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THREE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN 2019-2022


TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome Letter

3

Strategic Areas of Focus

4

KEY INITIATIVES Advance Animal Welfare Support a Healthy Community

5-11 12-18

Maintain Financial Health

19-22

Champion a Thriving Organization

23-26

IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE

27-30

Trends in Animal Welfare Influencing our Strategic Plan

31

Planning Background

32

Planning Process

33

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

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SAN DIEGO HUMANE SOCIETY STRATEGIC PLAN 2019-2022

WELCOME! San Diego Humane Society enters our new strategic plan in an era of incredible growth and change: In fiscal year 2018-2019, we doubled the number of animals we take in annually to nearly 50,000 and expanded our services and programs to meet the needs of our community. Our latest strategic plan, which was the result of more than a year’s work and planning, will guide our efforts as we keep San Diego at zero euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals and create a better world for animals everywhere. What follows represents our vision and commitment to work collaboratively with our local and national partners to accomplish our ambitious goals. The development of this plan has reinforced our belief in the collective strength of our employees, volunteers, donors, public officials and partners, and will serve as a road map to guide our strategic initiatives for the next three years. Over the lifetime of this plan, we will save the lives of tens of thousands of animals, serve as the safety net for animals and people in San Diego, and develop innovative programs that will shape the future of animal welfare on a national level. A few highlights include: • D  eveloping a high-quality/high-volume spay and neuter clinic to address the root cause of pet homelessness — especially the thousands of kittens who enter our system each year. • B  uilding our emergency/disaster response capabilities in order to increase our ability to respond to crises in San Diego, California and across the country. • A  ddressing the veterinary needs of pet owners who are unable to afford medical care for their pets. • E  xpanding our presence in East County and South Bay, making our services more accessible so we can better serve our community. The inspiring trajectory of this plan offers a glimpse into the potential that lies ahead. I invite you to review it and share in our excitement about what the future holds for animals and the people we serve. Sincerely,

Gary Weitzman, DVM, MPH, CAWA President and CEO

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

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ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION

We will strive to deliver exceptional programming for animals and people living in the San Diego region and support the global animal welfare movement by sharing our expertise in saving and changing lives.

We will continue to foster a Culture of Care, in which we respect and care for our staff, volunteers, guests, donors, government agencies and other partners in service to our community and animals.

STRATEGIC

AREAS —OF—

MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH

FOCUS

SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

As stewards of funds and resources, we will continue to expand lifesaving programs and services that make up San Diego Humane Society’s safety net. We will do this responsibly by testing all of our programs for efficiency, effectiveness and need.

We will build a unified communications system and collaborate with other organizations to continue staying at zero euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals; making spayneuter surgeries accessible; helping people keep their pets and coexisting with wildlife.

VISION

WE OPERATE THROUGH A CULTURE OF CARE

A more compassionate world

MISSION

Create a more humane world by inspiring compassion, providing hope and advancing the welfare of animals and people

VALUES • Compassion • Resourcefulness • Impact • Integrity • Courage 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

• Respecting and caring for self and others • Building cohesive teams • Modeling leadership • Developing people • Aligning the organization • Managing resources responsibly • Improving continuously IN SERVICE TO:

• Employees • Volunteers • Animals • Guests

• Donors • Community • Government agencies • Animal welfare partners 4


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

ANIMAL SERVICES CONTRACTS Exceed contract obligations for all of our 12 contract cities by providing exceptional care of animals and people throughout San Diego County. This also includes the care of our partners, such as San Diego Animal Welfare Coalition and Rescue Partners.

Key Performance Indicators

SDHS was awarded the animal services contracts for six additional cities in the summer of 2018. This brought our total municipal contracts to 12. Setting the gold standard for development and execution of government contracts is a top priority and may pave the way for what has historically been a challenging fiscal and operational endeavor for shelters across the United States. It is our goal to exceed service standards for all of our contract cities in every possible category.

Customer service REVIEWS City representation meetings for review of CONSTITUENT RESPONSES

REVIEW AND IDENTIFY CHANGES to the San Diego

service contract Review and UPDATE ALL UPCOMING contract terms STANDARDIZE all 12 contracts

EAST COUNTY SERVICE presence identified

SOUTH BAY SERVICE presence identified

SERVING

HELPING

12 CITIES

2.2M PEOPLE

ACROSS

620

SQUARE MILES

Milestones Ensure ADEQUATE PHYSICAL SPACE

and resources for our contractual obligations.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Launch 24-HOUR EMERGENCY response.

Identify possible solutions to our “service deserts” in the SOUTH BAY AND EAST COUNTY.

Implement a TELECOMMUNICATIONS CENTER .

5


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

PROJECT WILDLIFE Launch the Pilar & Chuck Bahde Wildlife Center as the preeminent regional wildlife resource and national leader in wildlife rehabilitation and conservation with demonstrated outcomes that can be adopted by other shelters and agencies.

320

SPECIES OF WILDLIFE

The Bahde Wildlife Center provides emergency and high-quality critical care to the thousands of orphaned or injured wild animals who enter our doors. One of only four wildlife centers in the country run by humane societies, we care for more than 320 species of wildlife in an exceptionally biodiverse region.

Key Performance Indicators SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS on wildlife rehabilitation

and conservation

Animals Assisted by Project Wildlife

11,246

10,338

NUMBER OF PATIENTS brought in and measured

9,683

9,510

FY17-18 FY15-16

FY14-15

Key INFLUENCERS WE COLLABORATE WITH to advance rehabilitation and conservation

FY16-17

by reason for intake Number of LIVE OUTCOMES

Milestones Establish NEW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES by

December 2019.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

TRAIN NEW VETERINARIANS in wildlife

medicine by adding the Bahde Wildlife Center to intern rotations by 2020.

Write a marketing and communications plan to ADVANCE THE BAHDE WILDLIFE CENTER’S GOALS

by March 2020.

