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Sept 2017

Brad Jeremiah

If it  wasn’t  for  the  televised  2017      Honor  Bowl  game  on  the  Fox  Sports  network,  many  prep  football  enthusiasts  outside  of  San Diego’s Eastern League would have not         witnessed,  Honor  Bowl  MVP         quarterback  Brad  Jeremiah,  propel  his      Chris an  High  School  Patriots  in  a         powerful performance over the Boron High  School Bobcats.     

Josh McNish‐Heider  According to folklore, Valhalla is the corridor of slain warriors in Norse mythology. It also shares its name with a band of warriors who wear the orange and white of the Valhalla High School football team. For the last several years, head coach Charles Bussey’s Norsemen, have pushed their weight around in the competitive East County, and more specifically in the GrossmontHills league.


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

The San Diego Cavers have set themselves up with a 6-0 record to start the 2017 season. The last time they were in this situation was back in 1994 when Head Coach Charles James was a freshman quarterback. Coach James recalls when they faced Rancho Buena Vista in the CIF Playoffs.  

OCT 2017


If it wasn’t for the televised 2017 Honor Bowl game on the Fox  Sports network, many prep football enthusiasts outside of San  Diego’s Eastern League would have not witnessed, Honor Bowl  MVP  quarterback  Brad  Jeremiah,  propel  his  Chris an  High  School Patriots in a powerful performance over the Boron High  School Bobcats.     

A er a  42‐0  half  me  score  and  the  implementa on  of  a        running  clock  in  the  4th  quarter,  the  class  of  2018  Jeremiah,          finished  the  game  with  a  staggering  383  yards  passing,  and  complemented  it  with  5  touchdown  passes  in  a  62‐6          destruc on of the overmatched Boron Bobcat team. 


Donned in  a  custom  made  stars  and  stripes  uniform  represen ng  USA  strength  and  the  theme  of  the  Honor Bowl, number #3 did not hesitate to let people know that you can’t define a player by the size of  their school. And to the contrary, that today many smaller programs are producing players that can com‐ pete in any league and on any team.   Fi ed with an accurate and strong arm, the mellow and poised pro‐style quarterback actually started his  gridiron career on the defensive side of the ball as a linebacker. It was not un l middle school that he  found his calling in life, that of a signal caller, a leader, a quarterback.   For Jeremiah, the 2017 season started early, the summer to be precise. With a summer of 7‐on‐7 games  and camps, the inspired senior was also ba ling the early morning traffic to train with former San Diego  Aztec and quarterback guru Cree Morris. While working on his passing mechanics with Cree, he also aug‐ mented his pre‐season prepara on with athle c and strength condi oning with renowned trainer Todd  Durkin.    

And to  say  that  it  has  paid  off  is  an  understatement.  By  looking  at  the  quarterback’s current  sta s cs,  you would think that the 2017 season has been played in full and completed. Only 6 games into the sea‐ son,  the  6‐5,  205lb  signal  caller  has  toppled  his  impressive  2016  sta s cs  (21  Td  passes,  2034  passing  yds,169  yds  per  game)  with  22  touchdown  passes,  1744  passing  yards,  and  a  staggering  354  yards  per  game average. This has placed Jeremiah on the top of the list of a bevy of quarterbacks locally and na‐ onally (according to Maxpreps).    

1. Ranked 1st in touchdowns and passing yardage in San Diego  2.  Ranked 2nd in touchdowns and 3rd in passing yardage for the state of California  Ranked 11th in touchdowns and 33rd in passing yardage in the Na on   

Being a year older with some added savvy doesn’t hurt, but when asked about the increase of his passing  sta s cs  in  2017  Jeremiah  pointed  out,  “First  of  all  this  year  we  don’t  have  a  running  back  like  Joey  Morones, so we had to open it up and throw the ball more than we did last year. We also have a great  wide receiver group that make plays and are very reliable with Jesse Ma hews, Alex Gonzalez, Alonzo  Richardson, Nashom Carter, and Bryce Riepl.”   

