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2012

Prepare. Serve. Lead. Succeed.

The Graduate Programs of

Seattle University


Contents Introduction 1 College of Arts and Sciences

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Albers School of Business and Economics

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College of Education

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School of Law

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College of Nursing

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College of Science and Engineering

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School of Theology and Ministry

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General Information Student AND ACADEMIC Services

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Admission Requirements

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Tuition AND Fees

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Admission Deadlines

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Financial Aid

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Campus Map

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Graduate Programs Listing

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a deeper knowledge of your field with a broader sense of

SU Quick Facts

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purpose and enrichment.

F or more than half a century, Seattle University has offered graduate programs stressing professional development while reflecting values of leadership and social justice. It is a unique approach to graduate education that satisfies your quest for

Seattle University is a regional leader in graduate education, with 34 accredited graduate degree programs, more than two dozen certificate options and seven schools and colleges. We continually revise and expand our offerings to meet the needs of the Pacific Northwest. We understand the

challenge of advancing your education while juggling the demands of a job, family and other responsibilities. You’ll find that SU programs accommodate the often full schedules of working professionals, with options for evening and weekend classes and faculty available in extended office hours.

Photography by Mel Curtis, Braden Van Dragt, Tom Reese and Chris Joseph Taylor.

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Professional Development. Leadership Formation. Mind and Body; THEORY AND PRACTICE

Social Justice.

Seattle University students have access to the latest developments in their fields, as well as career-development resources like this Competitive Advantage networking forum.

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A Personal Education, A Great City

A CONVENIENT Campus Oasis

Expect an academically rigorous education with individual attention, an engaged, collaborative classroom atmosphere and a diverse campus community. You’ll feel the influence of our world-class city and its varied entrepreneurs, companies and organizations. You’ll have faculty who come from these organizations and have done extensive work in your chosen field.

The SU campus has easy access to Interstates 5 and 90, and business classes at a Bellevue site just off I-405 and I-90. Our 48-acre Seattle campus is a state-certified wildlife habitat, with tree-lined malls and lush pesticide-free landscaping. Works by internationally known artists grace walls and workspaces. Light-filled lobbies and leafy enclaves invite study and reflection. The McGoldrick Collegium gives graduate students their own space for studying, relaxing and socializing. Students now enjoy a refurbished library and state-ofthe-art learning center.

Seattle University students receive a holistic education. You’ll receive both theory and practice. Your courses will integrate current and impending developments in their field. They will also integrate a sense of ethics and

the values of community service. Whatever your program, you’ll grow as a leader with high professional standards and the tools and desire to pursue social justice within your organization and community.

Through team-building and leadership development, Seattle University students learn to reach higher both figuratively and literally. Some students reach for the treetops in the Albers adventure-based leadership seminar.

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College of Arts and Sciences The College of Arts and Sciences offers seven graduate programs, all of which support Seattle University’s mission to educate the whole person for a life of leadership and service. That mission, central to our Jesuit heritage, guides an emphasis on ethical reflection as the cornerstone of our students’ professional careers. Critical thinking and the desire to take on challenging roles—and go beyond what is required—set our graduates apart. Go to www.seattleu.edu/artsci/ for details on the following programs: • Arts Leadership (MFA)

• Public Administration (MPA)

• Criminal Justice (MACJ)

• Sport Administration and Leadership (MSAL)

• Executive Nonprofit Leadership (MNPL)

• Juris Doctor/Criminal Justice

• Organization Systems Renewal (OSR)

• Juris Doctor/Public Administration

• Psychology (MAP)

• Juris Doctor/Sport Administration and Leadership

Profile

Laura Polson, Criminal Justice student

BECOMING A LAW ENFORCEMENT PROFESSIONAL Before she arrived at Seattle University, Laura Polson did a wide search for just the right graduate program in criminal justice. Too many of them, she says, focus on public administration and policy. “I looked for really diverse classes and a program that wasn’t so policy oriented,” she says. “And I wanted connections to the community that were obvious from the get-go because those were key to getting the right job.”

“The opportunities are there for just about anything you want in law enforcement.” Laura Polson, Criminal Justice student

As an SU graduate student, she signed on for every practicum to see what suited her best: Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) or Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). She also interned for the ATF as well as the U.S. Marshals Service. “The opportunities are there for just about anything you want in law enforcement,” she says. In 2010, she landed her dream job as a deputy U.S. marshal with the nation’s oldest federal law enforcement agency. Based at the federal courthouse in Tacoma’s remodeled, 100-year-old Union Station, Polson is pumped about every aspect of her work. She hasn’t yet had reason to draw her gun or play a role

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in extraditions of any notorious criminals, although she has traveled as far as Florida to return a fugitive to the Northwest. As early as her graduate student internship, she discovered she liked working with inmates and the courts. “I get to see the whole judicial process close up and in motion,” she says. “Plus, every day I kind of don’t know what my work will be. I bounce from one thing to another. I might be doing transports or bookings of new prisoners or serving subpoenas or taking an inmate for medical care.” It’s a big leap for the 2004 Eastern Washington University anthropology graduate whose previous work experience involved sitting at a desk doing data entry. She’s pleased to have found the right niche. “I’m never at my desk and I love that. I don’t have to write warrants or do paperwork, just go out and get the bad guys,” she says. Deputy Polson is continuing to develop her leadership abilities by creating a practicum to challenge and support SU’s graduate and undergraduate criminal justice students. She plans to cover the courts, witness security, judicial security, asset forfeiture, warrants, a tour of the courthouse and perhaps even a meeting with a judge as part of the two-day practicum on the U.S. Marshals Service, which hasn’t been represented until her efforts. Based on her experience so far, her career goal is an intriguing one. “I think it would be really interesting to investigate threats against the courts and judges,” she says. “If I made a career of doing judicial security, I’d be very happy.” Laura Polson landed her dream job as a deputy U.S. marshal in Tacoma.

