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WORK SEAN HOUGHTON

2007 - 2016

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN TAUBMAN COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE + URBAN PLANNING

POSS ARCHITECTURE + PLANNING ASPEN, COLORADO

BLU HOMES SAN FRANCISCO & VALLEJO, CALIFORNIA

PFAU LONG ARCHITECTURE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA


C O NT E NT S WORK / INTRODUCTION

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WORK / ACADEMIC

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PROXY: DTW BUILDING ANATOMIES THESIS ADDITIONAL WORK

The Prodigal City ARFF Facility Flick(e)ring North Dakota

08 12 18 28

WORK / PROFESSIONAL

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POSS The Lodge on Biltmore Estate Hotel Aspen Souki Residence BLU HOMES Woodcock Residence PFAU LONG 270 Brannan 100 Hooper

32 38 46 52 56 62


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E sjhought@gmail.com W www.linkedin.com/in/seanhoughton/ www.issuu.com/seanhoughton/

W O R K / I NT R O D U CT I O N SEAN HOUGHTON is an architecture and design professional with experience in the design, documentation, and construction of projects of a variety of types and scales. His work has engaged the mechanics of production in design, and the intersection of technology, craft, urbanism, an material culture. He is an experienced BIM modeler, a skilled construction detailer, a proficient project collaborator at all levels, and a comprehensive design thinker. Most recently, at Nautilus Group, Sean led the development and documentation of new cross-project architectural standards for all factory-built housing units, while a member of a multi-disciplinary product development team. He also guided the implementation of these standards on all projects under development. The WORK that follows presents a comprehensive and occasionally divergent range of academic and professional exploration. Looking forward, Sean seeks opportunities that are comprehensive, challenging his creative, logistical, technical, and technological thinking and making abilities, at new and varied scales, in rigorous and progressive design environments. He seeks to leverage his skills and experience to lend valuable conceptual and technical support to complete project life cycles.


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W O R K / A CA D E M I C

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

TAUBMAN COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE + URBAN PLANNING ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

2006 – 2010


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DATE SITE

P R O XY : DT W

Fall 2007 Mexicantown Detroit, MI

/ THE PRODIGAL CITY

ARCHITECTURE is often a heedless stage set for tragedy; specifically, the tragedy of the city. It conjures ambitious dreams — credulous childhood notions of bourgeois splendor — conceiving the city as a cathedral to accomplishment, or as an anticipatory pantomime, both stricken with expectation.

PART I: CATALOGING PROXY / PROXY CATALOG. In the wake of the fall of our great empire, we see the city becoming the site of great denial, and great betrayal. A new spatial, graphic, technical, and textural paradigm is working in frantic desperation to reconcile, and avert, the imminent consequence of socio-economic negligence. The city may have betrayed its people, but now the people have turned on the city in vain. (LEFT) Spatial, graphic, and textural catalog of Detroit’s proxy economy


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predators amass

burden to his kin

baleful shadows provoke

confounding betrayal or

the terminal din

martyr to ambition? esteemed and beloved vigor and virtue sanctioned his untimely fate


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P R O XY : DT W

(LEFT) Site context joiner (above); Model/narratives (below) (BELOW) Perspectival section

PART II: POETIC JUSTICE. Fifteen-hundred remnants of foreclosed livelihoods, forfeited histories, forsaken ambitions, are assembled to frame a tragic, and paradoxically eager landscape. This new cathedral conflates the city’s past, present and future onto a single surface, visceral both in celebration and lamentation. Its demise is imminent‌


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DATE SITE

Spring 2009 Louis Armstrong International Airport Kenner, LA

TEAM

Diane Moseley (technical diagram) Andrew Fang (rendering, some 3D)

B U I L D I N G A N AT O M I E S (ABOVE) Location of MSY within Greater New Orleans. Lake Pontchartrain borders the region to the north. (LEFT) A BREATHABLE STRUCTURE. The proposal for a new fire station at MSY works as a machine for displacement, retention and reuse. The goal being to reduce impact on the regional displacement infrastructure by putting water to work in managing the building’s environmental needs.