With only one defeat on their record to rival Santa Fe Chris an (30‐7), the 5‐1 Patriots are in 5th‐gear as  they progress down the road to the D‐2 sec on playoffs. No longer in Division‐3, the Patriots have taken  their talents to a playoff‐division that is simply more compe ve. “Being in D‐2 is tough. Every team is  bigger at almost every posi on. It’s a really tough division, but we are excited to see what we do,” ex‐ plained Jeremiah.    

Loaded with 16 teams that include on‐fire programs as Lincoln (5‐1), Valley Center (5‐1), Mira Mesa (5‐1),  and undefeated Ramona (6‐0) and Bishop’s, the D‐2 division could produce the most exci ng and intense  match ups in 2017.     

Look for Brad to lead the Red or Blue squad at the 2017 SDFNL All Star Showcase Game.  


Division I Academic Standards Division I schools require you to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements: 1. Complete a total of 16 NCAA core courses in the following areas: 4 years of English. + 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 1 additional year of English, math or natural/physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Note: See the core-course progression requirements. 2. Complete 10 of your 16 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Students whose academic credentials are solely international (including Canada) are not required to meet the 10/7 requirement. 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.300) on the Division I sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board. If you plan to attend a Division I school, you must complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses in eight academic semesters or four consecutive academic years from the start of ninth grade. If you graduate from high school early, you must still meet core-course requirements.

Core-Course Progression (10/7) Requirement In order to be eligible to compete during your initial year of full-time enrollment, you must complete a total of 16 core courses. Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school and at least seven of these 10 core courses must be in English, math, or science. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Note: Students must also meet the Division I sliding-scale index for competition (minimum 2.300 core-course GPA). Courses Taken After High School For Division I, only courses completed in your first eight semesters will qualify as core courses for Division I. If you graduate from high school on time (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth grade class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A college course taken after high school graduation can be used toward your initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit. An additional core-course unit taken after on-time high school graduation cannot replace a course used to meet the core-course progression (10/7) requirement, but an additional core course after on-time graduation may replace one of the remaining six core-course units necessary to meet corecourse requirements. What if I Don’t Graduate on Time? In Division I, if you do not graduate on time (in four years/ eight semesters), the NCAA Eligibility Center will still use your grades and coursework for the first four years/eight semesters in your certification. You will still need to provide proof of graduation (once you graduate) and you may not use any coursework taken after your high school graduation toward your certification.

How to plan your high school courses to meet the 16 core-course requirement:

4 x 4 = 16

4 English courses (one per year) + 4 math courses (one per year) + 4 science courses (one per year) + 4 social science (and/or additional) courses (one per year) 16 NCAA core courses GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

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Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from all high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division I school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division I school.

Early Academic Qualifier

If you meet specific criteria after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division I and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment. Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 900 OR minimum ACT sum score of 75; and a core-course GPA of 3.000 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses: 3 years of English; 2 years of math; 2 years of science; 2 additional years of English, math or natural/physical science; and 5 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment at an NCAA Division I school.

Academic Redshirt

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first regular academic term but may NOT compete during your first year of enrollment. You must pass either eight quarter or nine semester hours to practice in the next term.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of enrollment at a Division I school. What if I Don’t Meet the Division I Standards? If you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

Sliding Scale for Division I Beginning Aug. 1, 2016 Core GPA

3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.299 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT

400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 880 890 900 910 910 920 930 940 950 960 970 980 990 1000 1010 1020

ACT 37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 86

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; and 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after Aug. 1, 2016.

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ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Division II Academic Standards Division II schools require college-bound student-athletes to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. The standards are changing for students who initially enroll full time at a Division II school on or after Aug. 1, 2018. If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

1. Complete a total 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural/ physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

1. Complete a total of 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural or physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

2. Earn at least a 2.000 GPA in your core courses. 3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned during or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.200) on the Division II competition sliding scale.

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Core-Course Timeline If you plan to attend a Division II school, you must complete 16 NCAA core courses after starting grade nine and before your first full-time college enrollment. Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from ALL other high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division II school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division II school.