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Albers School of Business and Economics The Albers School of Business and Economics educates managers from around the globe to be effective world-class leaders—both in their professions and in their communities. In the Jesuit tradition of leadership and service, you are challenged with contemporary and ethical issues facing businesses and society throughout the curriculum, and service projects are incorporated into several classes. The Albers School is fully accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International, the premier accrediting agency for business schools worldwide. Go to www.seattleu.edu/albers/graduate/degrees.aspx. for details on the following programs: • Business Administration (MBA) • Finance (MSF) • Health Leadership Executive (MBA) • Leadership Executive (MBA)

Profile

• • • •

Professional Accounting (MPAC) International Business (MIB) Post-Master’s certificates Joint degrees with Law

Brittney Hurst, MIB ’11

MIB graduate Brittney Hurst (left) and Linda Ruthruft, a Red Winged Leadership Award finalist, meet for coffee at Street Bean Espresso.

APPLIED LEADERSHIP As she describes the work that went into the creation of the Red Winged Leadership Award project, Brittney Hurst says she was pleased with the way each student in her cohort rose to the challenge. “What was so impressive was that every individual took the ball and went for the stars,” she says. The Red Winged Leadership Award began as a project of 21 graduate students in Seattle University’s 2010 Graduate Leadership Formation Certificate (GLFC) cohort at the Albers School of Business and Economics. The award honors community leaders committed to embracing the overlapping intersection of leadership, business acumen and social impact. Members of the cohort worked together to identify possible candidates in the community who embody these principles, then recognized top citizens at an awards ceremony. According to Hurst, it was Management Asst. Prof. Jennifer Marrone who came up with idea, inspired by the Opus Prize, the world’s largest faith-based, humanitarian award for social innovation. The prize was administered by Seattle University in 2008.

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For the Red Winged Leadership project, Hurst was in charge of finding a panel of jurors who would choose two finalists and a winner. That jury included: Norm Rice, former Seattle mayor and CEO of the Seattle Foundation; Phyllis Campbell, member of the SU board of trustees and CEO of JPMorgan Chase Northwest; Tara Smith, associate director of Seattle Works; John Dienhart, Frank Shrontz chair of professional ethics at the Albers school; and Carly Cannell, assistant to the director of the SU Center for Service and Community Engagement. Hurst’s was just one of numerous committees and subcommittees involved in the project. “We had no idea what this would look like, feel like or what it would mean at the start of the quarter,” she says. “There were layers to it – a lot of moving parts – with teams in charge of branding, finances, the awards event and more. Calling this experience a class project really undersells it because it was so much more challenging than that.” Rahwa Habte, co-owner of Hidmo Eritrean Cuisine in Seattle’s Central District won the 2010 award. Finalists that

year were Linda Ruthruff, executive director of Street Bean Espresso in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, which provides homeless and street youth with supportive employment, and Dylan Higgins, Seattle co-founder of savetogether.org, which promotes the power of responsible saving. Studying leadership was especially valuable for Hurst, who also works as a business development executive with Hearst Seattle Media. “Leadership was a natural fit for me and this program was very diverse, with 90 percent of the cohort working full time. We examined theories about leadership and when we learned concepts, we had an opportunity to apply them. “The university environment at SU is so collegial and collaborative. I like structure, but I like flexible structure with intelligent, challenging people. That I could start my studies in any quarter was appealing, too. “I especially like the holistic approach and that what we do means something to the community in a responsible and caring way. I’m attracted to the fact that care and concern can be rewarded in business,” she says.

“I especially like the holistic approach and that what we do means something to the community in a responsible and caring way. I’m attracted to the fact that care and concern can be rewarded in business.” Brittney Hurst, MIB graduate

Hurst, whose business studies Albers focused more on entrepreneurship, has a goal of one day becoming a venture capitalist. “I’m really good at connecting thoughts and connecting people, creating a confluence that swirls around me. I like the idea of launching different businesses. Having that impact is challenging,” she says.

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College of Education The mission of Seattle University’s College of Education is to prepare ethical and reflective professionals for quality service in diverse communities. The College of Education is devoted to preparing students for educational careers and for leadership roles that promote a just and humane world. Students can select from eleven graduate programs that will enable them to use their community leadership skills and impact systemic change from the classroom to the boardroom. Go to www.seattleu.edu/coe/ for details on the following programs: • Adult Education and Training (MA/MEd) • Counseling (MA) • Curriculum and Instruction (MEd) • Educational Administration (MA/MEd/EdS) • Education Leadership (EdD) • Literacy for Special Needs (MEd) • School Psychology (EdS) • Special Education (MEd) • Student Development Administration (MA/MEd) • Teacher Preparation (MIT) • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (MA/MEd) • Post-Master’s certificates When Monico DeLeon was a student teacher, he challenged students to redirect their energy.

Profile

“Now I want to be the type of teacher that unfortunately I didn’t have. Every class I’ve taken at SU has helped me move forward to be the teacher I want to be.”

Monico DeLeon, MIT ’09

Monico DeLeon, MIT ’09

HE FOUND ROOM TO BE CREATIVE Monico DeLeon’s vision for the future is clear: he hopes to be director of special education programs for a school district within three to five years. “And I see myself becoming a principal after 10 years,” says DeLeon, a graduate of the College of Education Teacher Education (MIT) program. The MIT program was an incredibly collaborative experience for him from the outset. “The MIT program prepared us to hit the ground running. Personally and professionally, it was the best thing that has happened to me,” DeLeon says. “They allowed a lot of room for us to be creative, to not be afraid of failure. If you fail, you’ll learn what you need to do to fix it.”