SITUATED approximately ten miles west of downtown New Orleans, Louisiana, the city of Kenner is home to Louis Armstrong International Airport (MSY), the region’s main air transportation hub and a key component of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s regional air-ground evacuation support system. Surrounded almost entirely by the region’s strained levee system, the airport sits about 4.5 feet above sea level, occupying a former marshy area two miles south of Lake Pontchartrain—about 3 feet above sea level—and a half-mile north of the Mississippi River—averaging about 15 feet above sea level locally. MSY’s largely commercial surroundings to the north and east, however, sit largely below sea level (indicated by the cool shades in the map below), borderded still to the west by remnants of the omnipresent bayou that dominates the Mississippi Delta. This bayou forms the basis of the region’s flora and fauna. Low marshy grasses, bald cypress trees, sedges, black willows, brown pelicans, blue herons, egrets and alligators

/ ARFF FACILITY

dominate the land. As a compromise to this sort of urban development, these plant and animal populations are being displaced, as the relatively new dry land provides no little to no support for such ecologies. Much of the infrastructure of the region, led by a region-specific team from the Army Corps of Engineers, is structured around the displacement of ground water. A carefully orchestrated system engages in the process of water displacement— untimately consequential to this flora and fauna displacement—employing surrounding levees that rise as high as 25 feet above sea level along the river, and are fortified by steel sheet piles driven as far as 70 feet into the ground. A complex network of drains, pumping stations, and canals work to supplement this process, effectively wicking the water away. Here, unlike the vast majority of other urban centers, impermeable surfaces help to sustain civilization in one ot the United States’ most important shipping ports. This system provides the drainage necessary to keep most of the land dry through a 50 year


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Exaggerated regional topography and soil characteristics. Levee

Elevation 20’

Mississippi River

15’

Levee

10’

5’

MSY Lake Pontchartrain

I - 10

0’ -5’

-10’

-15’

Loamy Clay

Exaggerated regional topography at 100-year flood stage

Mucky Clay Infill Loam

flood. The airport, however, is situated such that it is safe at the 100 year flood stage, provided the levees hold. The soil, too, does not help the ground water situation. Predominately clayey soils, mixed in with sand, loam and muck, brought in from upstream, tend to hold water, rather than drain it, making for potentially exacerbated flooding situations. In addition, this sort of retention bears a very heavy load, making it difficult and expensive to build basements or any other below-grade structures essential to developing and sustaining the region. In addition, a bedrock depth of seventy to one hundred feet has limited, until recently, many high rise developments.

But the land, and the river, is in a constant, and relatively rapid state of flux, as the greater delta region is consumed by the ocean. Approximately 25 square miles of land is lost each year as the loose clays drift into the sea. In addition, a combination of factors relating directly to human development have resulted in the continued sinking of the ground. A process known as subsidence, or settling of the ground surface, is a familiar process in the ecological sustinence of the delta region. However, as the ground subsides, human development has prevented the Mississippi’s natural replenishing process of silt and soil deposits from upstream, effectively permitting the continued sinking of the ground. This condition, coupled with

increased hurricanes threats and rising sea leves continue to place immense and perhaps insurmountable pressure on our engineering capabilities. As a result, concerns favoring development may need to shift more toward adaptations to the whims of nature, as opposed to impositions presumed to overtake nature. The proposal, then, for a new fire station at MSY works in response to these conditions, as the building itself becomes a machine for displacement, retention and reuse. The goal here is to reduce impact on the regional displacement infrastructure by putting water to work in managing the building’s environmental needs.