What if I Don’t Meet the Division II Standards? If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards: 1. Earn a 2.000 GPA in 16 core courses; OR 2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

Early Academic Qualifier

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school after Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following standards:

Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 820 OR minimum sum score of 68 on the ACT; and a core-course GPA of 2.5 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses in the following areas:

1. Complete 16 core courses; AND 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division II partial qualifier sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

If you meet specific criteria below after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division II and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship.

3 years of English; 3 years of math; 2 years of natural/physical science; and 6 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of full-time enrollment at an NCAA Division II school.

Partial Qualifier

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first year of enrollment, but may NOT compete.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of full-time enrollment at a Division II school.

Courses Taken After High School For Division II, you may use an unlimited number of core courses completed after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated. College courses taken after high school graduation can be used toward your Division II initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit.

14

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Grade-Point Average The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates your core-course grade-point average based on the grades you earn in NCAAapproved core courses. Only your best grades from the required number of NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. Your GPA is calculated on a 4.000 scale. Numeric grades such as 92 or 87 are changed to letter grades such as A or B. The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating your GPA. Weighted honors or advanced placement courses may improve your core-course GPA, but your high school must notify the NCAA Eligibility Center that it weights grades in these classes. In pass/fail grading situations, the NCAA Eligibility Center will assign your high school’s lowest passing grade for a course in which you received a pass grade. For most high schools, the lowest passing grade is a D, so the NCAA Eligibility Center generally assigns a D as a passing grade.

Calculating Your Quality Points In order to determine your quality points earned for each course, multiply the quality points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Examples:

• • •

An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points.

The following worksheets will help you to determine your core-course GPA.

Quality Points A = 4 points B = 3 points

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C = 2 points D = 1 point

Units of Credit

1 quarter unit = 0.25 units 1 trimester unit = 0.34 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1 unit

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


According to folklore, Valhalla is the corridor of slain warriors in Norse mythology. It also shares its name with a band of warriors who wear the orange and white of the Valhalla High School football team. For the last several years, head coach Charles Bussey’s Norsemen, have pushed their weight around in the competitive East County, and more specifically in the Grossmont-Hills league. The Norseman are lead by 2016 All-League and All-CIF senior Josh McNish-Heider, and after 5 games, Josh is on pace to surpass his stellar 2016 statistics (53 tackles, 10 sacks). This physical defensive end’s journey began several years ago. While donned in A.J. Hawk gear from head to toe, the Hawk inspired linebacker put his mark throughout the East County Pop-Warner circuit with his aggressive ferociousness. It was not until his second season at Valhalla High School, when the football gods shifted his position and his football career forever, which turned out to be a good decision for the enthusiastic sophomore and team. “I started playing defensive line my sophomore year. I played linebacker my freshman year, and Coach Bussey thought that it would be a better fit for me,” explained Heider. “I was hesitant at first, but then after playing a few games and practicing, it felt like the right fit.”


And with his new role, the 6’2” 260lb high-motor monster wreaked havoc all over the East County, which culminated into All-CIF and AllLeague honors after his junior season. Even his current football idol changed from a linebacker (A.J. Hawk) to a player that shared his own position: “My current inspiration is Aaron Donald. I want to model my game after him,” said Heider. “We are both 6’2” and over 260 pounds, and we are both a little undersized but we still show out. He is my inspiration to get to his elite skill set and his size some day.” But don’t get it wrong. It was not a solo effort by any means to cultivate his natural talent to that of an All-Star lineman; it also included the support and coaching from the Norseman’s tremendous staff. “My coaches help my game by giving me all the knowledge and tools to succeed. Coach Bussey consults me on team stuff and is helping me with my recruiting process,” said Heider. “Also, Coach Green is fine tuning and teaching me more moves on the d-line. Coach Hall is keeping me conditioned, so I am able to go 4 quarters. The rest of the Valhalla Coaching staff has built a relationship with me, and I know they have my back no matter what.”