Establish Project Wildlife as one of five CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE and a global leader in wildlife rehabilitation by 2021. 6


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

HUMANE LAW ENFORCEMENT Deliver a comprehensive, leading-edge Humane Law Enforcement program that will serve San Diego County and act as a “voice” for national conversations on related topics such as minimum hiring and training standards, accreditation and development of best practices for humane law enforcement field services.

Key Performance Indicators ATTENDANCE at HLE training/conferences

including the basic and advanced humane academies held in the fall

Continue to build on the strategic foundation set forth in 2017 to become a nationally recognized leader in Humane Law Enforcement that other organizations can look to for guidance and best practices.

Number of COURSES OFFERED AND/OR SPONSORED by SDHS’s HLE and attendance by the animal control community Number of opportunities to conduct INVESTIGATIONS or serve as expert resources for other agencies Number of PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS made in industry-related forums Satisfy or exceed CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS among our contract cities

ONE OF THE LARGEST HUMANE LAW ENFORCEMENT DEPARTMENTS

Milestones Adopt a

Create an INSTITUTE

“COMMUNITY POLICING” style

FOR HUMANE LAW ENFORCEMENT that will serve

for all HLE operations by year-end 2019.

as a hub for education and sharing advancements within the HLE community by 2021.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Develop INTERNAL SPECIALIZATIONS of

individual officers and teams with identified areas of expertise that can be shared with other agencies by 2021.

Establish SDHS Humane Law Enforcement as one of five CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE

by 2022. 7


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

BEHAVIOR CENTER Advance our leading-edge behavior rehabilitation program that improves adoptability for difficult-to-place companion animals in our care and provides training and behavior modification guidance to families faced with rehoming their pets.

Key Performance Indicators Number of LIVES SAVED through intervention: j Admissions to the center j Graduates from the center Number of CONSULTS REQUESTED by other shelters Number of PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS made in industry-related forums Number of FAMILIES PROVIDED GUIDANCE via the Behavior Hotline

Behavior rehabilitation helps prevent euthanizing healthy and treatable animals. As one of only a very few behavior rehabilitation centers in the country, SDHS sets high standards for behavior rehabilitation in an effort to place animals in homes when they may otherwise not have the opportunity. In addition to the lifesaving work being accomplished in San Diego County, the Behavior Center can be a model for behavioral intervention that is replicated by shelters throughout the United States. Our Behavior and Training program positions SDHS to be at the forefront of influencing the number of lives saved nationwide.

Number of human and animal participants in BEHAVIOR TRAINING CLASSES

Animals Enrolled in the Behavior Center

542

FY18-19

Milestones by July 2019 and smoothly transition rehabilitation of our animals.

Update and implement a marketing communications plan to ADVANCE THE BEHAVIOR CENTER’S GOALS by March 2020.

Establish the Behavior Center as one of five CENTERS

Establish PHILOSOPHY, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES by November 2019.

Establish an ONLINE BEHAVIOR RESOURCE CENTER for other shelter contacts to access by November 2020.

OF EXCELLENCE

OPEN THE NEW BEHAVIOR CENTER

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by 2021. 8


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

KITTEN NURSERY Continue to save lives through our nationally prominent Kitten Nursery and ensure all healthy and treatable kittens in San Diego County are safe from euthanasia. SDHS will continue to share the wealth of information it has amassed running the Kitten Nursery over the past decade so other humane organizations and communities across the country can benefit.

24

HR

KITTEN NURSERY With more than a decade of experience running a 24-hour Kitten Nursery, SDHS sets the standards of care and practices while achieving lifesaving goals and preventing cat overpopulation. The impact of cat overpopulation on communities across the country is evident, and SDHS is a reliable resource for helping communities address this aspect of the problem. SDHS continues to evaluate processes every season in order to consistently improve and assist other communities by scaling our program to fit their needs.

TOTAL

Kittens Cared For...

2009

12,106 2010

662

2011

640

1,045

2013

2014

1,422

1,747

2016

2017

2015

1,506 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

1,107

1,331

Key Performance Indicators Number of SHELTER CONTACTS WHO REGISTER to access online Kitten Resource Center Number of CONSULTS CONDUCTED to help a shelter open/enhance their nursery Number of KITTENS RESCUED and cared for through the Kitten Nursery

2012

1,548 Milestones SET KEY METRICS

2018

1,098

and regular reporting by December 2019.

Annually, speak at a minimum of two conferences or other SPEAKING OPPORTUNITIES .

Establish the Kitten Nursery as one of five CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE

by 2021. 9


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM SDHS will have a comprehensive and expanded presence in all levels of disaster, rescue and emergency response involving animals. SDHS is prepared to provide disaster/ emergency animal response in San Diego County and is also a lead agency statewide and a consistent responder in national emergencies.

Key Performance Indicators Establish and implement a MONTHLY INSPECTION PROGRAM to maintain all resources in readiness mode

Number of TRAINING SESSIONS COMPLETED

Number of EXECUTED MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING AGREEMENTS with other organizations, first responders and municipal agencies

We will have professionally trained animal rescue personnel who can provide an effective response to any emergency occurring in our contract cities, San Diego County and beyond.

Milestones Merge the standalone Animal Rescue Reserve and Special Response Team into a NEW EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM ,

including adoption of policies and procedures, and have new ERT fully operational by 2019. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Develop and implement EFFECTIVE RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND TRAINING

for SDHS staff and volunteer candidates by 2020.

Research and design an EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT STRATEGIC PLAN to outline steps needed to create a nationally recognized Emergency Response Team by 2020. j Establish

an effective callout system that identifies skills and availability of individual ERT members. 10


ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE

SHELTER MEDICINE Opening the Pilar & Chuck Bahde Center for Shelter Medicine is a critical milestone for San Diego Humane Society and homeless animals in our region. Not only is this hospital vital to accommodate the recent increase of animals coming into our care, but it also serves as a teaching hospital for advancing the practice of shelter medicine and molding shelter veterinary staff of tomorrow. SDHS’s goal is to make this critical resource a nationally recognized leader in shelter medicine and an SDHS Center of Excellence.

