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Contributing Editors Thomas Gutierrez Brett Fischer Photography Ruben Peña Christopher Smith Don De Mars Advertising sdfnlmagazine@gmail.com SDFNLMagazine is a registered trademark of MBA Sports LLC 2012 No parts of SDFNL Magazine may be re produced in any form or by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Publisher accepts no responsibility for unsolicited contributed manuscripts, photographs, artwork or advertisements. #SDFNL17


THE 49ERS PRESENTS THE HONOR BOWL HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL SHOWCASE Cathedral Catholic High School, San Diego CA.

THE PURPOSE: Uniting and educating the youth, coaches and communities of America about the needs of our military veterans.

Day 1 Friday, September 1, 2016 USMC Camp Pendleton Experience 8:30am – 12:30pm

Camp San Mateo, Camp Pendleton, California

Honor Bowl Football Showcase – Opening Ceremony 4:30pm 7:30pm

Christian High Patriots, CA. vs Boron High School Bobcats, CA. Cathedral Catholic Dons, CA. vs. Orange Lutheran Lancers, CA.

Day 2 Saturday, September 2, 2016 Honor Bowl Football Showcase – Tribute Day & Memorial Finale 12:00pm 4:00pm 7:30pm

  

Helix Charter Highlanders, CA. vs Paraclete High School Spirits, CA. Serra Cavaliers, Gardena, CA. vs. Punahou High School Buff ‘N Blue, HI. Centennial Husky’s, Corona, CA. vs IMG Academy Ascenders, FL.

First team on schedule designates home team and colors Times are tentative and can change due to overtime games or media/television requests All teams must arrive 2.5 hours before game time and will have individual locker rooms

MOTTO: “IT’S MORE THAN JUST A FOOTBALL GAME!”


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

Aug 2017

Mozes Mooney When you  think  about  San  Diego  High  School  football  you  think  of  explosive  offensive talent that is off the charts year  a er year a er year.    The player that I said would be the most      explosive  and  impac ul  senior  back  in          December  a er  I  watched  him  put  on  a  clinic in the D3 Championship game, was  Bishops Mozes Mooney. Read more ….. 

Billy Dunkle In a  city  mostly  known  for  producing  some of the best running backs of all  me  the past few years have seen and influx of  devasta ng  lineman  gain  the  spotlight.  Coming  in  to the  2017  season one of  the  top offensive lineman in the state of Cali‐ fornia is from right here in San Diego and  his name is Billy Dunkle.  Read more….. 


SDFNLMAGAZINE.com

JULY 2017

David Gonzalez It’s easy to think of a defensive player as a  hammer when he nails running backs and  wide receivers on a con nuous basis.  Yet  for  Granite  Hills  High  School,  David  Tyler  Gonzalez,  he  is  equally  the  proverbial         mallet when he is on the offensive side of  the  ball.  You  see  this  class  of  2018              defensive  end  and  mul ‐posi on  player  will pound you with the pigskin in his hand  as well! Read more …. 

Mikel Oliver

6'1 240 pound D end/TE Mikel Oliver never had  a  sense  of  stability  un l  he  started  a ending  Steele  Canyon  High  in  Spring  Valley.  In  the       middle  of  his  ninth  grade  year  Mikel,  his      mother,  and  2  younger  siblings  packed  up  and  moved from Minnesota to California looking for  a be er opportunity in life. That bold move now  could  possibly  present  Mikel  and  his           family    with  the  ul mate  opportunity  for  any  high school football player, a college scholarship  Read more……….  


SDFNL MAGAZINE Presents SDFNL Kick Off Classic August 18th and 19th at La Jolla Country Day Benefiting SAN DIEGO FOOD BANK


STEPS 2 STAY Freshman Year: You should logon and review the NCAA Eligibility Center and review the courses they approve to certify your initial Eligibility. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. This will give you the list of classes you will need to complete for your NCAA requirements. In addition, I would register your child and have them either take the SAT/ACT or Take a practice test. This will give you as parents and the student on what they need to work on. You can take the SAT as many times as you want. The SAT only takes your highest score. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).

Sophomore Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse. Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area – summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to ensure you get the classes you need. The End of the Sophomore Year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). The last two test of the year are in May and June. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor).


