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SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

NOV 2017

Beware of the Dawgs 2017 has been one of the most exci ng years in San Diego High School football history with na onally recognized talent all over the county and compe ve league games every week. One team who annually expects to have a plethora of that talent and dominate San Diego County is The Helix Highlanders.

QB Trevor Scully Scully threw 26 touchdowns and over 2200 yds in the regular season. He also showed he can make plays with his legs rushing for over 300 yards and 6 touchdowns. Scully bursts onto our radar week 6 vs Hoover when he threw 5 Touchdowns and had a quarterback Ra ng of 145 in an 52�10 win over the Cardinals.


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

NOV 2017

A er two  seasons  at  pres gious               Cathedral Catholic High School, current  Serra  High  School  senior  middle             linebacker  Kieve  Curry,  did  just  that.  “My  football  experience  at  Cathedral  was  great.  I  got  to  meet  a  lot  of  new  people  and  played  with  some  great  guys  such  as  Colin  Myers,  Chris  Cal‐ houn, and Jake Lynch,” exclaimed Curry.  

RB JAHMON MCCLENDON With the  ball  at  its  own  20‐yard  line,  Monte  Vista  High  School’s  Jahmon  McClendon  took  his  customary  spot  deep  in  the  Monarch  backfield.  The  junior  running  back  surveyed  the  de‐ fense and readied himself for his first  carry of the game.  


2017 HELIX HIGHLANDERS 2017 has been one of the most exciting years in San Diego High School football history with nationally recognized talent all over the county and competitive league games every week. One team who annually expects to have a plethora of that talent and dominate San Diego County is The Helix Highlanders. People know about the great Helix tradition of excellence and they know about their D1 bound superstars of Carson Baker, Rashad Scott, and Isaac Taylor-Stuart, but it's the big boys in the trenches that allow Helix to be Helix year in and year out. The 5 Scottie Dawgs tasked with leading the way for the skill superstars are Lopaka Rojas, Matthew Avi'i, Chris Alvarado, Isaiah Mann, and William Payne. These monsters in the trenches have helped Helix steamroll their way to a 9-1 record and the #2 seed in the Open Division playoffs. Except for a week 2 defeat to Southern Section power Paraclete, the Scotties have been unstoppable all season and they expect that continue all the way to a CIF State title. I asked the group what it means to play at Helix and to have the "CIF or nothing" expectation placed on you every season, "Helix's Football Program has set the bar extremely high for schools in San Diego County. It has successfully produced five star NFL players from Reggie Bush and Alex Smith to Levine Toilolo. Our coaching staff plays a BIG role in the success of any Helix player, most of which are Alumni themselves keeping the pipeline strong for the next group of young men. Our community of parents are the invisible players of Helix, some coach and teach and hold administrative positions at Helix so it's bigger than just football here."


5 WARRIORS These 5 warriors know that they are a small but integral part of the big machine seeking it's 9th CIF Title and 2nd since 2015 when they defeated St. Augustine 44-30 in the Open Final. As mentioned earlier the Highlanders had a "look in the mirror" game early in the season when Paraclete of Lancaster looked head and shoulders above in a 2017 Honor Bowl win over the Scotties 23-6. I asked the group how that loss brought them together not only as a unit but as a team seeking greatness. "Honestly, after suffering the defeat to Paraclete in the Honor Bowl it became surreal that we as a team needed to unite. Become a true brotherhood! Losing taught us that no team is based on individuality, It is a COMBINED effort of everyone. It was rough game for us offensively and we knew that we have to show that helix is not a hoax and we are the most dominate team in the county. Our coaches needed us to step up and that's just what we did, trying to resemble the Great Wall of Helix from 2014. Having all of San Diego bash your team is a tough pill to swallow but we weren't going to just sit back and pity ourselves. We know what we want, we want to win it to all." Since that Paraclete loss Helix has not allowed more than 7 points on defense and they have put up no less than 30 points on offense while hanging 50+ four times in the last six games, explosive would be a understatement. When you have the fastest player in high school football along with a plethora of other D1 talent all over the field it can get pretty fun on Friday nights in La Mesa. I asked the group what they think about the arsenal of weapons they get to block for every week and if they prefer to punish teams with the run game or hit the homerun by going up top. "It's truly an amazing


