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Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak 2010-2011 Annual Report


Mission To promote pride and self-determination on part of the sovereign and indigenous people of the Kodiak area in their cultural heritage and traditions; to preserve and promote educations, physical, economic and social well being of the Alaska Native individual, family and community; and to restore to effective self-government, reminding those who govern and those who are governed of their mutual and joint responsibilities.

Annual Meeting

Table of Contents

Join us on December 11th for the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak Annual Meeting from 1:00-3:00. A potluck will follow the meeting at 5:30 p.m.

Bingo Schedule

Council Welcome & Chair’s Letter 3 Tribal CEO Letter 4 Financial Statements 5 Sun’aq Tribal Enterprises: WildSource 8 Natural Resources Department 10 Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers 12 Program & Social Services Department 14 Youth Advocacy 16 Women’s Advocacy 17 Congratulations to Our Graduates 18 Tribal Enrollment Report 19

The Sun’aq Tribal Bingo’s regular weekly schedule as follows: Tuesday through Thursday & Saturday:

• • • • •

Doors open for pull tabs & bingo sale at 6:00 p.m. Bingo session starts at 7:30 p.m. Friday-doors open at 6:00 p.m. First session starts at 7:00 p.m. Second session starts at 10 p.m.

Special sessions are held periodically as posted in the local newspaper.

Photos on cover, 2, 4, 5, and 17 by Patrick Saltonstall

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Tribal

Council Cama’i

Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak Tribal Council Members: (left to right) Iver Malutin; Doreen Anderson; Brenda Schwantes, Chair; Johnny Reft, Vice Chair; and Gary Watson, Secretary/Treasurer.

Dear Tribal Members,

Tribal Council Members Brenda Schwantes, Chair (2012) 907-481-1697, bschwantes@hotmail.com Johnny Reft, Vice Chair (2011) 907-486-5464 Gary Watson, Secretary/Treasurer (2011) 907-486-2650, stb1@alaska.com Doreen Anderson, Member (2013) 907-942-3991, blueyedbaby777@yahoo.com Iver Malutin, Member (2013) 907-486-6068, ivermalutin@yahoo.com

It is with gratitude that we refle ct on this past year’s accomplishments and growing experiences as the Council strives to serve you. The Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak continues to increase in Citizenry and thriv e in its programs which benefit our people. Our cultural , social service, education and training, environmental and economic development goals and strategies have a single focu s, that of sovereignty. While pursuing these goals through the Tribe’s 5-year strategic plan, our Council remains active in repr esenting our people on issues of subsistence, cultural heritage, land and governmental issues. The Sun’aq Council thanks eac h Sun’aq Citizen and Sun’aq staf f member for your dedication and support while we serve as you r representatives. Quyanaa, Brenda Schwantes Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak Chair

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Tribal CEO Letter

you knew it was true. This one doesn’t exactly fit within my story line here, but he just came into mind. (Must be a reason for that).

Dear Tribal Members: It might be December when you read this, or later if this report got mistakenly buried in your junk mail, but it’s just before Thanksgiving as I write, so I thought it would be timely to mention the things I’m thankful for in my job as your Tribal Administrator. (I’m also on a short deadline to get something written and this was all I could think of under the immense pressure). So without further ado, here goes:

I’m thankful when I hear a drum beating downstairs in the Tribal Hall, usually around 4 p.m. Sound travels well here. It’s the beat of the Alutiiq dancers as they practice for their next event. They are as strong as ever I’m told. I’m thankful for the folks I work with here at the Tribal Center, Staff and Council. They’ve given me the opportunity to experience and see all that Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak has to offer and all its potential for the future. As they say ‘it’s been a great ride’. I’m thankful for our annual Christmas party. That’s the one time of the year I get to visit with many of you. The Tribe’s not a name or a building, it’s you, the membership and it’s good to be reminded of that. The peroks pretty good too.

I’m thankful when little two or three year olds wander into my office on occasion. We like having kids around here. (Makes you realize what it’s really all about).

Finally, and before I get too mushy, I’m thankful I made the deadline and it’s near the end of the day when I can go home and be with my family. (It’s sort of like a bonus). I hope you enjoy reading through this year’s annual report.

I’m thankful when walking by our large conference room in late afternoons and seeing several of our high school students gathered for homework club. It means they’ll get better grades and have a better chance in life. (That feels good).

Since it looks like I have a tiny bit more space, a few things I don’t like (as in not thankful for):

I’m thankful when signing payroll action forms, which is done when we add someone to the payroll. Not much of a better thing a tribe can do than provide a good job for someone, most often someone with a family to help support.

Paperwork. (No need for further comment here). That annoying sound the fax machine makes. (kinda like fingernails on a chalk board).

I’m thankful when signing scholarship checks for our kids attending college. I expect to sign some for the kids in homework club in two or three years. I like to hear when they graduate too.

The coffee. The Staff says its good, but I know that’s only because it’s free. (I bring my own). Filing. I hate doing it, so I don’t, even though I know it might get me into trouble someday. (I have several people covering for me).

I’m thankful for the occasions when a Tribal Elder stops by my office to ‘chew the fat’. We get a better idea of where we’re going when we know where we’ve been. Plus, everyone likes a good story, (even if sometimes it’s the third or fourth time around).

Parking under a street light at the Tribal Center. (Seagulls have no respect for my car). Quyanaa,

I’m thankful for the windows in our offices. Not that long ago this place wasn’t much to look at and wasn’t the greatest work atmosphere. It is now and we’re pretty happy campers.

Robert Polasky Chief Executive Officer ceo@sunaq.org ext. 25

I’m thankful my former father-in-law took me, raw behind the ears, under his wing some 40 years ago and taught me some things about survival in the bush (and thus life as well) as he said ‘the Indian’ way. He was incredible. Chased moose for twenty miles on snowshoes and when he told the story

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Management Discussion & Analysis Year Ended September 30, 2010

This section of the annual financial report of the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak (the Council) provides an overview and analysis of the Council’s financial activities for the year ended September 30, 2010, with comparable information presented for the year ended September 30, 2009. This analysis pertains to the Council’s

financial performance as a whole. Readers should also review the notes to the financial statements and the financial statements themselves to enhance their understanding of the Council’s financial performance.

