar or raw sugar on scones before baking. Bake 15-18 minutes or until lightly browned. Makes 20 1½-ounce scones.


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The Power of

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Through writing, COE's Stephanie Guerra is helping incarcerated girls and women find their voice

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BY ANNIE BECKMANN

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hey peek out the slim windows of their individual cells with curiosity. The heavy metal doors unlock simultaneously and eight girls at the King County Juvenile Detention Center walk into a common area for their literacy and writing class. The average age is 15. There’s a look of vulnerability among most, save for a couple of students who present a tough-girl swagger. Drug charges, first-degree assault and domestic violence are typical reasons they’re incarcerated here; only rarely more heinous crimes. In just minutes, Stephanie Guerra grabs their attention. The teacher’s magnetism has a captivating effect on the girls. She is well acquainted with how to offer inspiration and brighten a stark setting. It was a passion for literacy that drew Guerra to work with incarcerated girls and women. As a Seattle University adjunct professor in the College of Education’s Literacy for Special Needs program, Guerra volunteered for seven years as a creative writing teacher for women at the King County Jail when she felt she also wanted to teach literacy to teenage girls at the county’s juvenile detention center, a few blocks south of campus. Her expertise in this area comes from her volunteer work with the incarcerated as well as her scholarly research. She says her real motivation, though, is twofold: a higher religious calling to serve and a kinship with these teens. “I understand them, I've been on the roads they're traveling and I've come out the other side,” she says. “Writing has been a tool for me professionally, emotionally and socially and I want them to have this tool, too. I want them to feel comfortable writing about their thoughts, feelings and experiences to arrive at better understandings of themselves and others. I want them to write for joy and healing.” Guerra is thankful she landed a youth arts grant from the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, which provided a new opportunity to share her talents with teen girls in detention. Catherine Gribos, education coordinator at the jail, describes Guerra as creative and resourceful.

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20 / The Power of Words


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“It’s difficult to understand the level of appreciation the incarcerated have that someone who teaches college, is an author and has a successful career would volunteer to teach them,” Gribos wrote when she recommended Guerra for the grant. “We usually have a waiting list of women wanting to attend her creative writing class.” A 17-year-old girl who participated in six of Guerra’s classes at the detention center wrote, “Life in jail isn’t easy at all and easily can get overwhelming and stressful. Having the writing class every week really helps a lot. I believe that no matter who ends up in the unfortunate situation of being in jail has a story to tell and deserves the chance to tell it.” The weekly class at the detention center starts with Guerra reading aloud. During a recent class she read from Sherman Alexie’s Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Typically she selects young adult urban literature with African American or Latino protagonists and cautionary or redemptive tales. Unna Kim, the recreational coordinator who supervises Guerra’s efforts at the detention

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center, says the girls, often unfamiliar with books of this genre, frequently are mesmerized by Guerra’s readings and relate to the characters. “Reading out loud, we’ve lost that. Today everybody says, ‘Here, watch a movie.’ These are really talented, intelligent girls in unfortunate circumstances. Stephanie is like a ray of sunshine,” says Kim. “She encourages the girls and is positive, yet firm.” After her reading, Guerra talks about the craft of writing, focusing on topics such as voice or character development before the girls take about 20 minutes to write a few pages of their own, either fiction or nonfiction. Then they read aloud and discuss their work. “We set a few boundaries. They can’t use what’s in their writing against one another, for example,” Guerra says. With an MFA in creative writing from the University of Notre Dame and subsequent research in literacy education at the University of Pennsylvania, Guerra discovered healing is the number one reason incarcerated students choose to write. “In many cases, they’ve had terrible educational experiences in the past so I try to show how there can be magic and fun in writing. … I just step back and let it happen,” says Guerra, author of the new young adult novel, Torn. Thanks to her grant, each girl receives a copy of her book, a realistic story about allegiances in a friendship between teen girls who encounter bullying, an abusive relationship, drug use and other issues recognizable to at-risk youth. “The purpose of this teaching is to give them an engaging and affirming literary experience. This is their last gasp chance. Most drop out of high school within a year after their release. Only about five percent go on to get their high school diplomas,” says Guerra.

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g n i f o w o e n n o dk s n a a w -b l g i n a m j u e o o y m t e g r g n n s i i y o a Be g cr w l s e a a c l i w l il I o w t p I a e s th h g t f n f i y h o t k m e ac b wn o thos e d h t t n ng a i i h n s n a W u , r s Iw s a r a w e t t u a t f o n b o e l a s si d e ink n h t e p d t l p u u a o o h c l l g a n i e h r t e y w s ay n Ever w o i t y o m m n e o y d M t n s “ I want them to feel comfortable writing a e 4 m o about their thoughts, feelings and experiencesas 1 s r w o f to arrive at better understandings I n rd o i a t h n of themselves and others. I want them re ete e d w to write for joy and healing.” a ats e w s e r Stephanie Guerra, College of Education e The w s ff u c le d p n a e h h T . kin s e y c i l m o p e h t u o and c I ll A . e fac n d i d I ? l l e h M . g n feeli d e k o I lo c y l n o


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22 / The Power of Words


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Read more of the students’ work at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Being young and knowing that I was going to jail was one of those things I will always remember. I was in the back of the police cruiser, silent tears running down my face. All I could think about was, What did I do? Everything happened so fast, so quick. My emotions were all out of control. I was 14 and on my way to juvenile detention for some stupid stuff. The seats were hard and cold. The handcuffs were way too tight, cutting my skin. The plexiglass separating me and the police officer was all up in my face. All I could think was, What the hell? I didn’t even know what I was feeling. My emotions were too strong. I looked out the window and saw the only city I knew. I was on my way to jail for arguing with my aunt about something so petty, so childish. The only thing bothering me was the look in my mom’s eyes when I got handcuffed. It was hurt. It was sad. It made me cry. And I never cry. I went through the process: strip-searched, clothed and thrown in a dirty cell tons of girls lived in. I still didn’t know what to think. I didn’t know what I was feeling. I knew I was pregnant. My mom didn’t. That’s what I was thinking. I was mad at myself. I was thinking only about my mom. The most important person to me. I looked at myself in the mirror that had tons of gang symbols. I knew this place wasn’t for me. I wanted to feel pain. Like the white walls that I stared at that whole night. It was time for a change. People make mistakes. And I make lots. But no matter what, I kept moving forward. All I let myself think about was my mom’s eyes. And how next time I would make sure things were different. That was the last time I seen my mom. And that was a year and a half ago.

