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SHIP TRUST

All-

Competitive Admission

Scholarship

Needed!or the By John Ewald

Webb Institute of Naval Architecture is a small, independent, privately endowed college, fully accredited by Engineers' Council for Professional Development and Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. Located in a beautiful setting on Long Island Sound, it offers, tuition-free, a single program in ship design engineering, culminating with the degree of Bachelor of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. Features are intensive design and engineering studies, combined with a two-month per year experience in marine industry. Student costs include room, board, books and personal expenses, about $2,000 per year in 1978-79. Student financial aid is available. Admits on competitive basis U.S. citizens only, based on College Board scores and high school record. Does not discriminate on basis of race, sex or religion, only criteria are academic ability and motivation for program. For details write William G. Murray, Registrar,

Webb Institute of N aval Architecture Glen Cove, New York 11542

Tel: 516-671-2231

The.biggest call McAllister

McAI1·ISler

The Stuyvesant. a 225,000 dwt tanker. bui lt by Seatrain at their Brooklyn , N.Y shipyard McAllister Brothers. Inc Towing and transportation 11 B attery Place. New York . N Y. 10004 (212) 269-3200. Serving the ports of New York. No rfolk. Philadelphia. and San Juan .

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Mr. Ewald retired last year from his job as manager of the square rigger Falls of Clyde in Honolulu; prior to that he had been manager of the Balclutha in San Francisco. Now working for Xerox in Indiana, he maintains a lively interest in the historic ships movement. Here he call for philosophic and pragmatic development of the Ship Trust mission -and for support of that mission. -ED.

We need a collective give-and-take to speed the development of national priorities and to present a unified national front on maritime preservation . The "opinion centers" around the country are understandably deeply involved in their own set of conditions and project problems that take enormous energy. There are also elements o(self protection, ego, and personal differences in approach, making open communication somewhat less than ideal. The problem is still there, however; to have national policy, national discourse is needed. We will need the wisdom that comes directly from the experience of people like Waldo Johnson, Linwood Snow, Peter Stanford, Karl Kortum, Ken Reynard and Lance Lee. The National Trust's Baltimore Conference brought most of them together, once. SEA HISTORY is doing a wonderful job of printing letters, articles, and opinion. In fact, it is the only place where these issues are being addressed, and doing a first rate job as a magazine too. But more is needed. The Ship Trust is an idea whose time has come. Launched by the National Maritime Historical Society, it now needs direction and support. The goals outlined in the first Ship Trust Committee report include: • A Maritime Heritage Division in the executive arm of the government, to receive advice and focus supportive programs on high-priority undertakings. • An emergency fund to be provided for saving imperilled ships which have a place in the maritime heritage. • A natio nal register for historic skills and arts in the maritime heritage. • Revised laws to encourage operation and insurance of sail and other sea training vessels. • Strengthened protection of underwater artifacts in national and international waters.

The goals as I understand them are complementary, not competitive, to the programs of the various museums and SEA HISTORY, WINTER 1979

Sea History 013 - Winter 1978-1979  

9 EAST RIVER: OF TIME AND TIDE, Peter Stanford • 12 A DREAM OF TALL SHIPS IN SOUTH STREET • 13 THE SCHOONER BERTA PUTS TO SEA, Francis Bowke...

Sea History 013 - Winter 1978-1979  

9 EAST RIVER: OF TIME AND TIDE, Peter Stanford • 12 A DREAM OF TALL SHIPS IN SOUTH STREET • 13 THE SCHOONER BERTA PUTS TO SEA, Francis Bowke...

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