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Earning his master’s in teaching with a social studies endorsement spurred him to continue at Seattle University. Thanks to an unexpected experience he had as a student teacher in special education, DeLeon chose to explore teaching youth with challenging behaviors. He says he doesn’t like the term “at-risk” youth. “We’re all at-risk, whether it’s behavioral or biological,” says DeLeon, who received a Martinez Foundation Fellowship offered to students of color who pursue education degrees. DeLeon was the first recipient of the fellowship for special education. DeLeon has come far since his youth. His family moved to Southern California from Tijuana, Mexico, when he was

12. He recalls a time when the only people he and his siblings could relate to were gang members. “The road to this moment has been amazing” says DeLeon, the first in his family to go to college and graduate. “Now I want to be the type of teacher that unfortunately,– I didn’t have. Every class taken at SU helped me move forward to be the teacher I want to be.” “At SU, I’ve learned: Be bold, challenge yourself, challenge your students. Don’t underestimate those you teach. They may be bright and defiant, but when you reach them, that bond will last.” One of his proudest achievements came when he was a student teacher at Black River High School, an alternative

school in the Renton School District that closed in 2010. “I noticed all the students would save their rage until Fridays and then there would be a lot of fights. I chose to go to work dressed nicely and my students would often ask why I was so dressed up to go to the ghetto. I told them if you look good, you feel good. So I got this idea to challenge students to dress up on Fridays. “The first time, it looked like a prom scene, with prom dresses and formal wear,” he says. “The next week, they started to dress professionally and the fights started to disappear. Pretty soon, it became school wide. Fresh Fridays, it was called. And you know, there were zero fights on Fridays in what had been considered a problem school.”

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School of Law Seattle University School of Law, the largest and most diverse law school in the Northwest, is dedicated to the twin priorities of academic excellence and education for justice. The School of Law is home to leading academic programs, including the country’s top-ranked Legal Writing Program, the Ronald A. Peterson Law Clinic, and distinguished centers and institutes. These programs and a superb faculty support the law school’s mission to educate outstanding lawyers to be leaders for a just and humane world. Go to www.law.seattleu.edu/ for details on the following program • Juris Doctor (JD) • Joint degrees with Juris Doctor and the following graduate programs: • • • •

Business Administration (MBA) Criminal Justice (MACL) Finance (MSF) International Business (MIB)

Profile

• • • •

Professional Accounting (MPAC) Public Administration (MPA) Sport Administration and Leadership (MSAL) Transformational Leadership (MATL)

Keith Jang-Hoon Seo, JD ’09

FINDING HIS VOICE Keith Jang-Hoon Seo left his native Korea for boarding school in Canada in hopes of learning English. After years of careful study and practice, he has an expert grasp, but it was another language altogether that provided one of his most meaningful experiences at Seattle University School of Law. Seo earned a B.A. in Spanish and a minor in Japanese. While in law school, he volunteered for CASA Latina, which is dedicated to empowering Latino immigrants. Working for the Wage Claim Project, he helped Hispanic workers

Keith Jang-Hoon Seo credits the law school’s top-ranked Legal Writing Program for helping him develop writing skills that have been praised by judges and employers. recover more than $23,000 in unpaid wages. Many are undocumented workers who fear deportation if they speak up for themselves. “These are husbands and fathers who have family members often depending solely on their income,” Seo says. “With no savings, if there is no income for even a month, they suffer tremendously, barely making ends meet.” One particularly rewarding case involved workers who

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were hired by an Asian contractor who refused to pay them for their services. Seo helped them recover what was rightfully theirs. “These workers were very skeptical that an Asian person would or could help them because they were lied to by another Asian person,” Seo says. “They were surprised when I spoke to them in Spanish, but they opened up to me and later called me ‘amable,’ which means ‘kind.’ That I was able not only to help them be paid, but also to cure their emotional injury was very fulfilling.” Seo didn’t envision himself in law school, but another situation involving language set him on the path. When his parents were in a car accident in the United States, he saw how hard it was for them to communicate with lawyers and insurance companies with their limited English skills. “I realized if a lawyer spoke their language, it would benefit them, and I thought I could do that for other immigrants,” says Seo, an attorney with the Seattle law firm Riddell Williams. He was drawn to Seattle University School of Law’s twin goals of academic excellence and education for justice. He credits the law school’s top-ranked Legal Writing Program for helping him develop writing skills that have been praised by judges and employers. “The Legal Writing Program is top-notch. The quality of the faculty is impressive. The first-year professors really got me interested in the law. For me law school was about justice, but it is also about intellectual challenge and stimulation.” Keith Jang-Hoon Seo was drawn to the Seattle University School of Law’s twin goals of academic excellence and education for justice.

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College of Nursing Today’s complex and ever-changing health care environment demands that nurses have advanced knowledge and skills, as well as the ability to be flexible and work collaboratively with other health team members. Graduate study in Seattle University’s College of Nursing offers you the opportunity to deepen your knowledge of critical phenomena, develop new perspectives, learn new roles within the health care system and become certified in one of the advanced practice specialties. Through scholarship, leadership, and delivery of quality nursing care, the College of Nursing emphasizes caring for vulnerable populations, which reflects the Jesuit mission of preparation for service and emphasis on social justice. Go to www.seattleu.edu/nursing/ for details on the following programs: • Nurse Practitioner Doctorate (DNP) • Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (PCNP/MSN) • Advanced Practice Nursing Immersion (APNI/MSN) • Leadership in Community Nursing (LCN/MSN) • Post-Master’s certificates

Profile

Natalie Sloan, APNI student Interviews with the homeless give Natalie Sloan opportunities to understand their needs.

LEARNING FROM THE VULNERABLE Seattle University’s College of Nursing is addressing concerns of the homeless who are medically fragile. The initiative focuses on King County with an emphasis on Lake City, eight miles northeast of downtown Seattle. At its heart is Natalie Sloan, a second-year student in the Advanced Practice Nursing Immersion program. She says her commitment to social justice inspired her to want to be part of the initiative. “I see myself as more of a resource,” she says. Sloan, originally from Battle Ground, Wash., joined the Peace Corps after she graduated from Washington State University-Vancouver with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. She spent two years doing community health work in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania before weighing her options and deciding to study leadership and community health at SU.