Stephanie Guerra listens as one of her writing students at the King County Juvenile Detention Center shares her story.

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My mom always used to say we were fraternal twins. I was white and he was black but we were so much alike, we didn’t let our skin color bother us. So one hot day in July, I was drinking Kool-Aid when my little brother told me Ky, my cousin, got caught up in a drive-by shooting. My hands shook so bad, I shattered the glass on the floor. As I was running out the door, I could hear the car’s wheels screech against the asphalt. After I was outside I saw my cousin on the ground. As I went to hold him for comfort, Rakeem bust through my back door. He ran and grabbed me and I just let all my feelings go. He said it was going to be okay. Since that, I knew he was going to be right there for me. That’s the day I realized our friendship meant family, too.

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With pencil to notebook paper, what incarcerated teenage girls at the King County Juvenile Detention Center write in a mere 20 minutes can be edgy, deeply personal, provocative or heart-wrenching. As those who supervise Stephanie Guerra’s efforts with incarcerated girls and women can attest, she elicits incredible writing from her students. Below are the works of two of her students.

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WRITING IT ALL DOWN


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Students Myra Williams and Marche Rhyne are embracing this learning alternative to a traditional high school setting.

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Beth Brunton, Seattle Public Schools site coordinator and a humanities teacher, says factors that draw teens to the transformational learning environment of a Middle College are adversity at home and challenges at a traditional high school. Thinking, listening and communication skills and managing goals are frequently as important as academics. Community building, leadership and setting norms—all common threads at Middle College—help students develop resilience and college readiness, says Brunton, who is ”Ms. B” to her students. At a Middle College open house in late January, President Stepgen Sundborg, S.J., told a crowd of supporters, educators, families and students that the university’s priority is to put the good of students first, including those at Middle College. “Middle College takes a central place in our commitment to youth and that’s why it makes sense to have it at the heart of our campus,” he said. “With the launch of Middle College, we’re a better university, truer to our mission and committed to its success.” Seattle Schools Superintendent Jose Banda also spoke at the event and described the university as a welcoming partner engaged in the community, especially the public school system. “This partnership provides an opportunity for

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Seattle University recently launched an innovative alternative high school on campus aimed at students who seek a small setting to complete their high school graduation requirements and prepare for success in college and in life. Located at the north end of Loyola Hall, Middle College High School at Seattle University is administered by the Seattle Public School District and intended for students ages 16 to 20. It’s a dynamic collaboration between the College of Education and Seattle Public Schools that has been many years in the making, according to Charisse Cowan Pitre, associate professor in SU’s Master in Teaching (MIT) program and the Middle College partnership director. SU faculty and students contribute advice, advocacy, resources and support for the school in exchange for real-life learning opportunities. “The students here have just as much promise as any other young person with hopes for a bright future, but they may not have had the opportunity to succeed academically,” says Cowan Pitre. “This partnership provides the opportunity for students to reach their academic goals and prepare for college and a career.” The school, which opened in mid-November with 25 students, is designed for a maximum of 40 to 50 high school juniors and seniors. Recruiting students who live near campus is a goal. The successful Middle College concept began in New York City in the 1970s and opened its first Seattle site in 1991. The program now thrives at

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“With the launch of Middle College, we’re a better university, truer to our mission and committed to its success.”

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Middle College students to experience a university campus,” Banda says. “What an added benefit to be part of a university. And not on the outer edges, but right here in the center of Seattle University. That says something.”

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five locations throughout Seattle with nearly 200 students. Margit McGuire, MIT program director in the College of Education, and the late Sue Schmitt, former dean, were instrumental in the planning for a Middle College at SU.


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Charisse Cowan Petrie, associate professor in the College of Education's Master in Teaching program and Middle College partnership director, chats with students Jacob Ross and Zeb Davis.

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Puget Sound region from Vietnam in 2008, he spoke no English. He recalls sitting in a classroom that first year unable to speak or understand. It became progressively easier for him, yet he soon recognized he wasn’t learning in a traditional high school. “I’ve learned how to work for myself rather than depend on others,” says Pham. Believing in the students and creating bridges to success for them is a big part of the Middle College teaching model, says Brunton. “The best part is seeing the transformation in students, from the very beginning to when they come back to see us after they’ve graduated and share how their hard work paid off.”

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The individualized attention Middle College students receive blends group learning with digital curriculum, says Brunton, who taught at the Northgate Mall Middle College for 11 years before the SU site opened. Students focus on core classes of humanities, math and science in the morning. Afternoons are more student-directed and include special programming, often with guest speakers and career-focused panels. Senior Marche Rhyne lives just a five-minute walk from SU. He credits his grandmother with recognizing the value of a smaller school for him. “I was a slacker in middle school and never had a lot of ambition. High schools are full of so much drama and too much trouble,” Rhyne says. “Now I’m just about my education. Completing and accomplishing things gives me hope and the drive to do more.” His dream is to become a music producer. Rhyne and student Jacob Ross recently won Martin Luther King Jr. scholarships from the Mt. Baker Commmunity Council, the first scholarships for Middle College students. When Anh Pham and his family came to the

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President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., speaks of the value of Middle College at Seattle University during the program's recent open house on campus.

