Page 1

FROM MISO-ROASTED AUBERGINES TO BLACK BRUSHSTROKE CAKE, HALLOWEEN HAS NEVER BEEN DARKER!

NG W E D DI I V E E XCL U S

MARK BOUCHER’S BIG DAY will bowl you over!

O OK N E W C O OKB YOTAM OTTOLENGHI serves up the sweetest spread ever seen

s Fre sh § fa bulou ROS E

A N D LE

MON SCE

N TE D N O BA K E C H E E S E CA K E S TAC K E D W ITH S TR

AW B E R

RIES

OUR MOST FLAVOURFUL ISSUE YET!

Get your sizzle on this summer WITH AWESOME DISHES TO ENJOY ALFRESCO


45

62 COVER STORIES 56 A MATCH MADE IN HEAVEN Mark and Carmen Boucher recently tied the knot at her parents’ beautiful farm outside Jeffreys Bay 70 A FEAST FOR GOTHAM Katelyn Williams goes dark and decadent with this ravishing spread, ’cause black is back! 86 KEEPING THINGS SWEET Fresh from the oven: Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh, published by Ebury Press

FEATURES 26 THE IMMORTAL MUSHROOM The Mushroom Guru introduces: the

magical mushroom, reishi, sporting breast cancer-fighting properties 62 THE CHICKEN AND THE EGG Fair is fowl and fowl is fair: we honour the fowl with the egg this World Egg Day on Friday, 13 October 80 A GIANT SPIRIT Hospitality is served with a special touch at The Elephant Café, upstream from the Vic Falls in Livingstone 94 WHEN IN REIMS Jenny Handley sipped her way through the Champagne houses and their legacies – toasting Global Champagne Day on 20 October

REGULAR FOOD FEATURES 38 KITCHEN FILES Tips, tricks and nice-to-know info – how to cook the perfect steak 40 3 WITH 1 Learn three ways with blueberries

FACEBOOK.COM/FOODANDHOME ENTERTAININGMAGAZINESA

45 IN SEASON Guavas, red onions, rhubarb, strawberries and turnips 98 CARB CURB Sesame-crusted tofu with prawns, butternut and cashew red sauce 100 USE IT OR LOSE IT Filo pastry makes its way into three radical recipes – it’s all in the crunch! 104 THIS MONTH WE LOVE... Juniper berries

REGULARS 2 8

ED’S LETTER SURF’S UP Visit foodandhome.co.za and be treated – or don’t and feel tricked! 13 FOOD BITES News, trends, shopping, restaurants and decor 25 PETS’ POZZIE Dr Jacques Visser addresses the topic of cancer treatment for our pets

TWITTER.COM/FHEMAG


OCTOBER 2017

70

CONTENTS 10

ON THE BACK COVER ON THE COVER Rose and lemon scented no bake cheesecake stacked with strawberries RECIPE AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI ASSISTED BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE PHOTOGRAPH BY DYLAN SWART

30 DRINK UP Get the latest liquid news and views 34 PIMP YOUR Doughnuts 36 BOOKS FOR COOKS The latest on the cookbook shelves 106 TRIVIA Of health, Halloween and heavenly bubbles 107 FOODIE BLOCKWORD 108 RECIPE INDEX, STOCKISTS AND TRIVIA ANSWERS 110 SLICE OF LIFE The sister team behind the Crumbs & Cream brand shares a bite of their ultimate ice cream sandwich

GIVEAWAYS & OFFERS 7

DEAR FOOD & HOME… The writer of next month’s winning letter will walk away with a Linen Drawer voucher, worth R4 000

PINTEREST.COM/ FOODANDHOMEMAG

12 SUBSCRIBE TO F&HE AND GET 35% OFF Subscribe to your favourite foodie mag or renew your subscription now and receive 35% off our cover price 15 THE ART OF PASTRY The esteemed Chefs Training & Innovation Academy is offering five readers a masterclass voucher in pâtisserie, worth R2 500 32 WIN WITH CREATION You could be the winner of the Art of Creation premium pinot noir and chardonnay in a luxurious case, valued at R1 750 36 WHAT ARE YOU READING? Five lucky readers will each win a copy of Breaking Breads – a New World of Israeli Baking by Uri Scheft (Artisan), worth R558 44 WIN A SAFARI Win a two night stay for two people, sharing, at a Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge, valued at R30 000!

