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EAST COUNTY PREP FOOTBALL  CIF DIVISION IV CHAMPIONSHIP  By Adam Paul  Chula Vista (12‐1‐17)   

It is  great  to  be  a  Monarch  these  days.  You  might  ask  what  kind  of    monarch and the answer would be a Monte Vista Monarch.   

The reason being it is great to be a Monte Vista Monarch these days is  because  they  are  the  CIF  Champions  of  Division  IV.  This  season  the  Monarchs knew they had a mission a er missing out last year as they  lost a semi‐final heartbreaker 35‐32 to Santana in the final minute.   

That loss really stung the Monarchs and they vowed to come back this  year and avenge that loss. Coming into the season they were looked at  to be one of the favorites in Division IV but early on they lost a couple  of games. One of those games was Division IV foe University City which  was big as it was in the Division.   

However the Monarchs marched on and were awarded the #4 seed in  the  Division  IV  playoffs  which  meant  they  would  receive  a  bye  in  the  first round. In the second round they faced Chula Vista who gave them  everything and eventually the Monarchs pulled it out in over me on a  stop on a two point conversion. With the win they were once again in  the semi‐finals, this  me against University City who had beaten them.   

However unlike  last  season  the  Monarchs  pulled  out  the  semi‐final     victory  over  #1  seeded  University  to  reach  the  championship  game  where they would face #2 seeded San Diego High, another school with  rich history and tradi on.   

What would  happen  in  the  CIF  Division  IV  Championship  game  would  be one for the ages and stuff legends are made of. 


Courtesy of ECPREPS.com  

Big stud  running  back  for  the  Monarchs,  Jahmon  McClendon  who         interes ngly enough played the game sick and slightly dehydrated as it  was described rumbled his way each  me through the Cavers defense  and constantly picked himself up ran away with things all the way to  se ng records on the night.   

Now on the stat sheet it will say 383 yards but a couple of media guys  and others had the total at 390 yards. However the official number on  the night was 383 yards. He also on the night scorched the Cavers for a  record 8 touchdowns.   

McClendon’s record  touchdown  runs  would  include  runs  of  3,  42,  44,  32,  49,  23,  10  and  48  of  which  all  set  a  sec on  championship‐game   record.   

His rushing yards would be two yards short of the championship game  record. The most impressive part of it all was the fact that he scored  on mostly on a running play the Monarchs call “2‐Power.” They would  insert the direc on into that play call as well.   

For the  Monarchs,  McClendon  wasn’t  the  only  one  to  enjoy  the         fireworks  of  scoring.  His  running  mate  Elshaddai  Levi  who  ran  for  83  yards  also  scored  on  a  55‐yarder  and  Terell  Kyle  ran  for  76  yards  and  two scores.   

On the season McClendon with his record se ng night now is at 2,353  yards and 37 touchdowns and 3,919 and 58 scores for a career.    

The San Diego Cavers did their best to stay in the contest as quarter‐ back  Quinn  O’Connor  threw  for  317  yards  on  16  of  25  passing  and  5  touchdowns and two intercep ons.   


One of  the  most  spectacular  grabs  was  by  Caver  receiver  Daniel  Thomas  who  hauled in a couple passes one handed of 30 and 70 yards finished with 116 yards  receiving.   

Early on the Monarchs actually led 14‐0 before San Diego would come back and  e it up about midway in the first half.   

However the Monarchs would retake the lead as McClendon busted his way for  a 44‐yard score to give Monte Vista a 21‐14 lead. But that lead didn’t last long as  San  Diego  was  able  to  retake  the  lead  on  a  Thomas  circus  catch  and  a  2‐point  conversion which gave them a 22‐21 lead.   

Monte Vista didn’t flinch as once again it was McClendon who again ran away  for the 32‐yard diving score and a er a 2‐point conversion it was now 29‐22.   

A er McClendon scored he was s ll lying on the ground a er diving and it was  said  by  a  couple  of  bystanders  that  he  looked  like  he  had  been  injured  on  the  play.   

But as it was later found out, McClendon hadn’t eaten all day long so he was just  feeling the effects of that. Plus playing both ways was     having an effect as well  but he gu ed it out.   

At the  intermission  the  Monarchs  led  San  Diego  29‐22.  McClendon  in  the  first  half really carried things as he ran for 206 yards and 4 scores.   