Junior Year: Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. (Note: if you are behind in a subject area –summer school is a great time advantage and make up classes). Meet with counselor to

ON ACADEMIC TRACK FOR COLLEGE ensure you get the classes you need. Junior year I highly recommend you register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both Test are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.

Senior Year: You must take the ACT and/or SAT (if Needed). Enroll in NCAA Clearinghouse (if you have not already). Post your classes on the site. Go to www.eligibilitycenter.org and click on College Bound Student Athlete. You can monitor if you are on track to completing your classes for eligibility. You will need to submit your transcript to NCAA Clearinghouse. Meet with counselor to ensure classes are completed. If needed register and take the ACT (www.act.org) and/or SAT (www.collegebound.org) in your local area (use the NCAA Eligibility Center Code “9999”). Both tests are offered several times a year. This will allow your child to understand the test environment of both standardized test – Hopefully ease any anxiety. Parents each test cost - so please ask counselors for fee waivers. (Note: if you are an IEP student you can request to take the test in IEP setting and receive your modified test with your school Counselor). You must also put your film together and start sending to colleges. Once film is completed you should always keep a copy of your highlight reel and copy of transcripts on your for when you meet coaches or attend various camps.


The Best Way to Find, Share, and Score High School and Youth Sporting Events

www.scorestream.com San Diego’s Prep Football Live Scoring


The Rise of the By: Bre  Fischer 

When you  think  about  San  Diego  High  School  football  you  think  of      explosive  offensive  talent  that  is  off  the  charts  year  a er  year  a er  year.  The  same  can  be  said  about  the  2017  season  with  players  like  Jack Tu le, Chris Brown, and Kyle Phillips all receiving na onal a en‐ on  with  Tu le  and  Phillips  commi ng  to  Pac‐12  schools  earlier  this  off  season.  The  player  that  I  said  would  be  the  most  explosive  and            impac ul senior back in December a er I watched him put on a clinic  in the D3 Championship game, was Bishops Mozes Mooney. Whether  he is lined up outside on offense or prowling the secondary on defense  he  can  change  the  game  at  any  me  and  he's  looking  to  set  some       records  while  he's  giving  it  one  last  go  in  high  school.  "Personally  I  want to leave a tradi on at Bishops and open up doors for recrui ng to  all  the  young  guys.  Also  I  want  to  get  the  career  recep ons  and            receiving yard records, the intercep on record would be cool too."   

Coming off  of  a  14‐1  2016  campaign  in  which  Bishops  absolutely         dismantled  Chris an  in  the  CIF  Title  game,  they  are  upping  the  ante  and moving up to D2 in 2017 with powerhouses like Mater Dei Catholic  and  Valley  Center  wai ng  in  the  wings  to  get  a  shot  at  the  private  school in La Jolla. Mozes and the knights know there will be challenges  ahead  this  season  but  his  mindset  never  changes  regardless  of            opponent,  "Personally  I  go  into  every  game  the  same  way,  I  find  out  who their best coverage dude is and expect him to be on me the whole  game. Bishops Head Coach Joel Allen knows his team has to be ba le  tested  to  win  a  tle  in  a  higher  division  the  very  next  year  a er        domina ng D3 and he scheduled as such.                                                     

cont


The Knights play Grossmont, St. Margaret's of San Juan Capistrano and  Mater  Dei  Catholic  within  their  first  six  games  as  well  as  Santa  Fe   Chris an  and  La  Jolla  Country  Day  to  end  the  season.  Mozes  sees  no  difference  between  this  season  or  last  season  just  a  division  change  that  should  only  make  his  team  that  more  focused  on  another  tle.  "This season should be very similar to last season for us. Most of us are  returning and we have the same mentality. We have the swag and we  come out and play with it. The only thing that changes is us now being  D2, so more compe on."   

