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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR A heavy snowfall in November But barely any comes in December. Yesterday feels like it was just today And tomorrow is so far it may never come. We are stuck in the snow Expecting it to melt in a heartbeat While it takes a decade. With tomorrow comes change And I am scared. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t. But I’m sure we’re all scared To leave behind the only lives we’ve ever known And begin again. So only for now Do not think about yesterday And do not think about tomorrow. We are here today In a space we aren’t even sure what it is But we are together And we will wait for the snow to melt. With love,

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THEME

Liminality by definition is a disorientation that occurs in the middle of a period of transition. Individuals are no longer who they were when their journey began, but they are not yet who they will be. However, liminality is more complex than this. According to Dr. Troy Samuels, professor of Classical Archaeology, liminality comes from “limes�, the Latin word for doorway; for every person it can stand to mean a different thing. Liminality can be a place, a space, or a time between. It can describe a person or a state of being. But overall, it is about changes; changes to the self. Whether the journey is short or long, this year we begin to reflect on a new decade approaching and what the last decade has been. For many college students, the last ten years of their life have been a rollercoaster; from childhood to adolescence to semi adulthood and adulthood. Countless changes have taken place. We have crossed through dozens of doorways and come out better people: stronger, successful, and beautiful. During all of these phases and passages of time, we have reflected on everything that was and will be. We have been afraid for our future, yet constantly waiting for change to happen. We have gone through many rites of passages such as bad hair days, poor outfit choices, breakups, bad grades, paying rent, and experiencing college. The person that we once were is not who we are now. We are always changing, we are always walking through doorways going from one place to another, and the person we are now is not the same as when we began.

Autumn Brandt


photo to go here


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Letter from the Editor Theme Explanation Table of Contents Accreditations ALL WORK NO PLAY MOCK-UP GREY AREA OF FOUR MINDS EN ROUTE

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TEAM ACCREDITATIONS EDITOR IN CHIEF | PAIGE VENTURI DEPUTY EDITOR IN CHIEF | ERIN HUSTON DIRECTORS DIRECTOR OF MERCH AND STYLING | ARJUN MADHAVAN DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE DESIGN | LIVVY REECE DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL | RIN MCNUTT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE | CARRICK MOON DIRECTOR OF MARKETING | CONNOR GARCIA DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS | MADISON GODFREY DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY | SARA MANTICH [MERCH & STYLING]

[MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS]

[CREATIVE DESIGN]

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Mackie Schroeter

PHOTO/VIDEO LIASON: Madison Waliewski

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Maddie Arias

STYLISTS: Tony Abascal Shaya Abbaspour Varsha Anand Mikaela Blackwell Autumn Brandt Zee Brown Sariah Borom Catie Cook Arianne Dora Kennedy Keown Kate Mojica

PUBLIC RELATIONS: Lily Friedrich EVENT PLANNER: Stanlee Yurks

LAYOUT DESIGN: Alex Dreier Kimberly Flores Kameryn Moore Nyssa Qiao

[EDITORIAL]

[PHOTOGRAPHY]

EDITORIAL WRITERS: Carolyn Ciolfi Elissa Fertig Swarna Gowtham Avalon Husain Charlize Tan Lim Abe Plaut

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Madelyn Knight Sara Mantich Lilly Thomas

MERCHANDISE OFFICERS: Jess Becker Anna Gebhardt Karen Koak Beth Reynolds Kelsey Rike

VIDEOGRAPHERS: Anthony Gosling Lauren Thompson [FINANCE] DATABASE MANAGER: Hali Lucas

Thanks to Cole Daly for the use of ALL WORK NO PLAY’s pictured khaki trench.


ALL WORK ALL WORK NO PLAY NO PLAY


from goodwill (I promise you will be able to find these at every location). Finish the look with your favorite boot –combat, cowboy, riding – and you’ll be walking comfortably even on the streets of New York.