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Landing Middle College

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Alumna influential in bringing alternative high school to Seattle

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Students’ Lives: How “Exploring Transfer” Works, and Why. (Hungar also collaborated on the book, Life After 60? Yes!: Choices for Managing the Third Part of Your Life with John Morford and Delight Willing, retired SU faculty members. Morford is a former dean of the College of Education and founder of the doctoral program.) “Janet Lieberman is exceptionally creative as well as effective in putting her ideas into practice, and Middle College was her first big success,” says Hungar. In January, Hungar returned to her roots for the Middle College open house. As she toured the space and listened to the testimonials of students and faculty, she says she was pleased to see a school like this take shape at SU. “As an alum, I’m proud that my institution has taken on this commitment to make a significant difference in the lives of individual students and the quality of education in Seattle as a whole,” she says. “As a believer in this genuinely revolutionary innovation for educating high school students, I'm excited at the way SU is expanding the concept and multiplying its power.” Hungar may be retired, yet she remains active in education through her volunteer work as well as her book collaborations. On Wednesdays she reads to fifth graders at Bailey Gatzert Elementary School, co-teaches a monthly class on great composers and leads occasional field trips.

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How Middle College High School found its way to Seattle involves alumna Julie Hungar. A 1982 graduate of the College of Education’s Educational Leadership doctorate program, Hungar was a vice chancellor for Seattle Community Colleges when she first began to explore ways to encourage collaborations among educational institutions with a goal of improving the number of transfer students. After attending a conference where one of the speakers was Janet Lieberman, founder of the original Middle College High School at LaGuardia Community College in Queens, NY, Hungar suggested Lieberman as a speaker for a Seattle conference in the fall of 1988. Soon Hungar was invited to a Seattle Public School District cabinet meeting to talk about the Middle College concept, where she pitched the merits of the program. From there, Seattle Public Schools and Seattle Central Community College took over and hammered out a plan for the city’s first Middle College, which opened in 1991. Although she continued to work as a higher education consultant—she also taught as an adjunct in the COE—Hungar retired from Seattle Community Colleges in 1995. Funny thing, though. She and Lieberman then collaborated on several books, most notably The Wisdom Trail: In the Footsteps of Remarkable Women and Transforming

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Read writer Annie Beckmann's personal story that parallels the lives of many of the students of Middle College at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

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Julie Hungar, ’82 EDLR

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“As an alum, I’m proud that my institution has taken on this commitment to make a significant difference in the lives of individual students and the quality of education in Seattle as a whole.”


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ALUMNI VOICE B

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A Telling Story on Family | By Tina Potterf

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Julia Anderson, ’93 MBA, researches lineage and finds book-worthy material

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Author Julia Anderson’s debut novel was inspired by her great-grandmother and her daughter, Anna, who inspires her every day.

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TAKE THE JOURNEY Learn more about author Julia Anderson and Through Christina’s Eyes at www.throughchristinaseyes. com. Connect with Anderson on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ AuthorJuliaAnderson.

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grandmother, and both are strong women. The book was a way to share her own story as well, as the second half is devoted to how Julia and her husband Bill, ’93, learned of Anna’s health issues and how they gain strength as a family dealing with the news that your child will never walk or talk and never live independently. In Through Christina’s Eyes, Christina as narrator illustrates the struggles of her ancestors, as well as their joys and triumphs. Anderson lays out Christina’s life and through her writing conveys an overriding message that love and family allow us all to make it through challenging times and adversity and still come out the other side whole. “The book explores the love of family over five generations and the notion that family members are watching over us even after they pass,” Anderson says. “… And it brings to light the communication that occurs between people in many different ways, encompassing those unable to verbalize their thoughts and messages.” Anderson recommends others who want to learn more about their ancestry to start with family members who are living: ask questions of parents and grandparents who can provide invaluable information of their past and clues to your future. And collect any documents (books, newspaper clippings, journals) that will help fill in the gaps. “Knowing where you came from,” says Anderson, “helps explain who we are, how we are and why we are.”

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For Seattle University alumna Julia Anderson, ’93 MBA, the familial link from her past to her present provided the backdrop for her debut novel, Through Christina's Eyes where the central character is Anderson’s great-grandmother Christina Nilsson. The story follows Nilsson’s journey from Sweden in the late 1800s to her migration to the United States, where she started out as a maid working near Chicago. An IT consultant by day turned historical novelist, Anderson never set out to pen a book when she began to dig deeper into her roots, which was motivated largely by a desire to collect clues that might explain the multiple disabilities of Anna, the eldest of Anderson’s three daughters. “After Anna was born, there was no information about why this happened to her,” says Anderson of her daughter’s brain injury. During the course of her research she learned that her daughter had a genetic marker for a blood clot in the brain, or stroke, that caused her condition, which is evident in people of Scandinavian heritage. As part of her research on her greatgrandmother, Anderson traveled to Joliet, Ill., where Christina had spent much of her adult life. Slowly she began to piece together her greatgrandmother’s story, which led her to travel to Sweden to find out more about her early life. At the same time, Anderson felt this connection between Christina’s life and her own; her daughter Anna’s middle name is Christina, in honor of her great-

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Tracing a family history can uncover revelations both welcomed and unexpected. Connecting the lineage dots or filling in the family tree may unveil the origins of a name, a long lost relative or a genetic predisposition.


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News from Alumni House

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Our work with Magis: Alumni Living the Mission continues, as we co-hosted the 2nd Annual Alumni Day of Service in April. I tell new alumni that the relationship with their alma mater doesn’t end when they walk across the stage at graduation; it is just beginning. The Alumni Relations team strives to connect alumni throughout the state, the country and around the world but we can’t do it alone. It’s through open and frequent communications with you that we know where we are succeeding and where we need to improve. We ask that you continue to share your thoughts, answer our surveys, update your information through the online directory and attend events. Send us your feedback and suggestions to alumnifeedback@seattleu.edu. Our alumni are our most treasured resource and your voice matters.