INSTAGRAM.COM/ FOODANDHOMESA

86 COOKBOOK OF THE MONTH Three readers will each win a copy of Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh (Ebury Press), worth R520 107 FILL IN OUR FOODIE BLOCKWORD... and stand a chance to walk away with a copy of The Naturalista – Nourishing Recipes to Live Well by Xochi Balfour (Headline), valued at R524

BACK COVER CLOVER WAY BETTER WORLD'S SUMMER LOVIN' FEAST Celebrate the return of the warmer weather by whipping up a niçoise salad using Clover’s Cream O’Naise and delectable grilled pineapple skewers with Krush tropical granita


ed's letter

Health, hope Ġ����Ġē����Ė� shroom

both chicken and egg (page 62) – and Global Champagne Day on 20 October... I confess to bubbling with envy when one of our favourite freelance writers, Jenny Handley, told me she was off to the seat of where bubbles first rose in Reims, France (page 94). Speaking of clinking glasses, we are thrilled to be featuring the wedding of former SA wicketkeeper, Mark Boucher, and his exquisite new wife, Carmen, at her parents’ farmstead in the Eastern Cape (page 56) – it was an unforgettable event and I hope to soon return to this part of our beautiful country to soak up more of the grace, warmth and generous hospitality that was shown to me. Here’s to health, hope and happiness!

My find of the month A universal symbol of hope, I can never have enough candles in my home! And with its wonderful fragrance combinations of Wild Litchi & Aloe, Exotic Amber & Lime, Pomelo & Ginger, and Desert Rose & Orange Blossom, the new SoyLites Urbanesque Gift Candle range is my latest obsession. In glass containers that have a dappled diamond shape on the inside – which casts utterly romantic patterns of light and shadow when burning – the candles (260ml each) have an impressive 60 to 70-hour burn time and come with bamboo wooden lids to protect the candles from dust when not burning. Available for a recommended retail price of R380 each, visit soylites.co.za to purchase online or to locate your nearest stockist.


INTRODUCING DULUX

COLOUR OF THE YEAR 2018

PICTURED ROCKS ALSO KNOWN AS NORDIC SAILS 2

Colour of the Year 2018 Pictured Rocks Nordic Sails 2

Manor House

Wet Granite

Steel Symphony 2

Blush Noisette 5

Transform your home with Dulux Colour of the Year Pictured Rocks. This sophisticated warm yet versatile colour is also available in Luxurious Silk. From South Africa’s icon and most loved paint brand. * The new Dulux Colour FuturesTM trends brochure is available in-store from October 2017. .

For product information or painting advice please contact Dulux Careline on 0860 330 111 or visit our website at www.dulux.co.za www.facebook.com/LetsColourSA

@DuluxSA

www.pinterest.com/duluxza

*Voted Icon Brand and Paint Category winner in the 2017/2018 Ask Afrika Icon Brands™ by TGI.

Colour reference is as accurate as the printing process allows. Please reference the Dulux colour charts for accurate representation of colours.

See how our trend colours for 2018 will look in your home with the Dulux Visualizer App.


Our contributors EDITOR

 andreaph@caxton.co.za

Cape Town-based recipe developer, food stylist and photographer, Illanique compiles our regular feature, “In seasonâ€?, along with photographer, Adel Ferreira. “After completing an intensive three-year chef and pâtisserie course at the acclaimed Institute of Culinary Arts (ICA), I ventured into the world of food media and have been in the industry for 10 years. I’m passionate about design and teaching, so lecturing Media Communications at ICA in Stellenbosch brings me great joy.â€? You have to try the rosy yoghurt panna cotta with ��������������������������������������������������� colour and tartness that is unique to fresh rhubarb. It’s a beautiful dessert for alfresco entertaining.

‚ ‚†… Helen has worked alongside Yotam Ottolenghi as a lead product developer for the past 10 years. The pair put together the much anticipated cookbook, Sweet. “I draw widely on Asian, Western and Middle Eastern inuences in my cooking – and on my love of sweets.â€? The recipes selected from Sweet����������� are all close to my heart for different reasons. I’ve been making the take-home chocolate cake �������������������������������������������������� my cafĂŠ in Melbourne (Mortar & Pestle) and was featured in the national weekend paper with the title: “World’s Best Chocolate Cakeâ€?. I still get letters from people saying it’s their family favourite!