Key Performance Indicators Number of fourth-year VETERINARY EXTERNS rotating through the center Number of INTERNS matriculated and graduated through the program Number of educational COURSES/PROGRAMS OFFERED

In November 2018, we opened the first of its kind Bahde Center for Shelter Medicine in California. The new center enables SDHS to serve as a leader in the advancement of shelter medicine by establishing a comprehensive specialty and teaching hospital to train veterinary and shelter professionals from across animal welfare disciplines. The center will include mentorships, a full curriculum and appropriate academic affiliations necessary for training veterinary medicine.

Number of opportunities to SERVE AS AN EXPERT RESOURCE for other agencies Number of PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS SDHS makes in veterinary and shelter forums Number of inquiries from other shelters or veterinary institutions for LEARNING AND INFORMATION SHARING

Milestones FULLY STAFF medical leadership

FORMALIZE RELATIONSHIPS with academic

positions, including credentialed personnel in the specialty of shelter medicine by July 2019.

institutions in shelter medicine (preceptorships; adjunct faculty) by July 2020.

Establish shelter medicine

ADVANCE THE BAHDE CENTER FOR SHELTER MEDICINE PROGRAM NATIONALLY by July 2020.

BEST PRACTICES, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES by December 2019.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Write a marketing communications plan to

Establish the Bahde Center for Shelter Medicine as one of five CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE by 2021. KEY LEADERSHIP is

credentialed in shelter medicine by 2022. 11


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

SAN DIEGO HUMANE SOCIETY SAFETY NET San Diego Humane Society is the safety net for animals and people who love them. As of July 1, 2018, we were serving 12 cities and more than 2.2 million people across 620 square miles of the county, providing vital resources, services and education.

Whether it’s sheltering homeless companion animals, helping injured or orphaned wild animals recover and return to the wild, rescuing animals from emergency situations or providing food and supplies to pet families in need through our PAWS San Diego program, partnering with the community makes this life-changing work possible.

Key Performance Indicators Identify WELLNESS NEEDS of communities Conduct a PILOT OF COMMUNITY VETERINARY SERVICES with PAWS San Diego

Launch SOFT OPENING of Community Veterinary Services

Milestones Expand PAWS SAN DIEGO community pet events to bimonthly in 2019, and monthly in 2020. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Increase CARE PROGRAM candidates by 10% per year.

Conduct and expand PILOT OF COMMUNITY VETERINARY SERVICES

with PAWS San Diego clients. 12


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

RESOURCE CENTER Assess and improve telecommunications technology to provide flexible and scalable systems that will support the public service goals of SDHS. Ultimately, this will lead to a fully accessible 24-hour Resource Center for handling all public inquiries about SDHS and animals.

ONE In order to expand and improve the services offered to our various constituents through the Resource Center, we must ensure our technology and process foundations are able to provide a flexible, scalable solution that allows us to continually drive toward onecall resolution for callers. Achieving this objective will allow us to serve more people more efficiently, grow and meet contractual service obligations and provide a rewarding and fulfilling experience for the public.

Key Performance Indicators RESOURCE CENTER METRICS to be determined from

baseline when reporting becomes available

7

24

DAYS A WEEK

HOURS PER DAY

Monthly, report number and type of issues handled through Dispatch, Resource Center and email to determine trends and MEASURE IMPACT (number of people assisted)

Milestones Revise CALL ROUTING AND REPORTING set up for managers by September 2019. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Implement CALL RECORDING/ QUALITY SYSTEM that serves Dispatch and Resource Center teams by December 2019.

Implement KNOWLEDGE-BASED

deployment complete by July 2020.

Expand Dispatch hours to 7 DAYS A WEEK, 24 HOURS PER DAY

by July 2021. 13


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

SPAY/NEUTER CLINIC Develop the capability and implement high-quality/high-volume spay/neuter services for San Diego County to meet the needs of pet owners, partner animal rescue groups and underserved populations.

In the past 15 years, the number of animals in San Diego County animal shelters has held steady at about 45,000. Kittens and pit bulls make up a disproportionate number of these animals. Historically, targeted spay/neuter has been the single most effective tool in decreasing these numbers. The ratio of accessible low-cost, high-quality spay/neuter providers is low compared to the human population of San Diego — especially in underserved areas where less than 70% of pets see a veterinarian. Programs designed to reduce animal overpopulation such as pit bull clinics and targeted community cat programs require a HQHV spay/neuter clinic to be successful. Area rescue groups also need access to such services. While SDHS has performed more than 35,000 low-cost or free community spay/neuters since 2012 (in addition to tens of thousands of surgeries for our own animals), we need to double or even triple that number in order to see a real decrease in these populations.

# of Low-Cost or Free Community Spay/Neuters

Key Performance Indicators Number of SPAY/NEUTER SURGERIES in targeted ZIP codes Number of COMMUNITY CATS who receive spay/neuter surgeries FISCAL SUSTAINABILITY

EMPLOYEE RETENTION

MINIMIZE INJURIES due to repetitive motion

activities (special concern in spay/neuter clinics)

>35,000

SINCE 2012

Milestones Identify COMMUNITY NEED for these services by September 2019.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Create START-UP PLAN to include: identification of physical location or mobile response, budgeting, source funding, recruitment and hiring and a marketing campaign by July 2020.

HIRE STAFF by

OPEN FACILITY

2021 and train at industry leaders like Humane Alliance and Emancipet.

and evaluate program deliverables and fiscal outcomes by 2022.