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B U I L D I N G A N AT O M I E S

3+4 2

1

1 5+7


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PLANS – Roof (PREVIOUS PAGE, TOP), Main Level (PREVIOUS PAGE, BOTTOM), Lower Level (BELOW) 1 – vehicle rooms 2 – turnout gear storage 3 – watch/alarm room 4 – fire department office 5 – work shop area

6 – storage room 7 – hose-drying room 8 – dormitory 9 – lavatory/showers/lockers 10 – mechanical room

11 – dining room 12 – kitchen 13 – training/study 14 – day area 15 – water retention/rain room

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8

15

6

11 + 12

13 + 14 10

(ABOVE) Lower level plan (BELOW) Longitudinal section

3+4 1

2 1 15

13 + 14


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B U I L D I N G A N AT O M I E S THE BUILDING

(ABOVE) Interior view - lower level (BELOW) Performative section

Roof / Structure Plan. Three large emergency vehicles and three small (Rapid Intervention) vehicles are accommodated under the roof, in addition to appx 8,000 square feet of interior and exterior program. As much of the year in New Orleans is spent in high humidity, the goal is to facilitate air currents through a roof and water collection system. The cantilevered roof acts as a shading device in the summer, but allows for the low angle of the winter sun to reach the interior and heat up the space. The funnels also act as light wells to naturally light the space below ground. There is also a berm to surround the building, which not only aids in the flooding situations of New Orleans by increasing the height above sea level but also has geothermal advantages for cooling the program space underneath.


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DATABASE (P/RE)CONSTRUCTIONS: (Generated Sites) Site 1 - Landscape


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DATE SITE

THESIS

Spring 2009 Flickr + “North Dakota Town”

/ FLICK(E)RING NORTH DAKOTA SYNTAGMATIC APPROACHES TO SITE


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A CURSORY GLANCE exposes the site “North Dakota Town”, and its multiple iterations, as both monolithic and inconsequential, potentially the largest extent of physical and symbolic urban vacancy (both vacant urbanism and vacant of urbanism) existent in these United States. As the by-product of such a framing, our collective memory, manifested in vast image repositories, weighs heavily machinations of this landscape as a series of alienated peoples on the brink of extinction, of alienated economies on the brink of collapse, and of a singular, alienated landscape on the brink of irrelevance. Under what circumstances were such assumptions founded? Consider the

construction of the database as a means of nurturing paradigmatic approaches to accessing, seeing, and knowing. I’m referring here to the emergence of electronic image repositories, such as the three-billion image strong Flickr, as the primary mode by which the technocratic elite comes to understand the rest of the world. This new electronic environment has the capability of restructuring perceptions of the physical environment into a series of “keywords” or “tags” that privilege pattern recognition in advance of, even as a replacement to, nuanced prose. As a component of this environment, the place “North Dakota Town” preconceives a plausible homogeneity, and plausible

distance (from the heterogeneous American metropolis), that makes it easily susceptible to reductive engagement as a means of establishing visual narratives of place. This pattern recognition is translated to metadata tags, which media theorist Lev Manovich describes as the materialization of the paradigmatic dimension of language, in that each element (image, in this case) of the database (Flickr, in this case) is encountered via the linguistically inscribed set of related elements (images). What is not privileged here, as a consequence, is the syntagmatic dimension, which acts through linguistic units to construct narrative and inscribe individual identity. Thus these constituent


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dominating tags—“abandoned”, “rural”, “vintage”, “ghost town”, “decay”, “lost”, etc.—are doing a complete disservice to the potential variability of new media structures, and as a result, systematically reducing the heterogeneity of visual and spatial perception. The target of much of this work, then, is to offer visual reads and re-reads of the conditions of database mythology by reconstructing “North Dakota Town” in its nested representations of landscape, town, and domicile (at left). Such myths are the result of the oversaturation of six or seven key paradigmatic tags, which are more or less synonymous. As a result, each image becomes the

embodiment of every other image in the set, and so the proliferation of a specific series of tags both results from and perpetuates the (pre)conditioning of spatial cognizance. Inevitable horizons are drawn explicit, exposing the vast distance between foreground and background, sparsely populated by a seemingly inconsequential array of decommissioned anthropomorphisms. Traces of urban centers reveal empty storefronts—disenfranchised economies being reappropriated by the land. And any hope for domesticity has been subverted, occupied instead by rhetoric of failure— the failure of aesthetics and structure, via natural selections and reductive engagements, to perpetuate complex,