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candidates for your internships. Check out the Redhawk Network at www. seattleu.edu/careerservices/. We are excited to partner with Student Development to be part of new student orientation and Welcome Week. This is important, as we believe the alumni experience begins with admission to SU and we must start early to develop a lifetime relationship with our students, who are “alumni in training.” This year we’ve taken a big step in expanding the university’s visibility statewide. Thanks to the efforts of our Alumni Board of Governors and our many alumni and friends, 4,000 signatures were collected to support a bill that has been submitted to the State Senate for a Seattle U license plate. This is a significant initiative, as proceeds from the sale of the plates will benefit student scholarships. And in March, we celebrated our first year competing in the WAC Tournament in Las Vegas.

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Two years ago a comprehensive survey of our alumni was conducted about their experiences. From the survey results we know that alumni want to be engaged in meaningful ways, with our office, with faculty and with other alums. In the past year, we’ve been developing programming in support of these efforts. For example, we brought back the traditions of Homecoming, Alumni Family Weekend and reunions that we hope will become a part of your alumni and family traditions. Through our partnership with Career Services we provide a broader set of offerings for alumni networking and professional development through the Redhawk Network including three new alumni career development workshops. This collaboration has allowed us to improve the process by which you can connect with SU by acting as a mentor or in finding quality

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Opportunities to Get Involved Abound at SU

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“I tell new alumni that the relationship with their alma mater doesn’t end when they walk across the stage at graduation; it is just beginning. ” SUSAN VOSPER, ASSISTANT VP/ALUMNI RELATIONS

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Recently engaged or married? Got a job promotion? We want to hear from you. Send us your updates for Class Notes through the new and improved alumni directory: www.seattleu.edu/alumni/get-involved/directory/.


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Making a Difference

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Seattle University celebrates remarkable alumni and friends at the 2013 Alumni Awards Seattle University honors the men and women who are leaders making a difference in their fields, in their communities and in the lives of others. These are the 2013 Alumni Award recipients.

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ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR | GORDON MCHENRY, JR., ’79

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Gordon McHenry, Jr.’s connection and dedication to Seattle University is vast. A Board of Trustee member since 2002, he has served on the Board of Regents and the Alumni Board of Governors as well. His commitment to the community is also well-rooted and longstanding. This past October he was named president and chief executive of Solid Ground, a Seattlebased nonprofit social services organization. Prior to his current role, the Seattle native and father of three was executive director for Rainier Scholars. According to the organization, McHenry’s unique blend of private and public sector experience in the Seattle area made for an ideal leader. McHenry, who has a bachelor’s degree in political science from SU and earned his juris doctorate from Georgetown University Law School, served for many years as director of Global Corporate Citizenship for Boeing’s Northwest region. He was also an attorney with Perkins Coie in Seattle. McHenry was raised with a strong respect for education, his father being the first in his family to graduate from college and the first African American to be promoted to a management role at Boeing. He has served on various boards and community organizations including the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, United Way of King County and the Seattle Public Library. While a student at SU, McHenry was elected ASSU president. His wife Dorina CalderonMcHenry is also an alum, graduating in 1980.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

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Read more about this year’s recipients at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/ and watch for photos from the awards ceremony in the fall issue.

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Gordon McHenry, Jr.’s connection and dedication to Seattle University is vast.


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ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR

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Gordon McHenry, Jr.,’79


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Santa Maria Rivera is a voice of hope for the Washington state Latino community. As a firstgeneration Mexican American living in Yakima, he caught the attention of men’s soccer coach Pete Fewing. Soon after, Rivera joined SU’s soccer team, helping lead his team to a national championship in his junior year. Since graduating, Rivera has committed himself to helping at-risk youth both in his work and in volunteer service.

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OUTSTANDING RECENT ALUMNUS

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UNIVERSITY SERVICE

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MAUREEN BENOLIEL, ’71

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Visit the gallery in the Alumni and Administration Building to see portraits of this year's winners and read more about their lives and work.

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Maureen Benoliel is honored for her commitment and contributions to the university. Benoliel, a graduate of the College of Education, chaired the Board of Regents and the SU Gala and currently serves on the COE advisory board. Benoliel is a passionate advocate for SU alumni and volunteer leaders, and has worked with many students on professional development, mentoring those looking for help with résumés, networking and internships.


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Carol Weaver, PhD, of the College of Education is an outstanding teacher who engages, leads and understands how to challenge and connect students to the material while enabling them to succeed. Now in her 23rd year at SU, Weaver was hired to implement the Adult Education and Training Program in the College of Education.

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DISTINGUISHED TEACHING

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Following graduation from the College of Science and Engineering, Deborah Limb began a distinguished career at Boeing. She rose through the ranks, working on the 787 team and in 2007 was named director of Structures Engineering, leading a team of 500 employees in the Puget Sound region. She is a member of the college’s advisory board.

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PROFESSIONAL ACHIEVEMENT DEBORAH LIMB, ’88

A graduate of Albers School of Business and Economics, Rick Friedhoff has made a difference in the lives of many. During his tenure as executive director of Compass Housing Alliance, he increased the number of facilities serving the homeless as part of Compass Housing. He embodies the Jesuit commitment of providing for those less fortunate.

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COMMUNITY SERVICE RICK FRIEDHOFF, ’67


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Spy the Lie

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refreshingly wry sense of humor. Spy The Lie may not make you laugh out loud, but you’re guaranteed to chuckle to yourself more than once. Two of the most interesting chapters, “What Deception Looks Like” and “Let’s Be Careful Out There” debunk some of the myths we’ve all heard about lying and body language. The authors acknowledge that there is an important correlation between deception and nonverbal behavior, but that this correlation doesn’t work the way we might expect it to. For instance, you might think of lack of eye contact as an indicator of deceptive behavior. In fact, the authors discourage readers from overanalyzing eye contact. Instead, they suggest observing other behaviors we would have never thought to consider. A fascinating yet manageable page turner, Spy the Lie imparts practical tips and tricks that will likely have its readers using it as a reference guide for years to come.