14


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY VETERINARY SERVICES Research, plan and implement an accessible Community Veterinary Services program for owned animals, addressing the needs of underserved individuals in the San Diego area and SDHS rescue partners by 2022.

Key Performance Indicators Percentage/number increase of owned ANIMAL PATIENTS SERVED through our Community Veterinary Services

Percentage/number decrease of owned ANIMALS SURRENDERED to SDHS and San Diego Animal Welfare Coalition shelters for medical conditions with a good prognosis if given veterinary care

Ensuring accessible and affordable veterinary care to owned animals has a direct impact on sheltering operations: SDHS can provide citizens an alternative to surrendering their animals for medical reasons when faced with financial, health or other hardships. Access to veterinary care has increasingly been identified as having the greatest impact on keeping pets and families together. Additionally, providing needs-based accessible veterinary care for rescue partners increases rescue their assistance with the transfer and placement of homeless animals, alleviating crowding at SDHS shelters.

Percentage/number increase of RESCUE PARTNER ANIMALS receiving services through Community Veterinary Services

Percentage/number increase of owned ANIMALS RECEIVING PREVENTIVE MEDICAL CARE and services through our Community Veterinary Services

Milestones Complete a COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT identifying the scope of work required, and a feasibility study to identify both internal and external resources, barriers and opportunities by October 2019. Determine the DEFINITION, SCOPE AND SERVICE of the Community Veterinary Services program, to include the delivery method of these services (partnerships, existing infrastructure, expanded or new facility) by January 2020. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Identify and secure FINANCIAL SUPPORT and other resources for development, implementation and sustainability of Community Veterinary Services with initial support beginning July 2020 and program launch by July 2021. WORK WITH PAWS SAN DIEGO to pilot veterinary

care of animals belonging to PAWS' clients.

15


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY CATS Reduce the number of community cats entering San Diego County shelters through the creation of a strategic Trap/Neuter/Return program. Since the launch of the nation’s first 24-hour Kitten Nursery in 2009, total kitten numbers entering San Diego shelters have not decreased. It is imperative we help reduce the number of community cats roaming and reproducing in the county through a strategic TNR program.

Key Performance Indicators Year-over-year, DECREASE COMMUNITY (STRAY, FERAL) CAT AND KITTEN INTAKES and monitor both SDHS and SDAWC data

YEAR Quarterly statistics to includeHISTORY number of cats going through the program; COLLECT ZIP CODES comparing historical and current intake from those zip codes

TNR is widely considered to be the most humane and effective method for controlling community cat populations to alleviate overcrowding and reduce euthanasia at shelters. In order to maximize impact, TNR efforts will strategically and proactively target specific communities that generate the highest number of community cats entering our shelters. In some cases, kittens and friendly adult cats caught under this program may be socialized for eventual placement into adoptive homes. The TNR program will be complemented by our already established Shelter/ Neuter/Return program through which community cats are humanely trapped by members of the public and brought to SDHS for spay/neuter.

MONITOR CHANGES in Kitten Nursery intake

Monitor POSITIVE OUTCOMES for community cats; these may include outdoor placements through our “Wild at Heart” program or other humane placement options

Trap

Neuter

Return

Milestones DESIGN THE PROGRAM by

DETERMINE THE FUNDING/BUDGET

ESTABLISH LAUNCH DATE

January 2020.

(initial estimate $1.5M over three years) by June 2020.

by June 2020.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Purchase equipment, HIRE AND TRAIN STAFF and volunteers by

September 2020.

LAUNCH PROGRAM

by December 2020.

16


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY-BASED SOCIAL MARKETING Plan, define key performance indicators and implement a three-year community-based social marketing campaign that will increase SDHS brand awareness and influence people in ways that will inspire them to adopt, foster, conserve, protect animals and people, keep animals healthy — and donate to SDHS's mission.

With a 139-year history, SDHS has a longstanding reputation and support throughout the region; however, many donors, adopters, employees, volunteers and other advocates do not fully understand the breadth and scope of SDHS’s programs and services, as well as its impact on citizens and animals in San Diego County and animal welfare across the country. Constituents also don’t recognize how their actions can influence and play a key role in creating a more humane San Diego.

Key Performance Indicators Metrics to assess COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT around the needs of animals and their people through increases in: j Social media engagement j Adoptions j Donor engagement j Relinquishment intervention

CREATE A MORE

HUMANE SAN DIEGO

Milestones Create a comprehensive MARKETING CAMPAIGN to accomplish these goals by January 2020. j Modalities

will include social marketing outlets as well as traditional advertising platforms such as print media, TV and outdoor advertising.

j Funding

the above will be essential to the success of this strategy.

j Highlighting

actions that are having a positive impact on animals and people.

DEFINE END-STATE ACTIONS that will

support healthy community goals and launch a multiyear campaign by June 2020. MEASURE PROGRESS based on first year’s

baseline by June 2021. Determine whether or not end-state actions are producing the desired outcomes, and UPDATE PLANNING ACCORDINGLY by June 2022.

j Emphasizing

how all of us together can create a more humane San Diego.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

17


SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

REGIONAL RELATIONSHIPS SDHS will continue to work collaboratively with animal welfare organizations throughout the San Diego region, encouraging dialogue, sharing expertise, expanding influence and fostering partner relationships. Additionally, SDHS will strive to reach beyond San Diego and encourage ongoing exchanges of information with other shelters and rescues in Southern California, Baja California and across California and the U.S.

ZERO EUTHANASIA We act locally first to ensure SDHS successfully serves the immediate community and stays at zero euthanasia of healthy and treatable animals. By expanding and strengthening relationships that go beyond San Diego, SDHS will be able to work with other animal welfare groups to support healthy and safe communities for animals and the people who care about them. Partnerships with other shelters can help organizations in California and beyond respond to immediate challenges for animals. Transports are an essential factor in geographic equity of animals in the United States. This is becoming more and more evident in our population management as we see fewer and fewer puppies in San Diego but an oversupply in other areas of the U.S.

