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The season will soon be in full swing. With new teams battling it out to become the top team in their respective divisions. New players will step up and continue their teams wins success from 2016. Who will derail Helix, St Augustine, Madison and Cathedral? When the dust settles we will see what team(s) made it happen in the off season workouts. The summer workouts is where championships teams are formed. SDFNL looks forward to covering San Diego High School football in 2017. Roll up your sleeves and get ready to RUMBLE! -Ruben Pena —SDFNL MAGAZINE -Montell Allen — SDFNL MAGAZINE

sdfnlmagazine.com Directors Montell Allen Ruben Peña

Contributing Editors Thomas Gutierrez Brett Fischer Photography Ruben Peña Christopher Smith Don De Mars Advertising sdfnlmagazine@gmail.com SDFNLMagazine is a registered trademark of MBA Sports LLC 2012 No parts of SDFNL Magazine may be re produced in any form or by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. #SDFNL17


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

JULY 2017

RB Martell Irby Leading the way for the Southeast San Diego  staple  Morse  High  in  2017  is  senior  RB  Mar‐ tell  Irby  who  in  his  junior  campaign  rushed  for 1,729 yards and 22 TD. With those kind of  numbers you would think recruiters would be  knocking  down  his  door  but  before  the  off  season camp and 7 on 7 circuit started he s ll  had no scholarship offers. Read more ….. 

DB Josh Moala Grossmont High  School  is  a  football  program  with more history than any other school in the  East  County.  They  also  have  some  history  that  haunts  their  program  ll  this  day,  first  off  they  haven't  beaten  neighborhood  rival  Helix  since  1991  and  to  make  it  s ng  a  li le  more  they  haven't reached a CIF championship game since  1971. The current seniors at Grossmont are very  aware of the tasks at hand for the 2017 season  and those efforts are led by receiver Josh Moala  Read more ….. 


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

JULY 2017

LB Keanu Mookini Keanu ""HAWAIIAN PUNCH"" Mookini stand at 6  foot  3  and  295  pounds.  This  Madison  offensive  lineman  has  lots  to  prepare  for  this  upcoming  Warhawk season.  Keanu and the Madison War‐ hawk want to defend their state Division 1 Title.   Even  more  than  that  Keanu  Mookini  wants  to  earn a scholarship to play for Air Force Academy  and join his fellow teammates/brother Jojo Falo  and Brandon Lewis. Read more ... 

DB Jalyn Jackson You might  know  Jalyn  Jackson  as  a  track  and  field star seeing as he was the CIF State runner  up  in  the  triple  jump  with  a  personal  record  jump  of  48‐5.  His  track  and  field  skills  earned  him a scholarship offer from the Naval Academy  but  he  also  just  received  an  offer  from  Dixie  State for his football abili es. Jaylen's main goal  this offseason was to work on transla ng his ex‐ cellent  track  skills  to  the  gridiron  and  also  be‐ coming  more  polished  as  a  DB  and  receiver.   Read More... 


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August 31, 2016 SDFNL Magazine Kickoff Classic 9490 Genesee Avenue La Joya, CA 92037 Dear Montell, On behalf of The Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank, but more importantly those we serve, thank you for hosting a food drive! Your commitment to fighting hunger is evident: you donated a total of 1,398 pounds of food that will allow the Food Bank to provide 1,165 meals to those in need. More than 475,000 people in San Diego County face the threat of hunger every day. With the addition of the North County Food Bank, we now provide emergency food to 400,000 children and families, active duty military, and fixed income seniors living in poverty every month. You make it possible for them to bridge the gap between their limited income and their daily dinner table. Your continued support is vital to our success and we deeply appreciate it. For volunteer opportunities, as well as information on our programs, please visit our website at www.sandiegofoodbank.org. Thank you again for making a difference! Warm regards,

James A. Floros President/ Chief Executive Officer The Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank

The Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization. 9850 Distribution Ave. San Diego, CA 92121â—? Phone: (858) 527-1419 Fax: (858) 527-1457 Our federal tax ID# is 20-4374795.