A er si ng out part of the third quarter, McClendon emerged from the sideline  and back into the game and did his thing as he ran for a 49‐yard score.   

A couple  of  possessions  later  he  would  score  again,  this  me  on  a  23‐yard  scamper to give Monte Vista a 43‐28 lead.   

The Monarchs would stretch their lead even further as Elshaddai found the end  zone for a 55‐yard score to push it to 50‐28.   

A couple of possessions later a er scores by both teams, McClendon who wasn’t  finished would cap off his night with a 48‐yard score which would be the record  one to make it 71‐42. 


Things were  going  really  well  for  the  Monarchs  as  San  Diego  just  couldn’t  match the power of the run game for Monte Vista. In fact that would be prov‐ en on the next possession for Monte Vista as they would get into Cavers terri‐ tory on the 10‐yardline.  The ball was handed off to McClendon who took it and got to the 5‐yard line  where he was hit by quite a few cavers who tried to bring him down. Howev‐ er just like a beast, McClendon was able to carry all the defenders a er spin‐ ning and keeping balance and when it looked like he was going to be brought  down he was able to break free and into the end zone for the score to make  it 57‐28 and score his 7th touchdown.  PIVOTAL  MOMENT:  Trailing  22‐21  in  the  second  quarter,  Monte  Vista  was  able to retake the lead on a Jahmon McClendon 32‐yard score and never look  back.  NOTES:  McClendon’s  8  rushing  touchdowns  es  a  CIF  SECTION  RECORD  for  most in a game with Richard Dorian of Rancho Buena Vista who set the rec‐ ord  a  couple  of  weeks  ago  against  Santana.  McClendon  also  set  a  sec on  championship‐game record for TDs.  The 383 rushing yards by McClendon was two yards short of the CIF Sec on  tle game record.  The Monarchs on the night on offense put up 596 yards while the Cavers had  454 for a total of 1,050 and both teams combined for 17 touchdowns.   

The 119 combined points by both teams  ed another wacky game that Mon‐ te Vista Monarchs coach Ron Hamamoto was involved in back in 1999 when  he  coached  at  Rancho  Bernardo.  In  a  71‐48  victory  over  West  Hills  in  the  quarterfinals,  Rancho  Bernardo  ran  for  almost  700  yards  which  is  a  sec on  record.  In  that  game  under  Steve  Su on  and  his  air  it  out  offense  the  Wolf  Pack threw for 449 yards while Rancho Bernardo’s total yardage was 784.   

Monte Vista with this latest championship now has won 3 CIF SECTION TI‐ TLES.  Two  under  legendary  coach  Ed  Carberry  in  1995  and  2003  in  which  they beat Helix and the latest under legendary coach Ron Hamamoto who  has now won a  tle at a couple different schools. 


SDFNL PLAYER OF THE GAME RB Jahmon McClendon


www.ecpreps.comÂ


Courtesy of KUSI PPR  The El Camino Wildcats are CIF champions for the first time since 1999, with their stifling defense leading the way to a 2010 win over the Eastlake Titans in the Division I title game. The game's first big splash came courtesy of the Wildcat defense, as Donnel Frazier ended the first Eastlake drive with an interception. Two plays later, Chris Brown sprinted around the left side for a 50-yard touchdown and a 7-0 lead. The Titans made their first mark on the scoreboard thanks to the foot of DJ De Fierro, who booted a 39-yard field goal. But El Camino responded with another big play, this time a 42yard strike from Jaden Casey to Malachi Russell to make the lead 13-3 after the first quarter. The Wildcat defense continued to get their hands on the ball, with Daniel Naranjo picking off a pass and Jacob Sega diving on a fumble. El Camino turned that loose ball into seven points, as Brown capped off the ensuing drive with a 16-yard run for his second score. Rhyzon McCoy gave Eastlake a spark at the quarterback spot in the second half, finding Micah Pietila-Wiggs in the end zone the cut the lead to ten. But El Camino would hang on tight till the end, with Brown grinding out yards on a final clock-killing drive, to give the Wildcats their ninth section title in school history. 