Key Performance Indicators Number of ANIMALS IMPACTED through our partnerships

YEAR

Number of PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS we are HISTORY working with Number of CONTRACT ACQUISITIONS or expanded service opportunities Number of AGENCIES REQUESTING AND RECEIVING ASSISTANCE from SDHS

Milestones Build COOPERATIVE RELATIONSHIPS to support collaborative efforts on identified legislation by 2020. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Plan for FUTURE CONTRACT OPPORTUNITIES by 2020-2021.

Identify and explore REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS by 2020.

18


MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH

THE CAMPAIGN FOR ANIMALS We will launch the public phase of a $150 million Comprehensive Campaign. The full campaign is a seven-year initiative, beginning with the silent phase in 2019 and has included a feasibility assessment, donor communication and design development. The campaign includes an increase in annual giving, planned gifts, foundation support, major gifts, capital gifts and endowment support.

It is imperative that SDHS secure philanthropic support to fund current programs and future growth. The Comprehensive Campaign is designed to help raise awareness, establish a sense of urgency and encourage our supporters to provide greater levels of philanthropic support. As nearly every area of the operation is impacted by philanthropic support, the success of this initiative is essential in all SDHS does and hopes to achieve.

More Humane — The Campaign for Animals

Key Performance Indicators RAISE PHILANTHROPIC SUPPORT as outlined in each

year's fiscal budget Achieve incremental INCREASES OF 7-9% ANNUALLY in overall levels of philanthropic support by July 2020 PUBLIC LAUNCH for the campaign by July 2021

$150 MILLION

SAVE

SECURE 50% BY JULY 2021

lead

build

sustain

Milestones CREATE CAMPAIGN MATERIALS by July 2019.

Determine SPECIFIC GOALS for the following areas by January 2020.

The campaign is built around four pillars: SAVE , LEAD, BUILD and SUSTAIN .

j ANNUAL

Secure CAMPAIGN LEAD GIFTS by July 2020.

GIVING — funds raised, retention rates, donor counts, Constant Companion and Humane Leadership Circle members.

Secure 50% OF $150M GOAL , and conduct a public launch by July 2021.

GIVING — funds raised, upgrades, dual/triple asks, number of gifts of $50K or more.

Complete the SECOND PHASE of the campaign by July 2025.

j MAJOR

GIVING — funds raised, bequest inquiries, bequests confirmed.

j PLANNED

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

19


MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH

DATA MANAGEMENT Establish a Business Intelligence Unit focused on data management systems and processes to support effective and efficient data collection, analysis, reporting and data-driven decision-making across the organization.

Key Performance Indicators More ACCURATE TRACKING becomes evident Ability to pull RELIABLE REPORTS efficiently Ability to AUTOMATE regular data pulls QUALITY CONTROL as evidenced by the ability to

pull the same report twice with the same results

Data is used to provide insight and measure the success of programs and services, and the progress of initiatives and fundraising goals. Having accurate, reliable data can highlight processes that aren't working, as well as processes that are — and allow employees to be — more efficient. Reporting accurate and methodically collected data uniformly on nearly every aspect of operations on a quarterly and annual basis is required. Standardized data entry and tracking protocols implemented across a variety of database systems used throughout the organization will improve data analysis and organizational effectiveness.

FASTER TURNAROUND TIME for reports

(daily, monthly, quarterly and annually)

Milestones A list of ALL REPORTING OBLIGATIONS will be created and assigned to a staff member or department for action by October 2019.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

The current PROCESS FOR COLLECTING AND MANAGING THE DATA associated with each measure

should be examined and outlined step by step by January 2020.

Each staff member or department should have identified A NEW PROCESS FOR DATA COLLECTION (if it's determined that the current process does not allow for consistent and accurate collection and management), including any resources necessary to carry out the process (software, etc.) by July 2020. 20


MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH

PROCESS IMPROVEMENT Identify gaps and waste in current processes using continual improvement processes that will allow more efficient use of resources and improve programs and services.

50,000 ANIMALS RESPONSIBLE FOR NEARLY

EACH YEAR

SDHS doubled staff and intake of animals when it acquired six new city contracts in 2018. This increase impacted the way work was being performed and services and programs were delivered. In that same year, we began working with our corporate partner, Integris, who has introduced and trained staff to look for ways to increase efficiencies and eliminate waste and duplication using process improvement practices such as Lean and Six Sigma.

Key Performance Indicators ON A QUARTERLY BASIS:

j Track

number of departments that have gone through the CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT

j Track

j Track

INTRODUCTION

number of departments that have gone through PROCESS MAPPING number of ADOPTED PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS as a percentage of those recommended

Assess full staffing and RESOURCE NEEDS based on more efficient operations processes Evaluate all programs on the basis of IMPACT ON OUR MISSION

Milestones FORM CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT TEAMS BY JANUARY 2020 USING THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Work with two to three new departments each quarter and introduce continual IMPROVEMENT CONCEPTS .

Work with one new department to map their KEY PROCESSES every quarter.

Make MAPPING AND EFFICIENCY work a standard practice while transitioning the process leadership from Integris to SDHS. 21


MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH

WORK CAPACITY Ensure there is adequate financial, physical space and human resources to provide high-quality care to all animals, people and communities we serve.

The limitations of current space for animals can lead to overcrowding, increased disease risk and stress for both humans and animals. In order to fulfill our mission and contractual obligations, we must provide safe, appropriate and adequate space that our communities can access.