RUN BLOCKING feeling knowing that as long as we block that our players in the back field and our WRs will pay us back every time they touch the rock! It is truly amazing! Elelyon, Carson, Rashad, Isaiah and Terrance are all awesome athletes and even greater friends. So blocking for them is a lot easier because we as an oline love to protect our family. Run blocking of course for a linemen is where you make your money and as an offense in the overall scheme of things where you can make a huge statement to the other team. We love creating holes and huge running lanes for our backs to work with and it’s an awesome feeling just watching them bust open and run in the open field." Ask anybody around San Diego County and they will tell you that if Helix is not in the Open Title game in December it would be a shock to us all, that's how elite they have been in 2017 along with a handful of other programs. I asked Lopaka, Matthew, Chris, Isaiah, and William who they would like to see should they make it to Devore Stadium on Dec 2 and what steps are they taking to make sure they get there. "There are a couple of new faces in the open this year looking to make a name for themselves and we also have a some familiar faces back so I think that every game should be a competitive and challenging game for everybody in Open Division. There’s not a particular team in the playoffs that we want to see, we’re just focusing on bettering ourselves everyday at practice , going day by day , week by week, giving 100% heart and effort every practice and game. From there all we can do is let the chips fall and we’ll see how things end up in 4 weeks." Let the games begin!


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Division I Academic Standards Division I schools require you to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements: 1. Complete a total of 16 NCAA core courses in the following areas: 4 years of English. + 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 1 additional year of English, math or natural/physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Note: See the core-course progression requirements. 2. Complete 10 of your 16 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Students whose academic credentials are solely international (including Canada) are not required to meet the 10/7 requirement. 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.300) on the Division I sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board. If you plan to attend a Division I school, you must complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses in eight academic semesters or four consecutive academic years from the start of ninth grade. If you graduate from high school early, you must still meet core-course requirements.

Core-Course Progression (10/7) Requirement In order to be eligible to compete during your initial year of full-time enrollment, you must complete a total of 16 core courses. Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school and at least seven of these 10 core courses must be in English, math, or science. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Note: Students must also meet the Division I sliding-scale index for competition (minimum 2.300 core-course GPA). Courses Taken After High School For Division I, only courses completed in your first eight semesters will qualify as core courses for Division I. If you graduate from high school on time (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth grade class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A college course taken after high school graduation can be used toward your initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit. An additional core-course unit taken after on-time high school graduation cannot replace a course used to meet the core-course progression (10/7) requirement, but an additional core course after on-time graduation may replace one of the remaining six core-course units necessary to meet corecourse requirements. What if I Don’t Graduate on Time? In Division I, if you do not graduate on time (in four years/ eight semesters), the NCAA Eligibility Center will still use your grades and coursework for the first four years/eight semesters in your certification. You will still need to provide proof of graduation (once you graduate) and you may not use any coursework taken after your high school graduation toward your certification.

How to plan your high school courses to meet the 16 core-course requirement:

4 x 4 = 16

4 English courses (one per year) + 4 math courses (one per year) + 4 science courses (one per year) + 4 social science (and/or additional) courses (one per year) 16 NCAA core courses GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

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Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from all high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division I school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division I school.

Early Academic Qualifier

If you meet specific criteria after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division I and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment. Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 900 OR minimum ACT sum score of 75; and a core-course GPA of 3.000 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses: 3 years of English; 2 years of math; 2 years of science; 2 additional years of English, math or natural/physical science; and 5 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment at an NCAA Division I school.

Academic Redshirt

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first regular academic term but may NOT compete during your first year of enrollment. You must pass either eight quarter or nine semester hours to practice in the next term.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of enrollment at a Division I school. What if I Don’t Meet the Division I Standards? If you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

Sliding Scale for Division I Beginning Aug. 1, 2016 Core GPA

3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.299 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT

400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 880 890 900 910 910 920 930 940 950 960 970 980 990 1000 1010 1020

ACT 37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 86

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; and 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after Aug. 1, 2016.

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ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Division II Academic Standards Division II schools require college-bound student-athletes to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. The standards are changing for students who initially enroll full time at a Division II school on or after Aug. 1, 2018. If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

1. Complete a total 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural/ physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

1. Complete a total of 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural or physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

2. Earn at least a 2.000 GPA in your core courses. 3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned during or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.200) on the Division II competition sliding scale.

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Core-Course Timeline If you plan to attend a Division II school, you must complete 16 NCAA core courses after starting grade nine and before your first full-time college enrollment. Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from ALL other high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division II school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division II school.

What if I Don’t Meet the Division II Standards? If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards: 1. Earn a 2.000 GPA in 16 core courses; OR 2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

Early Academic Qualifier

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school after Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following standards:

Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 820 OR minimum sum score of 68 on the ACT; and a core-course GPA of 2.5 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses in the following areas:

1. Complete 16 core courses; AND 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division II partial qualifier sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

If you meet specific criteria below after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division II and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship.

3 years of English; 3 years of math; 2 years of natural/physical science; and 6 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of full-time enrollment at an NCAA Division II school.

Partial Qualifier

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first year of enrollment, but may NOT compete.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of full-time enrollment at a Division II school.

Courses Taken After High School For Division II, you may use an unlimited number of core courses completed after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated. College courses taken after high school graduation can be used toward your Division II initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit.