€Â?‚ ƒ€„ Â… As a lifestyle photographer and owner of Catharine Swayde Photography & Design, Carien traded the hustle and bustle of Joburg city life for the charming little surďŹ ng town of Jeffreys Bay. “Here, I have learned to ďŹ nd beauty in life’s simple things, like a perfect, sunny day and spending time with my family. I’m besotted with natural light, and love doing styled shoots with an authentic and organic feel.â€? I was absolutely overwhelmed with all of the tasteful (and tasty) elements at the Bouchers’ ���������������������������������������������� over – the more I explored with my camera, the more detail I discovered. It was an absolute honour to have captured a part of this breathtaking day on film!

�������������������

MANAGING EDITOR

 hasmita@caxton.co.za COPY EDITOR

  anzelleh@caxton.co.za ART DIRECTOR

   samanthal@caxton.co.za

DESIGNER

 danielahj@caxton.co.za

FOOD EDITOR

clairef@caxton.co.za COOKING ASSISTANT

  nomvuselelom@caxton.co.za DIGITAL EDITOR

���  imka@caxton.co.za MARKETING COORDINATOR

� nicolek@caxton.co.za 011-889-0613 OFFICE MANAGER

­ foodhome@caxton.co.za 011-293-6047 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jane Griffiths, Kamanee Govender, Jenny Handley, Malu Lambert, Kim Maxwell, Anna Trapido, Lisa van der Knaap, Jacques Visser CONTRIBUTING FOOD DEVELOPERS AND STYLISTS Helen Goh, Yotam Ottolenghi, Illanique van Aswegen, Katelyn Williams CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Paul Bussell, Amalia Dos Ramos, Myburgh du Plessis, Sean Edington, Adel Ferreira, Anthony Grote, Jenny Handley, Shanna Jones Photography, Leigh Kotze, Terry McCormick, Peden + Munk, Matthew Samuels, Craig Scott, Loraine Steyn, Dylan Swart, Catharine Swayde Photography & Design, Rachel Tembo, Katelyn Williams CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Sarah-Jane Williams CONTRIBUTING DIETICIAN Maryke Gallagher SUBSCRIPTIONS subs@magsathome.co.za �������������� COMMERCIAL MANAGERS CAPE TOWN AND JOHANNESBURG Rickardt de Beer ����������������������� DURBAN Eugene Marais ������������������������������������ BOOKINGS AND MATERIAL ������������������������������ Advertising Johannesburg ������������ Advertising Cape Town ������������ Advertising KwaZulu-Natal ������������ GENERAL MANAGER Anton Botes GROUP HEAD OF INSIGHTS Debbie McIntyre GROUP HEAD OF RETAIL MARKETING INNOVATION Dejané Poil GROUP HEAD OF DIGITAL Jana Kleinloog FINANCIAL MANAGER Rohan French MARKETING MANAGER Reinhard Lotz PRODUCTION MANAGER Sada Reddhi GENERAL MANAGER FINANCE AND SYSTEMS �������������������������������������������� PRINTING CTP Printers Cape Town DISTRIBUTION �������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������� ���������������������Email rna@RNAD.co.za REPRODUCTION ��������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� PUBLISHER AND PROPRIETOR CTP Limited CONTACT US ����������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������ ����������������������� ��������������������������������� visit foodandhome.co.za

���

������������

Helen Goh’s profile photograph by Peden + Munk

� �‡ˆ‚‰ �‚†‚


y t i v i t a C re ON A PLATE

WINNING LETTER

F&HE is more than just inspiration for me; the magazine opens so many opportunities, especially since I’m employed in the restaurant industry as a chef. To my delight, I picked up the June 2017 issue, opened it on page 40, to be exact, and was instantly inspired! The beer, orange and spice caramel sauce recipe in the “Pimp your caramel” feature had me in the kitchen in no time. I used Citizen Alliance Amber Weiss beer instead of lager, as I felt it has a rather fruity, caramel flavour. The result was... out of this world! (It pairs incredibly well with doughnut puffs, as if it is the dessert of gods!) Then there’s the Parmesan and thyme crème brûlée from “3 with 1”, using Parmesan as a hero ingredient (page 49)... again, I put a slight twist on this recipe. I smoked the Parmesan with hardwood, as it gives off a strong smoky flavour. Needless to say, this turned out extremely well. And then, lastly, there is the “Carb curb” dish: a beef, whisky and cheese mushroom burger (page 108). This burger is the ultimate of all burgers! I used 200g rump steak, which I grilled on the braai, then cut it up and served in slices, instead of a patty. I brushed the rump with Dewar’s Blended Scotch Whisky and the result was delectable, to say the least! As I said, F&HE is more than just my muse – every edition gets my creative juices flowing and I have achieved so much because of these published recipes. Thank you to everyone at F&HE. You are all amazing! Kyle Bryan Reeler, Bryanston