While most players spend their off season trying to be seen by as many  scouts as possible, Mozes took an old school approach which all of us  older  guys  can  definitely  appreciate  in  this  social  media  look  at  me  genera on.  "I  didn't  do  too  many  camps  or  anything  because  it  just  wasn't  in  my  best  interest.  I  wanted  to  enjoy  being  a  kid  for  one  last  summer and spend  me bonding with my friends. My bes riends are  on  the  team,  I  love  every  moment  with  them."  Some  of  those  best  friends will be doing everything in their power with Mozes in trying to  help  Bishops  win  back  to  back  rings,  he  thinks  Jacob  and  Jeffrey        Jackson  are  going  to  explode  as  they  did  last  year  as  well  as  Isaiah  Dawson who is a very underrated athlete for the Knights.   

All in  all  Mozes  Mooney  is  going  to  do  some  amazing  things  on  the  football  field  this  year.  For  a  player  with  so  much  talent  he  is  just  as  humble  and  knows  the  things  that  are  important  in  his  life.  He  has  schools from all 4 corners of the country filling his mailbox asking him  to be apart of their program, but I don't think we will see him making  any  10  minute  commitment    videos  in  the  near  future....unless  his  Bishops  Knights  brothers  can  join  him.  Hopefully  with  2  CIF           Championship rings on. 


By: Bre  Fischer 

In a city mostly known for producing some of the best running backs of  all  me the past few years have seen and influx of devasta ng lineman  gain  the  spotlight.  Coming  in  to  the  2017  season  one  of  the  top       offensive  lineman  in  the  state  of  California  is  from  right  here  in  San     Diego  and  his  name  is  Billy  Dunkle.  Anchoring  the  Eastlake           Titans  offensive line at 6'5 335, Billy has used this offseason to make a  name  for  himself  na onally  and  to  restore  the  pride  in  Eastlake          football  that  was  non  existent  in  2016.  "I  always  thought  I  was  over  looked and needed to get my name out to the recrui ng world. I've put  in a lot of hours this offseason and it's paying off. My team is looking  great,  this  year  it's  like  a  brotherhood.  I  didn't  really  go  to  a  lot  of  camps this year, only the Opening and I made it to the final 10 lineman  for  that  camp.  I  also  went  to  a  Giant  Skilz  camp  and  somehow  got      recorded  by  under  the  radar  and  that  video  blew  up  and  I  received  a  couple  offers  a er  that.  For  me  film  speaks  louder  than  anything  so  this  year  I  decided  to  just  work  on  my  cra   and  not  go  to  that  many  camps. Plus most of theses camps cost a li le to much haha. Everyone  is  buying  into  our  coaches  this  year  so  it's  going  to  be  a  lot  different  than last year."   

With a record of 2‐9 in 2016 the Eastlake faithful is chomping at the bit  for  August  25th  to  get  here  so  they  can  take  back  what  has  been  there's  for  more  than  a  decade,  none  more  so  than  Billy  Dunkle.  "Having that record says it all man, our leaders last year were non ex‐ istent, it was a bunch of dudes yelling at each other to be honest. This  year it's completely changed. Me and a couple other dudes decided we  have to change this program from the ground up. We are holding peo‐ ple  accountable,  no  missing  anything,  always  doing  team  chemistry  stuff. Our leaders this year can lead anyone. We were the laughing  


By: Bre  Fischer 

stock of the county and I'm not with that. We all are ready to throw it  all on the line to get rid of that loser label. People have to understand  we ran the South Bay for 10 years and when 30 of your players transfer  because  of  coaching  it's  going  to  impact  anyone  hard."  Billy  says  it  is  not  just  him  leading  the  way  for  the  Titans,  there  are  other  players  who will be counted on to bring Eastlake back to their elite status not  only in the South Bay but in the en re county, "Some other key players  will be my bothers Jalen Graham, Jalen Jackson, Reyshawn Parks Price  and someone that everyone is sleeping on is a kid by the name of Der‐ rick Speed, he's a quick WR and I think he's going to have a huge im‐ pact for us this season."   

Teams that Eastlake used to dominate in the past such as Otay Ranch  and  Olympian  have  caught  up  to  the  Titans  in  talent  and  even  made  some  CIF  Championship  appearances  but  if  you  look  at  the  banners  and  hardware  Eastlake  is  s ll  King  of  the  South  Bay  and  they  always  have that in their head preparing  for any opponent. "I'm looking for‐ ward to playing League most definitely.. we didn't win a single league  game  last  year  So  my  dawgs  are  hungry  for  one.  Also  playing  against  my  uncle  Freddy  Dunkle  who  coaches  for  Hilltop,  he's  the  DC  over  there  and  they  talk  a  lot  so  I'm  looking  forward  to  shu ng  them  up.  Otay  Ranch  is  probably  the  game  I'm  looking  forward  to  the  most  though, they need to remember that we run the South Bay and to re‐ spect that...Olympian is going to figure that out to."   