SDFNL MAGAZINE Presents SDFNL Kick Off Classic August 18th and 19th at La Jolla Country Day Benefiting SAN DIEGO FOOD BANK


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By: Bre  Fischer 

The 2017  off  season  has  been  rampant  with  praise  and           adula on  for  the  usual  suspects  in  San  Diego  County  high  school  football,  that  would  be  the  Cathedral  Catholics  and       Helix's  and  Oceanside's  of  course.  Surprisingly  some  historic  programs are on the rise again as well and have the city buzzing  such as Morse,    Lincoln, and El Camino to name a few. Leading  the way for the Southeast San Diego staple Morse High in 2017  is senior RB      Martell Irby who in his     junior campaign rushed  for  1,729  yards  and  22  TD.  With  those  kind  of  numbers  you  would  think  recruiters  would  be  knocking  down  his  door  but  before the off season camp and 7 on 7 circuit started he s ll had  no scholarship offers. "I     par cipated in a few tournaments on  the circuit with Team Makasi and it just gave me a chance to get  on the field with the best and at the end of the day it was in a  sense a confidence booster. It helped me understand how good  I can be if I just con nue to lay low and keep working. It made  me  want  to  work  even  harder.  A ending  college  camps  were   also a  plus for me. I gained a lot of exposure  and all in all the  camps were just a great experience." Some may frown upon the  camp and club 7 on 7 aspect of high school football but there's  no denying they are doing what they were made to do and that  is to expose kids to recruiters and get them no ced by colleges  all over the country.  


Martell has seen his popularity with recruiters soar going in to  the summer season as he has picked up offers from a number of  FCS schools and Ivy Legue ins tu ons which let's you know he's  a beast on the field and in the class room.  Martell has everything a recruiter wants, size, speed, diligence  in  his  classes  but  he  also  has  personal  things  he  wants  to          improve  on  so  that  Morse  can  have  the  successful  season       everybody is expec ng them to have. "Above everything else I  want  to  become  a  be er  leader  ,  both  on  and  off  the  field.     Other  than  that  I  need  to  improve  on  my  explosiveness        offensively and my ability to get up field when a hole presents  itself. Defensively I want to improve on my coverage skills and  become  a  lock  down  defender  to  the  point  where  my  man      never  makes  a  play."    Martell  knows  that  it's  going  to  take  a  team effort to get Morse back to their first CIF  tle since 1994  when  the  Tigers  were  one  of  the  most  feared  schools  in  the  county, "As a team I want us to win a championship but I feel  like  that's  so  typical.  More  importantly  I  want  all  of  my         teammates  to  grow  physically,  mentally,  and  spiritually  by  the  end of the season. I want them to be a step closer to becoming  the young men God wants and needs us to be. As an individual  I've  always  wanted  to  have  my  names  in  the  record  books  so  whether  that's  for  touchdowns  in  a  single  game,  intercep ons  in a game, or rushing yards in a game. It honestly doesn't even  ma er I just want to leave a legacy in some way." 


Legacy is  a  word  you  don't  hear  a  lot  especially  at  the  high  school level, kids in 2017 are looking for the quickest way to get  a  scholarship  and  if  they  have  to  a end  4  powerhouse  high  schools  in  4  years  they  will  do  it  and  that's  just  the  world  we  live  in  today.  Martell  is  a  different  kind  of  young  man,  a       throwback player and person if I say so myself. No ma er how  much his abili es might have seemed bigger than the school he  was playing for he always wanted to honor the past Tigers and  the Southeast community which helped raised him. "I grew up  watching Morse play since before I could remember. Playing for  Morse was something I knew I was doing since about 6th grade,  there  was  never  a  debate.  My  parents  are  Morse  alumni  so  I  knew  from  the  jump  where  I  was  going  to  high  school."  Not     only  did  his  parents  a end  Morse  but  his  older  brother  Daq,  who  currently  plays  for  Nevada,  did  as  well  and  has  laid  out  a      blueprint for what it takes to go from Morse to play D1 football. 