Government-wide Financial Analysis The following table provides a summary of the Council’s net assets for 2010 compared to 2009: Governmental Activities

Current and other assets

Business-type Activities

2010

2009

$ 1,619,498

1,408,889

28,693

-

1,648,191

1,408,889

1,512,103

78,485

-

1,638,310

1,512,103

107,178

-

3,286,501

2,920,992

-

590,795

639,214

1,559,825

Capital assets

2010

2009

2010

Total

2009

Total assets

$ 3,179,323

2,920,992

Long-term liabilities

$ 590,795

639,214

594,189

860,166

132,674

-

726,863

860,166

$ 1,184,984

1,499,380

132,674

-

1,317,658

1,499,380

$ 922,363

816,347

78,485

-

1,000,848

816,347

1,071,976

605,265

(103,981)

-

967,995

605,265

1,994,339

1,421,612

(25,496)

-

1,968,843

1,421,612

Other liabilities Total liabilities

-

Net assets: Invested in capital assets, net of related debt Unrestricted Total net assets

$

Photo by Patrick Saltonstall

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The following condensed table of changes in net assets displays the revenues and expenses for 2010 compared to 2009: Revenues Program revenues: Charges for services Operating grants and contributions Capital grants General revenues: Sun’aq Tribal Bingo distributions Foundations Donations Rental income

Governmental Activities 2010

2009

$ 7,880

-

1,327,187

896,221

19,500

-

Business-type Activities 2010

27,136

2009

2010

Total

-

35,016

-

-

1,327,187

-

-

19,500

-

-

162,401

2009

896,221 -

162,401 -

174,121

174,121

25,000

17,135

26,322

-

-

17,135

26,322

104,750

110,708

-

-

104,750

110,708

Concessions

11,668

17,747

-

-

11,668

17,747

Dancers

18,789

12,060

-

-

18,789

12,060

Sales, net Investment income (loss) Other Total revenues

Expenses

-

2,845

10,099

(2,735)

-

-

10,099

(2,735)

212,690

9,094

-

-

212,690

9,094

1,892,099

1,271,383

-

1,919,235

1,243,538

27,136

Administration

634,336

620,758

-

-

634,336

620,758

Education Health and welfare Community services

325,528 93,933 692,423

209,702 66,441 423,467

-

-

325,528 93,933 692,423

209,702 66,441 423,467

Unallocated interest

26,045

34,765

-

-

26,045

34,765

99,739

-

99,739

99,739

-

1,872,004

1,355,133

(72,603)

-

47,231

(83,750)

-

500,000

Sun’aq Tribal Enterprises Total expenses Change in net assets before transfer and extraordinary item

Extraordinary item

Transfers

-

-

1,772,265

1,355,133

119,834

(83,750)

500,000

560,570

(47,107)

-

47,107

-

-

-

560,570 -

Net transfers and extraordinary item

452,893

560,570

47,107

-

500,000

560,570

Change in net assets

572,727

476,820

(25,496)

-

547,231

476,820

1,421,612

944,792

-

1,421,621

944,792

$ 1,994,339

1,421,612

-

1,968,843

1,421,612

Net assets, beginning of year

Net assets, end of year

(25,496)

Analysis of the Council ’s Governmental Funds

The Council’s total assets increased by $753,332 (26%) during the current fiscal year. This was mainly due to an increase in capital assets of $126,207 and additional proceeds from the Exxon Valdez oil spill settlement of $500,000. Approximately 72 percent of our revenues before extraordinary items came from grants and contributions in 2010 compared to 71 percent in 2009. The Council also leases its gaming permit and provides leased facilities for gaming. Net proceeds from these operations and other miscellaneous income provide for matching funds and other unrestricted assets.

The Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak’s governmental funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Governmental funds reported a combined fund balance of $1,105,836, which is an increase of $481,328 from last year. The increase is all in the General Fund and is mainly due to the following: • Exxon Valdez oil spill settlement proceeds received in 2010. • Gaming distribution revenue in excess of related expenditures. • Rental income in excess of debt service obligations. • Other revenues falling short of expenditures.

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General Fund Budgetary Highlights

Component Unit Financial Statements

Actual revenues exceeded the final budgeted amounts by $197,107 in addition to other financing sources comprised of legal settlement proceeds of $500,000 which were not budgeted. General Fund actual expenditures were higher than final budgeted amounts by $215,743.

Sun’aq Tribal Bingo is a component unit of the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak. Separately issued audited financial statements of Sun’aq Tribal Bingo may be obtained by contacting the Council’s financial management at (907) 486-4449. Contacting the Council ’s Financial Management

Capital Assets and Debt

This financial report is designed to provide the readers with a general overview of the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak’s finances and to demonstrate the Council’s accountability for the money it receives. If you have any questions about this report or need additional financial information, contact the Finance Department at Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak, 312 W. Marine Way, Kodiak, Alaska 99615, telephone number (907) 486-4449.

As of September 30, 2010 and 2009, the Council had $1,638,310 and $1,512,103 respectively, invested in capital assets comprised of buildings, land, vehicles, and equipment. All long-term debt as of September 2010 and 2009 is attributed to renovations to the primary building from which the Council operates. Outstanding debt was $637,462 and $682,731 at September 30, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Of the total capital assets, $1,559,825 are in service for governmental activities and $78,485 are in service for business-type activities. Additional information on the Council’s capital assets and longterm debt can be found in the notes to the financial statements. Current Issues

The Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak is financially stable and has been over the past several years. As indicated in the preceding financial information, the Council is heavily dependent on federal grants. Federal grants are generally awarded on a year by year basis, with no guarantee that future funding levels will increase, or even be available. In the long-term, the current program and staffing levels will be dependent on increased funding to meet inflation. Careful financial planning and the use of current negotiated indirect cost rates each year will enable the Council to continue providing its valued services to the community.