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It was SU undergraduate nursing students who discovered God’s Lil Acre, a homeless drop-in center eight miles northeast of downtown Seattle. Soon, a collaborative partnership developed in Lake City where the Seattle Mennonite Church had created a community ministry to respond to neighborhood homelessness. Nursing students began to spend time at God’s Lil Acre taking blood pressure, dressing wounds and discussing good health. It wasn’t long before they realized Band-Aids wouldn’t do much to address the health needs of the homeless, however. Obesity, congestive heart failure, chronic hypertension and diabetes are some of the common health problems. Threats, intimidation and traumas greatly challenge the survival of this vulnerable population. Statistically, the homeless die 30 years younger than the rest of the population—in their 50s rather than 80s.

As a graduate research assistant, Sloan is now interviewing those who come through the drop-in center to determine how a new respite care center might best serve them. She also assists with community assessments to help develop what will become a resource for the homeless who are recuperating from major illnesses and surgeries. Sloan hopes to better understand where homeless individuals go when they’re discharged from hospitals and where they currently get care. She’s also looking for the reasons the homeless may have turned down opportunities for respite care after hospitalization. “God’s Lil Acre is a safe and respectful place to talk to someone as a human being,” says Sloan. She says she is grateful for the openness of this population to share unique and traumatic stories. “They’ve taught me there is still a great deal of stigma

“I’ve learned the power of listening. It’s profound how people hearing themselves talk out loud can be life changing.” Natalie Sloan, APNI student

and misinformation toward homelessness by the general public,” she says. “I’ve learned the power of listening. It’s profound how people hearing themselves talk out loud can be life changing. “Nobody starts out life thinking this is where they’ll end up. I want to learn how to use my voice to share their stories. How do you tell the stories of others so they’re heard in a fair way? That’s what I’m here to learn.”

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College of Science and Engineering Seattle University has long been a leader in software engineering education. We established the world’s first master of software engineering degree program in 1979. Throughout our history, our program has been shaped by relationships with leaders in the industry. Today, we offer two graduate programs in computing. The Master of Software Engineering program builds upon students’ professional experience, enhancing their technical and project management abilities. The Master of Science in Computer Science program focuses on the development of technical depth as well as research and lifelong learning skills. Go to www.seattleu.edu/scieng/ for details on the following program • Computer Science (MSCS) • Software Engineering (MSE)

Profile

George Makarenko, MSE ’11

ADDRESSING BRAIN INJURIES George Makarenko had the foresight to recognize his career as a program manager for Microsoft Corp. might call for stronger skills in software development. “Over the three years I was in the MSE program, I grew technically on my job at Microsoft and that was important for me,” he says. A Russian native from near Moscow, Makarenko first came to the U.S. in the mid-’90s as a high school foreign exchange student and landed in Castle Rock, Wash. He later attended Lower Columbia College in Longview before he enrolled at Washington State University in Pullman, where he majored in the management of information systems and international business as an undergraduate and in finance for his MBA. He says Seattle University offered the best option for a graduate degree program in software engineering. “This program was specifically what I wanted—a combination of computer science, software engineering and project management. With its evening classes, SU’s MSE program is tailored to people who are working for companies like Microsoft and Boeing.” As he reflects on his studies at SU, Makarenko says his greatest challenge was his capstone project, which gave him an opportunity to make a difference for those with traumatic brain injuries. He and two other students were involved in development, testing and architecture for a community service project submitted by Kathy Moeller, who sustained a brain injury in 1990. This founder of Cognitive Harmonics Inc. in Jacksonville, Ore., was moved by her personal experience to explore ways for those with brain injuries to transition from medical and rehabilitation environments back to daily life. In 1993, she created a paper-based system called the BRAINBOOK®, a life management system to assist with mild to severe short-term memory impairment.

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“Over the three years I was in the MSE program, I grew technically on my job at Microsoft and that was important for me.” George Makarenko, MSE ’11

“Kathy enables people not only to be more independent but also to go back to work and recover with much less supervision. This project had several elements—creativity, contribution to a community and flexibility—and that’s why we picked it. It wasn’t something defined and simple,” Makarenko says of the Cognitive Bionics project. “And it turned out to be the pinnacle with challenges we never had to face before.” While they weren’t able to build all that Moeller hoped for in an academic year, Makarenko and his fellow students did create the architecture and design for a platform and built documentation for the features she wanted. “The students were brilliant and wonderful to work with. They really imagined what it would be like to live with a brain injury,” Moeller says. The system the students created was based on Moeller’s extensive research, yet they had to think through the needs of the brain injured and those professionals who treat them. They had to explore ways to alert professionals when someone with a brain injury should be prompted to take medication. They also had to develop cues for the brain injured about everything from brushing their teeth to knowing who they are. “Dealing with a real-life problem and contributing something meaningful was especially worthwhile,” says Makarenko. “I had to rebuild one of my home computers to be the server for our project. That was part of the fun.” As part of his capstone project, George Makarenko teamed up with other students to serve the needs of the brain injured.

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School of Theology and Ministry The School of Theology and Ministry (STM) is a creative model of ecumenical cooperation. The student body is composed of adult learners who pursue personal and professional growth with a vision of service to the community. Each degree and certificate program carefully integrates academic and pastoral theology, an emphasis on spiritual growth, and development of pastoral skills. Graduates learn to minister with integrity, competence, and compassion in multicultural communities. Go to www.seattleu.edu/stm/ for details on the following programs: • Divinity (MDIV) • Pastoral Studies (MAPS) • Pastoral Counseling (MAPC) • Transformational Leadership (MATL) • Transforming Spirituality (MATS) • Graduate and Post-Master’s certificates • Juris Doctor/Transformational Leadership

Profile

Herbie Martin, MAPS ’09 “If I’m not doing something multicultural, I feel I’m not exercising or doing God’s will,” says Herbie Martin, whose STM studies included service in the Japanese Baptist Church as youth director, preacher and Sunday school teacher.

Faith THAT DOES Justice Herbie Martin has a history of working in the community. He’s volunteered as an assistant pastor for Seattle’s Mount Zion Baptist Church and Renton’s New Beginning Christian Fellowship, co-founded a youth mentorship program and advocated for the health of the homeless through a Harborview Medical Center citizen advisory board. He’s also a state Department of Social and Health Services intake worker, assisting needy people as they come into the system. So when he filled out the application for graduate work in the School of Theology and Ministry, he quickly saw his personal mission lining up with Seattle University’s mission of justice and service. “It went hand in hand with the Jesuit philosophy of social justice in action, with the involvement in the community for the least, the lost and the left-behind,” he says.