"As for  my  older  brother  he  made  sure  that  I  always          understood that nothing will ever be given to me. He made sure  that I knew that nothing in life will be easy. He made me want  to be the best I could be and he made me want to work so hard  and  I  pray  that  my  ac ons  con nue  to  make  him  proud."       Martell has made his family proud beyond measure living life as  the young successful man they raised him to be, now it's  me  for him to put Morse back among the elite of San Diego in 2017  and bring a CIF  tle back to Skyline Drive.  Photos Credit: Ruben Peña  Follow Martell Irby on Twi er @martellirby 


STEPS 2 STAY Freshman Year: You should logon and review the NCAA Eligibility Center and review the courses they approve to certify your initial Eligibility. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. This will give you the list of classes you will need to complete for your NCAA requirements. In addition, I would register your child and have them either take the SAT/ACT or Take a practice test. This will give you as parents and the student on what they need to work on. You can take the SAT as many times as you want. The SAT only takes your highest score. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).

Sophomore Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse. Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area – summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to ensure you get the classes you need. The End of the Sophomore Year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). The last two test of the year are in May and June. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).


Junior Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area –summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to

ON ACADEMIC TRACK FOR COLLEGE sure you get the classes you need. Junior year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both Test are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.

Senior Year: You must take the ACT and/or SAT (if Needed). Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. You will need to submit your transcript to NCAA Clearinghouse. Meet with counselor to ensure classes are completed. If needed register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both tests are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.


Madison offensive  lineman  Keanu  ""HAWAIIAN  PUNCH""  Mookini  stands            6 foot 3 and weighs in at 295 pounds. He has lots to prepare for this upcoming  Warhawk season.  Keanu and the Madison Warhawk look to defend their state  Division 1  tle.  Keanu’s goal is to earn a scholarship for the Air Force Academy.  Where  he  plans  to  join  his  fellow  teammates  Jojo  Falo  and  Brandon  Lewis.  A  goal that seems a ainable.  Long ago, The Polynesian People had always used the stars to navigate through  the South Pacific. Keaunu is using that quote as inspira on to lead him toward  his dream of playing for the Air Force Academy.  A er visi ng and  talking with  Coach  Campbell  of  Air  Force.  “Ge ng  a  scholarship  from  any  school  is  great  honor, but ge ng an offer from Air Force Academy would be my dream come  true”  says  Keanu.  “Great  educa on,  Great  pay,  Great  football  and  an  the          opportunity to see the world, what more can you ask for”.   Keanu looks to be one of the next Polynesian players to jump on the Air Force  Poly Pipeline. Last recrui ng season Air Force added JoJo Falo of Madison High  and  Nakoa  from  Kameamea  High.  This  off‐season  Keanu  has  worked  with  Coach Charleston of FITNESS QUEST 10 AND      GIANT SKILLZ to perfect his cra   as an offensive lineman.  The  2017  season  will  determine  a  lot  for  Keanu  Mookini. He will have a chance to truly fulfill his  dream  and  help  Madison  stay  on  top.  It’s  great  to see a young man so focused on his dream and  working towards his goals. If Keanu keeps push‐ ing we see him no doubt naviga ng through the  South  Pacific  as  an  Air  Force  Cadet  with  a  deep  Polynesian Heritage. 