Billy has  had  schools  from  all  over  the  country  shown  interest  in  him  with  the  University  of  Illinois  from  the  Big  Ten  Conference  being  the  most notable so far. With all that has happened in the past 11 months  


from viral  sensa on  to  being  awarded  3  stars  by  major  recrui ng        services,  only one thing keeps Big Bill Dunkle up at night. "I'm looking  forward to that first snap of the season haha, some mes I can't sleep  and  I  just  think  about  it.  This  season  people  are  going  to  be  begging  the ref to blow the whistle bc that's the only thing that's going to save  them. I'm also looking forward to my recrui ng process, I'm not going  to commit early I think, I'll probably be one of those guys who rides it  out  to  the  end.  A  goal  for  me  is  making  All  CIF  which  I  think  I  was  robbed of last season, obviously going to and winning the CIF and Sate  tle but we have to take it slow, we have to win play by play, game by  game." 


By: Tommy Gu errez 

It’s easy  to  think  of  a  defensive  player  as  a  hammer  when  he  nails  running backs and wide receivers on a con nuous basis.  Yet for Gran‐ ite Hills High School, David Tyler Gonzalez, he is equally the proverbi‐ al  mallet  when  he  is  on  the  offensive  side  of  the  ball.  You  see  this  class of 2018 defensive end and mul ‐posi on player will pound you  with the pigskin in his hand as well!    But the highly recruited Gonzalez is more than a hammer, to simply  state,  he  is  a  freak  of  the  gridiron.  While  most  accomplished  mul ‐ posi on players generally belong to the defensive back and wide re‐ ceiver family, who are generally smaller and skilled posi on players,  David Tyler Gonzalez breaks that category. Standing 6‐3 and weighing  in at 230‐pounds with 4.6 speed (40yd  me); this defensive lineman  slash mul ‐posi on player can out run and out finesse the best of the  best offensive mavens.  And last season, Gonzalez’s stats demonstrated his unique skill‐set as  the relentless Eagle amassed 95 tackles and 13 sacks in 12 games. Al‐ so,  with  a  combo  package  of  good  hands  and  speed,  he  added  435  yards of total offense with 5 touchdowns to a stellar 2016 season.  It is no coincidence that Gonzalez plays at a level that surpasses the  average prep athlete. Besides working out 6 days a week, it is his diet  that plays an important role in maintaining the machine. “My diet  consists of about 6k‐8k calories. The basic concept is to eat every two  hours and not get full, just fuel the body over the course of the day. I  drink a high calorie shake when I get up, then breakfast followed by a  


snack and then lunch followed by another snack, and then end my day  with my last high calorie shake,” says Gonzalez.    

With the  recent  conclusion  of  summer  football,  Gonzalez  took           advantage of the controlled freedom of the dog days of summer.  The  mul ‐posi on  monster  expanded  his  football  IQ  and  sharpened  his  tools  through  the  various  extra  curricular  ac vi es  of  the  off‐season,  which  included  the  compe ve  7on7  games,  and  various  private  and  college camps. “I learned new techniques, prac ced and learned body  control, schemes, and best of all I competed with top people from all  over,” explains Gonzalez.   

Through it all, he is not res ng on his success of the past. Gonzalez has  cleaned his slate and sees the upcoming season as possibly becoming  the pinnacle of his high school career. “My main goal this year is not to  just  compete  but  to  dominate.  I  can’t  control  who  we  play,  but  I  can  control how I win my box every down,” says Gonzalez. “With the help  of my team, I’d like to see how great we can be.”     