Key Performance Indicators Lower levels of prevalent ANIMAL DISEASES Measure programs and services quarterly to ensure ADEQUATE STAFFING LEVELS

Establish STANDARD ROUTINE TIMES and staffing numbers to complete animal care tasks Ensure each campus is OPERATING WITHIN PHYSICAL CAPACITY by managing daily animal population at an optimum capacity for care

NORTH COASTAL

NORTH INLAND

NORTH CENTRAL EAST

CENTRAL SOUTH

EXPLORE SHELTER OPTIONS IN SOUTH BAY AND EAST COUNTY

Milestones Implement PROCESS IMPROVEMENTS

directed at making a positive impact on animal population management by January 2020. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Develop a FACILITIES MASTER PLAN to determine solutions that address physical space limitations or “capacity for care” at all campuses, including exploration of new facilities by July 2020.

In order to better serve cities that have contracts with SDHS, we must EXPLORE SHELTER OPTIONS in areas in which we have no physical presence. Currently, those areas are in the South Bay and East County regions of San Diego. Implementation goal is July 2020. 22


CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION

SOFTWARE SYSTEMS Improve information systems supporting the operations of SDHS and the people and animals we serve.

In order to support recent growth, improve services and have efficient and effective processes that allow SDHS to be productive and perform valued and meaningful work, our information systems must be improved to enable the digital transformation we began in 2016. Once implemented, SDHS can expect streamlined interactions with communities, and provide easier and better access to information across the organization. Also, the new system will support process improvement as SDHS continues to evolve.

Key Performance Indicators END-SOLUTIONS THAT WILL BE PROCESS-SPECIFIC

and should be designed in conjunction with the process documentation (both as-is and to-be versions)

Establish project metrics and milestones, for IMPROVING THE GUEST EXPERIENCE at SDHS

Milestones Establish a team to DEFINE THE CURRENT STATE OF SYSTEMS in use and document business processes, including key areas for improvement and metrics, and prepare and present the project plan by January 2020.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Obtain sign off and FINANCIAL SUPPORT for the plan by March 2020.

23


CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION

LEARNING & DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY Being a teaching and learning organization underpins SDHS's Culture of Care. In order to develop and promote best practices, we must be open to learning as well as teaching. SDHS’s Learning & Development Academy will include multi-resource training and coaching to foster learning, teaching, career development, continuous improvement and succession planning.

Given significant organizational changes and growth in recent years — including doubling in size and work volume in 2018 — and the landscape of the competitive job market, consistent, accessible training in both technical and soft skills will be necessary to: Support positive guest and volunteer experiences.

j 

Key Performance Indicators Workforce and volunteers have the skills, training and development tools necessary to MEET THE CHANGING NEEDS of the organization Applied learning that BUILDS TEAMWORK and fosters a Culture of Care

Sustain employee and volunteer morale and retention.

j 

Create a formal leadership development program that will prepare first-time supervisors and help grow future leaders from within.

j 

TRACK LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT for individuals through a single learning management system

Encourage and promote ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS

Support careers and succession planning.

j 

Ensure continual improvement tools such as Six Sigma and Lean will support a Culture of Care, reduce operating costs and ensure efficient and responsible stewardship of funds.

j 

Milestones Launch The Leadership Challenge training series and Leadership Practices Inventory for organizational LEADERSHIP GROUP by September 2019.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Deliver Foundations of Team Cohesion training and DiSC assessment for NEW HIRES , quarterly.

Develop and pilot a consistent NEW-HIRE, ROLE-SPECIFIC TRAINING MODEL in the veterinary department by July 2019; evaluate, customize and roll out to all departments by July 2020. 24


CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Create a performance and behavior coaching and assessment framework to align with organizational core values and our Culture of Care.

Key Performance Indicators EMPLOYING

650 PEOPLE

SERVING

12 CITIES

STRONG LEADERSHIP competency, confidence and

accountability based on our core values STRONG EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE , confidence

HELPING

2.2M PEOPLE

ACROSS

620

SQUARE MILES

and accountability based on our core values STRONG EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION and engagement

TURNOVER RATE below industry average

Doubling in size as of July 2018 has significantly impacted the way employees are evaluated. With a new performance management system and processes in place, employees will have a better understanding of how their individual performance is advancing their department’s goals. Aligning clear and consistent expectations with organizational core values and providing tools and consistent approaches to coaching, counseling, rewards and recognition will set up individuals and team members for success from the start.

Milestones Create a LEADERSHIP PERFORMANCE AND BEHAVIOR MODEL based on the Leadership

Practices Inventory assessment by September 2019. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Update job descriptions, and PERFORM JOB ANALYSIS as needed to ensure roles, responsibilities and behavior expectations are clear and aligned with organizational core values and our Culture of Care by November 2019 and annually thereafter.

TRAIN PACK LEADERS

and employees on new tools and processes by September 2019.

25


CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION

A GREAT PLACE TO WORK Support and invest in people as our most valuable asset through conscious delivery of competitive pay and benefits, professional growth, self-care resources and a workplace environment based on our Culture of Care.

Key Performance Indicators HIGH LEVEL AND ENGAGEMENT RATINGS on

Alignment Capabilities and Engagement survey

A GREAT PLACE TO WORK

High level of PARTICIPATION IN WELLNESS PROGRAM and use of self-care resources

Providing for those who care for animals directly impacts the level of service and satisfaction SDHS is able to provide to the animals and people in our communities. Creating and sustaining an intentional Culture of Care and overall well-being that is purposeful and ingrained in the organization supports and sustains employees and volunteers. Aligning personal and work values for retention and engagement contributes to overall organizational effectiveness. Alignment of roles, behaviors, effective leadership, competitive pay and benefits helps in recruiting and retaining top talent.

Ability to ATTRACT AND RETAIN talent

Milestones Administer an ALIGNMENT, CAPABILITIES AND ENGAGEMENT SURVEY

in October 2019 and every other year thereafter.

Develop and launch a SELF-CARE PROGRAM with strategies and resources to support staff and build resilience; pilot by August 2019 and roll out full program by January 2020.

PROMOTE WELLNESS PROGRAM with

mobile resources and host quarterly events with incentives; promote Employee Assistance Program’s online offerings, webinars, in-person and onsite services by March 2020.