SDFNL PLAYER OF THE GAME RB Chris Brown


The Best Way to Find, Share, and Score High School and Youth Sporting Events

www.scorestream.com San Diego’s Prep Football Live Scoring


SDFNL PLAYER OF THE GAME RB Justin Cordova


Division I Academic Standards Division I schools require you to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements: 1. Complete a total of 16 NCAA core courses in the following areas: 4 years of English. + 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 1 additional year of English, math or natural/physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Note: See the core-course progression requirements. 2. Complete 10 of your 16 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Students whose academic credentials are solely international (including Canada) are not required to meet the 10/7 requirement. 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.300) on the Division I sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board. If you plan to attend a Division I school, you must complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses in eight academic semesters or four consecutive academic years from the start of ninth grade. If you graduate from high school early, you must still meet core-course requirements.

Core-Course Progression (10/7) Requirement In order to be eligible to compete during your initial year of full-time enrollment, you must complete a total of 16 core courses. Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school and at least seven of these 10 core courses must be in English, math, or science. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Note: Students must also meet the Division I sliding-scale index for competition (minimum 2.300 core-course GPA). Courses Taken After High School For Division I, only courses completed in your first eight semesters will qualify as core courses for Division I. If you graduate from high school on time (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth grade class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A college course taken after high school graduation can be used toward your initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit. An additional core-course unit taken after on-time high school graduation cannot replace a course used to meet the core-course progression (10/7) requirement, but an additional core course after on-time graduation may replace one of the remaining six core-course units necessary to meet corecourse requirements. What if I Don’t Graduate on Time? In Division I, if you do not graduate on time (in four years/ eight semesters), the NCAA Eligibility Center will still use your grades and coursework for the first four years/eight semesters in your certification. You will still need to provide proof of graduation (once you graduate) and you may not use any coursework taken after your high school graduation toward your certification.

How to plan your high school courses to meet the 16 core-course requirement:

4 x 4 = 16

4 English courses (one per year) + 4 math courses (one per year) + 4 science courses (one per year) + 4 social science (and/or additional) courses (one per year) 16 NCAA core courses GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

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Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from all high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division I school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division I school.

Early Academic Qualifier

If you meet specific criteria after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division I and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment. Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 900 OR minimum ACT sum score of 75; and a core-course GPA of 3.000 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses: 3 years of English; 2 years of math; 2 years of science; 2 additional years of English, math or natural/physical science; and 5 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment at an NCAA Division I school.

Academic Redshirt

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first regular academic term but may NOT compete during your first year of enrollment. You must pass either eight quarter or nine semester hours to practice in the next term.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of enrollment at a Division I school. What if I Don’t Meet the Division I Standards? If you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

Sliding Scale for Division I Beginning Aug. 1, 2016 Core GPA

3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.299 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT

400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 880 890 900 910 910 920 930 940 950 960 970 980 990 1000 1010 1020

ACT 37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 86

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; and 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after Aug. 1, 2016.

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ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Division II Academic Standards Division II schools require college-bound student-athletes to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. The standards are changing for students who initially enroll full time at a Division II school on or after Aug. 1, 2018. If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

1. Complete a total 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural/ physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

1. Complete a total of 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural or physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

2. Earn at least a 2.000 GPA in your core courses. 3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned during or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.200) on the Division II competition sliding scale.

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Core-Course Timeline If you plan to attend a Division II school, you must complete 16 NCAA core courses after starting grade nine and before your first full-time college enrollment. Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from ALL other high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division II school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division II school.

What if I Don’t Meet the Division II Standards? If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards: 1. Earn a 2.000 GPA in 16 core courses; OR 2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

Early Academic Qualifier

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school after Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following standards:

Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 820 OR minimum sum score of 68 on the ACT; and a core-course GPA of 2.5 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses in the following areas:

1. Complete 16 core courses; AND 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division II partial qualifier sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

If you meet specific criteria below after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division II and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship.

3 years of English; 3 years of math; 2 years of natural/physical science; and 6 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of full-time enrollment at an NCAA Division II school.

Partial Qualifier

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first year of enrollment, but may NOT compete.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of full-time enrollment at a Division II school.

Courses Taken After High School For Division II, you may use an unlimited number of core courses completed after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated. College courses taken after high school graduation can be used toward your Division II initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit.

14

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Grade-Point Average The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates your core-course grade-point average based on the grades you earn in NCAAapproved core courses. Only your best grades from the required number of NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. Your GPA is calculated on a 4.000 scale. Numeric grades such as 92 or 87 are changed to letter grades such as A or B. The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating your GPA. Weighted honors or advanced placement courses may improve your core-course GPA, but your high school must notify the NCAA Eligibility Center that it weights grades in these classes. In pass/fail grading situations, the NCAA Eligibility Center will assign your high school’s lowest passing grade for a course in which you received a pass grade. For most high schools, the lowest passing grade is a D, so the NCAA Eligibility Center generally assigns a D as a passing grade.

