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SEANEWSLETTER a bi-annual chronicle of the School of Environment and Architecture, Mumbai.

June, 2018

ISSUE 6. Winter Semester 2018

EDITORIAL

CONTENTS

It has been four years of continuing the methods and experiments that we set out for SEA. The school has initiated new programs, involved new people and made new institutional collaborations in its attempt to expand the pedagogical ambit of architecture and environment. Studio projects in the school have been devised in a manner to understand the relationship between humans, environment and architecture. Design provocations follow thorough fieldwork and documentation which themselves need to be consolidated into more concerted studies. In order to further this cause, the school has initiated research program through which concerted efforts are channelled into formalizing some of the field work produced during the studios.

1 \ Editorial

To the elaborate efforts of the school, the newsletter still remains a mere index that attempts to be the trace of new questions that are raised through multiple interests percolating in the classroom. A lot more needs to be archived and formalized beyond the twenty pages of this booklet. Yet, we present here new formats through which courses are conducted and new frameworks through which architecture is approached. Tracing a history of building technology, translating architectural texts in another language, thinking of urbanity at one’s own terms were some attempts in humanities. Poetic and parametric methods opened up new ways of representation techniques using manual and digital tools. Engagement with material and management processes offer orientation to building technology across the years. Design studios engage with questions of experience and the self, program and context; and water and landscape. Each of these exercises offer valuable perspectives through which pedagogy and practice of architecture may be widened and reframed for emerging contexts. Anuj Daga Editor

cover image: Parth Solanki, F. Y. B. Arch

2-15 \ Student Work History, Theory , Methods Architectural Drawing Technology Form & Space Studies 16 \ Settlement Studies Sem 2 \ Visit to Nani Buhari Sem 4 \ Visit to Jaipur 18 \ Electives 19 \ SEA Exhibition The Inventiveness of Reconciliation SEA at the Shanghai Design Festival 20 \ SEA City and SEA Assembly

CREDITS Editor: Anuj Daga Co-ordination, Layout & Design: Shreyank Khemlapure, Anuj Daga


2 modules

Sem 2 \ History Theory Methods text: Shreyank Khemlapure

The study of architectural history in the first year of undergraduate studies is thought of as a broad history of the world within which we study the production of buildings and what we refer to as architecture. In the same spirit, this year, the history module was seen as a study in history of building technologies. Four broad and rudimentary contexts were identified to which, it seems, building technologies seemed to have responded over the last 3000 - 5000 years of human civilizations across the globe - 1. Wall - To create boundaries, to differentiate between inside and outside etc. 2. Span, for shelter and to create one’s own world, to gather

A History of Heights

more people, etc. 3. Height, for symbolic reasons, to accommodate more programs, more people in the same piece of land and 4. Integrated services, to regulate flows of matter and energy like human waste, electricity, gas, water, air and communication networks. Under each of these chapters students studied how various cultures across the globe have historically responded to each of these challenges. To put it more precisely, what were the cultural necessities, material constraints, climatic considerations, geographical and geologica considerations, technological ideas that enabled specific material assemblages and

spatial organizations which we loosely refer to as building type. It was intended that the students would also gain a systemic and geometrical understanding of space from this study. However, the studio fell short of methodical engagement with drawing to enable that learning. This is something that can be thought through for next year. Four booklets containing their study over the two weeks were compiled by the students. The Sem 2 History Theory Methods module was conducted by Shreyank Khemlapure


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Sem 4 \ history Theory Methods text: Anuj Daga & Rupali Gupte This semester looks at the key developments and transformation in the course of architectural history of India over the last two millennia. Divided broadly into four sections of Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic and Colonial legacies, the discussions try to elucidate characteristics of architectural expressions emerging out of these religious philosophies, and subsequently their interactions with each other.

of architecture in India – thus giving an opportunity to consider what knowledge was lost or transformed in the process of cultural translation.