T H E S I S

DATABASE (P/RE)CONSTRUCTIONS: (Generated Sites) Site 2 - Town


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T H E S I S

DATABASE (P/RE)CONSTRUCTIONS: (Generated Sites) Site 3 - Domicile


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heterogeneous, and mutually inclusive networks of agrarian commerce. In each of these three representations (at left), the language of the such repositories becomes visceral in the way it upstages often-unstable architectural conditions of ground and wall in favor of the sort of paradigmatic stability that only gains strength as more images are added to the tag. But Flickr does not make these sorts of distinctions, rather it accumulates, like its SILENT and COVERT partner the METH LAB, a series of variables that erase place, in favor of potentially hazardous conditions surrounding dependencies on material and chemical synthesis.

Positioning databases as mythologies, this thesis aims to attenuate specific paradigmatic proliferations (indeed, axiomatic alliterations), in the interest of full and simultaneous disclosure. My authorship, then, becomes a sort of necessary insurgency—the three conditions begin to bleed into each other as the database surrenders to wavering senses of its own completeness and incompleteness. The momentum for this insurgency becomes the parallel reality of the METH LAB as the destruction of the deterministic conditions of both the domestic realm and the notions of abandonment that the database Flickr conditions.

IN THE END, I see essential architectural processes of abstraction, and synthesis, in translation, as upholding the nearly ubiquitous, and depleted, database condition. By offering such paradigmatic alternatives, architecture acts as the facilitator for the reinstatement of concurrent and multitudinous syntagmatic approaches (without prescribing specific dispensations), specifically to the conditions of site via visual and spatial perception. After all, these alternatives are just as true to “North Dakota Town� as machinations of abandonment, and addiction, are.


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T H E S I S

SUPPLEMENTAL IMAGERY (PREVIOUS PAGE) Site 1 - Landscape (ABOVE) Erasure of place (BELOW) Site 3 - Domicile


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26 METH DAKOTA: INDETERMINATE SITES (Generated) (PREVIOUS PAGE) - #1 - Lab (BELOW) - #2 - Landscape/Town

T H E S I S


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Proposed swimming pool. Transition from path to pool includes a gentle slope to a maximum depth of 5’.

(72.00)

77.85

(74.00)

75.20

A

(76.00)

TS 93.50

90.80

77.10 90.00

BS 88.00

Childrens’ play area.

C L

93.80 87.90

88 .0 0

8.7%

90 .0 0

1% TS 86.00

C L

TS 79.90

BS 79.88

92 .0 0

BS 78.88

3.0%

B

(78.00)

90.00

Located away from pool and within site of the house’s main living quarters.

93.80

(80.00)

86.00

92.20

79.85

92.40 89.90

94.00

1st FLOOR

(82.00)

FFE 94.00 84 .00

7.2%

Slate walkways. To mimic acute geometries of larger scale design elements.

94.00

BS 85.80

TS 93.50

91.95

1.6%

(84.00)

0

90.0

0

92.0

(86.

94.00

0

94.0

00)

CL

94.00

BS 93.65

C

(78.00)

2nd FLOOR

FFE 103.00 84

92

.00

8.0 (8

0

(84.00)

CL

FFE 102.50

102.0

For cultivation of fresh herbs and vegetables. Planted at owners’ discretion.

(82.00)

86.00

CARPORT

10

0

0.0

10

90.00

92.00

1.60

88.00

0)

.75

94.90

(90.00)

Kitchen Garden.

(80.00)

96.00

(86.00)

(92.00)

(88.00)

2.00

10

2%

(94.00)

102.0

3.

DI

(90.00)

0 98.40

RIM

(96.00)

104.00

(92.00)

98.00

(98.00)

103.80

CL

Planting Box. (94.00)

See planting plan. 106.00

4%

.00)

(102

(104

(96.00)

8%

108.00

.00)

102.30

108.75

CL

CL

06

.0

0)

108.95

(98.00)

109.45

(1

Proposed Residence.