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ith one more semester left of the academic year, sights turn towards internships and job offers but often forget one of the most important aspects of all: the closet. Gone are the days of leggings and hoodies and in will come outfits that have to be Tim Gunn approved. Don’t want to replace your entire closet? Here’s a few ideas to mix in your undergrad pieces to make them office appropriate:

Have fun with a plain button-up shirt stolen from an ex by layering your favorite black bralette or lace tank over the shirt and stacking multiple chain necklaces on top. A black jean brings the whole look together, while a messy bun pulls the attention to your accessories.

Pair your favorite graphic tee with an oversized vintage blazer and cuffed cotton trouser 8


Photographer: Lilly Thomas. Models: Varsha Anand & Alfonso Soto. Stylists: Varsha Anand, Arianne Dora, Shaya Abbaspour, Catie Cook, and Kennedy Keown. Merchandise Officers: Karen Koak, Kelsey Rike, and Anna Gebhardt.

Remember that midi dress you wore to a semi-formal one time and thought you would never wear again? Drape a cropped off-theshoulder sweater or tie a buttoned cardigan over the waist of your dress for an outfit that is comfortable but can stand up for itself in a board meeting. Pair a distressed denim jacket with a vintage neck scarf and peasant blouse to create a classic Parisian chic. Maybe even add a red lip if you’re feeling especially like Audrey. Lastly, don’t be afraid to rock a statement shoe in the workplace. Chunky Fila’s, platform Doc Martens, even a Jelly sandal can add a fun bit of personality to a tame outfit. Paige Venturi


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MOCK-UP MOCK-UP


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Photographer: Sara Mantich. Models: Autumn Brandt & McKenna Yankel. Stylists: Autumn Brandt. Merchandise Officers: Kelsey Rike, Karen Koak, Jess Becker, and Beth Reynolds.


Models and IU Fashion Design students Autumn Brandt and McKenna Yankel patterned and created the skirts featured.

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GREY AREA


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n 2007, Lindsay Lohan got arrested 4 times. Britney Spears checked herself into rehab and the iPhone debuted. Amy Winehouse was still alive and singing, and the fashion world was saturated with low rise jeans and sequined page boy caps. One year later, the housing bubble blew up, the stock market crashed and with it, an era of Juicy Couture track suits and all the newest Gucci handbags. Suddenly, it was cooler to thrift your Balenciaga coat than it was to buy the latest one— who had the money, anyway? In keeping with our theme of liminality, the 2010s have been a strange time for fashion: hyperfuturistic but also nostalgic (we see you, Lisa Frank), and rife with a strange combination of the two. The previously K-mart savvy brand Champion is the new Gucci, and the rise of stars like Billie Eilish feature a new blend of emo, skater boy and logo print. The enmeshing of all of these styles is chaotic. And looking at the timeline of the cultural moment of the 2010s, well, it’s not hard to see why. Reflecting on the 2010s is an emotional rollercoaster. Back in 2012 and 2013, we have the rise of luxe comfort (even with the death of the Juicy tracksuit) with Isabel Marant’s wedge sneaker. Take it all the way to the present, this trend has persisted from the runway (see any of Virgil Abloh’s latest runway shows) to the classroom (see any girl with her chunky FILA sneakers ((no tea no shade)). The juxtaposition here of formal and informal, comfort and style, is a definitive trend of the 2010s, a strange

in-between not expressed as starkly in any decade until now. Another very popular trend in the 2010s is nudity. Nudity has always been popular but the rise of the nude body and discretely placed lacey dresses over it is a newer trend in the runway- and in pop culture at large. Everywhere from Bella Hadid on the runway last May, to the naked selfie of Kim Kardashian in 2016, emboldened female nudity is everywhere in pop culture. Perhaps the difference here between, say, Kim Kardashian and Marilyn Monroe pulling her dress down, or Twiggy and Farrah Fawcett in the ‘90s with their bare ribs and dark eyes, is the amount of agency that is given to the girls on the runway and on their social media platforms. Fashion has been disseminated in so many different ways throughout time and in the 2010s the main conduit was social media. What does this do to the female body, so constantly objectified and scrutinized, when women are given that front-facing camera and a faceless, yawning audience? The answer might be, wear a nude dress. Jumping forward to some trends we have seen in the past five years or so, we move toward the technologization and digitization of fashion- the Tumblr girl and, in the past year, the e-girl. These trends are more focused on high school and middle schoolaged girls: dyed hair, pastels, fake freckles, schoolgirl skirts, anything borrowed from Japanese and Harajuku culture, rosy cheeks,