Calculating Your Quality Points In order to determine your quality points earned for each course, multiply the quality points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Examples:

• • •

An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points.

The following worksheets will help you to determine your core-course GPA.

Quality Points A = 4 points B = 3 points

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C = 2 points D = 1 point

Units of Credit

1 quarter unit = 0.25 units 1 trimester unit = 0.34 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1 unit

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


EAST COUNTY PREP FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS CIF DIVISION II CHAMPIONSHIP By Adam Paul Chula Vista (12-2-17)

What an amazing season for the Steele Canyon Cougars. The Cougars finally broke the semi-finals curse and now are Champions of Division II. The Cougars in the preseason were picked to be in the top half of their side of the Grossmont league which they did as they ended up finishing with a third place finish. Due to the fact that they also play a tough schedule besides their league schedule they received a 7-seed in the playoffs. They received that seed due to the fact that they lost to Granite Hills who received the 6-seed. So their road in the playoffs started at home with a rematch against No. 10-seed Mira Mesa who they once again dispatched. The next opponent would be No 2-seed Bishop’s and highly regarded receiver Mozes Mooney but low and behold the Cougars went in and gut punched them to win. So after the big win over Bishop’s it was learned they would be playing No 6seed Granite Hills who had beaten No 3-seed Valley Center. So the rematch was set for the semi-finals the day after Thanksgiving. The Eagles had previously beaten the Cougars on a last second play in the third week of the season. However this time the tables would be turned as the Cougars went into Valley Stadium and came away with the 28-27 victory to punch their ticket to the Championship. The No 1-seed Ramona Bulldogs had pretty much steamrolled through their half of the bracket dispatching their opponents by double digits and also scoring 40 points in each victory. So it was set. The Championship game between the Ramona Bulldogs and the Steele Canyon Cougars. Ramona got the scoring going early as they would score on a double reverse Tristan Stacy to finish off an 11 play drive to lead 7-0. However that didn’t deter the Cougars as Senior Quarterback Thomas Fishburne worked his magic and was able to air it out to Jordan Anderson who scampered into the end zone for a 42-yard score to tie it 7-7.


Courtesy of ECPREPS.com  

In the second quarter the Bulldogs would retake the lead thanks to a fourth-and1 conversion by Sean McDonald who would then score on a 4-yard run to make it 14-7 with about 9:00 left in the half. Once again undeterred, Fishburne was calm and cool and used his legs to run for a 34-yard scamper. The long run would set up a TD pass to Kenneth Watson for 22-yards which knotted the score at 14-14 with about 6:00 minutes left. However Ramona again retook the lead as Casey Buggein would find Stacy for 55-yards and the score to lead 21-14. The score would remain a one touchdown score until about 1;45 in the half when Deontae McKinney would cap a 82-yard 9 play drive with a 5-yard score to tie the score 21-21 which would be the score at the intermission. The Cougars who had played a lot of close games this season were used to this type of contest. This showed in the second half. Steele Canyon would receive the second half kickoff and promptly march down the field and actually take their first lead of the game on a 36-yard field goal by John Lautner to lead 24-21. The score would remain a three point lead heading into the fourth quarter. In the fourth quarter the defense for the Cougars came up big and was able to secure the ball back but unfortunately the offense gave it away as Cameron Necochea picked off a Fishburne pass in the red zone and would get the ball back at the 1-yard line. This really put the pressure on the Bulldogs as Steele Canyon was capable of making the big play and that they did. A couple plays later DE Mikel Oliver burst through O-Line and grabbed McDonald and tackled him for the safety which gave the Cougars a 26-21 lead and also the ball back. Steele Canyon took advantage of the opportunity as Fishburne scrambled for a 26-yard gain and McKinney also burst his way for a 26-yard gain. These two big runs would set up the Cougars at the 1-yard line where Fishburne called his own number and found his way into the end zone for the score and a 33-21 lead with 4:20 left in the contest. However the Bulldogs wouldn’t go down without a fight. They would drive down and answer with a score on a 3-yard run by McDonald. They would attempt the two point conversion and complete it as Stacy found Buggein for the completion. The score was now 33-29 with 1:20 remaining in the game.