With a blazing first step, number #45 can either run by or through offensive lineman. And along with his physical prowess, he is also a student of the game and studies his opponent as thoroughly as an accomplished chess master. This includes watching film several hours a week while observing his opponent’s technique and overall tendencies. “I will see if they lunge on their first set or when they are setting in their pass set. I'll look for a quick pass set or a long kicking pass set,” noted Heider. “I'll look for whether they jump out or lunge down, and I’ll look at their hand placements on a pass and a run. Mainly I try to pick apart my opponent as much as possible.” Even though Valhalla is at the midway point of the season with tough loses to Granite Hills, Eastlake, and Otay Ranch (2-3 record), their current record does not detour the accomplished Norseman senior. Regardless of their standings, Josh McNish-Heider, win or lose, will continue to focus on keeping his team in the right mind set in pursuit of a successful season as they continue to progress through the rugged Grossmont-Hills league.


WR Maurice Jones

3 recepĆ&#x;ons for 45 yards and a TD 2 IntercepĆ&#x;ons on defense Returned 1 pick for 50 yards The BOY has SKILLZ


STEPS 2 STAY Freshman Year: You should logon and review the NCAA Eligibility Center and review the courses they approve to certify your initial Eligibility. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. This will give you the list of classes you will need to complete for your NCAA requirements. In addition, I would register your child and have them either take the SAT/ACT or Take a practice test. This will give you as parents and the student on what they need to work on. You can take the SAT as many times as you want. The SAT only takes your highest score. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).

Sophomore Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse. Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area – summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to ensure you get the classes you need. The End of the Sophomore Year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). The last two test of the year are in May and June. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).


Junior Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area –summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to

ON ACADEMIC TRACK FOR COLLEGE ensure you get the classes you need. Junior year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both Test are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.

Senior Year: You must take the ACT and/or SAT (if Needed). Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. You will need to submit your transcript to NCAA Clearinghouse. Meet with counselor to ensure classes are completed. If needed register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both tests are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.


The Best Way to Find, Share, and Score High School and Youth Sporting Events

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The San Diego Cavers have set themselves up with a 6-0 record to start the 2017 season. The last time they were in this situation was back in 1994 when Head Coach Charles James was a freshman quarterback. Coach James recalls when they faced Rancho Buena Vista in the CIF Playoffs. “Those were some good times”, James expressed. Back in 1994 the Cavers had a dynamic trio of players that lead their high-powered team in Leron Harper, Demico Hill and Charles James. They ended the season with a 7-5 record and a 1st round win vs Granite Hills and eventually losing to Rancho Buena Vista in 2nd round. Charles James took over the Cavers football program when it was less than its rich history of winning and having dynamic play as well as players. Shoot the school was almost completely shut down. Well the 1st thing Charles did is emphasize his players with college mentality and focus on getting his players opportunities beyond high school. Despite Coach Charles 2016 1-9 season players started to see his vison . He made sure college coaches would stop by and take a peak at the prospects that are on his team. Next thing was making sure the players had the grades to play football. For his team to be failing and not being a qualifier is no longer an issue. “We have set the bar high with our studentathletes. Passing is not enough anymore. They need to take the necessary courses required for them to be accepted into college. If you want to go to college, I will help you find a home”, says Coach James. Lastly he made sure that his players took the SAT/ACT test. “Working with staff and studentathletes buying in. San Diego Caver Student-Athletes are taking those standardize test at an all-time high”, Coach James expresses with a smile. Fast Forward to 2017 and the new Era in Caver Football. Lighting has struck again and the Cavers are 6-0. Like 1994 they are led by a trio 1,2,3 COMBO PUNCH. They consist of #1 RB Raiden Hunter, #2 Thomas “Athletic” Marcus and #3 Jayden “Agililty” Wickware.


Raiden Hunter (Junior 5’10/190 – RB/LB): Raiden has incredible feet and a compact stride that allows him to be a downhill runner. Raiden ability to keep his feet under himself and make lateral cuts at a moment's notice. Watching film Raiden flourishes in gap and power schemes, but he is at his best running wide while setting up lead blockers. Raiden style lures flowing safeties and linebackers with hesitation steps and glances back inside. He has run-away gear around the corner that he keeps tucked away for special occasions. In addition, Raiden has exceptional vision. He is quick to flow from first to second read on run plays. Raiden is a greedy red zone runner with ability to cash those checks. The brighter the lights, the bigger his game, Raiden is ready to set the tone. He can play in both one-back and two-back set. His rare ability to cut it all the way back across the grain changes direction with degree of subtlety on second level without gearing down. Not much of a dancer just a punisher.