With the  new  season  around  corner,  2017  looks  promising  for  the  Granite  Hills  Eagles.  Returning  is  a  list  of  football  players  that  have  made  their  mark  in  San  Diego  football  last  season.  Teaming  up  with  Gonzalez  is  QB  Jacob  Siegfried  who  put  up  insane  numbers  in  2016  (1833 yds passing, 15Tds, 900 yds rushing, 12 Tds), TE William Burton,  and 2nd Team All‐CIF tackle Garre  Curran. But the savvy veteran un‐ derstands that what looks good on paper will not necessarily apply to  reality under the Friday night lights. “I believe every team wants to win  league and CIF. With our coaches and players we have the tools to do  that.  It  is  up  to  us  to  prepare  and  come  together  as  a  team,”  notes  Gonzalez. “I also believe nobody is perfect and just ask that everyone  and every player give their best, 100% effort, 100% of the  me!”      

As you can see, from his youthful days as an Alpine Mountaineer to the  compe ve grind of Granite Hills football, the sport is not just a game  for  David  Tyler  Gonzalez;  it  is  a  parable  for  life:  “I  have  played  on  teams,  where  we  went  0‐10  and  for  teams  where  we  didn’t  lose  a  game  all  year,  and  winning  the  league  championship.  Every  year  and  every  team  I  have  learned  valuable  lessons  not  just  in  football  but  in  life.” 


Division I Academic Standards Division I schools require you to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements: 1. Complete a total of 16 NCAA core courses in the following areas: 4 years of English. + 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 1 additional year of English, math or natural/physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Note: See the core-course progression requirements. 2. Complete 10 of your 16 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Students whose academic credentials are solely international (including Canada) are not required to meet the 10/7 requirement. 3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.300) on the Division I sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board. If you plan to attend a Division I school, you must complete 16 NCAA-approved core courses in eight academic semesters or four consecutive academic years from the start of ninth grade. If you graduate from high school early, you must still meet core-course requirements.

Core-Course Progression (10/7) Requirement In order to be eligible to compete during your initial year of full-time enrollment, you must complete a total of 16 core courses. Ten of the 16 core courses must be completed before the seventh semester (senior year) of high school and at least seven of these 10 core courses must be in English, math, or science. Once students begin their seventh semester, they must have more than 10 core courses completed to be able to repeat or replace any of the 10 courses used to meet the 10/7 requirement. Note: Students must also meet the Division I sliding-scale index for competition (minimum 2.300 core-course GPA). Courses Taken After High School For Division I, only courses completed in your first eight semesters will qualify as core courses for Division I. If you graduate from high school on time (in eight semesters) with your incoming ninth grade class, you may use one core course completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A college course taken after high school graduation can be used toward your initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit. An additional core-course unit taken after on-time high school graduation cannot replace a course used to meet the core-course progression (10/7) requirement, but an additional core course after on-time graduation may replace one of the remaining six core-course units necessary to meet corecourse requirements. What if I Don’t Graduate on Time? In Division I, if you do not graduate on time (in four years/ eight semesters), the NCAA Eligibility Center will still use your grades and coursework for the first four years/eight semesters in your certification. You will still need to provide proof of graduation (once you graduate) and you may not use any coursework taken after your high school graduation toward your certification.

How to plan your high school courses to meet the 16 core-course requirement:

4 x 4 = 16

4 English courses (one per year) + 4 math courses (one per year) + 4 science courses (one per year) + 4 social science (and/or additional) courses (one per year) 16 NCAA core courses GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

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Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from all high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division I school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division I school.

Early Academic Qualifier

If you meet specific criteria after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division I and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment. Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 900 OR minimum ACT sum score of 75; and a core-course GPA of 3.000 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses: 3 years of English; 2 years of math; 2 years of science; 2 additional years of English, math or natural/physical science; and 5 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment at an NCAA Division I school.

Academic Redshirt

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first regular academic term but may NOT compete during your first year of enrollment. You must pass either eight quarter or nine semester hours to practice in the next term.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of enrollment at a Division I school. What if I Don’t Meet the Division I Standards? If you have not met all the Division I academic standards, you may not compete in your first year at college. However, if you qualify as an academic redshirt, you may practice during your first term in college and receive an athletics scholarship for the entire year.