Courtesy of ECPREPS.com   Everyone knew what was coming next and that was an onside kick. Ramona set up for the onside kick and kicked it and they thought they had the ball as Michael McCrory recovered it. However the officials had thrown a penalty flag and called the Bulldogs offsides. Once again the teams set up and this time the kick was recovered by Fishburne. The Cougars couldn’t simply just run out the clock so on fourth down they were forced to punt but the clock ran out and Steele Canyon was able to preserve the victory. SCORE: #7 Steele Canyon 33, #1 Ramona 29 RECORDS: Steele Canyon (10-4), Ramona (12-1) PIVOTAL PLAY: Mikel Oliver bursting through the Ramona offensive line and just pouncing on McDonald for the safety which led to a Fishburne 1-yard score. STATS: For the Cougars, Thomas Fishburne throwing for 163 yards and 2 scores and running for 149 yards and another touchdown. Rushing wise, McKinney ran for 79 yards on 11 carries and a TD, Perry Steele caught 3 balls for 71 yards, Jordan Anderson had a TD and 66 yards on 3 catches. Defensively the monsterous pair of Robert Whitehead and Darin Walton terrorized on defense. Whitehead tallied 11 tackles to lead the bunch and Walton had 10 tackles. QUOTABLE I: I just felt like since we’ve been in these tight games all season and Ramona hasn’t, that would be an advantage for us,” Fishburne said NOTES: This was the very first CIF Championship for the Cougars in football. With the win the Cougars who haven’t lost in over a month and now have won 6 games in a row will move onto the state playoffs where it is projected by CalPreps that they will face the Dos Pueblos of Goleta-Quartz winner in the So Cal Division 2-A Regional Bowl next week.


SDFNL PLAYER OF THE GAME QB Thomas FISHburne


EAST COUNTY PREP FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS CIF OPEN DIVISION CHAMPIONSHIP By Adam Paul CHULA VISTA (12-2-17)

Everyone who was anyone knew that the two best teams in San Diego were about to faceoff. This had been expected since the summer time when each team lost in a 7-on-7 tournament just before they would have faced each other. Except this time it wasn’t for a summer tournament championship. This time it was for all the marbles of an Open Division Championship in front of a crown estimated to be about 10,000 if not more. The lines were so long at Chet DeVore Stadium at Southwestern College that the start time of the game was postponed to accommodate people trying to get in. Once everyone was in the stadium and situated in their seats everyone knew they were in for a treat. The crowd on each side was loud and proud. It was a super electric atmosphere. Each student section was doing their thing as Helix’s student section known as “The DawgHouse” chanted their chants and the Mission Hills student section known as “The Growl Crowd” did their chants as well. The contest between the two best defenses in San Diego and teams could have been seen as an equivalent of when Hulk Hogan took on the Eighth Wonder of The World Andre the Giant at Wrestlemania III which was dubbed as “The irresistible force meeting the immovable object.” That is how big this game was considered in San Diego. It had that magnitude. Once the game got started the two teams didn’t disappoint as it seemed that every score between the two were lead changes. Also both teams made the plays necessary that it seemed that they all had an impact. Both teams ran their offense with Helix using the ground game while Mission Hills tried to use the air game.


Courtesy of ECPREPS.com  

However the man who would have the biggest impact on the outcome was really one of the smallest. For Helix, Elelyon Noa would have his day as he ran for 164 yards and three scores on 29 carries. Noa impacted the outcome in the fourth as he was able to run out the clock in the final four minutes by securing multiple first downs. In the beginning it was Mission Hills who struck first as they would march down before they would have to settle for a field goal. It would be Ezekeal Mata with the 19-yarder to make it 3-0 Grizzlies. Helix would answer as they marched down on an eight-play, 69-yard drive which ended with Noa’s first TD run of 3-yards out at 6:52. However the extra point was no good so it was 6-3. Mission Hills responded with a long drive of their own. They wound up with a 13-play, 73-yard drive that allowed them to retake the lead 10-6 on a 2yard score by Sam Dixon. Interestingly enough neither team converted a first down until 3:18 left in the first quarter. One of the big highlights came for the Highlanders in the first quarter as Carson Baker was able to find Isaiah Wooden 32-yard spectacular over the shoulder catch to lead 12-10. Mission Hills would receive the second half kickoff and they took advantage of that as Jack Tuttle was 4-of-6 for 63 yards capped by a 7-yard scoring strike to Chris Olave to retake the lead 16-12. Helix would answer with another long drive capped by another Noa short score to make it 19-16 with about 2:39 left in the third quarter. Mission Hills would once again knot the score 19-19 on a Mata 26-yard field goal after driving 71-yards.