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Over the years of study for his Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies, Martin furthered his sense of justice as well as his knowledge of himself, his awareness of God and his sense of direction and purpose. Raised in the Baptist tradition, Martin spent 20 years as an Army MP and recruiter. As his work took him through 40 states and a dozen countries, he was struck by the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.’s observation that Sunday service is “the most segregated hour” in America. That segregation, he says, creates a lack of clerical unity in fighting injustice. “Our greatest witness will be when the church can put away differences of traditions and we look on our commonalities and see our brotherly love,” he says. “When we know that injustice has happened in the community, all walks of life should be there to rally. Injustice to one is injustice to all.”

Martin himself spent much of his studies in a multicultural setting, with a year of service in the Japanese Baptist Church as youth director, preacher and Sunday school teacher. With about a dozen people from the church he spent Wednesdays tutoring kids at the Yesler Terrace Community Center. It gave him a better sense of himself. “I’m comfortable with who I am now and with what I bring to the plate because of being placed outside of the norm,” he says. It was a transformational experience, a sort of professional formation that is profoundly personal. “This experience here helps me realize my goal and my objective: If I’m not doing something multicultural, I feel I’m not exercising or doing God’s will. Because in the 21st Century, that is where God is moving.”

“Our greatest witness will be when the church can put away differences of traditions and we look on our commonalities and see our brotherly love.When we know that injustice has happened in the community, all walks of life should be there to rally.” Herbie Martin, MAPS ’09

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Seattle University

Student and Academic Services Seattle University offers resources beyond the classroom to assist you in pursuing your goals.

Lemieux Library AND MCGOLDRICK LEARNING COMMONS The new six-floor facility houses a media production center, The Byte Café, five distinctive reading rooms, numerous group study rooms, and two computer labs. It also offers 4,000 sq-ft of 24-hour study areas on two floors. Desktop computers provide access to the library catalog, online digital information, and the Microsoft Office Suite. A secure wireless network is accessible from all public areas and a laptop and digital media equipment check-out service is available. For more information, consult the Library website at: seattleu.edu/library.

Campus Ministry Campus Ministry provides many opportunities to grow spiritually, learn more about yourself, share your gifts and talents, and build community with others. We welcome and support persons of all faith traditions. For additional information visit: seattleu.edu/campusministry.

Career services OFFICE Career Services offers support for students engaged in vocational discernment and career development. The office hosts events such as resume workshops, LinkedIn workshops and an annual Career Expo during spring quarter. All students can access the Redhawk Network: Seattle U’s online resource for jobs, internships and career events. To learn more visit us online at: seattleu.edu/careerservices.

Computer ACCESS OIT provides you state-of-the-art computer labs offering secure, high-speed ethernet access to the campus network with web-based email and access to various software packages. Virtual desktops allow students to use Windows lab desktop from anywhere as well as the standard computer labs. For more information please go to the following link: seattleu.edu/oit/ServicesDetail.aspx?id=60527.

Connolly SPORTS Center

Seattle University offers a nationally recognized program of Collegia spaces — home-like environments where students can meet, study, snack and relax between classes.

The Archbishop Connolly Center featuring the Eisiminger Fitness Center is an approximately 170,000 square-foot recreation and fitness facility located at the corner of 14th Street and East Cherry Street providing the Seattle University community with a space to recreate positively and safely. Building and pool hours will vary. For detailed information regarding schedules and facility closures visit: seattleu.edu/recsports.

DisabilitIES The Disabilities Services office coordinates appropriate accommodations, assisting you to deepen your self-

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knowledge, academic competence and advocacy skills. It also promotes a welcoming and accesssible campus environment to persons with disabilities. You can consult with the Director prior to and while enrolled in a graduate program. For additional resources, visit: seattleu.edu/sas/disabilityservices.

International Student Center The International Student Center serves over 560 international students from 63 countries and the Center is a focal point for student activities and programs of a global, cultural, educational and social nature. The ISC plans large-scale events like International Education Week and the International Dinner while providing assistance to our international students in all matters pertaining to immigration and visa status. For more information visit: seattleu.edu/isc.

Learning ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Learning Assistance Programs provide one-on-one meetings with learning specialists to address topics such as managing time, coping with difficult reading assignments, adjusting to a new field of study, learning and applying theories, and using learning strengths. For additional information, please visit our website at: seattleu.edu/sas/learningassistance.

McGoldrick Collegium The McGoldrick Collegium is a gathering place for graduate students and non-traditional aged undergraduates from all programs and is located in Hunthausen Hall (School of Theology & Ministry). You must enroll to become a member of a Collegium. Enrollment is free and ongoing throughout the school year. For more information: seattleu. edu/commuters/collegia.

Resident Housing Seattle University does not offer on-campus housing for graduate students in the traditional residence halls. However, in order to provide more housing options for University students on or near our campus, the University has entered into a cooperating agreement with the owners of the Douglas Apartments. For more information, visit their website at http://thedouglasatseattleu.edu. Housing and Residence life also contracts with Places4Students.com, a company that specializes in providing off-campus housing solutions for area graduate students in the Seattle area.

Student Center and PIGOTT Pavilion FOR LEADERSHIP The Student Center and Pavilion houses the major dining facilities as well as many student services and student organizations. The center was designed and constructed with ecologically sensitive building practices.