The studio undertook the translation of the ‘Vistara’ - the catalogue of one of the important exhibitions on architecture that took place in India. As a contemporary revisit of Indian architectural history, the translation of Vistara served multiple purposes at once:

The architectural theory seminar supported the design studio ‘What is an Archive?’ From key readings on archives and their epistemes such as ‘Archaeology of Knowledge’ by Michel Foucault, ‘What is an Apparatus’ by Giorgio Agamben, ‘Archive Fever’ by Jacques Derrida and another of the same title by Okwui Envezor and other key readings, students culled out arguments for their own design processes. Each student wrote a 1500 paper referring the texts , to delve on the questions ‘Archive of’ and ‘Archive as’ in their own design processes.

1. It gave a method to look at the most important works of architecture and history in India very succinctly. 2. The work of translation was aimed at interrogating how native students “receive” architectural knowledge, wherein one is compelled to understand spatial and formal concepts in the language one thinks in. 3. The process interrogates the colonial episteme of interpretation and perception

A translated excerpt of Vistara’s Introduction

4. The final product becomes a valuable contribution to the field of architecture, reaching out to wider audience, inviting dialogue and discussion on concepts of space.

The Second Year History Theory Methods module was conducted by Anuj Daga and Rupali Gupte

sem 6

Text: Devesh Uniyal & Megha Jhawar The broader objectives of the module for semester 6 were to familiarise oneself with the history and discourses around the cities in the world, and in India a well as to understand the basics of city planning and its processes. It worked with the quantitative and qualitative methods of research, while introducing students to urban issues concerning the Mumbai Metropolitan Region. The exercise through which the students explored these objectives were through theoretical discussion and the task of taking up one’s own neighbourhood and questioning what was it that bothered them within their neighbourhood. Further questioning why it bothers them, a lot of the aspects of why those issues occur, why they become a part of the concern, how the city planning affects various areas of the society, and what our views of the city are were opened up. The Third Year History Theory Methods module was conducted by Prasad Shetty

Vistara Catalogue cover


4 modules

Sem 2 \ Architectural Drawing Hybrid drawings text: Anuj Daga

The focus of the second semester Architectural Representation studio has been to introduce hybrid drawing, i.e. blending hand-drawing and digital techniques of image-making. Rather than maintaining it as a passive skill-building studio, our attempt was to push students to find their own ways of creating an imagery for a given provocation. Two aspects were mobilized simultaneously: 1.

Basic Introduction to key softwares (AutoCAD, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign and Google Sketchup) A provocation, where each student was asked to select from a matrix of words, resulting in a phrase that would become their brief for representation.

Program Room Street Garden/Playground House Balcony Courtyard Tunnel Theatre Factory / Warehouse Wall

Preposition in of around within below above across through between behind

Individual selections from the columns of the above table resulted into unexpected, but imaginative propositions like: “Room

House above Crowded Trees Ronak Soni

Courtyard Within Breezy Mountains Aashumi Shah

The matrix consisted of four columns with options for program, preposition, adjective and a context, as given alongside.

Context trees mountains ghosts desires geometries punctures river bodies reflections destructions

The Collage Table in Calm Geometries” or “Wall through Scented desires” or “Factory around orderly trees”. Through referencing artists, architects and graphic designers, the studio worked out possibilities of visually representing each of these phrases. Over three weeks of the representation studio, students worked towards creating evocative drawings of their respective provocations, that were compiled into small booklets. The project helped students find their own orientation to different softwares as well as engaging with them more meaningfully. In the

2.

Adjective chaotic Scented Crowded Dark Breezy Undulated Calm Sensuous Orderly silly

process, they learnt inter-adaptability between softwares, identifying potentials of each and exploiting their features towards achieving desired results that their provocations demanded. The studio opened up image-making in architectural representation as an important tool towards argumentation, evocation and imagination. The Second Year Drawing module was conducted by Anuj Daga and Shreyank Kehmlapure.

Courtyard around Breezy Mountains Nikeita Saraf


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Text: Megha Jhawar

The site of Sea Rock hotel at Bandra, was the design site for the Technology module. The intention was to build a public library, with the structure being majorly made out of RCC. The first phase involved reconceptualizing a library typology. After studying a few precedents, through the processes that take place within a public library, the area requirements and the standards, the designs had to be later made into working drawings. Multiple iterations were made to the existing designs over an understanding and incorporating details of fire protection, water, sewage management. The basis of the studio was to understand the fundamentals of construction and how to further communicate them for building processes.