This didn’t deter the Highlanders as Baker would find Michael Shawcroft on a play action pass for 35-yards over the middle which would set up a 3-yard score by Noa. Helix would go onto hold the lead until the clock ran out to claim their ninth section title out of 12 appearances in the title game. Both teams were either Nos 1 or 2 the entire season. Helix was the No. 1 team in the beginning but a 23-6 loss to Lancaster Paraclete in the Honor Bowl flip flopped the two teams. Thus the reason why they were the No 2seed. In the state the Highlanders were ranked No. 13 and will definitely move up after the victory. With the victory the Highlanders are now moving on to the state playoffs which they claimed in 2011. Mission Hills on the other hand was ranked No. 10 in the state and it isn’t known if they will make the State Playoffs as well. SCORE: Helix 26, Mission Hills 19 RECORDS: Helix (12-1), Mission Hills (12-1) Carson Baker on the night for Helix threw for 110 yards on 8 of 12 passing. On the other side, Jack Tuttle was 23 of 43 passing for 295 yards. The best receiver in San Diego according to many, Chris Olave for Mission Hills caught 12 balls for 150 yards. Defensively for Helix, Isaac Taylor-Stuart tallied 10 tackles to lead, he was followed by Tauanuu, Giles and Raymond Sanchez who each had 7 apiece. Helix has now won 2 Open Division Titles which is the most since the Open Division was created. Also this was their fourth straight Open Division title tilt. The other big thing that Helix accomplished and finished was a perfect weekend for East County Football. Helix, Steele Canyon and Monte Vista the previous evening all defeated teams that came into the championship game undefeated which made El Centro Southwest as the last undefeated team standing. So with that accomplishment the East County was a perfect 3-0 on the weekend.


SDFNL PLAYER OF THE GAME RB Elelyon Noa


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For Immediate Release www.GlobalFootball.com Global Football Notes 2017-02 Twitter @GlobalSportsGuy

Media Contact: Michael Preston Tel: (001)-781-363-0305 MP@MPrestonSports.com www.Facebook.com/GlobalFootballLTD

CHINA BECOMES THE 28TH COUNTRY TO HOST A GLOBAL FOOTBALL EVENT Team Stars & Stripes High School Student-Athletes Will Visit Beijing and Shanghai and Participate in Global Ambassadors Bowl China FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – GRANBURY, TX – Wednesday, February 1, 2017 – Global Football will venture to China for the first time in 2017 when Team Stars & Stripes travels to Beijing and Shanghai to participate in the 2017 Global Ambassadors Bowl China from April 1-9. China will become the 28th country to welcome Global Football travelers when hosting the ninth Global Ambassadors Bowl. The annual event provides the opportunity of a lifetime for deserving student-athletes to travel internationally, while playing the sport of American football and representing their school, state, nation and themselves. The squad of high school senior standouts is selected as much for a player’s conduct off the field as for his performances on the gridiron and is known as Team Stars & Stripes. “During the past two decades, I have been able to work with dedicated coaches and inspired student athletes as we travel, learn through experience and compete in far-off lands,” said Global Football Founder & President Patrick Steenberge, upon returning from a planning visit to Beijing and Shanghai. “Holding an event in China has always been a dream of mine, and I am thrilled to organize a unique American football tour visiting two of its most notable cities, and exposing our team to the wonders and peoples of China.” Chris Adamson of Viewpoint School in California and long-time Penn Charter (Philadelphia PA) coach Bill Gallagher will serve as joint head coaches for Team Stars & Stripes, who will experience spectacular cultural sites including the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, the Beijing Olympics Complex, and a Shanghai River tour. Team Stars & Stripes will face a team from the American Football Academy (AFA) at Yuanshen Stadium in the Pudong district of Shanghai. The American players and coaches will host an American football clinic in both Beijing and Shanghai for local Chinese players discovering a sport growing in popularity in China. “During my career I have seen firsthand how skilled and passionate football players and fans outside the United States are about the game,” said Coach Adamson. “The reality is that China presents one of the relatively new frontiers for American football. In a short period of time the game has taken off at every level and is rapidly gaining momentum. The chance to lead a team of American High School All Star players and coaches into China to showcase the game of football and bridge cultural differences along the way is truly once in a lifetime. We are excited to do what we can to help the game of football continue to grow and flourish in China and we are even more excited to represent the United States of America in this game.” Coaches who wish to nominate suitable high school seniors for Team Stars & Stripes should contact Coach Adamson (Chris.Adamson@viewpoint.org) or Coach Bill Gallagher (bgnd72@comcast.net). Players wishing to join Team Stars & Stripes, as well as family members wanting to join the 9-day tour should register online through Anthony Travel: http://www.anthonytravel.com/gab-china/ Joining head coaches Adamson and Gallagher are Jerry Ralph (El Camino High School, CA) and John Storey (VillaAngela St Joseph, OH). The coaching staff has strong links to Global Ambassadors Bowl organizer Patrick Steenberge, the President of Global Football.