Photo by Rick Rowland

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Since this fall, Sun’aq Tribal Enterprises, Inc. (STE) has been working closely with the faculty at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fishery Industrial Technology Center. One of our projects has been reproducing the delicious “native” style of smoked salmon produced in villages and in backyards around Kodiak. In our latest attempt, we are very pleased with the results and are confident that we will be able to get the process parameters approved by the health authorities so that we can take it to market by next season. STE has taken every opportunity to improve our knowledge base and skills in the value-added seafood industry. In 2011 we participated in a two day Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) workshop in Anchorage and an “Opportunities In the Utilization of Fish Processing Byproducts” workshop with New Zealand’s Plant and Food Research Crown Corporation and the USDA/Agricultural Research Service at the Fish-Tech Center in Kodiak. We are learning that the seafood “waste” we encounter through processing has many valuable uses around the world. Of particular note is our participation in the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Alaska Seafood Processing Leadership Institute (ASPLI). The Program accepted only 19 students from all over the State for sessions in Kodiak; Anchorage; the Boston

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International Seafood Show and New England processor visits. The 10 day Kodiak session was a fine introduction to food safety and regulatory requirements; smoking and freezing technology; lean manufacturing; microbiology and fish oils and marketing. Sun’aq Tribal Enterprises, Inc. CEO Chris Sannito is an instructor with ASPLI and assisted the University of Alaska Fairbanks with the earlier described events. The sessions are important for developing collegial relationships across a wide range of seafood processors state-wide. Most participants are middlemanagement with existing large processors or part of new Native Alaskan seafood enterprises. This fall we have purchased halibut and sablefish to add to our product mix. We are continuing to investigate new marketing opportunities for our products as we plan ahead.

Dave Monture, Economic Development Director ext 30, ecdev@sunaq.org

Chris Sannito, Sun’aq Tribal Enterprises, CEO ext 27, csannito@alaska.com

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Natural Resources Department New Boat on the Horizon

We are also developing a Tribal Response Program, which may create two added positions. A primary focus would be to thoroughly assess environmental issues related to military presence in the Sun’aq Tribal Area, and create a plan to categorize needs leading to long-term remediation. This information would then be tracked using a Geospatial Information System (GIS).

A Tribal Member recently donated an old Beck snag-skiff with a Yamaha outboard motor, trailer and a subsistence salmon net. Indeed it was a fixer-upper! Another Tribal Member, Duane Freeman, agreed to rebuild the trailer and restore the skiff and motor back to working order. With a new paint job and net mending the whole package should be done come spring. The boat will be used for hunting, fishing and gathering subsistence items in tribal customary and traditional locations throughout our rural Kodiak area. When we get an isuwiq, we will share!

Environmental Capacity Building Project

Pamela Bumsted became the environmental project manager in July after Alex Gerber’s family transferred out-of-state. The Administration for Native Americans (ANA) is the major sponsor of our Environmental Capacity Building Project. Quyanaa to those who also contributed their items, expertise, photos, books, questions, time, or other donations, totaling more than $15,000.

Protecting Tribal Subsistence

Sun’aq staff are actively participating in subsistence regulatory meetings for the long-term benefits of the Tribe. It strengthens our words as more members participate. This way when a specific resource investigation occurs, we will be ready. For example, we are in the process of communicating with the Office of Subsistence Management about an upcoming survey related to subsistence in the Kodiak area. We have written two proposals to the Federal Subsistence Board about handicrafts with feathers and closure to our area during egg collection times.

Staff can be contacted by mail, telephone, email (epm@sunaq.org), or via Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/pages/ Sunaq-Tribe-of-Kodiak/482693210187). Stop by to meet your research team, or join our email newslist to receive regular updates on the project by sending us your preferred email address. We are interested in knowing how we can better communicate with Tribal Members about your environmental issues and concerns?

The Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council and Subsistence Regional Advisory Council are two meetings that we participate in to continue keeping the Tribal Subsistence Rural Priority, so this subsistence right, indicated in the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) Title 8, will exist forever. A few years ago there was an investigation related to the Kodiak area about whether or not the Sun’aq Tribal Area was actually a “Rural” area. Fortunately, the decision was made by the Federal Subsistence Board that regulations in this regard about Kodiak would remain “Rural.”

Analysis of the 2010 Traditional Ecological Knowledge Survey is underway. At the end of September we had 162 surveys returned, with a response from about 10% of our members. The Tribe sought various means to engage our community in resource protection beyond survey completion. For example, on October 2, 2011, Sun’aq hosted a perok cookoff, which contributed to our documentation of subsistence foods usage and youth training. We also hosted several resource usage projects that illustrate the passage of traditional

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knowledge from Elders to youth, including harvest of yarrow and devil’s club to mix with beeswax and olive oil to make into salves. We distributed salves to Elders who participated in interviews and the 2011 annual picnic. Researchers also made salmonberry jam.

more at Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning: The Alaska Problem (http://seagrant.uaf.edu/ bookstore/pubs/M-02.html). The project also completed water quality sampling and training in August and September at six sites along the Buskin River. Initially, we worked with our colleague at the University of Anchorage engineering department, Dr. Aaron Dotson. Sun’aq researchers then collected a second sampling set independently. All sample data are permanently logged. Primary quality measurements--acidity (pH), temperature, and dissolved oxygen (DO)—were all in good range.

It is important that Tribal Members support the Tribe with information related to subsistence needs, uses and concerns. It would be very helpful for all Tribal Members to call, visit or send in a letter to let us know what they are thinking about their uses related to subsistence hunting, fishing, collecting and harvesting activities. Sun’aq has assembled a draft subsistence resources booklet, with photos and notes about traditional resource usage. This resource documentation effort will continue under IGAP funding. We invite members with photos or descriptions of subsistence resources to please consider contributing copies to the Tribe’s archives.

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is used around the world in project preparation as a process to identify, communicate, predict and interpret information on the potential impacts of proposed activities on the environment, including humans. It also finds ways to address and mitigate these impacts, for example by examining alternatives. Sun’aq has contributed recently to several EIA processes, such as the Kodiak Road System Trails Master Plan. The Kodiak Public Library Association board met with the Tribal Council to request assistance in making a successful new public library. The Natural Resources Manager conferred with agencies about the Kodiak Airport modifications and with Coast Guard Kodiak about surplus lands, among other issues. We have also provided comment to the Department of Natural Resources on ways to improve DNR permit processing. Many members participate in borough or state or federal environmental reviews at public meetings or by reading or sending comments to the agencies. Tribal environmental staff can assist you in reviewing whether actions taken by public institutions might affect Sun’aq environment and health. Please send your summaries or notes to the office, to widen our awareness of our environment.