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a personal level, their reasons for writing this book go a bit further. In the book’s introduction they write, “The three of us came into this world from entirely different backgrounds. The common denominator was the combination of a fascination with human nature and a conviction that untruthfulness lies at the heart of all too many of the problems we face as individuals, as a nation and as a global community.” Spy the Lie’s authors want to make it clear to their readers that there is no such thing as a human lie detector. But by imparting their knowledge, they make it possible for anyone to be a deception expert. The keys to understanding deception can be found within a methodology developed by Houston. Of course, the methodology is a painstakingly perfected intelligence tool, but the authors make it digestible—offering up simple exercises readers can try out on their friends. The authors also has a knack for unpacking a serious subject like deception with a

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The only thing separating a good lie from a bad lie is the ability to know the difference. In Spy the Lie, former CIA officers Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, ’92 JD, and Susan Carnicero, with the help of esteemed journalist Don Tennant, teach readers how to detect deceptive behavior in others. The authors share their expert knowledge through thrilling stories from the frontlines of counterterrorism and criminal investigations and help readers apply professional lie-detecting techniques to their daily lives. The last time you confronted your teenager about a missed curfew, did you get a straight answer? Can you say for certain that you’re always hearing the truth from your boss, your coworkers or your employees? And what about your spouse or significant other? What if you could enter any compromising conversation confident in your ability to catch a lie? While the authors are eager to assist their readers in applying this expertise on

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By Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, ’92 JD and Susan Carnicero with Don Tennant | Reviewed by Maura Beth Pagano,’12

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The only thing separating a good lie from a bad lie is the ability to know the difference.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a book published, Seattle University Magazine wants to hear about it. We consider for review books released by alumni, faculty and staff. Send notice to sumagazine@seattleu.edu.


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French Illusions

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Read On…

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u Alumna Linda Kovic-Skow shares her experience working as an au pair for an aristocratic French family in the summer of 1979 in herr debut memoir, French Illusions. The book is based on the writer’s diary from this memorable time in her life and the challenges and triumphs she lived through as she adjusted to this new life at age 21.

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FACULTY PICKS

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Global Case Studies in Maternal and Child Health

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Author | Ruth White

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Associate Professor Ruth White (social work) puts forth her considerable knowledge and experience in the area of maternal and child health as examined through a series of global case studies. The book is written for students in public health, medical and allied health professions and brings to life theoretical and conceptual ideas discussed in primary texts through the analysis of stories from maternal and child health programs around the world.

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Author | Nalini Iyer and Amy Bhatt

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d Roots and Reflections: South Asians in the Pacific Northwest, co-authored w by Professor Nalini Iyer (English), uses an oral history approach to show how South Asian immigrant experiences were shaped by the region and how they differed over time and across generations. The book d includes stories from immigrants from India, Pakistan, Bang-ladesh and Sri Lanka who arrived in the Pacific Northwest following World War II and through the 1980s.

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class notes

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Masaki James Yamada, ’97, ’04 JD, and his wife Christina Emerald Yamada, ’00, ’09 MBA, welcomed daughter Victory Grace Sept. 14, 2012. She joins big sister Trinity Jade.

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36 / Class Notes

Francella Kohls Hall, ’58, was named to the Heritage and Arts Commission in Tiburon, Calif. Hall, who paints landscapes and still life in oils and watercolors, is a longtime member of the Marin Society of Artists. She is also a member of the Golden Gate chapter of the National League of American Pen Women, an organization of writers, artists and poets. Her work has been exhibited at Tiburon Town Hall several times since 2006.

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Rachel Schaefer, JD ’12, and Travis Dailey, JD, ’12, have new roles at Riddell Williams. Schaefer joins the litigation practice group and Dailey the bankruptcy and creditors’ rights and litigation practice groups.

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Nick Acosta, ’08, married Sasha Vazquez on July 28, 2012, in Chicago.


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Ryan Schmid is president and CEO of Vera Whole Health, a full-service and wellness company that provides women, men and families with fitness, nutritional and health guidance. The company is now available across the United States.

Greg Dole, MFA, has been named the grants director and community development director at the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge. The agency funds arts organizations in New Orleans’ 11-parish region.

Toni Napoli, MA, has expanded her thriving private practice as a mental health counselor. Her new practice, Counseling West Seattle, now includes associates Jan Kritzer and Kate Viskova, with intern Stefani Vert.

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Alan C. Reyes was recently appointed director of operations and in-house legal counsel for Pilot International Inc. This international nonprofit service organization raises money for brain injury prevention and awareness.

Line Sandsmark, MFA, is managing director of ArtsWest Playhouse and Gallery, the Jonathan Porter is the recipient of the recipient of a National Theatre Company 2012 Robert Ross National Personal grant from American Theatre Wing. ArtsAchievement Award by the Muscular West, in West Seattle, is the first theater in Dystrophy Association. Recently, Porter the state and one of only 10 nationwide to was appointed to the Seattle Mayor’s win this award. Commission for People with Disabilities, where he advocates for policy Terri Stewart, MDiv, was awarded the 2012 changes regarding transportation, hous- Gertrude Apel Pioneering Spirit Award by ing, employment and public access. the Church Council of Greater Seattle. Stewart, currently in the post-master’s certificate 2011 in transforming spirituality/spiritual direcDiana Chamorro, MSAL, earned tion program, spearheads the Youth Chapnational honors for her work as laincy Coalition, recognized for its work assistant director of athletic comwith young people in detention centers.

2008

100 40

40 100

Julie Larson-Green, MSE, was promoted to head all Windows software and hardware engineering at Microsoft. She will lead development for Microsoft’s flagship product.