Chris Adamson coached future first round NFL Draft pick Bjoern Werner at Salisbury School in Connecticut when the German defensive end came to the United States as a member of Global Football’s International Student Program as a high school sophomore. This summer, Adamson’s Viewpoint School hosted visitors from Ritsumeikan Uji High School in Japan, whose developing student-athletes visit America annually through Global Football. Bill Gallagher played in the same backfield as Patrick Steenberge at the University of Notre Dame and has taken charge of Team Stars & Stripes for the past four journeys overseas. He has visited France, Germany, Italy, Ireland and Spain with Global Football. Jerry Ralph was the offensive coordinator for Team USA, which won the Global Football-organized NFL Global Junior Championship during the week of Super Bowl in San Diego in 2003, featuring the Under 19 national teams of USA, Canada, Japan, Mexico and Europe. John Storey has been a member of the high school-aged Team Stars & Stripes squad’s coaching staff for all eight years on visits to Japan and Europe. He first traveled with Global Football in 1997 as the offensive line coach with John Carroll University, and most recently as a coach for the NCAA D-III select team at the annual Tazon de Estrellas in Mexico. Having held a combine and individual tryouts for local players, China’s American Football Academy (AFA) is currently recruiting local Shanghainese and expatriot players to represent China in the Global Ambassadors Bowl. The AFA was founded in 2016 and provides education and professional football training, promoting the core values of football players: leadership, teamwork, discipline, integrity, and endurance. “We are extremely pleased to provide the opportunity for youth in and around Shanghai to compete and matchup against a team from the United States,” said Chris McLaurin, founder of the AFA and the team’s defensive coordinator. “For me, this has been a long time goal to see our teams compete at a U.S. standard, and our coaches and managers will be doing everything we can possibly do to prepare. This game also shows how the game of football can serve as a powerful touchpoint between the United States and China as the game continues to grow in China, a positive form of people-to-people diplomacy.” The AFA team coaching staff will include McLaurin, as well as former AFLC Titans Head Coach Kevin Coleman, former Ohio State cornerback Dionte Allen, former U.S. H.S. Defensive Line Coach Eric Minor, and local coaches from the Shanghai area. The Global Ambassadors Bowl traces its origins back to Japan in 2008 and has taken high-school aged travelers and mentoring coaches to Europe and Asia to expand their appreciation of the world, make new friends and play football. The series has graced Japan (2008 and 2009), France & Belgium (2010), Germany (2011), Italy (2012, 2013 and 2015), Spain (2014) and Czech Republic & Germany (2016), with Team Stars & Stripes boasting a 7-2 overall record. About Global Football: Since 1996 Global Football has provided 15,000 amateur football players, coaches, families and fans from more than 350 schools the opportunity to travel and compete internationally with similar people of differing cultures. During that time they have produced games and tours in 27 countries on 6 continents, including 2012, 2014 and 2016 D3 college and high school showcases staged in Ireland alongside the NCAA college football games. Through these games, clinics and tours the people involved experience and learn about unique lands, fascinating people, and the sports environment in different parts of the world. Global Football has become the world's largest exporter and producer of American football outside of the USA. Contact Patrick Steenberge: Tel: 817-219-7274 / Email: Patrick@GlobalFootball.com


SDFNL MAGAZINE Dec 2017  

SAN DIEGO CIF FINALS

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