WE ASKED: BREAKFAST IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL

20%

28% SCRAMBLED

27% FRIED SUNNY SIDE UP

25% POACHED

6

OCTOBER 2017

GET F&HE ONLINE NOW AND SAVE UP TO 40%! TO DOWNLOAD THE LATEST ISSUE OF F&HE TO YOUR TABLET OR PC, VISIT FOODANDHOME.CO.ZA/ SUBSCRIBE AND SUBSCRIBE TO 12 ISSUES FOR R259,20 – JUST R21,60 AN ISSUE. WHAT A BARGAIN! our ne w e to ib

Remember to sign up for our newsletter at foodandhome.co.za. Packed with juicy news from our latest issue and divine giveaway goodies, it’s the perfect pick-me-up!

s

tf ter a oodan let

For some seriously delish egg-cracking dish ideas, turn to page 62.

ONLINE NOW!

Subs cr

LIKE US, IN A CAKE!

ome.co.za dh

OF THE DAY! HOW DO YOU LIKE YOUR EGGS?


letters & online

WIN!

NEXT MONTH’S WINNING LETTER WILL RECEIVE A LINEN DRAWER VOUCHER, WORTH R4 000 Linen Drawer produces top quality, 100% cotton percale and pure linen for your bed. They also supply accessories like throws, bathrobes, towels, duvets, pillows and bed wraps. Their bed linen has hypoallergenic properties, which is great for your family’s health. It’s made by expert sewists in Paarl, Cape Town, using the finest natural fabrics. Order your Linen Drawer products online and receive free delivery in SA. For more info on Linen Drawer, call 021-872-0108 or visit linendrawer.co.za.

WONDER

women!

Compiled by Hasmita Amtha and Imka Webb. F&HE digital subscription pricing correct at time of going to print

FOLLOW THESE FOOD ARTISTS AND FELLOW FOODIES

@missladybirdcakes

Calling all of our cake-loving readers! If you’re not following Melbourneborn Gina Tubb yet, then you best get clicking. Filled with stunning cakes that have been carefully crafted and beautifully decorated, we cannot help but get carried away when scrolling through this treasure trove of mouthwatering deliciousness.

@nikkialbertyn

Drop everything right this instant and follow Nikki Albertyn! Co-owner of the Lionheart Pâtisserie Studio (with Karmen de Reuck) in Woodstock, Cape Town, Nikki’s infatuation with pâtisserie and beautiful photography will leave you craving more. If sweet treats are your thing, you’ll fall in love with the sheer artistry of these sugary masterpieces!

@SAFoodGuru

We adore local foodie Horak Corver’s Instagram feed. This self-proclaimed “hungry guy” takes his followers on culinary adventures throughout SA and around the globe. If you need to know what to eat and where to dine, then give this account a follow to keep up, because in Horak’s own words, he’s “always eating something”!

@foodandhomesa Are you following us on Instagram? If not, you should be! Follow us as we share exclusive behind-the-scenes content and the latest news on what’s happening on our local food, home and entertaining fronts!


Surf’s

up! Trick or o’self y t a e tr

This month, we have gobsmackingly great giveaways up for grabs on foodandhome.co.za. We’re giving you the chance to win one of three copies of 5 Ingredients: Quick & Easy Food by Jamie Oliver, valued at R430 each, or one of two copies of Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh’s Sweet, worth R520 each (get a sneak peek of this delectable cookbook on page 86). You could walk away with an awesome hamper too: one of two Exclusive Books cookbook “lucky packets” (valued at R1 250 each) or innovative top brand kitchenware from Edison Stone OXO, worth R2 500! We’re also giving away three Plush hampers, filled with household cleaning items, including their brand-new all purpose cream (each Plush prize is valued at R1 500). For these delightful surprises and so much more, visit our website during October. You really don’t want to miss out! EAT, DRINK AND BE SCARY You’re in for a scream on 31 October! We’re creeping it real with Halloween favourites – a spooktacular feast and a boo-tifully wicked cake awaits. Oh, do come in, dear reader... if you dare! DON’T FORGET! Follow us on Facebook (FoodandHomeEntertainingSA), Instagram (@foodandhomesa) and Twitter (@FHEMag) to be the first to know about exclusive recipes and online competitions.

complimentary newsletter AND BE A PART OF THE EXTENDED F&HE FOODIE FAMILY Scan this QR code or visit foodandhome.co.za to get started.