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Graduation Programs

S eattle U niversity

Admission Requirements

Tuition and Deadlines

Thank you for your interest in Seattle University. Specific school application packets are available on-line at seattleu.edu/go/gradapply or by request from Graduate Admissions. Each contains copies of all required admission documents for any of that school’s programs. If seeking a student visa you must complete the Declaration of Finances form in the school application packet. International deadlines, requirements for English proficiency, and financial documentation are also detailed in the graduate application packet. All application materials should be received by specific program application priority deadlines to receive full consideration. Later applicants will be reviewed on a space available basis. Application deadlines and entry terms vary by program so please follow the deadlines listed. International applicants should refer to international deadlines listed in the graduate application directions. Test scores must be sent directly from the testing agency. Some programs will require that specific documents be sent directly to the department; if so, please send them in a separate envelope. Transcripts are considered official only when they arrive in the original envelope from the issuing institution or sent electronically via secured institution to institution system.

The following documents should be sent directly to Graduate Admissions: n Submit application form for Graduate Admission

and a $55 non-refundable application fee. See the opposite page for priority deadlines. n Provide official, degree-posted transcripts from the last

graded 90 quarter/60 semester credits of your bachelor’s degree, including any transfer institution credit earned during this time period. Official transcripts from any post-baccalaureate institution will also be required. Doctoral and post-Master’s applicants need only submit all graduate-level transcripts. Exceptions to the policy are noted with the degree requirements.

n Evidence of the minimum of an earned four-year bacca-

laureate degree from a regionally accredited institution is required.

n Students who have earned degrees from institutions

issuing non-graded transcripts must request official results from GRE, GMAT or MAT tests as determined by your program.

n Applicants for whom English is not a native language

must demonstrate English proficiency. Graduate applicants with a baccalaureate or higher degrees from recognized colleges in the U.S., Canada, Great Britain, Ireland, New Zealand or Australia and who have continued to reside in countries where English is the primary language for at least two years prior to applying to Seattle University will have this requirement waived. English proficiency may be met with an official TOEFL score of 92 (IBT) 580 (PBT); the IELTS exam with a minimum score of 7.0; PTE score of 62, or an institu tional Michigan Proficiency Test result of at least 83%. Certain programs may consider applicants with a mini mum TOEFL of 86 (IBT) 567 (PBT), PTE score of 58, IELTS score of 6.5, or an institutional Michigan Proficiency Test result of 80% but you will be required to participate in the graduate section of the Culture and Language Bridge program in your first term of study.

n Please consult the inserted application packet to see the

additional documents required for your program of interest.

Tuition

2 0 11 - 2 0 12

The average credit load per quarter is 3 for part-time students and 6-9 for full-time students. 2011-2012 Tuition per credit hour

Arts Leadership

$626

Business $748 Computer Science

$748

Criminal Justice

$626

Education (master’s and educational specialist degrees)

$575

Doctor of Education

$681

Public Administration

$626

Nonprofit Leadership

$626

Nursing $626 Organization Systems Renewal (OSR)

$609

Psychology $626 Software Engineering

$748

Sport Administration and Leadership

$700

Theology and Ministry Albers Executive Programs

$581 see program website

Fees Application, graduate and non-matriculated

$55

Deposits: Doctor of Education

$100

Executive Master of Nonprofit Leadership

$175

Master in Teaching

$500

Advance Practice Nursing Immersion: MSN

$150

Psychology $100 Technology fee

$100/qtr full-time $65/qtr part-time

Payment PLANS Several payment options are available to assist you in paying for each quarter’s tuition. For detailed information, please consult the Student Financial Services website at www.seattleu.edu/go/gradfin or contact Student Financial Services at (206) 220-8020.

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APPLICATION PRIORITY DEADLINES FOR TERMS OF ENTRY

International student deadlines may be earlier; see graduate application

Accounting Adult Education and Training Arts Leadership

Wınter

Spring

Summer

Fall

11/20

2/20

4/1

5/1

11/20

2/20

5/20

7/20

3/15

(Intersession start)

Business Administration Computer Science Counseling Criminal Justice Curriculum and Instruction Educational Administration Educational Leadership

11/20

2/20

11/20

2/20

8/20

3/20

7/20 3/20 3/15

11/20

2/20

5/20

7/20

11/20

2/20

5/20

8/20

4/1

First Review 12/1

Executive Nonprofit Leadership (Intersession start) Finance 11/20 Health Executive MBA International Business 11/20 Leadership Executive MBA Early Review 1/1 Literacy for Special Needs Master in Teaching Nursing Nurse Practitioner DNP Organizational Systems Renewal (OSR) Psychology Public Administration School Psychology Software Engineering Special Education Sport Administration and Leadership Student Development TESOL Theology and Ministry Christifideles

5/20

11/20

3/15 2/20 2/20

5/20 4/1 5/20

8/20 8/20

4/1 2/20 10/1 (APNI only)

5/20 12/1

7/20 2/1 12/1 11/1 7/1

10/20 10/20 11/20 11/20

2/20 10/20 2/20 2/20

5/20 2/20 5/20

1/15 7/20 2/20 7/20 7/20 2/15

11/20

2/20

1/15 5/20 4/1 2/15

1/15 7/20 6/1 2/15

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Graduate

Come Visit

Financial Aid

Our Campus

Graduate students must be enrolled at least part-time (three credits) to be considered for financial assistance. There are three financial aid options available—student loans, scholarships, and graduate assistantships. Seattle University financial aid is not available for international students.

To be considered for financial aid, you must be admitted to the university, and you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This is your application for federal, state, and institutional funds. For assistance, contact the Student Financial Services Office at (206) 220-8020, or visit the web at seattleu.edu/sfs.

Marylou Wyse Award

Loans Long-term, need-based loan.

n

Annual limit of $8,500

2011-12 interest rate is 7.9%

n

Combined total of loan and other aid may not exceed cost of attendance. n Interest accrues immediately but principal can be deferred.

Interested applicants should contact individual departments for information on departmental assistantships, and/or other scholarships. n

School of Theology and Ministry Tuition Aid Grants are available for students in the Theology and Ministry programs. For more information contact the School.

C1 LOYA

Administration Building

D1 ADMN

Lynn Building

E1 LYNN

n Students may obtain their own posi- tions; job listings are posted on the Redhawk Network web site at seattleu.edu/redhawknetwork.