Sun’aq Ecological Archives and Library is a collection of information in paper and electronic forms to accompany our knowledge in human form. Books, papers, photos, audio, video, and more are catalogued and securely stored for current and future members to use. This is an ongoing project, starting small, with plans to grow our knowledge system storehouse. Two researchers and the ANA environmental project manager participated in a special training seminar, customized for Sun’aq by University of Alaska Fairbanks in archives, cataloguing, and oral history management. The UAF Rasmuson Library includes an outreach and education office, a mapping office, Mather Library, Geophysical Institute, and collections of Government Documents Oral History, Jukebox, Digital Archive. The purpose of this visit was to understand and accurately catalogue subsistence survey information, photos and collected interviews, and resulting environmental review records, also known as “Metadata.” If this information is not documented and catalogued, in the future it may no longer exist within our living tribal knowledge. Tribal knowledge is worth maintaining (archiving) for future use. Also through this project, researchers learned how to test clams for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). PSP is a serious public health issue for us. Tests came back negative for the tide and location tested. Read

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Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers

Cama’i! The Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers have had a very exciting, interesting, and productive year, with many plans to make the new year just the same. Travels Our first trip of the year on was quite an experience for our younger dancers. On March 25, 2011, we loaded up the Sun’aq van, boarded the Tustamena and headed to Anchorage for the Ida’Ina Gathering sponsored by the Tebughna People of Tyonek. The focus for this trip was to bring as many younger dancers (12 and under) as possible, as they are an important part of the group and participate in all the events, practices and fundraising. It was their time to shine, and they did an awesome job!

Trish Cox, Dance Coordinator

before our first performance at the Palace Theater. In addition to this and daily performances at the Powwow, dancers also participated, performed and shared their culture at Connections Charter School for their Multi-Cultural Day. Our latest trip was to the Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention in Anchorage, October 20-22, 2011. Unfortunately I was unable to attend AFN with the group. Although the dancers enjoyed AFN, I understand after speaking to several of the dancers their highlight of AFN was spending one whole day performing at different schools. They said the reception they received at the schools was, in their words, “unexplainable” they felt very welcomed, relaxed and really enjoyed themselves. Thanks to Mary Padilla at Gladys Hill School and Anchorage School District Indian Education Supervisor, Doreen Brown for making this possible. I’d also like to say Thank You to Teressa Muller, Brandy, Iris Elizabeth Rowland Brown all of Anchorage and Isiah Simeonoff of Akhiok for joining us in our performances.

The highlight of our travels this year was attending the 6th Annual InterTribal Powwow in Hilo, Hawaii, May 24-31, 2011. The dancers put in many hours of hard work and fundraising in efforts to attend this incredible gathering. Our trip started on May 24th stuck in Kodiak for 2 days due to weather. We had to make the decision to split the group up and travel separately or cancel completely. Thanks to ERA and Amanda LeDoux’s efforts we were all able to make it 2 hours

Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers at AFN, photos by Robert OToole

Recently, I submitted a DVD and Biography to be considered for Opening and Closing Ceremonies of the Arctic Winter Games 2012, in Whitehorse Canada, March 4-10, 2012. The

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Arctic Winter Games are a bi-annual sports completion for Arctic peoples with Alaska, Greenland, Russia, Saami (Norway/ Sweden/ Finland), Alberta, Northwest Territories and the Nunavut represented. In addition to the opening and closing ceremonies they will be required to perform publicly at least once a day as well as additional spontaneous performances encouraged. The criteria for this opportunity only allows for dancers between the ages of 14 and 20. If we are selected only six dancers and 1 chaperone will be allowed to travel. Those selected will be notified by December 10th, 2011. We also have hopes of being accepted to participate in Celebration 2012, in Juneau, Alaska, June 5-10, 2012. During the month of August, Sitka dancers, youth and Elders traveled to Kodiak for a Cultural Exchange. During this exchange they taught and gave back to Kodiak a series of songs, called the Alutiiq Series. This exchange was very exciting and emotional for some, friendships and family ties were made and it was sad to see them leave. We hope to join them again at Celebration 2012.

Dancer Recognition I’d like to say Quyanaa to Samantha Heglin. Samantha is an inspiration to the rest of the group, and in my absence she doesn’t hesitate to take control and do what needs to get done. She does this in such a manner that the other dancers have great respect for her.

Fundraisers We began our fundraising efforts with a “Perok-Luk Dinner and Cook-Off.” The outcome of this event was overwhelming. I couldn’t have asked for anything except MORE space! We filled the entire Sun’aq Tribal Hall, with special thanks to the American Legion for allowing us to borrow more chairs!

Brandy Berg, Mandi Cox and Samantha Hegin all participate in the Alutiiq Language class at Kodiak High School and this has turned into a real asset for the dancers. These three young ladies also participate in Native Youth Olympics and JOM youth programs along with other school sports and activities and still manage to lead the charts for attendance and fundraising for the dancers. Thank You, Sammy, Brandy and Mandi for your continued efforts and time volunteered to the Kodiak Alutiiq Dancers.

The Perok-Luk judges were Kathryn Chichenoff, Dave Anderson, Frank Peterson, Melissa Berns, April Laktonen Counceller, and Samantha Heglin. Prizes were awarded in 3 categories: Best Crust, Best Filling and Best Overall.

Quyanaa

Larry Evans walked away with two titles, Best Crust and Best Overall, while Shelly Peterson was honored as Best Filling. There was also a Best Overall Youth Division won by Sean Hales.

We have had an overwhelming amount of support from the community of Kodiak, villages around the Island, Native corporations and tribes, airlines, businesses, friends and family. Being able to teach and share our culture through song and dance has been an awesome opportunity for our youth and Elders. Quyanaa to all of you for making it possible.