ME

HO ND DA SA O O E M/F ZIN .CO MAGA K O G EBO ININ / FAC ERTA OM T EN M.C MESA A R TAG DHO G MA INS DAN HE O F / O F M .CO TER T I M/ G TW .CO EMA T S M E O TER DH PIN DAN O FO


COVER RECIPE

rose and lemon scented no bake cheesecake STACKED with strawberries A super-simple cheesecake that tastes just like summer. If you wanted to get ahead, the base freezes well in the tin Serves 10 EASY 45 mins + 2 hrs, to set THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS BISCUIT BASE 1 x 200g box plain digestive biscuits 1 x 200g packet Bakers Tennis biscuits 200g butter, melted

4

Remove the biscuit base from the fridge and gently remove from the tin (you may have to wait for the base to reach room temperature, to allow for easy removal, about 15 minutes). Place the base on a cake stand or serving plate, then spoon the filling into the base. Cover with cling film and chill in the fridge, at least 1 hr 30 minutes. Remove from fridge, 15 minutes before serving to take the chill off. Pile with strawberries, fresh mint leaves and sprigs, and slice to serve.

FILLING 2 x 250g tubs cream cheese, at room temperature 260g double cream yoghurt zest of 2 lemons 10ml (2 tsp) rose water 230g icing sugar, sifted 250ml (1 cup) thick/ double thick cream strawberries, some whole and others halved fresh mint leaves and sprigs, to serve HOW TO DO IT Grease a deep, loose-bottomed, fluted tart tin (21,5cm in diameter and 6cm deep) with non-stick cooking spray. For the base, put both types of biscuits into a blender and blitz to a fine crumb. Stir in the melted butter until well combined. Firmly press the biscuit mixture into the base and up the sides of the tart tin, using your fingertips. Place the tin in the fridge to chill, at least 45 minutes. While the biscuit base chills, make the filling by placing the roomtemperature cream cheese into the bowl of an electric stand mixer (or a large bowl if using a hand-held electric mixer). Beat briefly until smooth, scraping down the sides of the bowl with a spatula, so that all of the cream cheese becomes smooth. Add the double cream yoghurt, lemon zest, rose water and sifted icing sugar, and beat until smooth and well combined. Add the thick/double thick cream and beat until just incorporated, about 30 seconds – 1 minute (take care to not beat the mixture any longer than this, as the cream could split).

1 2

3

Strawberries that in gardens grow 

BUT SWEETER FAR AS WISE MEN KNOW ��������ƒ�����Ś��������� ROBERT GRAVES

10

OCTOBER 2017


Y N O MV U S

EL E LO

AN

REC IPE

B TED

ART SW

AN D

SIS AS M

RA N

DI

NC

UB

E PH OTOGRAP

HB YD

S

Y CLAIRE FER B ING

L TY

YL


SUBSCRIPTION

�Ġď�����Ġď���Ē������ AND GET 35% OFF OUR NORMAL COVER PRICE

„Š„€‰–

GUARANTEED HAND DELIVERY of subscription copies to select suburbs in South Africa only AT NO EXTRA COST! Š        —† ““  ‘ ††    ““  –

ƒ­  

ome.co.za. Su ath b gs

, renew, upd ribe at sc

er details at m rib a sc



A 12-month subscription for just R280,80 (You save R151,20!)

ange your s ub r ch eo

SUBSCRIBING IS EASY    

 

           ­ €‚ƒ„€‚…† ƒ‡ ­ ˆ  ‰ Š‹ ­ ­    Œ     Ž‘‘‚’ Ž€ 

 “ ƒ  ’ Ž ‘‚ƒ     

      ƒ ­­ † 

    

   ““† ”•Š„Œ …‘ ‡““  –ˆ  „ — “ ”      