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Taking parametric designing further, we designed parametric furniture pieces that could be easily fabricated. These furniture pieces were to be designed for our daily use like a space to read books, have lunch on or a shelf to keep our models on. Much of these were designed ergonomically. They were to be designed in a way that it could be easily fabricated on site.

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text: Divya Vaidya & Aditya Verma

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The Sem 4 Technology module was conducted by Abhilasha Porwal, Vinit Dharia and Milind Mahale

he pseudo code same, various design variation can be obtained by altering the paramete PUSH

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The Sem 6 Technology module was conducted by Ravi Punde, Dipti Bhaindarkar, Pankaj Joshi, Arun Kale and Gauri Joshi

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6 modules

Sem 2 \ Technology

text: Veeravalli Vikram & Nikeita Saraf

In the second semester Building Sciences and Technology module, the students started with experiments on different methods to increase the strength of a member, such as accumulation, interlocking , folding to name a few. This experiment was conducted until the resultant structure could hold 1 Kg weight exactly through a series of optimisations. With that as a base, the goal was to design a pavilion using suitable materials and dimensions such that the full potential of the material is utilised optimally. There was also an aspect of experimentation with this, with regards to the change in material and variation in form until the finalization of the pavilion. The models of the same were accompanied by scale drawings of plan, section and details.

1.

The final part of the module included the development of construction details and which material would be used in its actual construction. Starting from the major material used in the structure, to the materials in the joinery, each aspect was explored in detail to complete the understanding of the structure and how it is built. Environmental studies course of the module included case studies in which pairs of students each took a specific building from a different climatic zone and constructed a model of it in an appropriate scale. In addition to that, the students conducted a study on the embodied energy of the building and came up with a method to reduce it, either by changing the material or by modifying some part of the structure, in context of the climatic zone in which the structure is. Another part of this study included a detailed analysis of water sources and usage by region. Each student took a specific region such as the eastern ghats, northern plains etc and conducted a study on water storage spaces and its utilisation. The second semester Building Technology Module was conducted by Shreyank K., Dushyant A., Dipti B., Malak S. and Pratik D.

2.

3.

images on this page 1. Grishma Mehta 2. Akshata Waingankar 3. Sanjana Habde 4. Manthan Chandak

4.


modules 7

sem 4 \ Technology

text: Divya Vaidya & Aditya Verma

1.

2.

This semester the technology module focused on basic steel structure, AESS structures and modular construction along with learning more about building services. The students were asked to design a structural system that would be made of AESS- Architecturally Exposed Steel Structures and modules of the basic ‘L’ angle, ‘C’ angles and steel rods. 5. Following the regular documentation practice of the services of a general building, we were asked to re-design and optimize the structure into a cafe which could be prefabricated for a site and would have sufficient water management system. This exercise was aimed at understandig AESS: Architecturally Exposed Steel Structures and modular construction along with optimized and environmentally sensitive use of water management technology.

The fourth semester technology module was 5. conducted by Milind Mahale, Prasad Shetty, and Suhas Chande

images on this page

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4.

1. Herin Vora 2. Tanvi Savla 3.Vaishnavi Bhartiya 4. Ashwin Gupta 5. Jatan Gala 5. 6. Manish Shravane

6.


8 modules

Sem 2 \ Form & Space Studies text: Veeravalli Vikram & Nikeita Saraf

The second semester design module focused on the poetics of experience via text and its translations into space and form. The module started with an exercise where students wrote about their emotions related to their personal space. With those learnings, students expressed what they experience everyday on the journey to college from their home and back. Those write-ups were further developed and the next part of the module was to make a spatial model to express the emotions or experiences related to the journey. The last part of the module involved the students designing a studio on an assigned site, one that was right in front of the college across the road. Students then derived a basis for their studio by selecting certain activities which they would perform there along with the environment which would shape that experience.

1.

2.

Some students took their models forward while incorporating the essence of the previous exercise and developed them further to design the studio while others started with a clean slate and chose to a develop space or form based on their experience of the studio space. The module was concluded by translating models to sheets which would effectively capture the essence of the studios. 3. The Sem 2 Form & Space Studies Module was conducted by Dushyant A, Milind M., Neera A. and Prashant C.