Dinner consisted of your choice of Perok, Salad, Fry Bread and Dessert. We plan on making this an annual event. In addition to the Perok-Luk we have had one fundraiser, Cookie 4 U and anticipate having a raffle right after the New Year.

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Program &Social Services Department Indian Child Welfare

Contacts Frank Peterson, Program Services Director, ext. 24, programs@sunaq.org Linda Resoff, Social Services Director, ext. 29, socialservices@sunaq.org Megan Holmes, Youth Specialist, ext. 34, youthspecialist@sunaq.org Trish Cox, Dance Coordinator, ext. 31, kodiakdancers@sunaq.org Sarah Lind, Youth Advocate, ext. 36, youthadvocate@sunaq.org Emily Capjohn, Women’s Advocate, advocate@sunaq.org

During 2011, our Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) program has had 12 active cases with most out of state. Most of the children are placed in relative foster care. Over the past year, four children were released from state custody and are back with their parents. This summer three children were adopted by family members. As a Tribe we are doing our best to make a difference for our children.

The Program & Social Services Department offers a wide variety of support for Sun’aq Tribal Members.

ICWA services are available for children who are enrolled or eligible to be enrolled in the Sun’aq Tribe. ICWA applies to children who are in state custody (Child in Need of Aid cases or CINA) from the moment they come into custody until they are returned to their parent or adopted. ICWA can also apply to stepparent adoptions and private party adoptions.

Frank Peterson as Director of Program Services is responsible for overall department supervision and implementation of the following programs: • Educational and Cultural Programs • General and Emergency Assistance • Vocational Training and Job Placement Assistance • Community Service Block Grant

ICWA does not apply to custody cases between two biological parents (even if one parent is non-Native). Although some lower-48 reservation tribes with tribal court systems will become involved in divorce or custody cases between parents, Alaska tribes cannot intervene in custody between two biological parents.

Linda Resoff as Director of Social Services is responsible for supervision of the following social services: • Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) services • Child Care Assistance (NEW) • Indian Alcohol Substance Abuse (NEW) • Child Abuse Prevention & Awareness (Title IVB)

The ICWA program continues to recruit new foster parents in Kodiak. We have a lot of work to do to ensure the security of our Tribal children. One thing we can do is make sure we have the resources available to support our children in need. If you are interested in becoming a foster parent or learning more about what being a foster parent means, please call Linda Resoff. Child Care Assistance Program

Our Child Care Assistance Program started October 1, 20ll, and is now providing assistance to Sun’aq families with child care expenses. The Child Care Program serves families with children under the age of 13 who meet the following eligibility criteria: • Children must reside with parents, or individuals acting as parents who are working or participating in education or training activities. • Family income must be at or below 85% of state median income. • Children receiving or in need of receiving protective services are eligible for services. • Priority is given for children with special needs. If you have any questions or need assistance with child care please stop by the Sun’aq Tribe for an application. Indian Alcohol Substance Abuse This too is a new grant for the Sun’aq Tribe as of October 1, 2011. With this grant the Sun’aq Tribe intends to develop and enhance our tribal justice system. By doing this we would like to develop and establish the Sun’aq Tribal Youth Alcohol and Substance Abuse Diversion Court. With our established community partnerships, the court will provide rehabilitation, mental health

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services, and tribal community service and appropriate tribal reintegration activities. With careful study and reflection, our interaction with our Tribal Youth program we realized that our youth alcohol and drug problems are contributing significantly to their criminal behavior and school infractions. Child Abuse Prevention and Awareness On March 22-23, 2011, Sun’aq Tribe along with the Kodiak Area Native Association, Native Village of Afognak, Office of Children’s Services, and Kodiak Housing Authority hosted the 3rd Kodiak Regional Child Abuse Prevention Summit Conference. The collaboration was a huge success with over 128 conference participants coming together to bring awareness about the issues surrounding child abuse prevention and family wellness in our region. The goal for the Summit was to focus on an asset-building model for child abuse prevention. A large number of conference participants were mandated reporters, professionals like health care workers, teachers, day care providers, foster care providers and social workers. Our aim was to raise awareness to the regional service providers and agencies about the issues surrounding child abuse in our region; offer a refresher on the signs and symptoms of child abuse and types; bring increased awareness to the negative effects and the updated information about the resources available locally and statewide; and develop a child abuse prevention plan among Kodiak and the villages. Participants gained insights and strategies to: promote healthy early brain development; strengthen the coordination of child protection services; improve the community approach to address violence against children; and increase support for families. The Social Services department continues to hold its Family Fun Night by providing dinner, games, activities and arts and crafts for the whole family. It is held downstairs in the Tribal Hall once a month. If you are interested or would like to know more information about the program please contact Sun’aq. Youth Activities

We provide a wide variety of educational and cultural programs for Tribal Members. A summary of recent youth activities is provided below, in addition to the Alutiiq Dancers Program described on page 12-13, and youth services provided through Youth Advocacy on pages 16-17. Kodiak Middle School Homework Club continues every Tuesday after school. Our middle school homework participants get together and work on projects and schoolwork and even have a tutor to help with math for students that need extra assistance. During this club, students help each other. As needed, Staff provides additional support to help make sure they keep their grades up best they can. Through Johnson-O’Malley Cultural and Educational Program (JOM) support, Sun’aq supports a youth leadership council where members decide what community service or crafting activities to engage in. For example, many of the members of our youth council are involved with the Youth Auxiliary Legion and decided to collaboratively host a Haunted Halloween Maze for kids on October 29th. Everyone worked together, helped supply tarps, other items and costumes to create this wonderful maze. It was a good turnout with both younger and older kids. Special thanks to parents who brought food and drinks for the kids during their breaks between shifts. We all had a lot of fun, and the kids who came really enjoyed themselves. As another recent highlight, youth participants enjoyed an afternoon making Halloween crafts, including: reflector necklaces and ghost, pumpkin, and black cat fabric magnets. The kids took home one of each along with a sugar rush of cupcakes and candy—a good way to kick off the Halloween weekend festivities, ending with a wonderful Halloween for the downtown trick-or-treaters on the 31st. We had a huge turn out with well over 600 kids showing up to receive there candy bags thanks to the Sun’aq Tribal Bingo, Sunami and Sun’aq Tribes help. As with any end of a year the beginning of another approaches, with many new ideas and activities planned, including a trip to the Youth Leadership Conferences in April, a campout at camp Muller with the older kids, and continued monthly community activities, including a snow shoveling service for the Elders, yard and trash pickup, and a possible grocery shopping service for those who have trouble getting out in the winter. It has been another great year for our youth, with many new prospects for the coming year!