Sliding Scale for Division I Beginning Aug. 1, 2016 Core GPA

3.550 & above 3.525 3.500 3.475 3.450 3.425 3.400 3.375 3.350 3.325 3.300 3.275 3.250 3.225 3.200 3.175 3.150 3.125 3.100 3.075 3.050 3.025 3.000 2.975 2.950 2.925 2.900 2.875 2.850 2.825 2.800 2.775 2.750 2.725 2.700 2.675 2.650 2.625 2.600 2.575 2.550 2.525 2.500 2.475 2.450 2.425 2.400 2.375 2.350 2.325 2.300 2.299 2.275 2.250 2.225 2.200 2.175 2.150 2.125 2.100 2.075 2.050 2.025 2.000

SAT

400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 790 800 810 820 830 840 850 860 870 880 890 900 910 910 920 930 940 950 960 970 980 990 1000 1010 1020

ACT 37 38 39 40 41 41 42 42 43 44 44 45 46 46 47 47 48 49 49 50 50 51 52 52 53 53 54 55 56 56 57 58 59 60 61 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 86

To qualify as an academic redshirt, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following academic standards: 1. Complete 16 core courses; and 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after Aug. 1, 2016.

12

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Division II Academic Standards Division II schools require college-bound student-athletes to meet academic standards for NCAA core courses, core-course GPA and test scores. The standards are changing for students who initially enroll full time at a Division II school on or after Aug. 1, 2018. If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 To be eligible to practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate from high school and meet ALL the following requirements:

1. Complete a total 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural/ physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural/ physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

1. Complete a total of 16 core courses in the following areas: 3 years of English. + 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher). + 2 years of natural/physical science (including one year of lab science if offered). + 2 years of social science. + 3 additional years of English, math or natural or physical science. + 4 additional years of English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

2. Earn at least a 2.000 GPA in your core courses. 3. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned during or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

GUIDE FOR THE COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT-ATHLETE

2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA (minimum 2.200) on the Division II competition sliding scale.

13


Core-Course Timeline If you plan to attend a Division II school, you must complete 16 NCAA core courses after starting grade nine and before your first full-time college enrollment. Academic Certification Decisions To receive an academic certification, you must have a final official transcript with proof of graduation, official transcripts from ALL other high schools attended, test scores, no open academic tasks and be on a Division II school’s certification request list. Being placed on a school’s certification request list notifies the NCAA Eligibility Center to complete an academic evaluation for you once all of your appropriate documents have been submitted. Once a certification has been completed, you will receive one of the following decisions if you are being recruited by a Division II school.

What if I Don’t Meet the Division II Standards? If You Enroll BEFORE Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school before Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ONE of the following standards: 1. Earn a 2.000 GPA in 16 core courses; OR 2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

Early Academic Qualifier

If You Enroll AFTER Aug. 1, 2018 If you enroll full time at a Division II school after Aug. 1, 2018, and you have not met all Division II academic standards, you may not compete in your first year. However, if you meet the standards to be a partial qualifier, you may practice and receive an athletics scholarship in your first year at college. To be a partial qualifier, you must graduate high school and meet ALL the following standards:

Minimum SAT combined score (math and critical reading) of 820 OR minimum sum score of 68 on the ACT; and a core-course GPA of 2.5 or higher in a minimum of 14 core courses in the following areas:

1. Complete 16 core courses; AND 2. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA (minimum 2.000) on the Division II partial qualifier sliding scale. SAT scores earned on or after March 2016 will be evaluated based on concordance tables established by the College Board.

If you meet specific criteria below after six semesters, you may be deemed an early academic qualifier for Division II and may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship.

3 years of English; 3 years of math; 2 years of natural/physical science; and 6 additional core courses in any area. A final high school transcript is required to be submitted to the NCAA Eligibility Center after high school graduation for all early academic qualifiers.

Qualifier

You may practice, compete and receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of full-time enrollment at an NCAA Division II school.

Partial Qualifier

You may receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of enrollment and may practice during your first year of enrollment, but may NOT compete.

Nonqualifier

You will not be able to practice, receive an athletics scholarship or compete during your first year of full-time enrollment at a Division II school.