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septum piercings. An essential part to this trend/culture is the presence of social media. The e-girl or tumblr girl in real life probably just looks like a teen experimenting with hair dye in her mom’s bathroom. But online? With the help of filters, blurring or changing facial features and even adding animalistic ones, as well as ambient accessories like glitter or flowers, the e-girl/Tumblr girl is able to create a fashion aesthetic that is based almost completely around the digitization of her own self. Her brand is an online one; her brand is her own self. This blurs a kind of strange line between autonomy and corporeality. So, in the 2020s we will see: a changing political landscape rife with tension at home and abroad, technology subsuming our interactions faster than we can imagine (for better, and worse), a crumbling environment and an economy as niche and

gigged-out as ever. Along with that will come, of course, changing fashion trends that run in tandem with these issues, just like today: thrifting, the merging of streestyle and couture, digital fashion and all the rest of it. The future is a strange and blurry landscape, and it can often be scary to contemplate, but maybe the world of fashion makes things a little bit more digestible, less terrifying when seen through the lens of glittery eye makeup, chain belts, logo prints, the color mauve. And fashion gives us tools for that hindsight as well in its very corporeality- who hasn’t looked at their early 2000s closet and wondered, what was I thinking? Maybe in 10 years, some other college student will be sitting at this very desk on their Mac Two Million writing about fashion of the 2020s for this very magazine. Who can say? Elissa Fertig


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Photographer: Madelyn Knight. Models: Sophie Pope & Bradley Streetman. Stylists: Sariah Borom, Varsha Anand, Zee Brown, and Kate Mojica. Merchandise Officers: Kelsey Rike and Jess Becker.


OF FOUR MINDS


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ccessories are a transcendent facet of fashion; they remain through every era, they define occasion, and they don’t even need to be functional-- they exist to punctuate looks and Today more than ever, the fashion industry meets in the middle with the worlds of technology, architecture and art. Such an evolution has created a space for innovative accessories in the ambiguous realm of liminality.

Work-of-Art Shoes: Sculptural heels were a hit on the Spring 2020 ready-to-wear runways this season, combining fashion and art, runways saw a slew of mismatched shapes and silhouettes in the heel department. These creative pieces require science, craftsmanship, and style to cultivate a transformative addition to an outfit, elevating shoes to the world of the abstract.


The Shrunken Purse

The Futuristic Sneaker:

Coco Chanel’s brilliant words, “Fashion is architecture. It is a matter of proportions,� could not be more fitting for this emerging accessory trend. This year, the world saw the dramatic introduction of a new purse: one of refined and meticulous proportions: the micro-bag. These cute accessories dangle from the fingers of models and celebrities alike, they maintain the essence and fun that accessories should bring to fashion, while still pushing the boundaries of clever innovation and exploration of the possibilities within structural design.

Visible and bold tech are central to athleisure and sneaker brands currently. In addition to futuristic textures and colors, the actual functionality of sneakers today are using innovative technology as well. Whether the goal is to be lightweight, flexible, or aerodynamic, the sneakerhead world is truly coinciding with the world of inventive tech. Avalon Husain


Photographer: Lilly Thomas. Models: Paige Venturi. Stylists: Sariah Borom, Shaya Abbaspour, and Mikaela Blackwell.


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EN ROUTE EN ROUTE


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Photographer: Sara Mantich. Models: Arianne Dora, Delaney Parker, and Bailey Jackson. Stylists: Arianne Dora, Varsha Anand, Zee Brown, Catie Cook, and Mikaela Blackwell. Merchandise Officers: Karen Koak, Beth Reynolds, and Jess Becker.


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Profile for SEASON Magazine

Liminal: F/W 2019  

SEASON Magazine presents its seventh issue for Fall/Winter 2019: Liminal.

Liminal: F/W 2019  

SEASON Magazine presents its seventh issue for Fall/Winter 2019: Liminal.