Perform comprehensive compensation research and analysis for specific departments and roles, benchmarking with market data; review internal pay grades, ranges, years of experience and equity analysis; adjust pay to REMAIN COMPETITIVE IN THE MARKET, attract and retain a highly talented and committed workforce; perform annually to keep pace with market and fluctuating hiring trends by July 2020. 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

OFFER ADDITIONAL STIPENDS AND DISCOUNTS for public transit

passes, carpooling, pet insurance and fitness memberships by July 2020. 26


IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE

ADVANCE ANIMAL WELFARE FY2019-2020 JULY-DEC 2019

JAN-JUNE 2020

FY2020-2021 JULY-DEC 2020

Animal Services Contracts

Ensure adequate physical space and resources for our contractual obligations

Identify possible solutions to our “service deserts” in the South Bay and East County

Launch 24-hour emergency response

Project Wildlife

Policies and procedures

Communications plan

Veterinary intern rotation

Veterinary intern rotation

Humane Law Enforcement

Veterinary intern rotation

Veterinary intern rotation

Establish Institute for HLE Develop internal specializations within Institute for HLE

Behavior Center

Establish philosophy, policy and procedures

Kitten Nursery

Set key metrics and regular reporting

Speak at a conference

Emergency Response Team

Adoption of policies and procedures

Develop a strategic plan for Emergency Management

Develop and implement effective recruitment selection and training for SDHS staff and volunteers

Shelter Medicine

Establish policies and procedures

Fully staff medical leadership positions/ credentialed shelter medicine

Formalized relationships with academic institution

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Veterinary intern rotation

JULY-DEC 2021

JAN-JUNE 2022

Veterinary intern rotation

Establish as a Center of Excellence

Implement “Community Policing” model Marketing communications plan

JAN-JUNE 2021

FY2021-2022

Online resource center for other shelters

Establish as a Center of Excellence

Establish as a Center of Excellence

Open new Behavior Center

Merge existing emergency response programs into one and have it fully operational

Speak at a conference

Establish as a Center of Excellence

Speak at a conference

Write a marketing and communication plan that advances the Bahde Center for Shelter Medicine program nationally

Establish as a Center of Excellence

Key leadership credentialed in shelter medicine

27


IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE

SUPPORT A HEALTHY COMMUNITY FY2019-2020

San Diego Humane Society Safety Net Resource Center

JULY-DEC 2019

JAN-JUNE 2020

Identify communities needs

Look at how to expand PAWS program outreach by 10%

Expand community events Increase behavioral support

FY2020-2021

JULY-DEC 2020

JAN-JUNE 2021

Expand community events

Pilot of Community Veterinary Services

Track and analyze relinquishment trends

Establish partnerships with community food banks

Increase vaccine clinic at each campus

Increase CARE candidates

Analyze CARE client trends; incorporate into Community Veterinary Services

Expand to 24/7

FY2021-2022

JULY-DEC 2021

JAN-JUNE 2022

Expand a pilot Community Veterinary Services with PAWS clients

Launch soft opening of Community Veterinary Services program

Open facility and evaluate program deliverables

Knowledge base implemented

Revise call routing and reporting Implement call recording/quality system that serves Dispatch/Resource Center

HQHV Spay/Neuter

Identify community needs and define scope of work

Create start-up plan to include: identification of physical location, establish budgets, source funding, recruitment and hiring, and marketing campaign

Hire staff and train

Community Veterinary Services Community Cats

Assess needs and define scope of work

Determine definition, scope and services

Identify and secure financial support and other resources

Program launch

Design the program

Determine funding/ budget

Purchase equipment, hire staff and train in preparation

Establish launch date

Launch program

CommunityBased Social Marketing Regional Relationships 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Launch community-based social marketing campaign

Measure progress based on first year

Determine if defined activities are producing desired outcomes; update plan

Plan for future contract opportunities

Identify and explore regional partnerships

Define activities Build cooperative relationships to work on legislation

28


IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE

MAINTAIN FINANCIAL HEALTH FY2019-2020 JULY-DEC 2019

JAN-JUNE 2020

FY2020-2021 JULY-DEC 2020

JAN-JUNE 2021

FY2021-2022 JULY-DEC 2021

JAN-JUNE 2022

The Campaign for Animals

Create campaign materials

Determine the specific goals for annual, major and planned giving

Secure campaign lead gifts

Data Management

Create list of reporting obligations by department

Establish written documents for current data collection

Refine collection methods where necessary

Process Improvement

Form continuous improvement teams

Continue work of existing teams

Continue work of existing teams

Continue work of existing teams

Continue work of existing teams

Continue work of existing teams

Launch 4-6 new groups

Launch 4-6 new groups

Launch 4-6 new groups

Launch 4-6 new groups

Launch 4-6 new groups

Implement processes to improve animal population management

Develop Facilities Master Plan

Work Capacity

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Launch public campaign

Explore South Bay and East County shelter facilities

29


IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINE

CHAMPION A THRIVING ORGANIZATION FY2019-2020 JULY-DEC 2019

Software Systems

FY2020-2021

JAN-JUNE 2020

JULY-DEC 2020

Current state defined for systems in use in SDHS

Build a communications plan for implementation

JAN-JUNE 2021

FY2021-2022 JULY-DEC 2021

JAN-JUNE 2022

Obtain signoff and financial support for plan

Learning & Development Academy

Develop and pilot a consistent new hire training model in veterinary

Evaluate, customize and roll out pilot program to all departments

Deliver Foundations of Team Cohesion and DiSC training for new hires — quarterly Launch leadership training series

Performance Management

Create a leadership performance and behavior model

Implement LPI for leaders

Update job descriptions Train Pack Leaders and employees on new tools and processes

Great Place to Work

Administer alignment capabilities and engagement survey Develop pilot self-care program

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Launch self-care program Promote wellness, EAP, et. al.