1. Aashumi Shah 2. Parth Solanki 3. Somesh Nadkarni 4. Anjali Agarwal

4.


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Aashumi Shah

Somesh Nadkarni


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modules

Sem 4 \ Form & Space StUdies The fourth semester of architecture typically is devoted to an ontological question after the question of ‘type’ ‘typology’ and a ‘pattern language’ addressed in the third semester. The previous two years have dealt with the question ‘What is a school?’ and ‘What is a home?’ in the same studio. This semester we delve on the question ‘What is an Archive? This year the study took students through a series of events. First they witnessed the opening of the exhibition ‘When is Space? Conversations in Contemporary Architecture’ at Jaipur where 27 contemporary artists and architects were invited to respond to the ideas of both Charles Correa, the architect of Jawahar Kala Kendra and

Shristi Karale

Herin Vora

Sawai jai Singh who built the city of Jaipur. Students later went on to study the Royal cenotaphs of Gaitore at the edge of Jaipur on the Amer road that connects to Delhi and North India. Students also spent time exploring the city of Jaipur. In the studio, students begin with reading key texts on the archive including Derrida’s ‘Archive Fever’, Giorgio Agamben’s ‘What is an Apparatus?’ and Foucault’s ‘Archeology of Knowledge’. The studio methodology this semester sought to draw on the studio readings, the students’ involvement in the exhibition, the city of Jaipur and their experiences of the Cenotaphs of Gaitore to produce a semi fictional narrative that addressed the question, ‘What is an Archive?’ This narrative would help

the students develop the programme for the archive and explore its spatial manifestations. Two questions to be addressed here were ARCHIVE OF? And ARCHIVE AS? This project stressed on the necessity of fiction in architecture and the role of projection. In doing so it built on the long tradition of architecture to propose new alternative pasts and futures for the discipline. We believe that a semi fictional reading of architecture can enrich the engagement of real world sites and programmes and needs to be an integral part of architectural thinking. The Sem 4 Form & Space Studies module was conducted by Anuj Daga, Rupali Gupte, Samir Raut, Kalpit Ashar and Vinit Dharia.


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Priyanshi Bagadia

Priyanshi Bagadia

Devarsh Sheth


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Architectural Design, Sem 4 Left: Srushti Karale Top: Devarsh Seth

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SEM 6 \ Form & Space Studies KOLKATA WETLANDS

d e ta i l s o f wat e r s y s t e m s

Kolkata, located within the deltas of the Ganges, was chosen as a site for Design studio of semester 6. Field Studies were undertaken at two sites within Kolkata – the (now landlocked) Mudiali Nature Park at Taratala and the water systems at Natar Bheri, Trinathpally (part of the East Kolkata Wetlands – a system now severed from the Sunderbans). During the study of the these sites, three chief questions were addressed: 1. What is the larger social and environmental system that these sites are a part of? 2. How do the water systems operate on these sites locally in terms of technical processes, construction, maintenance and administration? 3. What is the kind of architecture produced in conjunction with the operation of these systems?

After understanding the sites through these frameworks, a site for intervention and a programme was collectively workshopped over the span of site study, which would translate into a built form over the course of the design module. The site visits and discussions led to collectively understanding the larger systems that the site was a part of, and how it functioned on everyday basis, considering the various economic, sociocultural aspects. The study culminated in a comparative study report put together, named ‘Joal Koathaa’. On a delineated intervention zone of similar scale upon each site, a pair of building programs were collectively initiated during the field study to be translated in to a built form over the course of the design module based upon the architectural questions posed to the group as a whole.

The design project for semester 6 was broadly supposed to be a programme that was based on: • Spatial components directly relating to Fishing co-operative’s core activities and occupational routine. • Spatial components directly relating to the co-operative’s parallel activities for additional revenue generation and community empowerment. • Spatial components related to public outreach and education. • Street-edge de-programmed spatial components to reinforce the current fabric of anticipated activities. The project was supposed to be a layered and interwoven exploration into broad aspects defined specifically, which in this case were, engagement and embedment, building body and spatial structure, material articulation and tectonics, materiality and phenomenality, meaning

Belaghathi Canal

Natra Co-orperative Fishery (Khaal Between settlements connecting the Zheel and Bheris

e khaal connects to the jheel underground.