Admissions & Alumni Building

C2 ADAL

O’Brien Center

B2 OBRN

Archbishop Murphy Apartments

A1 ATMA

Pigott Building

D1 PIGT

n

Bannan Science Building

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available.

Arrupe Jesuit Residence

B1 ARRP

B2 LSAX

Student Center

B1 STCN

Bellarmine Residence Hall

B1 BELL

Campion Residence Hall

A1 CAMP

James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership

3,43,4

P1P1 1 1C1 CASY

Championship Field

A3

Catholic School Special Tuition Grant

Chapel of St. Ignatius

D1 CHAP

Connolly Complex

A4 CONN

reduction for full-time teachers and principals in Catholic schools of the Archdiocese of Seattle who are fully enrolled in Master’s Programs in the College of Education. A separate application from the Student Financial Services Office is required. The grant is not available for doctoral, pre-service teacher preparation (MIT) classes or to students eligible for Matteo Ricci College tuition remission.

B2 RINA

School of Law Annex

Other Assistance

C1

Rianna Building

C1 BANN

Bannan Engineering Building C1 ENGR

Casey Building

n Provides up to a 50 percent tuition

The Quad B RB O R AO DA W D AW YA Y

22

The Douglas A2 DOUG

8 8B1

Teilhard de Chardin Hall

A1 CHDN

University Services Building

C1 USVC

Xavier Residence Hall

E1 XAVR

P3P3

Fine Arts Building

E1 FINR

Garrand Building

D1 GARR

10th & East Jefferson Lot

A1 P1

Hunthausen Hall

E1 HUNT

10th & East Columbia Lot

B1 P2

LA5 oL o gJMTW a nn ga F iF eKV17 i ledl d Kolvenbach Residence 1217 A2 James Tower

3,43,4

44

55

13th & East Cherry Lot

P6P6

14th & East Jefferson Lot

B3 P6

C1 P3

D1 CNFA

Main Parking/Visitor Parking D1 P5

C2 L19 C2 L21

1 31University T3HT HA VA EV E Directions to Seattle Campus:

n

From Interstate 5, take the James St. Exit Ch aa mm pp io nn sh i pi p Ch io sh (#164A northbound, #165 southbound). F iFei ledl d Proceed up the hill and through the light on Broadway Ave. E. Turn left on 12th Ave.E. 41 T4HT HA VA EV E Go three blocks to E.1 Marion St. and turn left to enter campus and visitor parking.

3,43,4

P8P8P9P9

66

5

18TH AVE

E EM AM RA IROI NO NS TS T

T T N SN S ISOISO A DM A D M E E

Campus Campus

Exit Exit 165 165

1212

P6

Th ee Th GG r er e n en

22

2424

2525 2626

P7P7

2

2,12 2,12

2727

17TH AVE

E ES PS RP IRNI GN GS TS T Everett Everett

E DENNY WAYWAY E DENNY AY AY E WE W LIV LIV E OE O

LSAX

705 715

L21 L19

9,60 9,60

Main Entrance && Visitor Parking Main Entrance Visitor Parking

JMTW

E EC OC LOUL MU BM IBAI AS TS T

ADAL

2222 2121

A1 P4

Murphy Garage

18 2018 20

CONN 1515 1717

Medical Center 1414Swedish 1616 Cherry Hill Campus

1111

Lee Center for the Arts

Logan Court 819 A,B,C

P7

16TH AVE

A4 P7

Broadway Garage

Logan Court 821 B,C

3,4

LAKE LAKE WASHINGTON WASHINGTON E UNION ST ST E UNION

E MARION ST ST E MARION E CHERRY ST ST E CHERRY

Seattle Seattle S ESAETATTLTEL E University University PUGET SOUND PUGET SOUND

ST ST ES ES J A MJ A M

Exit Exit 164A 164A

Tacoma andand Tacoma SeaTac Airport SeaTac Airport

1 51 T5HT HA VA EV E

Campus CampusEntry Entry

22

2323Administration AdministrationBuilding Building 1616Admissions AdmissionsOffice Office

Accessible AccessibleRoute Route

King KingCounty CountyMetro Metro

1818College CollegeofofArts Artsand andSciences Sciences 1212College CollegeofofEducation Education

2

XAVR

CNFA

CLMB

T14TH h eAVE Th e QQ uu aa dd

1313

OBRN

11TH AVE 12

Main Entrance & Visitor Parking

2323

CHAMPIONSHIP FIELD

1010

A2 KV20

1 21 T2HT HA VA EV E

1818

1212

15TH AVE

Kolvenbach Residence 1220

Lemieux Library & McGoldrick B1 LEML Learning Commons

1919

13TH AVE

HUNT

P5

USVC

BELL

RINA

DOUG

P5P5

3

99

P2P2 PARKING AREAS 77

3,4

SLLH

12,60 12,60

KV20

FINR

LYNN

718

KV17

THE GREEN

CHAP PAVL

12TH AVE

99

3,4

4

External Scholarships

Seattle University resources include a listing of selected external scholarships in Student Financial Services Office available via the web at www.seattleu.edu/sfs/scholarships.aspx and, in the “categories” drop-down list, select “Graduate”.

P4P4

C1 SLLH

33

LOGAN FIELD

PAVL

Sullivan Hall

STCN

P4

2

PIGT

BANN

E SPRING ST

n

n

A1

THE QUAD

E UNION ST E UNION ST

Long-term non-need-based, credit-based loan

Departmental Opportunities

Logan Field Loyola Hall

ENGR

10TH AVE

E MARION ST

n

Applications are available from individual departments and must be received by the program application deadline.

D1 BDWY

2

ADMN CASY

LEML

ATMA

CHDN

2

12

GARR

LOYA

P2

CAMP

3,4

1

E CHERRY ST E CHERRY ST

Federal Direct PLUS Loan

n

P1

1313 East Columbia Building B3 CLMB

1001 Broadway Building

E JEFFERSON ST E JEFFERSON ST

Same conditions as Federal Stafford Loan, except interest accrues immediately. Principal can usually be deferred.

Awards based on departmental requirements, demonstrated professional leadership, and need.