Perform comprehensive compensation research and analysis

Administer alignment capabilities and engagement survey

Offer additional stipends/discounts for carpooling, pet insurance, fitness 30


TRENDS IN ANIMAL WELFARE INFLUENCING OUR STRATEGIC PLAN INCLUDE : A CHANGING DEFINITION OF SERVICE

THE UNDERSERVED

• Service includes people — and pets. • Public expectation of sheltering, animal

• Reduced fee and free veterinary and other services

rehabilitation and euthanasia is changing.

• Shelter intake is holding steady or declining on

average, even as the human population and the number of owned pets continues to climb.

THE ECONOMICS OF SHELTERING

• Shelter services for pets continue to increase nationally.

• Expectations for “Length of Stay” as a metric

are changing as well-resourced shelters take in more difficult cases, which require extensive medical and behavioral rehabilitation.

• Cost of care of animals per capita is

driving consolidation among agencies, eliminating duplication.

THE EXPLOSION OF RESCUES AND TRANSPORTATION

• There is an upsurge of small, unregulated animal rescue groups.

• Collaboration with other organizations, rescue groups, veterinary practitioners, universities, social service agencies, etc., is essential for advancing animal welfare.

may still be too expensive and inaccessible for people with lower incomes and limited transportation.

• Animal welfare agencies need to rethink the way they deliver services to people and their pets in underserved neighborhoods.

ANIMAL SUPPLY/DEMAND AND WHERE PEOPLE ADOPT

• Only 25% of people adopt animals from shelters;

given the public’s changing perception of shelters, this is way too low.

• Breeds of dogs who come through shelters do not always match potential adopters’ desires.

• Shelters and humans in general are not good at

identifying breeds, so labeling of shelter dogs is often wrong..

• As euthanasia rates decrease, progressive

agencies are taking in more and more difficult-toplace animals.

• Older dogs and cats, bully breeds and

undersocialized animals are being rehabilitated and adopted, but this takes time and resources to accomplish.

• Transportation of animals geographically is essential and globally ties us together.

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

31


PLANNING BACKGROUND San Diego Humane Society has gone through massive changes and growth during the duration of the 2016-2019 strategic plan. The volume of animals and people served has exploded with the addition of six more city contracts, and staff numbers have increased to respond to the volume of animals requiring care. While the changes have been enormous, San Diego Humane Society has continued to deliver reliable, quality service to the community. During 2018, San Diego Humane Society began planning for the next three years by looking at the current organization and determining how to strengthen services to a broader, more diverse population and planning how to ensure a higher level of service and programming. SDHS worked with Integris to review the current state of the organization in contrast to the future. They built out a clarity map that was reviewed by SDHS’s Board of Trustees on Jan. 23, 2019. The president, executives and key staff took feedback from the trustee meeting and continued refining the plan to produce the new 2019-2022 Strategic Plan to guide the organization over the next three years.

Participants in the strategic planning process included... Board of Trustees

Trustees

Kenneth M. Cohen Chair

Colleen Blackmore Reilly

Lynn Pechet-Bruser

David Lynn Secretary and Chair, Finance Committee

Sharon Blanchet, JD

Emily Rex

Dee Anne Canepa

Jodi Smith

Susan Davis

Esteban Villanueva, JD

William Lafleur

Tori Zwisler

Eve Benton Chair, Board Governance Committee

Anne Liu

Richard Bockoff Chair, Philanthropy Committee

Staff Gary Weitzman, DVM, MPH, CAWA President and CEO Brian Daugherty SVP and Chief Philanthropy Officer Michael Lowry SVP and Chief Financial Officer Audrey Lang, SPHR SVP, Organizational Development Stacey Zeitlin, MAT VP, Community Engagement Beau Archer, CAWA Interim Chief Operating Officer

3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

Bill Ganley Interim Chief of Humane Law Enforcement Jerrica Owen, CAWA Interim Co-Director, San Diego Campus Jane Elliot-Hughes Sr. Director, Support Services Jennifer Grantham Sr. Director, Annual Giving Carol Spychalski Sr. Director, Philanthropy Polly Keyworth Controller

Gerry Gombatto Director, Donor Services Tina Nguyen, SPHR Director, Employee Engagement Elizabeth A. Pecsi, APR, Fellow PRSA Director, Communications Julianna Tetlow Director, Governmental Relations

Partners Brett Cooper, Integris Evans Kerrigan, Integris

32


PLANNING PROCESS DEVELOP CLARITY AND CURRENT STATE REVIEW current state. IDENTIFY high-level

aspirations. GATHER input on current

direction and capabilities. DEVELOP high-level process

view of organization. CAPTURE metrics

IDENTIFY STRATEGY AND INITIATIVES REFINE initial plan with

feedback from retreat. FURTHER DEVELOP

initiatives and action plans in support of each strategy.

FINALIZE PLAN DEVELOP potential focus

needed to track progress and performance in key processes.

DOCUMENT initiatives and

areas for 2019-2022.

planned implementation.

PRIORITIZE the potential

TEST improvement concepts

CAPTURE key KPIs for the

focus areas defined.

organization.

DEFINE STRATEGIES

on initial SDHS processes.

for the next three years.

BRING INITIAL INSIGHTS

DEFINE INITIATIVES

to trustees for develop and alignment at board retreat.

to support each strategy. DEFINE POTENTIAL ACTIONS and milestones

for the initiatives. SHARE final draft of staff

refinements and goals with trustees in late spring.

SEPTEMBER-JANUARY 3 -Y E A R S T R AT E G I C P L A N

FEBRUARY-MARCH

APRIL-JUNE 33

Profile for San Diego Humane Society

San Diego Humane Society Strategic Plan  

2019-22 Strategic Plan

San Diego Humane Society Strategic Plan  

2019-22 Strategic Plan

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