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In 2016, Head Coach Ron Gladnick and his Torrey Pines struck a balance between  offense and defense to win the Avocado League. Coach Gladnick catered to this  team  and  deviated  from  the  trending  high  volume  spread  offenses  that  throw  the ball over 40  mes per game and want to run a play every 25 seconds. Coach  Gladnick looked at his personnel and decided we were going to line up and ram  the  ball  down  the  opponent’s  throat.    A  tradi onal  method  of  football  from  a  coach who values tradi on.  2016  Torrey  Pines  was  the  surprise  of  San  Diego  County.  The  team  went  8‐3  in   arguably the toughest conference in San Diego. Torrey Pines defeated teams like  El  Camino,  Mission  Hills,  Carlsbad,  and  La  Costa  Canyon,  but  the  biggest  upset  was when they defeated Oceanside,  especially since this was supposed to be a  revenge game for the Pirates a er losing in 2015 in a 28‐27 thriller.  In the 2016  rematch vs Oceanside, Gladnick and the Falcons seemed to click, and played the  “Ground  and  Pound”  offense  with  a  “Bend,  but  Don’t  Break”  defense.  This     eventually led to a 32‐28 back‐to‐back win.  In Gladnick’s 3 years as head coach  he is 2‐1 vs Oceanside.  A great start to building a tradi on in a program with the  gauge of having a winning record over one of San Diego’s greatest historical pro‐ grams. Over the past 3 years, Gladnick has gone 6‐5, 4‐8, and 8‐3.  


In 2016,  his  team  showed  grit  and  toughness.  On  offense,  the  ground  game         averaged 191 yards, which is 79% of the team’s total offensive yards per game. In  2016,  Gladnick’s  heavy  run  offense  had  over  20  different  players  carry  the         football. What is so impressive is that  over 10 of the players who carried the ball  averaged more than 5 yards per carry.    Gladnick’s 2016 defense was simply s ngy. In the 8 wins, Torrey Pines gave up an  average of fewer than 10 in each of those games. The defense caused turnovers  and  kept  people  out  of  the  end  zone.  2016  defense  might  have  been  Gladnick’s  best defense so far in his tenure.  Approaching the 2017 season, the Torrey Pines Falcons are no longer flying under  the  radar.  With  over  20  seniors  returning  and  Gladnick’s  and  his  staff’s  coaching  style,  you  would  think  they  would  be  picked  as  the  favorite  to  win  the  Avocado  league back‐to‐back. Torrey Pines is not, but Gladnick doesn’t mind that at all. He  relishes in not being the favored. That is fuel for his staff and his team to go out  and  prove  people  wrong.    The  Torrey  Pines  Falcons  in  2017  will  be  a  team  to     reckon with, and Head Coach Gladnick will be leading every step of the way.  Going into the 2017 Season there are 3 players you must keep your eye on for the  Torrey Pines Falcons. 


TORREY PINES FALCONS  Going into the 2017 Season there are 3 players you must keep your  eye on for the Torrey Pines Falcons       

Louis Bicke   is  a  6’4  –  210lbs  linebacker  who  is  the  leader  of  the  s ngy      Falcon defense. Louis has matured and grown as a top prospect. Bicke  has  the  uncanny  combina on  of  height,  size,  and  speed.  His  freakish               ability to drop in coverage and his aggressive nature to make tackles on the  run  has  catapulted  him  onto  colleges’  recrui ng  boards.  One  thing  that  is  very impressive about Bicke  is his ability to change direc ons for a person  his size.  This allows Coach Gladnick to move Bicke  around and play OLB/ DE as well as MLB. Bicke  on the outside has shown that he is a complete  nightmare  for  offensive  tackles  and  blocking  backs.  His  quickness  off  the  ball allows him to disrupt play a er play. As a pass‐rusher, most blocking     

Photo Credit: Chris Smith 

running backs  just  can’t  match  his  aggression  in  pursuing  the  QB  Sack.     Bicke   will  be  the  tone  se er  for  each  game.  Bick‐ e   will  be  relied  on  to  make a ton of plays for the  Falcons  Defense  this        season.  It  is  ironic  that  his  ini als are LB, because he is  one of the best Linebackers  (LBs) in San Diego County.   