Thomas Marcus (Senior 6’4 – 195 – WR/DB/QB): The Jack of all trades is to way best describe  Thomas Marcus. He can play wide receiver, safety or quarterback in sub‐packages in any given  game. Thomas is very athle c and fluid in space with the natural ability to change of direc on          effortlessly.  He  moves  with  the  changing  flow  of  a  play,  giving  him  the  ability  to  make  the  big  play.  Thomas is willing to sacrifice his body when tackling runners on defenses. He showcases  his speed and quickness to make plays on the ball in passing situa ons.  Thomas doesn’t hesitate  to race downhill once he diagnoses the run and lay s down the boom. He flat out has top closing  speed to engage the ball carrier.  He can run down plays from sideline to sideline. His has the  ability  to knife into gaps and make tackles for losses or disrupt runs. Thomas can play man cover  on  receivers  and  is  physical  enough  to  handle  most  ght  ends.    He  is  a    capable  blitzer  who    buzzes in from all angles.  He is also an electric return man with ability to charge up the crowd  and his own sideline with big kick or punt return.   When on Offense – he is a constant deep threat. Thomas is sure‐handed and loves to catch the ball in  traffic as well as over the middle. His toughness allows him to go over the middle. At QB Thomas has  experience carrying the ball and as wildcat quarterback.  Look for Thomas to accelerate his offers and  become a sought a er wide receiver in San Diego.  He is currently    commi ed to University of Arizona,  where Head Coach Rodriguez will improve his abili es to  become one of the top players in the country. 


Jayden Wickware  (Junior  6’1/175  –  WR‐DB):  Jayden  has  the  ability  to  maneuver  around in routes and find openings in coverage. He can change direc ons in space  and make defenders miss. Jayden as a young receiver understands the concept on  how  to  work  the  defensive  backs.  A er  Jayden  catches  the  ball  he  has  a  ton  of       wiggle especially on wide receiver screens. Jayden’s ability to drive off the line and  into his routes is consistent no ma er at which level he plays.    On  film  Jayden  has  great  awareness  near  the  sidelines  and  will  drop  his  feet          in‐bounds  when  crowded  against  the  boundary.  Jayden  plays  with  good  strength  and  physicality  in  bump  &  run  schemes.  His  fluid,  powerful  strides  to  burst  past    cornerbacks on ver cal routes, is something that comes natural to him. Plus, he has  amazing body control for ball adjustments in any direc on. His hands are strong and  can secure in traffic. His  physical play extended effort as run‐blocker punching into  cornerbacks  frame  and  locking  out.    In  the  open  field  Jayden  is  able  to  make  first  tackler miss and accelerate. Look for Jordan to u lize his athle c abili es to become  one of the best shut down defensive backs in San Diego. Only a Junior, Jayden will  only become be er at what he is assigned to do for The Cavers.  


Make no mistake the Cavers know their history and a er a perfect mid‐season they  want to   con nue their success and make the second half of the season even be er.  Coach Charles James has been very humble and insist the team is taking one game  at a  me, but it has been hard to ignore what the Cavers have accomplished, 7‐0 for  the 1st  me since 1994, simply incredible.    Caver Pride is at an all‐ me high. No longer a doormat, they are looking towards to  the playoffs.  Coach James has established a new iden ty for San Diego High School  Football.  He  has  ins lled  a  new  sense  of  hope  in  Caver  Community,  STUDENT‐ ATHLETE is no longer a word but a way of life on the Caver Football team and Coach  Charles  has  groomed  3  student‐athletes  into  super  stardom.  This  team,  Coaching  Staff  and Caver Na on are Shining Stars. Look for them to leave their mark as the  season comes to an end.   


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SDFNL MAGAZINE Oct 2017  

Brad Jeremiah - Christian High School San Diego High School