ARRP

Buildings and Areas

E 9, 60

BDWY

BROADWAY

ST N ST S ON D IS O M AD I E MA E

n

n

n On-campus and off-campus job opportunities are available.

901 12th Avenue, PO Box 222000, Seattle, WA 98122-1090 Tel: (206) 296-6000, www.seattleu.edu

E COLUMBIA ST

Annual limit is $12,000. (Students may receive a partial Federal Direct Stafford Loan and a partial Unsubsidized Direct Federal Stafford Loan. The total of both loans may not exceed the combined annual loan limits of $20,500.)

3. School of Theology and Ministry

Student Employment

3,4

1207

n

Long-term non-need-based loan.

2. College of Nursing

Work

D

P3

E CHERRY ST

n

1. College of Education (teacher preparation and other master or educational specialist programs)

C 9

1218

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

Available to newly admitted students in the following graduate schools:

B 9

Y W AY S WA M ES JA E E JAM E

Repayment begins six months after student ceases at least half-time enrollment.

n

Check with your employer for scholar- ship and tuition reimbursement opportunities.

E JEFFERSON ST

n

n Limited scholarships available to outstanding candidates from under-represented populations.

A

n

E JAMES WAY

Interest rate is 6.8% for loans taken in the 2011-12 year. Interest does not accrue until repayment begins.

Graduate Diversity Scholarships

ST

n

No separate application required

ON IS AD EM

n

n

n Libraries are excellent resource centers; however, frequently scholarship listing publications cannot be checked out so allow time to browse.

E UNION ST

Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan

n Limited need-based scholarships available to new students admitted to select programs for up to two years.

n The web offers numerous scholarship search opportunities and resources.

12TH AVE E 12T H AV E E

Scholarships

BRO A DW AY B ROA D WAY

Application Process

Many graduate programs also sponsor regularly scheduled information sessions providing an opportunity to meet with advisors in specific programs. You are encouraged to contact the specific department or review the graduate events calendar at seattleu.edu/go/gradevents for dates and times. Three comprehensive graduate program open houses are hosted annually by Graduate Admissions to provide you an opportunity to research all our graduate options. Contact us for a listing of upcoming open house programs or email grad-admissions@seattleu.edu.

A visit to Seattle University will help you decide if we can meet your needs. The best time to visit Graduate Admissions is between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Since these hours may not accommodate your work schedule, we are also open on Monday and Tuesday evenings until 6 p.m. Appointments are available as well from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. some Saturdays, September through early June. Please call (206) 220-8010 to arrange an appointment.

Parking Parking

P9P9Parking Parking

2121Jeanne JeanneMarie Marieand andRhoady RhoadyLee, Lee,Jr.Jr. Center Centerforforthe theArts Arts

23


GraduatE Programs Accounting (MPAC)

Nursing (DNP and MSN)

Adult Education and Training (MA or MEd)

Organization Systems Renewal (MAOSR)

Advanced Practice Nurse Practitioner (MSN)

Pastoral Counseling (MAPC)

Arts Leadership (MFA)

Pastoral Studies (MAPS)

Business Administration (MBA)

Post-Master’s Certificates in Education

Computer Science

Post-Master’s Certificate in Family Primary Care

Counseling (MA)

Post-Master’s Certificate in Theology and Ministry

Criminal Justice (MACJ)

Professional Certification for Teachers

Curriculum and Instruction (MA or MEd)

Psychology (MAP)

Divinity (MDiv)

Public Administration (MPA)

Educational Administration (MA or MEd, EdS)

School Psychology (EdS)

Educational Leadership (EdD)

Software Engineering (MSE)

Executive Nonprofit Leadership (MNPL)

Special Education (MEd, EdS)

Finance (MSF)

Sport Administration and Leadership (MSAL)

Graduate Certificates in Theology and Ministry

Student Development Administration (MA or MEd)

Health Leadership Executive (MBA)

Teacher Preparation (MIT)

International Business (MIB)

Teacher Preparation with Special Education (MIT)

Joint degrees with Law

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Juris Doctor (JD)

(MA or MEd)

Leadership Executive MBA (L-EMBA)

Transformational Leadership (MATL)

Literacy for Special Needs (MEd)

Transforming Spirituality (MATS)

Seattle University Quick Facts Accreditations • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) • Association of Theological Schools • AACSB International – Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business • National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education ( NCATE) • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education • Northwest Commission on Colleges & Universities • American Chemical Society • American Bar Association

Fall 2010 Graduate and Professional School Enrollment Graduate-level

2,240

Law School

1,012

Total

3,252

Women 1,847 Men 1,405 78.3% from Washington State

Prepare. Serve. Lead. Succeed.

21.7% national and international

• Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs • National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration • Council on Social Work Education Approvals • American Medical Association • American Society of Clinical Pathologists • National Association of School Psychologists • Washington State Board of Education • Washington State Board of Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission

24

Seattle University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, political ideology or status as a Vietnam-era or special disabled veteran in the administration of any of its education policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletics, and other school-administered policies and programs, or in its employment related policies and practices. All university policies, practices and procedures are administered in a manner consistent with Seattle University’s Catholic and Jesuit identity and character. Inquiries relating to these policies may be referred to the university’s Vice President for Human Resources and University Services, and Equal Opportunity Officer at (206) 296-5870. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and its implementing regulations, Seattle University has designated three individuals responsible for coordinating the university’s Title IX compliance. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity may contact any one of the following Title IX coordinators: Gerald Huffman, Vice President for Human Resources and University Services, Equal Opportunity Officer, Rianna Building 214, (206) 296-5870, huffmaje@ seattleu.edu; Dr. Michele Murray, Associate Vice President of Student Development, Student Center 140C, (206) 296-6066, mmurray@seattleu.edu; Dr. Jacquelyn Miller, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs, Administration 104, (206) 296-5446, jcmiller@ seattleu.edu. Individuals may also contact the Office for Civil Rights of the U.S. Department of Education.

www.seattleu.edu


Graduate Admissions Viewbook