14

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Grade-Point Average The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates your core-course grade-point average based on the grades you earn in NCAAapproved core courses. Only your best grades from the required number of NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. Your GPA is calculated on a 4.000 scale. Numeric grades such as 92 or 87 are changed to letter grades such as A or B. The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating your GPA. Weighted honors or advanced placement courses may improve your core-course GPA, but your high school must notify the NCAA Eligibility Center that it weights grades in these classes. In pass/fail grading situations, the NCAA Eligibility Center will assign your high school’s lowest passing grade for a course in which you received a pass grade. For most high schools, the lowest passing grade is a D, so the NCAA Eligibility Center generally assigns a D as a passing grade.

Calculating Your Quality Points In order to determine your quality points earned for each course, multiply the quality points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Examples:

• • •

An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points.

The following worksheets will help you to determine your core-course GPA.

Quality Points A = 4 points B = 3 points

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C = 2 points D = 1 point

Units of Credit

1 quarter unit = 0.25 units 1 trimester unit = 0.34 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1 unit

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


It’s no secret that over the last several years, many prep athletes have chosen to play outside of their home schools. And as glamorous as the future may seem at a fancy private school or a top flight public school, many players are choosing to bounce back to their own neighborhoods. A er two seasons at pres gious Cathedral Catholic High School, current Serra High School senior middle linebacker Kieve Curry, did just that. “My football experience at Cathedral was great. I got to meet a lot of new people and played with some great guys such as Colin Myers, Chris Calhoun, and Jake Lynch,” exclaimed Curry. “But last year, I made the move back to Serra due to my parents wan ng me and my brother to play for the same school. Now that I am at Serra, I get to play with some guys that I grew up with, which is fun.” Nestled in the community of Terrasanta, Serra High School plays its football in the City League, and with their regular season recently ending with a 52‐14 destruc on over Clairemont, the Conquistador’s 5‐ 5 season was not without struggle. “We have a really young team this year, so we are making some small mistakes that kept us from winning more games,” explained Curry.

Regardless, this rough patch did not ra le or sway the middle linebacker’s ability to take care of his business in between the hash marks this season. In just 9 games as field general, the 6‐0, 198‐pound senior, ended the 2017 season as one of the leading tacklers in San Diego with over 100 tackles. “I feel I have had more success due to playing in more games compared to last year, when I had to sit out 6 games due to the transfer rules. Plus, dur‐ ing the off‐season I competed in track and got faster, and right a er track season ended, I hit the weight room hard,” said Curry.


While a combina on of solid ins ncts, ability to read offenses and

facili‐ ty to get past even the most determine offensive lineman, may provide him the swag and the confidence required on the compe ve gridiron, make no mistake about it, it is his family that provides him his strength in the game of life as Curry explained to me. “My inspira on in life is my family. They have sacrificed a lot for me, so going to college and ge ng a degree would hopefully make them proud. In football I would say my dad as he would al‐ ways push me to work hard and chase my dreams.” Not highly recruited or a player that has received a he y dose of social me‐ dia exposure, Curry won’t allow that to curb his enthusiasm as he sets his sights for life a er high school: “I definitely want to play on the next level. I’ll play for any school that is willing to give me the chance to play for them. I am undersized for linebacker on the next level, so playing safety would definitely be a move I am willing to make. But to be honest, I don’t really care what posi on I play. As long I can make an impact on the team, it doesn’t ma er to me.” With the recent conclusion of the 2017 regular season and the CIF Division 4 playoff brackets set, the Conquistadors have one more guaranteed Friday together as a team. With a division that includes the highly touted San Die‐ go Cavers (10‐0) and Kearny Comets (8‐2), the young Conquistadors will have a challenging road to reach the cozy confines of Southwestern College for the San Diego Sec on CIF Championships.


MONTE VISTA

FIND THE


Jahmon McClendon

END ZONE


Monte Vista High School’s Jahmon McClendon With the ball at its own 20‐yard line, Monte Vista High School’s Jahmon McClendon took his customary spot deep in the Monarch backfield. The junior running back surveyed the defense and readied himself for his first carry of the game. Taking the handoff, McClendon spo ed a small hole to the right. He darted through the crease, ran through the tackle of a Valley Center linebacker, and sprinted to the end zone. The 80‐yard rushing touchdown gave the Monarchs a quick 7‐0 lead, but the run was just the latest in a long line of great runs by one of the top running backs in the county. Since playing on the Spring Valley school’s varsity football team as a freshman, McClendon has flashed immense talent, unending determina on, and a strong compe veness during his three seasons. Having started his football career at right guard as a young fourth grader for the Tierrasanta Cougars, McClendon has progressed to become an outstanding running back with great vision, strength, and breakaway speed – skills he displayed on that opening run against Valley Center. “When I got the ball, the first thing I looked to was my center, Chris an De la Cruz, and read his block,” the 6‐2, 210‐pound junior running back explained. “As I came through the line, I met the linebacker and made him miss the tackle. When I saw the hole open up from there, it was a beau ful thing to see. A er that, I just gave it all I had and ran hard to the end zone. It was a great feeling and a good start to the game.” Monte Vista went on to take a 10‐0 lead in the contest, but could not hold on as Valley Center came back to secure the victory. Though the loss dropped Monte Vista’s overall record to 5‐5, the team s ll earned the num‐ ber 4 seed and a first round bye in the Division IV CIF playoffs. Coach Ron Hamamoto’s squad will face either Chula Vista or Coronado, looking to be er its run to the semi‐finals last season. McClendon is ready for this year’s playoffs to start, but won’t get caught looking too far ahead. Ar cle by: Mike Minjeres