1%

.00)

(100

100.00

110.00

(108.00)

10

(100.00)

2.0

(72.00)

Driveway + retaining walls begin. Poured concrete.

0

(110.00) (102.00)

(74.00)

(112.00)

(76.00)

(104.00)

92

.00

(78.00)

88

.00

90

.00

(106.00) (114.00) 86.00

(80.00)

(108.00)

(82.00)

.00

(110.00)

84

Proposed slate walkways.

(116.00)

(84.00)

0

90.0

(112.00)

0

92.0

(78.00)

(86.

0

00)

94.0

0

(80.00)

96.0

84

Proposed kitchen garden.

.00 (88

(82.00)

86.00

90.00

92.00

88.00

)

.00

(90.00)

(118.00) (114.00)

7.8%

(84.00)

0

(86.00)

0.0

10 (92.00)

(88.00)

.00

102 (94.00)

(116.00)

(90.00)

(96.00) (92.00)

98.00

(98.00)

104.00

(94.00)

(118.00)

.00)

(100

(120.00)

106.00 0)

(96.00)

2.0

(10

108.00 0)

4.0

(120.00)

(10

(1 06 .00

)

(98.00)

100.00

110.00

(108.00)

102

(100.00)

.00

Proposed concrete driveway and retaining walls.

0

120.0

(110.00) (102.00)

(122.00)

(112.00) (104.00)

0

122.0

(106.00)

(124.00)

(114.00)

(122.00)

(108.00)

(110.00)

(116.00) (112.00)

(118.00) (114.00)

(124.00)

(116.00)

(126.00) (118.00)

(120.00)

(120.00)

REET

(128.00)

00

120.

ELM ST

(122.00)

0

122.0

(124.00)

(122.00)

(130.00)

(126.00)

(124.00)

(126.00)

REET

(128.00)

ELM ST

(130.00)

(126.00)

(128.00)

Proposed dirt driveway. (130.00)

Road to house.

(128.00)

Left unpaved to mimic Elm Street and accomodate minimal grading, thus minimizing removal of trees. (130.00)


omnivorous urbanism - the networked kitchen - decentralized...recentralized

Recycl Sink

Mic/Ovn

Pantry

Storage

the kit(sch)

temporary resident

Trash

(PREVIOUS PAGE) SITE PLANNING - Siting, grading and landscape planning for a given house on a given, theoretical site.

omnivorous

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activity network

STORAGE CLEAN/DISPOSE

PREPARATION

ACQUISITION Sink Toaster Coffee Prep

ACQUISIT - centraliz capabiliti

STORAGE - small pa - accessib small app -refrigera

CONSUMPTION

Fridge

Fridge

Sink

Patio / Lawn

PREPARA - sink - cutting b - cooktop - oven (u - microwa - centraliz inventory controls f control/m - small ga - coffee m - toaster ( - perhaps displayed

Gardens

STORAGE

Mic/Ovn

CLEAN/DISPOSE

PREPARATION

ACQUISITION

CONSUMPTION

A D D IT I O N A L A C A D E M I C W O R K STORAGE

CONSUMP - access to - individu - capable centered - flexibili into table - prepara - outdoor

STORAGE

PREPARATION

ACQUISITION

CLEAN/DISPOSE

CLEAN/D - small (i - drying r - recyclin - trash co - compost - laundry

CONSUMPTION

Compost

Trash Recycl Storage

Sink

Mic/Ovn Sink

Pantry

omnivorus urbanism - the networked kitchen - decentralized...recentralized

Toaster Coffee Prep

kit(sch) network

Fridge

Fridge

PREPARATION CLEAN/DISPOSE Range

ACQUISITION Washer

Sink

Fridge

Gardens

Patio / Lawn

Dryer

Storage

(CURRENT PAGE) OMNIVOROUS URBANISM- Diagrams/ Plans for a networked/ decentralized/disbursed kitchen within a duplex.

