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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR To be honest We are all looking for power. For the force that dictates our lives And the energy to change this alone. This science is undeniable. Power lies in: A single motion The turning of wheels inside your head A first look at your own reflection The likeness you cherish with those around you And a displacement in the world born into Forcing your hand to write. The Laws of Physics demand action A gift from Mother Nature herself. It is time to act My friends.


T H E M E The ways in which we move through life and take up space are up to us as individuals; choices, as it would seem. However, we are constrained, to some degree, by the laws of physics: a set of undefiable rules that dictate the ways in which energy, force, and motion behave within the universe. These laws were not invented by physicists, they are simply the intelligible versions of the subtexts of nature that exist and have existed since the Big Bang, and will remain unchanged for millennia to come. As the physical state of the universe changes with time, these laws remain immutable. Therefore long after we, as a species, have left the Earth, and even after the Earth itself has disappeared from the universe, these laws will remain intact. In times of change and uncertainty such as the present, comfort can be found in the knowledge that some forces of nature are too powerful to be altered. And so we continue to explore movement, light, color, pressure, temperature, and sensation through science, math, art, and other means of creative expression. Inversely, we must remember that nature will not alter itself for our benefit, and every action we take has an equal and opposite reaction.

Erin Huston


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Letter from the Editor Theme Explanation Table of Contents Accreditations The Law of Conservation of Energy Newton’s Third Law of Motion The Tyndall Effect Newton’s Second Law of Rotation Archimedes Principle

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TEAM ACCREDITATIONS EDITOR IN CHIEF | PAIGE VENTURI DIRECTORS DIRECTOR OF MERCH AND STYLING | ARJUN MADHAVAN DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE DESIGN | LIVVY REECE DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL | RIN MCNUTT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE | CARRICK MOON DIRECTOR OF MARKETING | CONNOR GARCIA DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS | MADISON GODFREY DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY | SARA MANTICH [MERCH & STYLING]

[MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS]

[CREATIVE DESIGN]

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Mackie Schroeter

CONTENT CREATOR: Sarah Blau

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Maddie Arias

STYLISTS: Tony Abascal Shaya Abbaspour Varsha Anand Mikaela Blackwell Autumn Brandt Zee Brown Sariah Borom Catie Cook Gina DiDonna Arianne Dora Kennedy Keown Jada Lucas Kate Mojica Kayla Schutter

PHOTO/VIDEO LIASON: Madison Waliewski SOCIAL MEDIA: Ankitha Parlapalli

LAYOUT DESIGN: Alex Dreier Kimberly Flores Kameryn Moore Nyssa Qiao

PUBLIC RELATIONS: Lily Friedrich

[PHOTOGRAPHY]

MERCHANDISE OFFICERS: Jess Becker Anna Gebhardt Erin Huston Karen Koak Beth Reynolds Kelsey Rike

EVENT PLANNER: Stanlee Yurks [EDITORIAL] EDITORIAL WRITERS: Carolyn Ciolfi Avalon Husain Charlize Tan Lim Abe Plaut EDITORS: Elissa Fertig Swarna Gowtham

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Madelyn Knight Lilly Thomas Lauren Thompson VIDEOGRAPHERS: Anthony Gosling [FINANCE] DATABASE MANAGER: Hali Lucas

LAWS OF PHYSICS DEFINITIONS THANKS TO BILL HUSTON, ERIN HUSTON, AND JAGRANJOSH.COM


C O N S E R VAT I O N Energy can neither be created nor destroyed but it can be transformed from one form to another; therefore the energy in the universe remains constant.