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message, collectivism and common building performance and energy needs, human comfort, climate responsiveness, flexibility and adaptability. The Sem 6 Form & Space Studies module was conducted by Ravindra Punde, Suprio Bhattacharjee, Dipti Bhaindarkar, Gauri Satam and Faizan Khatri

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Akash Bhanushali

Bamboo stick which is used as a pulley to let down the jaali and board

Bamboo jaali covering pipe connecting 2 behris

Bamboo steps RCC bridge made to enter on which the the behri gates are inWater level of stalled the behri

Cleaning process of the behris and jheels

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entrance to smaller behris

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Jheel JHEEL Behri BHERI The is is pumped fromfrom behri bheri to the jheel when thefor behri jheel to the pumped water ewater is in need of draining. e land is kept for drying. This landdrying. in the behri is then kept for drying

Mat made of sliced bamboo sticks Horizontal members give shape to the filter gate Water hyacinths whose roots trap multiple wastes and minerals and decompose them

Lime + Sarso (mustard) ki khalli is sprinkled over the entire behri to reduce and minimalise the salt content Water flow

Ground

Vertical bamboo frame holds the filter mat with the ground

The land is then ploughed by a tractor the water is tractor. e land is ploughed by theand pumped back onto the land

e water is then pumped back into the land.

COMMON FILTER GATE - SECTION

Lime + Sarso ki khalli is sprinkled again to lter the Lime + Sarso ki khalli is sprinkled again to filter theas the food salt content. Also the khalli acts remaining remaining salt content. This khalli then acts as food for the fish for shes.

common filter gate section

SECTION ENTRANCE TO BEHRIS entrance toDD' behris

SCALE - 1:250 FILTER GATE filter1 gate 1

Bamboo mat 40 tied with nylon ropes

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Bamboo members used as a framework for the filter gate

T.Y.BA AAKA

Roadside Edge

Water free of solids like cans, bottles etc

FILTER GATE 1 - DETAIL

filter gate 1

SECTION C C'

Bamboo members holding the structure in shape

Water

People climb on this bamboo platform to remove the water hyacinths that flow along with the water

LOCK GATE lock

d e ta i l s o f wat e r s y s t e m s

CANTEEN

Steel Jaali used for fil- Ground level tering waste water by of the bund removing smaller solids from the water

Steel bars hold the bamboo in place

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LEARNING CENTRE

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AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE

Thick wooden board used to stop the flow of water. Let down when Jheel or Jaali has to be cleaned

d e ta i l s o f wat e r s y s t e m s

FISHIER MANS WARF

FISH DRYING NET

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settlement studies

Sem 2 \ settlement studies

text: Veeravalli Vikram & Nikeita Saraf The study of architecture is incomplete without field experiences. The ability to interact with people, bringing them at ease of conversation, and then understanding their ways of living are things which an architect should engage in doing. And that is exactly what was done in the settlement studies trip during the first semester. Nani Buhari, a tiny village that is a part of Buhari, consisting of not more than hundred households, was the place selected for the study. The trip dealt with the basic understandings of the forms of life, forms of building, the relationship between the two and the social structures of the rural settlements. On reaching the villages, the whole class was curious as to how they would go about the trip. On the first day, everyone went around the place trying to analyze and establish relations between what they saw and what they’ve seen throughout in the city. Post this exercise, the class

was divided into groups and each group was allocated a street that they had to document. All the houses of the street were to be documented with accurate plans and sections accompanied by a small social survey. There were also master plans made on 1:500 and 1:200 scale explaining different aspects of the settlement, like the water connections, electricity poles and the roof plans for each house, showing the diversity on each street. The trip also fulfilled the purpose of developing a good interactive ability, as by the end of 5 days, all students were friendly and familiar with almost all the villagers. The trip ended with a small exhibition of the work by the students where the villagers saw the result of all the work that had happened. The Sem 2 settlement studies module was conducted by Dushyant A. & Shreyank K.