an honor to play for Coach Hamamoto “We need to take it game‐by‐game,” he said. “Our focus is on ge ng ready to face either Chula Vista or Coronado. Of course, the ul mate goal is to finish up with a CIF championship. But, we need to stay humble and play hard every game.” McClendon considers it an honor to play for Coach Hamamoto and credits one of San Diego’s top coaches with teaching him to look for those cutback lanes when he is running the football. McClendon, who recorded 21 touchdowns and over 1,560 yards in 2016, knows he plays a prominent role in the Monarch’s offensive game plan and yet recognizes that a successful run in the playoffs requires contribu ons from the en re team. “What I want to do is run hard every play,” shared McClendon, who is star ng to receive some recrui ng interest from colleges and universi es. “I want to not only put myself, but everyone on the team, in the best posi on to be successful. When plays are called for my teammates, I want the defense to key on me and forget about the oth‐ er key players we have. When that happens, we know we have chances for big pass plays. It fills me up to see my teammates make a big play and makes me drive even harder to do my part to help us win.” McClendon says he appreciates the opportunity to play with a bunch of great guys and singles out Blake Schmidt, Chris an De La Cruz, and EJ Henderson with helping him stay mo vated and focused both on and off the field. “I look at all my teammates as brothers,” McClendon said. “I just love the sense of brotherhood we have as a team. The coaches helped to develop that bond over the summer and you feel it now. We have team wins and team losses. I can’t do what I do without the help from everyone. It’s not just me, it’s the team.”

RB Jahmon McClendon


QB TREVOR SCULLY


La Jolla High School’s Trevor Scully We all know all players have their own set of skills, you can never judge a player by his physical measurables because you never know the size of his heart. Quarterback Trevor Scully (5’11 – 170) his passion and play on the field cannot be measured. His is driven to be one of the best in the county. He currently has an outstanding 94.9 quarterback ra ng for the Vikings, which should earn all conference accolades. Scully threw 26 touchdowns and over 2200 yds in the regular season. He also showed he can make plays with his legs rushing for over 300 yards and 6 touchdowns. Scully bursts onto our radar week 6 vs Hoover when he threw 5 Touchdowns and had a quarterback Ra ng of 145 in an 52‐10 win over the Cardinals Trevor Scully is a dynamic athlete and game day compe tor. To put it plain and simple he rises to the occasion. In the biggest game of the season vs University City Scully wore his heart on his sleeve. Even though they loss Scully threw for 300+ yards, 3 Touchdowns and added 58 yards rushing along with a TD. Scully has scrambling abili es, he can reverse spins and buys me in the pocket while con nuing to scan the field ‐‐ can s ll set his feet, alter his throwing mo on and manipulate his arm and throwing pla orm. At mes Scully has shown Houdini‐like escape‐ability (uses subtle, ni y sidestep moves) and improvisa onal ability in the pocket to pull a rabbit out of his hat and create magic. Scully's peripheral, wide‐eyed running vision (some mes appears to have eyes in back of his head) and a very good feel for spac‐ ing. Carries the ball with a fearless confidence that he will find a way to create and usually gains posi ve yardage on broken plays when he


keep the s cks moving. appears trapped. Scully is mentally and physically tough will pop back up from hard collisions and respond to a challenge. He has a knack for sustaining drives and possesses playmaking abili es to keep the s cks moving. Bo om Line, Scully is athle c, tough, ins nc ve, strong‐armed, highly compe ve quarterback who will impress in workouts, interviews and on the board, and improved his college recrui ng status with those skills. Scully this season helped elevate the La Jolla High School Football program. Coach Tyler Roach describes Scully as "a gunslinger". Trainer Jason Carter says "Scully has excellent game‐management skills. I feel at the smaller college level, Scully will be a starter sooner rather than later and the degree to which he’s able to make those around him be er will determine his ceiling".


SDFNL Magazine Nov 2017  

Helix High School Trevor Scully QB La Jolla High School San Diego High School Football