TORREY PINES FALCONS 

Jacob Rabb is a 6’4 – 260lbs Center and Defensive Tackle/Nose Guard, and  is  the  Rock  of  the  Torrey  Pines  Falcons.  Controlling  the  interior  on  both  sides  of  the  ball,  Rabb’s  high  football  IQ  allows  him  to  manage  and           maneuver  complicated  blocking  schemes  for  the  Falcons.  On  Defense,  he  will  be  asked  to  help  stop  the  run  and  create  lanes  for  the  LBs  to  make  tackles. Rabb is the rock because even though his job is not glamorous and  doesn’t grab a ton of a en on, he is the 2nd most important piece to the  offense  (next  to  the  Quarterback).    He  calls  the  fronts,  the  schemes,  and  dictates where the play is going based on what he sees from the defense.  Look for colleges to start targe ng Rabb as the 2017 season progresses.    

Photo Credit: Chris Smith 


TORREY PINES 

Sully O’Brien,  5’11  –  180  Running  Back/Wide  Receiver,  is  a  loaded  bo le  rocket out of the Falcons backfield. In 2016, Sully rushed for 716 yards and  9  touchdowns.  He  averages  6.2  yards  per  carry.  Add  that  to  his  7                 recep ons  for  113  yards  and  1  Touchdown,  and  you  have  a  player  who     average  82.9  all‐purpose  yards  and  1  touchdown  per  game.  This  makes  Sully Torrey Pines’ top returning offensive threat, and one of the top in San  Diego County. Look this upcoming season for Sully to take on even a bigger  role.    With  off‐season  workouts,  Sully  has  added  10  pounds  of  muscle.  Now  Sully  has  the  threat  of  being  a  power  runner  and  ge ng  the  short  tough  yards  as  well  as  con nuing  to  be  the  open  field  nightmare  for  de‐ fenses.  Several  colleges  will  be  seeking  for  Sully  services  on  the  football  field a er the 2017 season. 


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The Eastlake High School football program is not used to losing. Eastlake is not a  school where you just go to play football, you go there to win! So when I tell you  that the 2016 Eastlake Titans were underachievers I don't mean that as a slight, I  mean  that  as  nobody  expected  them  to  go  2‐9  or  0‐4  in  league  play.  Those        records  were  shocking  seeing  as  Eastlake  has  been  one  of  the  winningest         programs of the last 10 years and one of the most dominant in the South Bay.  Jalyn Jackson wants everybody to know that last year was not the real Eastlake  and 2017 is the resurgence of Titan Football. Pu ng in that hard work in the off  season is what makes champions in December, Jalyn and his teammates know  what it takes to get back to the promised land. "I feel great about the offseason,  our whole team is pu ng in work and mo va ng each other more than we ever  have before. We are going to wake people up."   You might know Jalyn Jackson as a track and field star seeing as he was the CIF  State runner up in the triple jump with a personal record jump of 48‐5. His track  and field skills earned him a scholarship offer from the Naval Academy but he  also  just  received  an  offer  from  Dixie  State  for  his  football  abili es.  Jaylen's  main goal this offseason was to work on transla ng his excellent track skills to  the gridiron and also becoming more polished as a DB and receiver. "I've been  working  on  my  route  running  as  a  receiver  and  my  aggressiveness  and         awareness  as  a  cornerback  coming  into  the  2017  season.  I  want  to  be  a          playmaker on both sides of the ball for my team and in the return game." 

Eastlake will  have  its  hands  full  this  season  with  a  pre y  demanding  schedule  featuring the likes of Rancho Bernardo, Grossmont, and Valhalla. Of course Jalyn  and  the  Titans  have  their  eye  on  domina ng  the  South  Bay  before  they  focus  their a en on on winning a third CIF  tle for Eastlake. "I'm looking forward to  every league game we have because Eastlake has something to prove and I feel  like all the other teams are overlooking us because of what happened last year.  My personal goal is to be one of the best corners in San Diego and for my team  of course to win C.I.F in whatever division we are in. That will get exposure to  the  people  on  our  team  that  are  ge ng  slept  on,  especially  ge ng  more            exposure  for  myself  as  well  because  I  feel  like  I  can  play  with  all  the  dudes  around the county that have all of the big offers." 