settlement studies

sem 4 \ settlement studies

text: Divya Vaidya & Aditya Verma The Royal Cenotaphs of Gaitore is a royal cremation ground for the Kachhwaha Rajput kings and the members of the royal family. The word ‘Gaitore’ is believed to be a mispronounced form of the Hindi phrase, ‘Gaye ka Thor’ which means ‘resting place of the departed souls. Located on a narrow valley on JaipurAmer road, this place is 15 km away from Jaipur. The valley has cenotaphs (chhatris) made of marble and sandstone with Rajastani carvings, dedicated to the

kings of Jaipur. A perfect blending of Islamic and Hindu temple architecture, the cenotaphs are intricately detailed and carved with peacocks, elephants, flowers and ceremonial details. Drawing the cenotaphs was not only restricted to getting the facades and the intricate details right, but also analyzing the construction of these intricate domed structures in marble and sandstone. The documentation was a rigorous back and

Measure drawings of Gaitore ki Chhatriyan, Jaipur.

forth process of going back to the images and trying to get the experience of these pavilions in our drawings. This was best portrayed through the sections which cut through the raised platforms of the chattris, the magnanimous backdrop of the valley and how the cenotaphs are nestled in them. The Sem 4 settlement studies programme was conducted by Anuj Daga, Rupali Gupte, Samir Raut and Vinit Dharia

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electives

Electives 2017 Building, dwelling, making or how to read a city from three points? Sarover Zaidi, anthropologist

Space for Food Tamal Mitra

Architecture & Photography Dinesh Mehta

This course was an introduction to ethnography and anthropology of the city. It provided three modes of reading a city, firstly through its built form and architecture, second its habitations and everyday life, and third, as a technical object which is constantly under making. Working with literature from philosophy, anthropology and architecture, moved from the making of a house, to buildings, street plans, Mohallas and city skylines and horizons.

This ‘space’ has nothing to do with so called “kitchen”, “rasoi” or “rannaghor”. The workshop tried to explore and design a space specially for the male gender. Also, the workshop tried to understand the various conditions under which women cook in this country. During the course of elective the students created artworks and also tried to cook some food in the process. In the five-day exercise the students tried to understand and engage with the various regional and historical aspects of cooking.

The five day workshop was to develop an outlook towards architecture and photography. Through the workshop the students engaged with dynamic composition of images, humans and its interaction with space and learnt to look at architecture through the camera. The workshop gave an understanding about the concept of aerial photography and how to read shapes, forms, order and patterns in architecture through a series of exercises.

An Appreciation of Urdu Prose and Poetry Sheema Fatima

Imagining Spaces – Illustration and narrative Shrimanti Saha, artist and illustrator

Urdu, also called “the camp language” today has been made synonymous to a Muslim language. Modern Urdu literature and organizations like All India Progressive Writers Association played a crucial role in the construction of independent India but over the years it has been relegated to status of lovely poetry and prose. In the week long engagement with Urdu prose and poetry the intention was to break some of these myths and much more.

This workshop was an exploration of architecture through some examples from literature, movies, news reports and samples from early Indian miniature and mural painting. These examples were the starting points to study the relations between texts, images, fiction, narrative and spaces; and then to develop ways of image-making and illustration, through hand drawing, painting, comic strips, collage, assemblages and dioramas.

Z is also for Zines Himanshu S WHAT IS A ZINE? most commonly a small-circulation self-published work of original or appropriated texts and images usually reproduced using a photocopier, printing press or just paper and pen. Dissidents and members of socially marginalized groups have published their own opinions in leaflet and pamphlet form for as long as such technology has been available. Zines are usually intended for purposes other than profit. Zines frequently draw inspiration from a “doit-yourself” philosophy, or DIY ethic. The workshop involved the students in making and distributing their own zines.