Stacie Bain, JD, recently opened her own law firm, Rainier Bike Law. Since 2007 she has represented injured bicyclists. Her practice focuses on helping cyclists who have been injured by drivers, unsafe road conditions or defective products.

100 40

100 40

1992

2004

30 30

30

Benes Aldana was promoted to Captain (O-6) in the U.S. Coast Guard. He serves as the Chief Counsel of the Legal Engagements Division at U.S. Africa Command based in Stuttgart, Germany. Aldana leads a team of attorneys charged with advancing the rule of law and respect for human rights with African military partners.

Sarah A. Bir, ’05 MPA, and Michael J. Wald, ’00, were married Sept. 15, 2012, at McMenamin's Kennedy School in Portland.

2012

70 70

1999

1988

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

munications at Princeton University. The Collegiate Water Polo Association (CWPA) awarded Princeton its National Water Polo Sports Information Office of the Year. Chamorro achieved national exposure for water polo on ESPN, enabled internet streaming and provided a continuous stream of publicity for the sport.

30 30

30

Jessica Boling received a Fulbright scholarship to conduct research in Cameroon. For her Fulbright, she will examine the effectiveness of international aid to NGOs. Currently Boling is the executive director of Global Overseas Adoptees’ Link in South Korea. The nonprofit provides services to adoptees returning to Korea.

70 70

70

2007

Sahnica Washington, ’99 MIT, is the new principal of Roxhill Elementary School in Seattle. Previously she was the Summer Semester principal at the school in 2007 and 2008, and Summer Semester manager in 2010. She has also taught at Fairmount Park, Rainier View and Emerson elementary schools.

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

1995

Scott Yurczyk, a mechanical engineering graduate and former Boeing engineer, was recently promoted to Battalion Chief with the Seattle Fire Department. He currently covers West Seattle.

30 30

30

1987

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25 90 100

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Brooke Rufo-Hill, '99, and husband James Rufo-Hill welcomed twin girls Rosa Marietta and Ines Josephine into their family on May 7, 2012. Brooke keeps busy caring for her “gaggle of girls” (including big sister Magdalena, 3) and serving as the director of Magis: Alumni Living the Mission.

50 40 40

50

Mark Meier, ’99, was recently admitted into the Moss Adams LLP Partnership. Meier graduated with a bachelor of science in business administration degree, with a concentration in both accounting and finance.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Angelica Marie Germani, ’04, and Pablo Alejandro Mendoza were married Sept. 2, 2012, in Woodinville, Wash. The Rev. Clemente Salazar, longtime friend of the couple, performed the intimate ceremony in the presence of family and close friends. The couple honeymooned in Ashland, Ore., where they got engaged and travel every summer.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

ALUMNI VOICE B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100

70 70

70

PHOTO BY JOE DYER

100 60

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

ROTC CELEBRATE PROMOTION

100 40

40 100 40 100

40 100

40 70 40

10 40 40

At the end of the last academic year, SU Army ROTC alumni gathered in celebration of Kevin Stoll’s promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Army. This group has remained in the area since graduation and looks forward to representing the SU veteran alumni community. Pictured (front row, l-r) Kristie Johnson (Staber), ’96, Tricia Cawdrey, ’97, Jennifer Stoll (Dibble), ’97, Nicole Tinnel (Bowns), ’97, and Carrie Verge (Hughes), ’96. (back row, l-r) Brian deLeon, ’96, Sha McGary, ’96, Greg Verge, ’96, Lt. Col. Kevin Stoll, ’95, Jennifer Hiner (Huff), ’95, Chad Hiner, ’95, Stephen Simerly, ’95, Maj. Brent Tinnel, ’97, Robby Frondozo, ’99, and Chul Lee, ’94.

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

50 40 40

50 90 100

Submit achievements, personal and professional news and photos for Class Notes at www.seattleu.edu/magazine/.

38 / Class Notes

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Jennifer Kelly, ’85, recently released her debut CD, Nothing’s Lost. Kelly has been making music for 30 years with bass player and SU grad Darrell Jesse, ’84. The two started playing together in a student rock/dance band for an SU Search Retreat. Kelly describes the 13-song collection of music this way: “The CD thematically is a lot about human resilience and how when it comes to what’s deepest and truest, nothing can ever really be taken from us or lost.”

70 40 40

40 70 40

Merida Johns (Boetani), ’71, PhD, ’73, was awarded the American Health Information Management Association’s Distinguished Member Award. The award, the association’s highest honor, celebrates an individual with a long and exceptional history of health information management with a record of noteworthy contribution. Johns was a tenured faculty member at Ohio State University and the University of Alabama at Birmingham; she was editor of one of the premier textbooks in the field. Currently she heads her own company, the Monarch Center for Women’s Leadership Development that helps women break the glass ceiling and fulfill their economic and leadership potential.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

BEING SCENE

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

IN SEARCH of MEANING

70 70

70 30

30 30

Hundreds of book lovers converged and comingled with hundreds of authors at the fifth annual Search for Meaning Book Festival, presented by the School of Theology and Ministry. This year’s keynote speakers were Michael Chabon, Pulitzer prize-winning novelist (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay) and Reza Aslan, an internationally acclaimed author, scholar and speaker. Festival-goers were able to hear firsthand readings from the 40 authors-in-session at an event that explores themes of human meaning and a life lived with and for others.

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3 10 25

PHOTOS BY SY BEAN

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SU Magazine Spring/Summer 2 013 / 39

50 40 40

50

Book lovers browsed books and sat in on author readings presented by STM. Dean Mark Markuly (top right) set the tone for the day, which was a draw for literary folks who got the chance to mingle with authors including Sherman Alexie (above) and Michael Chabon (bottom right).


L/C

1

Round 3

2

4

5

6

IN MEMORIAM B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Seattle University remembers those in our alumni family and university community we’ve lost.