Division I Academic Standards Division I schools require you to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements: 1. Complete a total of 16 NCAA core courses in the following areas: 4 years of English. + 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 1 additional year of English, math or natural/physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Note: See the core-course progression requirements. 2. Complete 10 of your 16 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Students whose academic credentials are solely international (including Canada) are not required to meet the 10/7 requirement. 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.300) on the Division I sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board. If you plan to attend a Division I school, you must complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses in eight academic semesters or four consecutive academic years from the start of ninth grade. If you graduate from high school early, you must still meet core-course requirements.

Core-Course Progression (10/7) Requirement In order to be eligible to compete during your initial year of full-time enrollment, you must complete a total of 16 core courses. Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school and at least seven of these 10 core courses must be in English, math, or science. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Note: Students must also meet the Division I sliding-scale index for competition (minimum 2.300 core-course GPA). Courses Taken After High School For Division I, only courses completed in your first eight semesters will qualify as core courses for Division I. If you graduate from high school on time (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth grade class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A college course taken after high school graduation can be used toward your initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit. An additional core-course unit taken after on-time high school graduation cannot replace a course used to meet the core-course progression (10/7) requirement, but an additional core course after on-time graduation may replace one of the remaining six core-course units necessary to meet corecourse requirements. What if I Don’t Graduate on Time? In Division I, if you do not graduate on time (in four years/ eight semesters), the NCAA Eligibility Center will still use your grades and coursework for the first four years/eight semesters in your certification. You will still need to provide proof of graduation (once you graduate) and you may not use any coursework taken after your high school graduation toward your certification.

How to plan your high school courses to meet the 16 core-course requirement:

4 x 4 = 16

4 English courses (one per year) + 4 math courses (one per year) + 4 science courses (one per year) + 4 social science (and/or additional) courses (one per year) 16 NCAA core courses GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

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Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from all high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division I school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division I school.

Early Academic Qualifier

If you meet specific criteria after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division I and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment. Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 900 OR minimum ACT sum score of 75; and a core-course GPA of 3.000 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses: 3 years of English; 2 years of math; 2 years of science; 2 additional years of English, math or natural/physical science; and 5 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment at an NCAA Division I school.

Academic Redshirt

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first regular academic term but may NOT compete during your first year of enrollment. You must pass either eight quarter or nine semester hours to practice in the next term.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of enrollment at a Division I school. What if I Don’t Meet the Division I Standards? If you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

Sliding Scale for Division I Beginning Aug. 1, 2016 Core GPA

3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.299 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT

400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 880 890 900 910 910 920 930 940 950 960 970 980 990 1000 1010 1020

ACT 37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 86

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; and 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after Aug. 1, 2016.

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ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Division II Academic Standards Division II schools require college-bound student-athletes to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. The standards are changing for students who initially enroll full time at a Division II school on or after Aug. 1, 2018. If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

1. Complete a total 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural/ physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

1. Complete a total of 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural or physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

2. Earn at least a 2.000 GPA in your core courses. 3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned during or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.200) on the Division II competition sliding scale.

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Core-Course Timeline If you plan to attend a Division II school, you must complete 16 NCAA core courses after starting grade nine and before your first full-time college enrollment. Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from ALL other high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division II school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division II school.

What if I Don’t Meet the Division II Standards? If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards: 1. Earn a 2.000 GPA in 16 core courses; OR 2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

Early Academic Qualifier

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school after Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following standards:

Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 820 OR minimum sum score of 68 on the ACT; and a core-course GPA of 2.5 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses in the following areas:

1. Complete 16 core courses; AND 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division II partial qualifier sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

If you meet specific criteria below after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division II and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship.

3 years of English; 3 years of math; 2 years of natural/physical science; and 6 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of full-time enrollment at an NCAA Division II school.

Partial Qualifier

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first year of enrollment, but may NOT compete.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of full-time enrollment at a Division II school.

Courses Taken After High School For Division II, you may use an unlimited number of core courses completed after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated. College courses taken after high school graduation can be used toward your Division II initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit.