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A N D R O G Y N Y I N FA S H I O N

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“Androgynous� is an adjective defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary as having the characteristics or nature of both male and female. Alternatively, one could understand androgynous to mean neither specifically male nor female. When it comes to understanding androgynous fashion, we have to grapple with the ways in which the gender binary has held a strong influence on the mainstream fashion community for a long time. The gender binary dictated what styles, designs, and even colors were available for consumers. There was a stigma against breaking these uncodified laws of fashion, due at least in part to the association of dressing androgynously with the LGBT+ community. It is important that a certain distinction is made. While some members of the LGBT+ community may dress androgynously, not all do and vice versa. More and more however, there is growing acceptance in mainstream fashion for those who wish to breakaway

from rigid gender expectations. Major brands like Balenciaga have taken steps to curate a more genderinclusive approach to their marketing campaigns, such as their inclusion of gender-nonconforming models. Meanwhile the gender defying red carpet looks worn by celebrities like Sam Smith and Janelle Monae have complimented the rise and success of new brands including Muttonhead, GFW, or NotEqual. Brands like Muttonhead, GFW, and NotEqual are each different in the aesthetic that they carry, though they are similar in that they were founded with the same mission of providing quality clothes without any one gender in mind. Muttonhead was founded in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 2009. All of their garments are designed in Toronto and manufactured in North America in either Toronto or New York. With the outdoors in mind, Muttonhead has a range of sweatshirts, Tshirts, button downs, jackets, accessories and more, all of which is “100% gender neutral and designed with 10 | SEASON


all ages, sizes, shapes (and species!) in mind.” Muttonhead also works to be a more sustainable and environmentally friendly alternative to fast fashion, providing customers with Tshirts made from recycled fabrics. GFW clothing was established in 2015 as part of Gender Free World Ltd. GFW describes their origin story as a gathering of like minded individuals who felt that “what we have in our pants has disproportionately restricted the access to choice of clothing on the high street and online.” GFW is best known for their button down shirts available in a wide variety of sizes, colors and prints. Scrolling through the front page of their website offers shoppers a glimpse into the diverse cast of models that reflect differences in 11 | SEASON

race, gender, and body type. Designing clothes with body types in mind instead of gender, GFW demonstrates a commitment to freeing their designers and customers from traditional confines of gender. NotEqual, founded by creative director and designer Fabio Costa, has been making an impact on the runway. NotEqual clearly operates with the intention to shatter gender expectations and highlight androgyny by having models of all genders walk the runway and pose for their lookbooks. Even NotEqual’s logo is a symbol of androgyny. An icon of the female, male and Genderqueer symbols combined around a circle create the logo of NotEqual. That same symbol is sometimes used by transgender and gender nonconforming communities to show pride and comraderie. While NotEqual may have prices that are inaccessible to some customers, the impacts of brands like NotEqual can still be felt throughout the fashion industry. Liberating oneself from traditional gender roles and gender guidelines in fashion can offer opportunities to think more about what you choose to wear each day. Whether a tag says “women” or “men”, consider adding any piece that speaks to you to your wardrobe. Abe Plaut


Photographer: Lilly Thomas. Models: Sarah Cassidy & Grant Howard. Stylists: Jada Lucas, Sariah Borom, Tony Abascal, Kate Mojica. Merchandise Officers: Karen Koak & Kelsey Rike.


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MOTION


For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.


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Photographer: Sara Mantich. Models: Jalen Perdue, Khaila King, Maggie Zielinski, Isabelle Kwon, Lane Logan. Stylists: Arianne Dora, Catie Cook, Zee Brown, Gina DiDonna, Mikaela Blackwell. Merchandise Officers: Karen Koak, Erin Huston, Kelsey Rike.


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T YNDALL

The scattering of light by very small particles suspended in a gas or liquid.


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Lemonhead. Not drugs or even candy, but instead: glitter. This is the brand of glitter used by the head makeup artist of HBO’s series of the summer Euphoria. If you’re unfamiliar with Euphoria, do yourself a favor and go watch it. Don’t feel bad about staying in on a Friday night to binge- trust me when I say that you’ll feel like you’re partying the whole time. To summarize, beautiful teenagers do too many drugs, fall in love, try to understand their mental health and sexualities, and wear GLITTER. This trend has become so popular over Instagram and even onto beauty blogs like Into the Gloss that it’s impossible not to see it online wherever you go.