100

1950

100 100

1953 Barbara Joyce Dormann Keck, ’57 MEd (Nov. 6, 2012; age 80) Raised on Queen Anne Hill and in Ballard, Keck taught Spanish on Vashon Island, in West Seattle and later in San Leandro, Calif. After her children were raised, she worked for the Maritz Corporation as a commercial travel agent until her retirement.

1955

20 70 70

70 40 40

Donald F. Anderson (Nov. 1, 2012; age 81)

0000

70 40 40

1958 Thomas J. Morris (Nov. 22, 2012; he was 81)

10 25

Ginny Tessier (Nov. 3, 2012; age 76)

90 100

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75

Page 40

50 40 40

50

Born in Spokane and a graduate of Holy Names High School, Tessier resided in Seattle where she raised four children with husband Richard and worked as an elementary school art teacher. She also owned and operated a picture family business and was active at Saint John Vianney Catholic Church.

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

Born in Bremerton, Wash., Morris attended Seattle Prep then Seattle University. At the start of the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy, serving for four years. Morris worked for Boeing, the New Zealand Ministry of Works, Olympic Foundry and Vericast Foundry.

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Following graduation from O’Dea High School, Anderson joined the Army National Guard of Washington. Later, he went to work for The Boeing Company, retiring in 1992 after 35 years. In his free time he enjoyed spending time with family and hiking.

70 70 40

40 70 40

Seattle University Magazine publishes full obituaries online only at www.seattleu.edu/ magazine/. Note: Obituaries are edited for space and clarity.

10 40 40

40 70 40

We ask readers and family members to inform us of the death of alumni and friends of Seattle University. If a newspaper obituary is available, please e-mail it to sumagazine@ seattleu.edu or send via mail to: Seattle University Magazine, Attn.: Obits, Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122–1090.

40 100

40 100

After service in the Air Force during the Korean conflict, Hughes moved out west to Seattle to earn a bachelor’s from SU and a law degree from the UW. He practiced law as a patent attorney in Sumas and Bellingham, Wash., for many years.

100 40

40 100

Robert Bruce Hughes (Aug. 13, 2012; age 83)

1957 THINKING OF YOU

100 40

100 40

Jasper grew up in Grays Harbor, Wash., and later would attend and graduate from SU with a degree in education. He taught junior high school for many years, retiring from the Bellevue School District and Tyee Junior High.

Born in Renton, Wash., and raised in Issaquah, Chalfa enlisted in the Navy in 1945 before completing high school. He saw battle as a Radioman 3rd class on the LCS(L)(3) #8.

30 30

30

Richard Paul Jasper Sr. (Aug. 9, 2012; age 88)

Jack Chalfa, (Aug. 16, 2012; age 87)

70 70

70

1948

1951

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Following her father’s death, Keefe went to Seattle with her mother, who became the housekeeper at Catholic Archbishop Shaughnessy. She and her mother enjoyed 15 years of residency at the Archbishop’s mansion, during which time she graduated from Holy Names Academy and Seattle University (then Seattle College).

30 30

30

Anne Elizabeth Murphy Keefe (Aug. 19, 2012)

Born in Yakima, Wash., Carlisle eventually settled in Seattle, where she lived for most of her life. A fan of music, she sang in musicals while at Seattle University and enjoyed traveling in her free time.

70 70

70

1944

Marjorie Ruth Carlisle (Oct. 7, 2012; age 84)

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

A former teacher, coach and athletic director, who was known at SU for his skills on the basketball court, Tardie retired as an agent for State Farm insurances. A friend to many, Tardie was a member of the Board of Regents at SU, the Indian Wells Club and the Balboa Bay Club.

Antons served in World War II as a Chief Petty Officer in the Navy and was a survivor of Pearl Harbor. After receiving his bachelor’s degree from SU, he taught high school math in Washington and California, retiring in 1982.

30 30

30

Gerard “Jerry” Tardie (Nov. 7, 2012; age 70)

70 70

70

Alfred (Alf) Antons (July 28, 2012; age 92)

1965


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

1980

After graduating from Seattle University’s nursing school, O’Neill started her career working for the Army Corps of Engineers. The mother of five enjoyed traveling, reading, cooking and sports.

A native of Portland, Ore., Hayes worked for many years as an IT specialist and technology guru. His greatest passions were refereeing lacrosse across Oregon, sailing, kayaking and spending time with family.

30 30

30

1962

1983

70 70

Margaret Vicki Rose O’Neill (Nov. 1, 2012; age 84)

70

Frederick Wheeler Hayes, Jr., MBA (Sept. 17, 2012; age 57)

100

1959

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

In 2011, Coan joined Rosetta Resources as vice president and controller. Previously he worked for Linn Energy, Burlington Resources and ConocoPhillips.

30 30

30

Stephen Allen Coan (Nov. 18, 2012; age 59)

Born in Yakima, Wash., Verhey returned to her home city to teach following graduation from SU with a bachelor’s in education. She was an active member of Holy Rosary Catholic Church and was a member of the Ladies of St. Anne.

70 70

70

Patricia “Patty” (Harris) Verhey (Sept. 16, 2012; age 76)

100

Angevine served as a prosecuting attorney in the early 1970s in Skagit County and entered private practice in 1976. In his free time he enjoyed playing music—drums and piano—with the Jerry Jones Quintet and attending jazz festivals.

Nancy Claire Stack Chapman, JD (Aug. 7, 2012; age 51)

70

1964

Raised in Portland, Ore., Chapman was valedictorian of her St. Mary’s Academy high school class. After earning her law degree she practiced corporate business law and later was senior staff attorney at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center.

Debevec graduated from Creighton University School of Dentistry and established a private dental practice following service in the Army as captain in the Dental Corp from 1968–72. He retired from his dental practice in California after 33 years.