Garden

Toaster Coffee Prep

mic/oven

sink

Fridge

fridge

other computer

table

comp

CB / Prep / Feast

recycling

television

Patio / Lawn

Gardens

Sink

D/W

Fridge

Fridge

compost

D/W

Sink

Dryer

Washer

Range

Garden

Pantry

Toaster Coffee Prep

CB / Prep / Feast

STORAGE fridge

cooktop

Pantry

Storage

Sink

computer

pantry

recycling

cooktop

cutting board

Mic/Ovn

computer

p other storage

other sm. appliances

mic/oven

herb garden

other sm. appliances

trash compactor

toaster

computer

coffee maker

dishwasher

sink

washer

to

sink

coffee maker

comp dishwasher

pantry

other storage other storage

CONSUMPTION

toaster

washer

MAIN LEVEL dryer

television

compost

computer

cutting board

trash compactor

television

other sm. appliances

dryer

fridge

pantry

cooktop

pa


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W O R K / P R O F E S S I O NA L

POSS ARCHITECTURE + PLANNING ASPEN, COLORADO MARCH 2011 – APRIL 2013

BLU HOMES

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA MAY 2013 – APRIL 2014

PFAU LONG ARCHITECTURE

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA APRIL 2014 – JULY 2016


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OFFICE DATE SITE TYPE SIZE BUDGET PHASES (PREVIOUS PAGE) Partial Floor Plan - West - Level L4 (BELOW) Partial Elevation - South West

Poss Architecture + Planning March 2011 – April 2012 The Biltmore Estate Asheville, NC Hotel - New Construction Appx. 150,000 s.f. $45 million (hard costs) Design Development & Construction Documents

All drawings and imagery Š Bill Poss and Associates Architecture & Planning, P.C. All rights reserved.

T H E L O D G E O N B I LT M O R E E ST AT E

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE

INCLUDED HERE are selected drawings from the 157-page Architectural volume of drawings that were submitted for permitting on this 150-room, 150,000 sf hotel. The following drawings were selected to both highlight some my many contributions to the project (which began with Design Development), as well as to describe the document's logic as it works from plan and elevation, to wall section, enlarged plan, and detail. My contributions highlighted in these examples include the modeling of exterior cladding and finish-work, plan and elevation graphics, and drafting and annotation of all wall sections and details. Under advisement, I was primarily responsible for all modeling and drafting seen here (with the exception of the partial L4 plan and partial exterior elevation, which were a team effort). The Design Development and Construction Documents were completed entirely in Revit, and take full advantage of all the smart features of the software, including both 2D and 3D drafting and modeling, families, scheduling of doors, windows, and other items as necessary, visibility graphics settings, filters, smart links to all callouts, sections and elevation tags, and more.


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(LEFT) Wall Section (RIGHT, TOP AND BOTTOM) Corresponding Details


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T H E L O D G E O N B I LT M O R E E ST AT E

(LEFT) Corresponding Balcony Detail (BELOW) Enlarged Balcony Plan

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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T H E L O D G E O N B I LT M O R E E ST AT E

(LEFT) Typical Sheet of Details

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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(TOP LEFT) View - Main & Garmisch (TOP RIGHT) View - Bleeker & alley (BOTTOM) Proposed site plan - not to scale


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OFFICE Poss Architecture + Planning DATE May 2012 – April 2013 SITE 110 W. Main St Aspen, CO TYPE Mixed-Use Hotel/Residential Renovation & Expansion SIZE Appx. 55,000 s.f. BUDGET Undetermined PHASES Schematic Design & Entitlements All drawings and imagery © Bill Poss and Associates Architecture & Planning, P.C. All rights reserved.

H OT E L A S P E N View - Bleeker & Garmisch


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(COUNTERCLOCKWISE, TOP LEFT) Elevations - East, West, North & South


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THE PROPOSAL for the Hotel Aspen called for a renovation and expansion of the existing 45-room, 25,000 s.f. structure in downtown Aspen, into a 54-room, 32,000 sf hotel, plus the new construction of four (4) 3,000 to 4,500 sf free-market condominiums and an 8,000 sf underground parking garage. Included here are samples of the Schematic Design document, which has served as a visual supplement to a formal City of Aspen Planned Unit Development application, for review by the city for conceptual approval. Andy Wisnoski, Partner and Director of

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE

Design at Poss, and I collaborated on the design and planning of the hotel and residences, and together completed the conceptual model in SketchUp. Subsequent design revisions have also been attended to by other members of the Poss staff. Under his advisement, I was responsible for production of this document (with occasional assistance from other Poss staff). Plans and floor area calculations (not shown) were completed in Revit, and elevations and model views were a combination of SketchUp, SU Podium, Photoshop, and Revit.