Courses Taken After High School For Division II, you may use an unlimited number of core courses completed after graduation (summer or academic year) before full-time collegiate enrollment. You may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which you graduated. College courses taken after high school graduation can be used toward your Division II initial eligibility and will be awarded .5 unit unless awarded one full unit by your home high school and must appear on your home high school transcript with grade and credit.

14

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


Grade-Point Average The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates your core-course grade-point average based on the grades you earn in NCAAapproved core courses. Only your best grades from the required number of NCAA core courses will be used. Grades from additional core courses will be used only if they improve your grade-point average. Your GPA is calculated on a 4.000 scale. Numeric grades such as 92 or 87 are changed to letter grades such as A or B. The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when calculating your GPA. Weighted honors or advanced placement courses may improve your core-course GPA, but your high school must notify the NCAA Eligibility Center that it weights grades in these classes. In pass/fail grading situations, the NCAA Eligibility Center will assign your high school’s lowest passing grade for a course in which you received a pass grade. For most high schools, the lowest passing grade is a D, so the NCAA Eligibility Center generally assigns a D as a passing grade.

Calculating Your Quality Points In order to determine your quality points earned for each course, multiply the quality points for the grade by the amount of credit earned. Examples:

• • •

An A grade (4 points) for a trimester course (0.34 units): 4 points x 0.34 units = 1.36 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a semester course (0.50 units): 4 points x 0.50 units = 2.00 total quality points. An A grade (4 points) for a full-year course (1.00 units): 4 points x 1.00 units = 4.00 quality points.

The following worksheets will help you to determine your core-course GPA.

Quality Points A = 4 points B = 3 points

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C = 2 points D = 1 point

Units of Credit

1 quarter unit = 0.25 units 1 trimester unit = 0.34 units 1 semester unit = 0.50 units 1 year = 1 unit

ELIGIBILITYCENTER.ORG


S T E E L E C A N Y O N


M I K E L O L I V E R

6'1 240 pound D end/TE Mikel Oliver never had a sense of stability un l  he started a ending Steele Canyon High in Spring Valley. In the middle  of his ninth grade year Mikel, his mother, and 2 younger siblings packed  up  and  moved  from  Minnesota  to  California  looking  for  a  be er            opportunity  in  life.  That  bold  move  now  could  possibly  present  Mikel  and his family  with the ul mate opportunity for any high school foot‐ ball player, a college scholarship. "Steele Canyon has done so much for  me  as  a  football  player  and  as  a  growing  man.  Playing  for  this  team  means  family,  it  means  loyalty,  it  means  never  qui ng  and  always  pu ng everything you got out there on the field and in the classroom."    Coming off of a disappoin ng 2016 campaign Mikel and the cougars are  looking  to  replicate  their  2015  success  where  they  made  it  to  the  D1  semi  finals.  I  asked  Mikel  how  this  off  season  has  been  different  and  what things he hopes to improve on in 2017 to make his team successful  again.  "I'm  feeling  good  got  some  new  guys,  new  coaches,  and  pre y  much the whole program is being upgraded and made 10x be er. Also  the team is looking pre y dang good, 7 on 7 has been good for us so far.  I'm  coming  off  of  an  injury  so  I  didn't  get  to  a end  many  camps,          honestly  just  wai ng  for  that  first  game. I  wanted  to  improve  my  pass  rushing  going  into  this  season  to  stack  up  some  more  sacks  and  also      improve my route running and speed to really make a impact on offense  for us."    With  the  new  coaches  and  players  coming  in  to  the  Steele  Canyon       program Mikel and his senior teammates have set high expecta ons for  the  Cougars  in  2017,  "Take  CIF  and  show  everyone  that  doubts  Steele        Canyon they are wrong. I feel like our program is slept on and is always a  underdog  against  big  compe on,  I  think  we  are  just  as  good  as            anybody in the County so this year we are going to show that."    Mikel  and  the  cougars  will  have  every  opportunity  to  put  themselves  along  with  the  elite  of  San  Diego  County  with  a  tough  schedule  that       includes  Madison,  Otay  Ranch,  Mira  Mesa  and  of  course  East  County  powerhouse  Helix.  "I'm  looking  forward  to  Helix  of  course,  Grossmont  and hopefully that CIF game in December. Also I want come out with the  W against Valhalla very very badly." 


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