LaSalata earned a bachelor’s degree in geology from WSU and worked on various geological projects. Later he decided to pursue his dream of law school. LaSalata practiced law in Bellevue and Friday Harbor, Wash., before he was elected as a King County District Court judge.

Peggy Vandenberg Fursman (Nov. 11, 2012; age 65) Fursman graduated from Holy Names Academy, SU and Heritage University. She taught second grade at St. Joseph’s School in Issaquah.

1978

2004

0000

70 40 40

Titchenal graduated from Rogers High School in Spokane and received a bachelor’s degree in English from SU. A talented poet and artist, Titchenal advocated for disadvantaged students through the ACHIEVE program at Highline Community College.

70 40 40

40 70 40

Born in San Francisco as an “army brat,” Gwilliam lived in Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Washington state, Kansas, Texas, Uruguay and Germany. She served in the Army ROTC for six years, obtaining the rank of captain.

Katrina E. Titchenal (Nov. 5, 2012; age 38)

70 70 40

40 70 40

Elizabeth Ann Gwilliam (Andreacchio) (Aug. 14, 2012; age 56)

20 70 70

70 40 40

After graduation from Holy Names and SU, Ryan went to Boston University to earn a master’s degree. Some of her creative passions included writing, blogging and design; she enjoyed cooking, traveling and spending time with her children and grandchildren.

10 40 40

40 70 40

1996

40 100

40 100

Margaret Ellen Lamb Ryan (Nov. 13, 2012; age 79)

100 40

40 100

1966

100 40

100 40

Frank Vincent LaSalata, JD (Sept. 1, 2012; age 60)

30 30

30

Dr. Richard J. Debevec (May 5, 2012; age 69)

10 25

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

FACULTY

1978 Ann Boskovich (Jan. 13, 2013; age 57)

Kathleen “Kay” Korthuis (Oct. 6, 2012; age 78) Born in Peoria, Iowa, Korthuis later earned degrees in nursing from Wayne State University and the University of Toledo. As a nurse, she developed the first ICU in Michigan at Blodgett Hospital. She was dean of SU’s College of Nursing from 1986–1992.

50 40 40

50 90 100

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Born in Tacoma, Boskovich grew up in a strong Croatian community with her family and attended St. Patrick’s School and was a member of the last graduating class at Aquinas Academy. After earning a nursing degree from SU, Boskovich spent most of her nursing career at Swedish Hospital in Ballard, where she was a home health nurse.

70 70

1992

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Earl Francis Angevine (May 31, 2012; age 71)


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

THE LAST WORD

5

6

The Last Word is an interesting take on the arts/literature/academia/travel and more. B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

A Safe Place

100

30 30

30 100

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

SPD, Seattle Neighborhood Group and the Archdiocese of Seattle. College of Education School Psychology Professor Samuel Song, an expert in the field of youth violence whose most recent research focuses on anti-bullying programs, was the day’s facilitator. Song says that when students act as leaders engaged in school activities to promote crime prevention and antibullying the results effectively create and improve a safe environment. Through his extensive academic expertise in the field of youth violence, Song specializes in preventing children from being exposed to violence. Students from area schools—many of them in leadership roles on their campuses—were in attendance and spoke of ways they can influence positive changes among their peers and encourage others to do their part in making schools safe for all.

70 70

70

Hundreds of local high school students, police officers and school officials descended on Seattle University’s campus in late January to be part of an important effort to address head on issues challenging the safety of the region’s—and the nation’s—schools and children. The first annual Impact! Safe Schools conference was especially timely given the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary and the stories of young people who may do harm to themselves because of relentless bullying by classmates and peers. The importance of maintaining a safe and secure learning environment was at the center of the event, which featured guest speakers including Seattle Police Deputy Chief Nick Metz, SU President Stephen Sundborg, S.J., and Seattle Schools Superintendent Jose Banda. The conference was a partnership between the university, the Seattle School District,

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

Men's basketball Coach Cameron Dollar chats with one of the high school students on hand at the safe schools conference.

30 30

30

Seattle University hosts conference tackling ways to keep schools, students and communities safe

10 40 40

40 70 40

PHOTOS BY CHRIS JOSEPH TAYLOR

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40

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42 / The Last Word

50 40 40

50

The importance of maintaining a safe and secure learning environment was at the center of the event, which featured guests from the Seattle Police Department, Seattle Schools and more.


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

B

A

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

40 100

40 100

Seattle educator Tim Bursey, center, was among the city, school, law enforcement and community leaders on hand for the first Impact! Safe Schools conference.

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

WHAT WAS SAID

0000

70 40 40 10

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

“We’re going to talk about how to spot and stop bullying.” NICK METZ, deputy chief, Seattle Police Department

25 90 100

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CAMERON DOLLAR, head coach, SU men’s basketball

50 40 40

50

“To be a leader, you need to have integrity.”


L/C

1

2

Round 3

4

5

6

100

Seattle, WA Permit No. 2783

100 100 60 100 100

100 60

PAID

B

A

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

SEATTLE UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 901 12th Avenue PO Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

100 100 60 100 100

100 60 100

70 70

70

30 30

30

THE POWER OF

100 40

100 40

100 40

40 100

“And”

40 100

40 100

10 40 40

40 70 40

20 70 70

70 40 40

70 70 40

40 70 40

70 40 40

40 70 40

0000

70 40 40 10

3.1 2.2 2.2 10.2 7.4 7.4 25 19 19

3

At Seattle University, students don't have to choose between what matters most to them. Here, it's not a choice between academic rigor or spiritual fulfillment; great teaching or meaningful research; a worldclass education or a thriving urban setting. What makes Seattle University unique is the Power of And. Explore the many ways SU lives out this principle and its mission in the 2013 President's Report. www.seattleu.edu/president/report/

25

50 40 40

50

75 66 66 100 100 100 80 70 70 100

75 90 100

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Spring Magazine 2013