exhibition

the inventiveness of reconciliations sea at the shanghai design festival \ Anuj Daga Following China’s upcoming national strategy of ‘The Belt and Road (B&R)’ initiative and seeking possibilities and position of design within its frame, the Tongji University in Shanghai announced ‘New World’ as its thematic for the Tongji Design Week 2017. Under this rubric, the University invited innovative design practices in developing countries to inspire Chinese design (i.e: Self-organization, mechanism for complexity, studying typologies ); encouraging scholars to develop design research and practice in new fields and challenge the state quo; and responding the national strategy with design actions. SEA was one of the participating institutions along with College of Innovation and Design at the Tongji University where they brought together studies and innovations from three distinct cities: Shanghai, Mumbai and Nairobi. The TJDW opened on 9th October 2017 and lasted for about 2 weeks, alongside the Shanghai Design Festival in Shanghai. The dynamism of emerging cities in the global south is marked by distinct forces of social innovations and interventions that structure the manifestation and experience of space. While we struggle to read the hybrid character and complex mechanism of these cities, productive practices and products have been articulated by designers as well as

ability of self-governance by the locals in order to negotiate with the rapid transformations triggered by forces of economic realignments. Often heterotopic, these spatial and formal conditions accommodate multiple interests and claims and invent different ways of “escaping” the colonial hegemony so as to exist in such a political space and creating the new social territory / network / practices in the urban now. In putting together cases of such conditions, the exhibition aimed to uncover invisible patterns that constitute urbanity in the selected cities, their community, public space and everyday life. Through the diverse data and ideas gathered by means of exchange programs, local-international field research and design studios, as well as the collaboration between different institutions within the above cities over the last one year, the project presented and investigate further: 1. how pedagogical initiatives can help learn from similar contexts across geography thereby helping mediate social space; 2. how international collaborations can open up new ways of thinking and resolving urban issues and 3. how design can trigger and mobilize alternative forms of social engagement.

The intent was elaborated under the threefold rubric of exhibition + film screening + academic seminar: “Design for”, “Learning from” and “Dialoguing with” interweaving design education, research and design practices through international collaborations by students and scholars from countries of new world. The project identified within each of the above, tendencies through which new experiments for reconciling the present complex urban, economical and sociological conditions are being worked out for the new world. Prasad Shetty presented ‘On Goats, Ghosts and Follies’, arguing through discussions on different cases of urban renewal and redevelopment from the city of Mumbai, that cities work through innumerable absurdities created through unreasonable aspirations, bizarre practices and incoherent logics. He proposed that absurdities are integral to cities and provide them with their inherent energy and momentum.

Images below: 1. SEA Research and student work exhibited at the Tongji Design Week 2. Participating Institutions 3. ‘New World’ participants forging new collaborations

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sea city / sea assembly

Sea City 48. The Engineer’s Sketchbook By B L Manjunath 1st December 2017 49. The Architecture of Horizons: An Ethnography of Bombay By Sarover Zaidi 15th December 2017 50. Project/ Process 01: The Transition from the Industrial to the Crafted By SJK Architects 19th January 2018 51. Earchaeology: Structure of Acoustic Spaces By Umashankar Mantravadi, discussion with Nida Ghouse in collaboration with India Foundation for the Arts 2nd February 2018 52. Emerging Practices: I’m an Alien… By Ragunath Vasudevan 9th March 2018 53. Emerging Practices: Simplicity By unTAG Architects 16th March 2018

Anecdotes from The Engineer’s Sketchbook by B L Manjunath compiled by Anuj Daga “Different forms of structures in nature should be used to create new languages.” “I like to express the forces...as jewellery, as delicate ornamentation of the building.” “The strain is always taken by the engineer, so I have shown it on the top.” “When we work with a good architect, the gift we give is always a nice ‘detail’.” “Craft is beyond engineering.” “Gravity is the best adhesive [in structures].” “Gravity is the hidden geometry of space. We have to learn from gravity and see what are the different forms it takes.” “If you are an engineer, you cannot craft.”

SEA Assembly Sessions Winter 2018 7/14/2017 1/12/2018 1/19/2018 2/2/2018 2/16/2018 3/9/2018 3/16/2018 3/23/2018

India - China Border Crisis (Sikkim - Doklam plateau) Exorbitant Expenses And Quality Education Fire Outbreaks and the Ignorant Self Budget 2018 India vs. China growth Vandalism of Statues Privatization of the BEST buses God In Inanimate Objects

School of Environment and Architecture a joint initiative of Society for Environment & Architecture along with Suvidya Prasarak Sangh Eksar Road, near C.K.P Colony, Borivali West, Mumbai 400 091 Phone +91 86550 02156 contact@sea.edu.in | www.sea.edu.in

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SEA Newsletter 6  

SEA Newsletter 6  

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