H OT E L A S P E N


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(THIS PAGE) Proposed Plan - Lower Level (FACING PAGE) Proposed Plan - Level 1


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H OT E L A S P E N

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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(THIS PAGE) Proposed Plan - Level 2 (FACING PAGE) Proposed Plan - Level 3


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H OT E L A S P E N

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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OFFICE DATE SITE TYPE SIZE BUDGET PHASE

Poss Architecture + Planning September 2012 – April 2013 Lot 4, Mocklin Subdivision Aspen, CO Residential - New Construction Appx. 8,500 s.f. $12 million Design Development & Construction Documents

All drawings and imagery © Bill Poss and Associates Architecture & Planning, P.C. All rights reserved.

SOUKI RESIDENCE SIMILAR TO The Lodge on Biltmore Estate, my role in this modeling and drafting in Design Development and Construction Documents. However as part of a much smaller team, I had the opportunity to be more involved in discussions and decisions on things such as planning, materials selections, windows and doors, as well as participate in consultant coordination meetings and other team meetings. As there were only two of us tasked with completing all documentation, my contributions to each of the drawings shown here were varied, yet comprehensive. As with the Biltmore, I took the lead in most of the detailing, under advisement of course.

(THIS PAGE) Site Plan (FACING PAGE, TOP LEFT) View - North Side (FACING PAGE, TOP RIGHT) View - South Side (FACING PAGE, BOTTOM) Plan - Lower Level NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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Plan - Main Level

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S O U K I R E S I D E N C E

Plan - Upper Level

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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Elevations - South (TOP), North (BOTTOM)


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S O U K I R E S I D E N C E Window Details - Sample Sheet

NOTE : DRAWINGS NOT TO SCALE


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The role of Project Designer at Blu Homes is positioned as a bridge between between Sales & Conceptial Design (before a client signs a Purchase Order) and Production & Construction. My work, both on Woodcock and on other projects, brought together all aspects of a project – from site constraints and code requirements to product design standards and responding to client desires – leveraging the client’s vision to produce drawings that communicate design intent at the high level of resolution required to obtain building permits and

commence factory production and on-site construction. Working under the direction of the Senior Project Architect, Project Designers team members often work as gatekeepers to all the other teams and disciplines required to realize each project. In addition to producing permit drawing sets, much of our work required preparing deliverables for all factory teams, coordinating with all third-party consultants, supporting construction teams, and ensuring execution of design intent.

OFFICE DATE SITE TYPE SIZE BUDGET PHASE

Blu Homes August 2013 – April 2014 West Dry Creek Rd. Healdsburg, CA Residential - Prefab Appx. 3,000 s.f. $1 million Design Development Construction Documents BOM & Production Handoff

All drawings and imagery © Blu Homes, Inc. All rights reserved.

WOODCOCK RESIDENCE

(ABOVE) Image of a Balance in Ridgeway, WI Woodcock Residence similar (FACING PAGE) Site Plan (not to scale) – Woodcock Residence – Balance + W-Series Garage in Healdsburg, CA


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The drawings in this section are of the Woodcock Residence in Healdsburg, CA. Produced in Revit, a tool we use almost exclusively to both manage our inventory of standards (products, families, annotations, etc.) and produce project-specific drawings and other deliverables. These drawings represent a Schematic development set used to obtain final client approval of the design before moving into the meatier permit drawings phase. As factory-built homes require approval from a state-level

jurisdiction, and all site-built components require local jurisdiction approval, the Blu Project Design team will typically produce two drawing sets for each project: a set of drawings of the factory-built components of a project, and a set of drawings of the site-built components of a project. These to sets often require different consultants and take separate construction tracks that come together when the factory-built house is brought to the site and is lowered by crane and attached to its foundation.