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Youth Advocacy

approach KHS students who need tutoring, or anything else. She is a great personal contact for our program as she knows every Native youth in the high school and can refer them to me for activities and services. The Tribal Youth Program is working together with the new Indian Education Para for the Kodiak Middle School, Gail Gainer. With her correspondence, I am able to approach KMS students who need tutoring, or any other program they might need. She is a great personal contact for our program, as she knows many Native youth students in the Kodiak Middle School, and can refer them to me for activities and services. She has already shown to be a valuable connection, as she has referred 4 Native enrollees for homework help, and tutoring.

”Providing Native youth every opportunity to become successful in all they do.” by Sarah Lind, Youth Advocate This school year started off with some amazing achievements. I would like to recognize our Kodiak High school students who have been working so hard this year to keep their grades up! I am so proud of our Native youth who are also involved with the Alutiiq Dancers and the Native Youth Olympics Team. These are students expected to keep their grades up and make it to practices! Each day I am inspired by your children, and see in them the desire to preserve their culture by being involved in our community. Good Job, Moms and Dads!

Sun’aq Homework Hour Every Monday and Tuesday, STYP provides tutoring and an environment for after school homework time for the KMS and KHS who participate in the Sun’aq Tribe Youth Program. For the month of September, we were able to provide a homework hour, here at the Tribal Office for Kodiak Middle School, and Kodiak High School students. Some changes to the program may be in order; one being the length of time we get to spend together, and the frequency of meeting together, being the other. Sun’aq Tribe will be updated with any changes that do come about, in this Homework Program.

Youth Advocacy Activities and Services

2011 Sun’aq Annual Picnic — Games Many prizes were given out, and it seemed as though the games worked out perfectly as the participating children had a great time. Each child got to leave with something special, whether it was a new backpack, or a toddler toy from the ICWA program! Sun’aq Tribe Annual Picnic The Picnic was wonderful this year. Along with the youth games we provided at the picnic, we had an amazing response to our ‘Backpack Program’. In deciding what to get for the youth this year, we found many parents were contacting us about school supplies for the beginning of the school year. With this in mind, TYP/ICWA made a plan to purchase 40 backpacks, with enough school supplies for each one. At the Picnic we were able to distribute them, to all of the participating youth. We feel that this is something that can be done each year for our members’ youth.

Sun’aq Youth Programs Assists Healthy Tomorrows Among the many Tribe led activities, TYP has added Healthy Tomorrow’s ‘Open Mic’ nights to our calendar of activities to make our Native youth aware of the fantastic program. The Tribe’s youth advocate has made time to chaperone these events, and is very impressed by the community support to keep this monthly event afloat. “Open Mic” night for the Kodiak Middle school, and the Kodiak High school students, is a great monthly gathering for students, and we look forward to helping them in any way we can. Sun’aq Youth Programs Assists ICWA Family Dinner 9/26/11 Linda Resoff, from the ICWA program, and Sarah Lind from TYP, teamed up for this event. We were able to provide a lasagna dinner for all participants. We also provided crafts for the youth that attended the dinner.

Student Scholarships to NVA’s Dig Afognak Because we would like to see our youth attend the very educational and annually successful ‘Dig Afognak’ camps, we offered scholarships to insure that any Native member of S.T.Y.P. can attend. Thirty-five children were able to participate in the Dig Afognak various camps because of our financial support to Native Village to Afognak.

STYP Youth Calendar We created a monthly youth activity calendar and mailed it out to youth members of Sun’aq Tribe. This calendar has activities led by JOM and TYP within Sun’aq, and lists activities provided by Kodiak’s Healthy Tomorrows. Also, Sun’aq and NVA partnered to create a beach clean-up day with focus on youth togetherness and environmental awareness.

STYP Youth Advocate goes to Dig Afognak — Music camp I was invited to Dig Afognak’s Music Camp. I was so excited to be a part of this camp because all of the kids got a chance to know me better, and I them. This was a 5-day camp, filled with fun and activities. These are some of the activities and information that I presented. • The history of Alutiiq facial tattooing and piercing — Presentation • Practicing Native Youth Olympic events — Activity • Henna tattooing inspired by Tribal lithographs — Activity

Sun’aq Tribal Youth Supports KHS Starting in November, I began attending the Alutiiq Language class at the Kodiak High School, one time each week. As the youth advocate by being present in the class students are getting to know me and develop a dialogue. By being there, I am learning more about what they may need in the way of school support, tutoring, or anything else. Also, I am attending Georgiana Spears, High School ‘Cama’i Club’. “Cama’i Club” is a group of Native youth that meet together weekly to discuss service projects, educational opportunities, and to be together as a proud Native group of kids. I would like to make myself available for them, and support them in any way I can with Tribal Youth programs.

STYP/BBBS host a BBQ The Sun’aq Tribal Youth Program (STYP) and Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) joined forces for a BBQ on August 12th at the Buskin River picnic area. We brought crafts and support to this event with the idea of members learning more about the BBBS Mentorship program. Donated crafts included a binocular coloring kit, a pinwheel project, and t-shirt painting. We met many families involved with BBBS, while we lent a hand with cooking hot dogs and making crafts.

Sun’aq Youth Service Projects

‘Bear Cub’ Youth Bazaar’s A bazaar held 2-3 times in the winter months that will be led by KHS youth. The idea would be for our youth to host the bazaars’, open them up to our community of crafters, and encourage Tribal youth to sell crafts of their own, to fund program travel or needs.