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Recently, makeup trends across the industry have been responding to a general shift towards the “no-makeup-makeup” look. Brands like Glossier, Glow Recipe and Ohii that you might see perusing your Instagram feed emphasize a skin first, makeup second approach. They advertise fresh-faced models who look as if they are barely wearing makeup at all, aside from the occasional swipe of colored eyeliner or a red lip. The toned down, ‘natural’ look has been dominating the industry as the skincare industry takes off--even Chanel can be seen with a new hand cream shaped like a simple white pebble. But maybe No. 5 will always dominate the beauty’s mind’s eye. Euphoria abandoned all of that. Gone were the peachy nudes and inoffensive highlighters--the looks in the show mimic the chaos of the plot and instability of its character’s inner lives. Let’s start with Jules (played by Hunter Schafer). Jules’ makeup looks are fiercely whimsical and DGAF: she has inspired everything from a sunset-colored lid with a bold white stripe under her brow, to tiny cloud-like features splayed across her crow’s feet like little half-moons done up in white eyeliner with little else to complement. Jules’ looks cut to the chase: to me, they walk a hard edge that is both uncomplicated and daring, the same way that her general presence does (and her political identity as a transgender woman). Rue, who is played by Zendaya (~we stan~), is generally without makeup in the show. She does however wear the show’s most iconic look, the one used by the ads you might see around: glitter tears.


They are hued dark purple and glisten under Zendaya’s eyes, originally making an appearance in a scene where Jules and Rue are under the influence of drugs, creating a heavy, dazzling effect. In so many ways, this makes the glitter stand out even more. Another person without much makeup in the show is Cassie, played by Sydney Sweeney. Euphoria’s prom scene is an explosion of jewels and color on almost everyone’s faces save for Cassie, who favors a totally nude look with no color at all. The contrast is distinct, and makes both the glitter and the more natural look all the more exciting. Any and all of these characters switch from day to night in a moment. We see characters like Kat go from a traditional black wing to blood-red goth in a single episode, and others like Maddie shower themselves in lip liners and rhinestones from day one with abandon. All of this is to say that makeup is just another form of self-expression, another way of protesting or announcing to the world that you feel pretty or silly or bored. Whatever the emotion may be, it can be splashed across your face in more ways than one: glitter or no glitter, colored or nude or bedazzled or anything else. So yes, glitter is a bold statement but these are not times to be shy or reprehensive--in the fashion world, or otherwise. As Doniella Davy said in her interview with Vogue in August, “It’s absurd to think you can’t wear pink glitter to the grocery store.” Self expression is valid in all of its forms, whether it’s a nude lip or two different colors of eyeshadow. And the glitter? I’m here for it. You’re here for it. Elissa Fertig 38 | SEASON


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Photographer: Sara Mantich, Anthony Gosling. Models: Rachel Etabo, Isabelle Origer, Blake McKean. Stylists: Arianne Dora, Catie Cook, Shaya Abbaspour, Jada Lucas, Varsha Anand, Autumn Brandt, Shaya Abbaspour. Merchandise Officers: Jess Becker.


R O TAT I O N The rate of change of momentum is proportional to the impressed torque and takes place in the direction of the straight line in which the torque acts.