(ABOVE, LEFT TO FACING PAGE) Sample images of a completed Balance in Portola Valley, CA Woodcock Residence similar. (FACING PAGE) Entry Level Floor Plan (not to scale) – Woodcock Residence in Healdsburg, CA (BELOW) Kitchen Interior Elevations (not to scale) – Woodcock Residence in Healdsburg, CA


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WOODCOCK RESIDENCE


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OFFICE DATE SITE TYPE SIZE LEED PHASE

Pfau Long Architecture, Ltd. April 2014 – January 2016 270 Brannan St. San Francisco, CA Office - Core & Shell New Construction Appx. 200,000 s.f. Platinum (Certified) Construction Documents Construction Administration

All drawings and imagery © Pfau Long Architecture, Ltd. All rights reserved.

270 BRANNAN

(ABOVE) Conceptual massing diagrams (FACING PAGE) Completed Brannan Street facade

MY WORK as part of the 3-person 270 Brannan production team at Pfau Long was situated in Construction Documents and Construction Administration. As such, my work included the typical construction detailing, specifications, consultant coordination, and permit submittal preparation, and a portion of that work is captured here. There were a few additional design exercise that persisted into CD and CA. One exercise was to properly document and respond to the adjacent site contitions, which turned out to be a trickier business than was anticipated prior to demolitin and site prep. During demolition, we found adjacent infrastructure (an old train tunnel) to be particularly gnarly, causing a few significant design revisions during CA, mostly below grade. Additional excercises included the refinement of entry lobbies and canopies, and the design of a rather sculptural downspout intended to divert water from the courtyard canopy onto a splash block which directed water into the building’s cistern.


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270 BRANNAN

(IMAGES) Completed project entry and core (DRAWING, FACING PAGE) Plan - Ground Floor (DRAWING, BELOW) Plan - 6th Floor


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270 BRANNAN (FACING PAGE) Stair Plans & Detailing - Sample Sheet (THIS PAGE) Exterior Detailing


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All drawings and imagery © Pfau Long Architecture, Ltd. Renderings by Steelblue. All rights reserved.


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OFFICE Pfau Long Architecture, Ltd. DATE Sept. 2014 – Nov. 2015 SITE 100 & 150 Hooper St. San Francisco, CA TYPE Office - Core & Shell New Construction SIZE Appx. 450,000 s.f. LEED Platinum (100) - Target Gold (150) - Target PHASE Schematic Design Entitlements Design Development

100 & 150 HOOPER 100 & 150 HOOPER is a three-building, 450,000 square foot complex mixing office and light manufacturing uses, all linked by a Privately-Owned Public Open Space by SURFACEDESIGN. Immediately adjacent to California College of the Arts, the project intends to capitalize on the rich creative culture of the city, provding a hub for making and innovation.

(ABOVE) Conceptual massing diagrams (FACING PAGE) View down public alleyway, looking southwest

As the designer and job captain on this project, my primary responsibilities were to develop the design through entitlements, site permit and preliminary design development efforts, as well as lead the BIM modeling, documentation, and coordination efforts for the entire campus. Working with Principal Peter Pfau and Senior Project Manager Evan Jacob, I was deeply involved at all levels of project development, participating in most project-related meetings. Once entitled, and following submission of the site permit, the project was sold to Kilroy Realty, who brought in an executive architect to carry the project through construction, while Pfau Long remained on as the design architect.


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100 & 150 HOOPER (FACING PAGE) Views - 1) Hooper & 7th St, 2) PDR Space, 3) Hooper at Plaza (THIS PAGE) Site Plan


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T H I S D O C U M E N T AVA I L A B L E FO R V I E W I N G O N L I N E AT

www. i ssuu. co m / se anho ughton

Sean J Houghton / WORK  

Portfolio of academic and professional work.

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