Elder Honorarium — “Traditional Perok Making” with Julie Knagin In September, we had the privilege to work with Elder Julie Knagin who shared her traditional recipe for perok with us. We facilitated this wonderful learning event for seven Native youth, most of whom had never made a Perok before! I would like to extend a special ‘thank you’ to Linda Resoff, who donated salmon for this event from her personal stock. That donation to us was extremely generous. I am hoping to involve other Sun’aq Tribal Elders in the months ahead to share wisdom, experience, and Alaskan Native skills with our youth.

Salt Cans for Elders We have many Elders within the Tribe who would benefit from this project. We have collected empty coffee cans with lids, and are taking a group of youth to get sand from the beach. Next, we will mix sand and salt, and fill the cans. We would then deliver them to Elders wanting to participate in the program. The salt mix would ideally be used on the stairs and walking paths for our Elders over the winter months, where the danger of falling is a high injury risk.

K.I.B.S.D.’s School — Tribe Connections The Tribal Youth Program is working together with the IEA aide for the High school, Georgiana Spear. With her correspondence, I am able to

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Women’s Advocacy

Photo by Patrick Saltonstall

This year, Aksana developed and conducted four presentations for different social groups and community organizations about the issues of domestic violence/sexual assault and the needs of children witnesses; developed and distributed products, conducted outreach activities and events to increase public awareness of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking and their effects on children witnesses; provided information and referrals to general public about available resources on personal safety, parenting skills, life skills and relationship skills improvement. We are continuing to recruit volunteers for supporting and implementing the program. I have also been attending Green Dot training and workshops as they become available.

by Emily Capjohn, Women’s Advocate Cama’i! I was just hired and started on October 3rd as the Tribe’s new Women’s Advocate. Originally from Old Harbor, I moved to Kodiak in 2001 with my boyfriend Alexus and son Dylan. Alexus is a fisherman and Dylan is in the 8th grade. In my spare time I like to spend time with my family and do beading.

Provide temporary housing assistance for victims of domestic violence fleeing abuse:

I look forward to working with Tribal Members and the local community to carry out my job duties to the best of my abilities. I anticipate learning many new things in the coming months.

We have assisted our clients with locating and obtaining safe and affordable permanent housing; provided funding to eligible clients to pay their security deposit, rent, and utilities for three months; provided them with needed support and referrals. During the last eight months we provided housing assistance to 12 families.

The Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak is dedicated to improve, strengthen and enhance Sun’aq Tribal capacity in prevention and intervention in instances of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking crimes against Kodiak Native women.

In addition to the activities as described, Linda Resoff and I have attended the Kodiak Women’s Resource & Crisis Center Prayer Service for Victims of Domestic Violence on October 04, 2011 at the St. James the Fisherman Episcopal Church. It was a very nice service and a good turnout of the community. I have also met with Rebecca Shields from the Kodiak Women’s Resource & Crisis Center to discuss possible meetings and training for me to attend through the center.

Partnering with Kodiak organizations that deal specifically with domestic violence/sexual assault prevention and intervention, we are geared toward accomplishing following goals and objectives: Provide culturally appropriate and vital victim services to Kodiak Native women: During the last eight months (January 01 to August 11, 2011) Aksana Mathers, the previous Women’s Advocate, provided services to 14 Kodiak Native women who were victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. She also provided crisis intervention, counseling, education, and support services to clients in individual or group settings to the women in the Kodiak area. Aksana also assisted victims to obtain support, resources, and other essential services as well as facilitated a women’s support group. I am now in the process of attending advocacy training so I can continue to provide the services and support for Kodiak Native women and Tribal Members.

I have also met with Kodiak Island Housing Authority’s Brittany Suralta. She is the Self Sufficiency Coordinator. She hosts a Coffee Group and a Beading Group for the women living at the Woody Way apartment complexes. I have and will keep participating in their Coffee & Beading Group. The Coffee Group is held at Woody Way Family Investment Center on Tuesday & Thursday’s from 9:30AM to 11:30 AM. The Beading Group is held on Wednesday’s from 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM which is also at the Woody Way Family Investment Center. I enjoy meeting the different ladies and their children. To request assistance, join our Native Women’s Advisory Committee or receive more information about our program, please contact Emily Jean Capjohn – Program Coordinator/Women’s Advocate at 486-4449, or e-mail advocate@sunaq.org.

Improve quality of victim services & provide its continuum: This past year, Aksana provided three trainings for Kodiak professionals and one training to volunteers involved in violence prevention and intervention. She and the Women’s Advisory Committee created several resources for the program, including a brochure and booklet. I am now in the process of completing the cookbook that was also started.

Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak Ladies Craft Night  Every Thursday Night with Emily Jean Capjohn Upstairs at the Sun’aq Tribal Building 312 West Marine Way

Improve accessibility of services for victims: Aksana facilitated Native women gatherings for support and weekly traditional crafts group meetings, developed and implemented activities and products to empower Native women in Kodiak to deal with domestic violence and sexual assault issues. We are continuing to host the craft group, Women’s Empowerment Workshops and Women’s Support Group/ Beading class at the Woody Way Housing/ Family Investment Center.

6:00PM to 8:00 PM Bring your FAVORITE Craft!

Raise community awareness about the devastating effects of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking and the needs of children exposed to domestic violence:

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Congratulations to Our Graduates done. That’s one way we take away importance from any of our accomplishments. What good is a certificate if you don’t do anything with it? It’s “ONLY a certificate” if it’s just sitting in a frame on your wall. It has no importance. It’s “ONLY an Associate degree or Bachelor degree” if you get it then forget about it.

by Frank Peterson, Program Services Director There is no such thing as “only” a certificate, or “only” an Associate degree, or “only” a bachelor degree. Too many people describe their accomplishments preceded by an “only.” These are all great accomplishments. We should not belittle any of our efforts to improve ourselves. I know how much effort I’ve put into my associate degrees. I know how much time and sacrifice it’s taking to get a bachelor degree. I can see how my family suffers because daddy has to do his homework most nights. It may come easier for some than it does for others. Some may not have to exert as much effort compared to others. That doesn’t mean the accomplishment is any less significant.