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FASHION AND TECHNOLOGY

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Similar to technology, fashion moves forward. Textiles are a commodity that are always in demand and with that demand comes a need to advance the way the fashion industry is systemed. In her Forbes article, Hadari Oshiri, a CEO of a fashion technology company named Xehar Technologies says that the very answer to the implementing advances within the fashion industry is to search for technological innovations that will fix the problems of the fashion sector. “The question is not how to utilize these advances within the fashion industry, but instead who will use these technologies to create and implement new systems to bridge the gap between manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers,” Oshiri says. A company that is trying to do just that is Descience, with a goal of infusing scientific discovery and fashion inspiration,

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Descience initiates collabora- multitude of different colours tions between designers and to represent clonal tumour scientists. Elizabeth Deheza, a expansion. Each of these teams journalist at The Fashion Globe, stem their inspiration from talks to a few of the contesting scientific and medical concepts teams that are working with that affect normal people in Descience to create runway modern society. I feel that looks inspired by scientific re- the idea of innovating a design search. These teams are partic- through common scientific ipating in an innovative runway concepts is part of what Osevent sponsored by DeScience. hiri is alluding to about when One of the teams by the name she talks about technological of “OprahCure” incorporated advances “bridging” an under3D printing within their designs standing between consumer that are inspired by “cellular and designer. texture and patterns that are DeScience is just an used to find new drugs to treat example of how the fusion of rare genetic diseases”. The fashion and technology has begoal of using three dimensional come a hot topic among both printing with their designs is to the technology and fashion “showcase the dimensionality sector. Laurie De Jong, a guest of the concepts, patterns and writer at Entrepreneur mentextures they are working with” tions the potential the fashion (Deheza). The “Fermentase” industry has for startup compateam has been using custom nies. Even though many believe textiling to make chainmail that fashion to be inaccessible, De imitates the look of antibodies Jong voices that fashion housand proteins when looked at es and brands face the same up close. The designs of team problems that many companies “Transmutation” uses a in other industries face too--


they want to cut costs, monetize better and communicate with their consumers more effectively. Using methods that stem from technology can solve these problems that the fashion industry is trying to fix. Innovations that include in-store technology and VR runway shows can better fix the inaccessibility the fashion industry has with its consumers. Another journalist at Entrepreneur named Laura Entis talks about sportswear brands like Nike and Adidas using science to gauge the comfort and moveability in their fabrics. Oshiri, in her Forbes article, suggests that technology can even solve problems that fashion companies have with logistical issues such as paperwork, codes of conduct contracts,invoices etc.; the way these problems will be solved will be through the use of smart contracts which is basically a computer generated system that facilitates contracts,transactions, and negotiations between fashion companies and third parties in a faster/easier manner. Another fascinating concept that Oshiri highlights in her article is companies (using companies like Stitchfix and Zulily as an example) using data analyzing technologies to help predict the trends and styles that are statistically more likely to sell among their customer base than others. Moreover, technology can be effective in solving many other problems the industry is facing as well. These problems include supply chain issues, consumer to retailer relationship issues, problems regarding fees and whatever else you can think of. So to those who are STEM or Fashion students, do what you do best and think outside of the box. Think about combining you talents to create something truly special both in the fashion world and STEM world. Swarna Gowtham


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Photographer: Lauren Thompson (Head)& Lilly Thomas (Assistant). Models: Jaeda Mae, Regan Jones, Madison Moreland. Location: Bluetip Billiards Bar. Stylists: Arianne Dora, Varsha Karen Koak, Erin Huston, Anna Gebhardt.


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ARCHIMEDES The upward buoyant force that is exerted on a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the fluid that the body displaces and acts in the upward direction at the center of mass of the displaced fluid.


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Photographer: Madelyn Knight (Head) & Lilly Thomas (Assistant). Models: Lily Hoffman & Sarah Woerner. Location: The Village at Muller Park. Stylists: Sariah Borom, Shaya Abbaspour, Autumn B Merchandise Officers: Karen Koak, Kelsey Rike, Erin Huston, Beth Reynolds.


Brandt, Kate Mojica, Mikaela Blackwell.

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Profile for SEASON Magazine

The Laws of Physics: S/F 2019  

SEASON Magazine presents its sixth issue for Summer/Fall 2019: The Laws of Physics.

The Laws of Physics: S/F 2019  

SEASON Magazine presents its sixth issue for Summer/Fall 2019: The Laws of Physics.