14

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Grade-Point Average The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates your core-course grade-point average based on the grades you earn in NCAAapproved core courses. Only your best grades from the required number of NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. Your GPA is calculated on a 4.000 scale. Numeric grades such as 92 or 87 are changed to letter grades such as A or B. The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating your GPA. Weighted honors or advanced placement courses may improve your core-course GPA, but your high school must notify the NCAA Eligibility Center that it weights grades in these classes. In pass/fail grading situations, the NCAA Eligibility Center will assign your high school’s lowest passing grade for a course in which you received a pass grade. For most high schools, the lowest passing grade is a D, so the NCAA Eligibility Center generally assigns a D as a passing grade.

Calculating Your Quality Points In order to determine your quality points earned for each course, multiply the quality points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Examples:

• • •

An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points.

The following worksheets will help you to determine your core-course GPA.

Quality Points A = 4 points B = 3 points

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C = 2 points D = 1 point

Units of Credit

1 quarter unit = 0.25 units 1 trimester unit = 0.34 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1 unit

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Josh Moala

FOOTHILLERS


Grossmont High School is a football program with more history than any other  school  in  the  East  County.  They  have  legendary  players  and  coaches  da ng  all  the way back to the schools opening at the foothills of Mt. Helix in 1922. They  also  have  some  history  that  haunts  their  program  ll  this  day,  first  off  they    haven't beaten neighborhood rival Helix since 1991 and to make it s ng a li le  more  they  haven't  reached  a  CIF  championship  game  since  1971.  The  current  seniors at Grossmont are very aware of the tasks at hand for the 2017 season  and those efforts are led by receiver Josh Moala. Moala is a second genera on  Foothiller and he wants to do everything in his power to change history, " I feel  like  a  whole  new  player.  I've  go en  a  lot  stronger  and  faster  thanks  to  my      trainer Alex Johnson. My mindset has changed about how I want to handle my  senior year. This is my last chance to do a lot of things. I've been working my tail  off for this team and for my senior year."   

A er averaging a first down for every catch in his junior season Josh felt that he  could  add  more  to  his  game  to  help  his  team  get  down  the  field,  "Making  big  plays  a er  I  catch  the  ball,  I  didn't  do  enough  of  that  last  year,  so  simply  just  making  big  plays  and  helping  my  team  win  most  importantly."            For      Grossmont  to  reach  their  ul mate  goal  of  ge ng  to  a  CIF  Championship  they will have to go through two teams that were in championship games last  December as well as many other playoff teams in their own league. Josh and the  Foothiller's are ready to take the next step in ge ng the two giant monkeys off  of their back one of them being finally knocking off the Highlander's. "My head  coach ( Tom Karlo ) always tells us the most important game is "the next".. so  Bishops  would  be  the  appropriate  answer..  but  in  all  honesty,  I'm  coming  for  those sco es. I've been hearing a lot of talk about transfers coming in to helix..  and  I  could  care  less  who  transfers  there  or  who  is  on  their  team.  That's  the  game I'm looking forward to."   

Growing up in El Cajon Josh always knew he wanted to play for Grossmont and  be apart of the Foothiller legacy, "I remember watching Anthony Lawrence run  the offense and I knew then that I'd fit right in with the "no huddle" offense. It  was just right for me to a end Grossmont. The football team hasn't made it to a  CIF championship since 1971 and I was aware of that when I was in 8th grade. I  took that as mo va on to come into Grossmont and to help the Foothillers get  back to a CIF championship." Now it's his turn and he  knows exactly what he  wants  out  of  his  senior  season,  "10‐0  and  CIF  champions.  1st  team  All  CIF,  A  commitment to a 4 year university, and a strong bond with all my brothers for  the rest of my life." 


SDFNL MAGAZINE July 2017 issue  

Martell Irby - Eye of the Tiger Class of 2018 Torrey Pines - Brotherhood Josh Moala - Grossmont Keanu Mookini - Madison

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