We are proud of all our beneficiaries who strive to improve themselves. We are as proud of those who obtain their GED as we are of those who obtain a college degree. Below are several beneficiaries who we want to recognize for their accomplishments. If there are errors please contact me at programs@sunaq.org and I’ll correct them. These are individuals the Tribe has supported financially with Vocational or Higher Education scholarships. We want to recognize all our Tribal Members for their accomplishments so please contact us with their story.

The only reason any of us should consider our accomplishments “only” is if we don’t do anything with what we’ve got. That’s one way we diminish what we’ve

Josh Baker graduated from Alaska’s Institute of Technology (AVTEC) in June of 2011 with a certificate in Industrial Electricity Technology. Josh completed 1,363 clock hours of instruction and is qualified for employment as an Industrial Electrical Technician. His proud parents are Theresa and Craig Baker of Kodiak. Patrick Pestrikoff graduated from the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) with a degree in Fire & Emergency Services. His parents are Mary Padilla and Gerald Pestrikoff Sr. He has an older brother, Darin, and a younger brother, Gerald. Patrick hopes to continue his education and obtain a bachelors degree in civil engineering. Amanda Carlough graduated from the Kodiak College with an Associates Degree. She graduated with honors and wants to continue her education. She is currently working as a PCA and is an aspiring artist. She has a wonderful 12-year-old son, Christopher Kelly. Her advice to anyone wanting to receive a higher education is, “It’s never too late.” Karena Rounsaville graduated from Western Washington University with a B.S. degree in Biology and Anthropology. She will be continuing her education in medical school. Her proud parents are Steven and Darlene Rounsaville. Frank Peterson graduated from the Kodiak College with Associate of Applied Science

degrees in Accounting and General Business. Frank is continuing his education through the University of Alaska Southeast and their distance education program. Frank is working toward a Bachelor degree in Human Resource Management and Accounting. Frank works fulltime and has a full-time family to support him. Thanks Shelly, Merrick, Tyler, Luther, and Aiden. Leeanna Dahl graduated from the Kodiak College with Associate of Applied Science degrees in Accounting and General Business. Leeanna’s parents are Frances and Robert Dalglish. Abbigale Skonberg graduated from the Career Academy with honors in the Medical Assistant Program. “During my time at the Career Academy I met a lot of people, made new friends, and learned so much. The hardest part was being away from all my family, and having to do everything on my own. I could not have done it without the support of my family, friends, the people at the Learning Cafe, and the Sun’aq Tribe. If I were to say anything to anybody wanting to start the process of going to college it would be, don’t give up because in the end it’s worth it. ” Abby hopes to continue her education by going on to nursing school. Sarah Miles was born and raised in Kodiak to Sharon Wolkoff and Mike Miles Sr. She is the granddaughter of the late Helen and William “Dudie” Wolkoff. She successfully completed

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the Medical Assistant Program through the Career Academy in Anchorage in late 2010. “The medical staff at KANA welcomed me to their facility to complete my externship and allowed me to use the skills that I obtained from the Career Academy and assisted me in increasing my knowledge as a Medical Assistant. I am currently employed at KANA and grateful to be working in the community I grew up in. I plan to continue my education to become a registered nurse. I truly appreciate all the help and support that was provided to get me to where I am today. If you have thoughts of going to school don’t be afraid to reach out and ask for help or direction, our community has many helpful resources.” Kelly Englund graduated from Minneapolis College of Art and Design with a B.A. degree in photography. Kelly has done amazing things with her photography. She was a finalist in Photographer’s Forum Magazine’s best of photography 2011 competition. Check out her submission at http://pfmagazine.com/wpcontent/plugins/p-gallery/index.php?searchter ms=kelly&level=search. She also has a website where you can see more of her work and learn more about her accomplishments. Go to www. kellyenglundphoto.com to see more.


Tribal Membership Last year at this time we had 180 addresses that needed to be corrected in our database. This year I’m happy to say we only need 54! It is wonderful that you have been so responsive. If you have had a name change due to marriage or the death of a loved one please send a copy of the certification in order for us to keep our enrollment database current. Below are the names of members of whom we need correct addresses. If you know anyone on the list please inform them. If you would like your newsletter emailed give us a call. You can also stop by the Sun’aq Tribal office if you need a notary.

Thank you, Patricia Hester, Executive Administrative Assistant Enrollment Programs Manager

Enrollment Addresses Needed Abbas, Lisa T Apalone Jr., William F Apalone, Diana R Bell, Samantha Betoncourt, Mary Corliss Bravo, Cassandra Marie Chouinard Jr., Thomas Lee Chya, Michael John Donnelly, Raynette Sue Eckenberg, Clifford Michael Eckenberg, Melanya Joy Gilbert II, Kenneth Eugene Gilbert, Mikel Eugene Griffin, Marie Jean Hagen, Lori Lee Hamilton, Adam Bryce Jackman, Joshua James Jarnecke, Nida Jeannette Killion, Jimmie Dean Knauer, Coral Denise Kuust, Sara Jane Kuust, Scott Michael Lau, William James Martinez, Chelsy Marie Foster Martinez, Richard Kyle Foster McDougal, Brian Ashley Alexander McDougal, Randall Jason Alexander

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Mitchell, Aaron James Mitchell, Michael John Morrison, David Shawn Neitzelt, Robert Franklin Olsen, Katherine Marie Pahmeier-Olson, Zachary Lee Paulsen, Nikki Juliana Polson-Toteff, Sophia Claire Reft, Alfred Carino Reft, Cheryll Carino Reft, Nicholas Melvin Richardson, Sharon Louise Rudio, Jenna Marie Seaman, Elizabeth Ann Seaman, Sonya Ann Seaman, Zachary Ross Sherrett, Alberta Ann Showalter, Veja Ann Shuravloff, Richard Lee Smith, Daniel Allen Speer, Michelle Raylynne Stossmeister, Andriana Stream, Henry Clyde Swensen, Timothy Wade Turnipseed, Timothy Neal Welch, Charlene Marie Williams, Doreen Rae


Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak 312 West Marine Way Kodiak, Alaska 99615 907-486-4449 office 907-486-3361 fax www.sunaq.org

2010-2011 STK Annual Report  

The annual report to the tribal members for 2010-2011, including a CEO letter, updates on tribal activities, financial analysis, Wildsource...