 ­   ‡˜ˆ™™‚  ƒ † ­

  —  Š  — ™­

 ­      

 ­  ­    Š  —   ‘„   ”

   —    Food & Home Entertaining   š­ ­    †   


 

Trending: Poke cake RECIPE AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI PHOTOGRAPH BY DYLAN SWART


Poke cake

TRENDING

Caramel, peanut butter and chocolate poke cake What started out as a trend in 1970s American suburbia – then a boxed vanilla cake mix made as a tray bake, poked with holes and the holes filled with jello (or jelly here in SA), the jelly set, the top of the creation then spread with whipped cream and sliced into neat squares to serve. As we know, any good trend of yesteryear is bound to make a vintage revival – and, in this case, there’s good reason for our Pinterest feeds to be filled with poke cakes of all descriptions! Poking your cake (or brownies in this case) allows for extra deliciousness as the topping seeps into even more spaces and creates a “filling” for simple tray bakes Makes 25 – 30 EASY 1 hr 15 mins + 30 mins, to firm up THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 1 box chocolate brownie mix + any required ingredients, as per packaging instructions 1 x 360g tin Nestlé Caramel Treat 200g smooth peanut butter 10ml (2 tsp) vanilla essence 1,25ml (¼ tsp) salt 60ml (4 tbsp) fresh cream/milk

2 x 40g bars Cadbury Crunchie, roughly chopped HOW TO DO IT Preheat the oven according to the brownie mix’s packaging instructions. Grease and line a 25cmsquare brownie tin. Prepare the brownie mixture according to packaging instructions, transfer to the prepared tin and bake for the required time. While the brownie cake is baking, place the Nestlé Caramel Treat and peanut butter in a large bowl, and stir until the mixture is smooth and free of lumps. Add the vanilla essence, salt and fresh cream/milk, and stir until smooth and well combined. While the brownie cake is still hot, poke deep holes in the brownie using the handle end of a wooden spoon (poke them at about 2cm intervals). Allow the brownie cake to cool down completely before removing it from the tin in one, large square. Spread the caramel-peanut butter mixture over the brownies, working the caramel into the holes with a palette knife. Sprinkle with the chopped Cadbury Crunchies and place in the fridge to firm up, 30 minutes. Remove from fridge, cut into 4 – 5cm squares and serve.

1

2

3

4

30 SEPT – 1 OCT

22 OCT

25 – 29 OCT

The Say Cheese! Artisanal Cheese Fair will be bringing together cheesemakers and cheese lovers, bakers and brewers to the Italian Club in Milnerton, Cape Town. A lively weekend line-up will see leading cheese experts, chefs and winemakers in attendance – conducting cheesemaking demonstrations, tastings and pairings. “Whether you love chèvre or Cheddar, mozzarella or Maasdam, pecorino or provolone, you’ll get to appreciate some of the finest, limited production, artisan cheeses in an intimate environment,” highlights fellow organiser, Kiki Ciman-Frauenknecht. Tickets will be available at the door: R90 for adults; R55 for pensioners and scholars aged 12 – 18; children under 12 enter free. Email saycheesefair@gmail.com for more info.

Join hands and crusade against breast cancer with Avon Justine, as they work to save more lives through breast cancer education at the 12th annual Avon Justine iThemba Walkathon, taking place at Marks Park Sports Club in Joburg. One of the largest breast cancer awareness walks (5km or 8km) with over 29 000 participants, the iThemba Walkathon presents the whole family with the opportunity to #WalkForAPurpose, enjoy an afternoon of memorable live performances, great food and heaps of entertainment for the kiddies too! Ticket prices are: R135 for adults; R90 for children between the ages of two and 12 (little ones under two years enter for free); four-legged friends walk for free. Visit ithembawalkathon.co.za to register online.

Christmas gift shopping is made that much easier by simply visiting the annual Festive Ideas Market, taking place at the Simondium’s Country Lodge – turned into a magical wonderland. Aptly themed “Wish List”, the market is the perfect place to browse and relax, with not only gifts, but also decor inspiration for your festive table, a little pampering for yourself or friends, or even something to add a celebratory touch to your wardrobe. And if you need to stock up your pantry, the deli will be overflowing with delectable home-made treats and seasonal produce. With live music, decorated stands, and a lush tea garden and wine bar, this should definitely be in your calendar this year! Entrance is R30 for adults, while youth under the age of 18 enter for free. festiveideas.co.za

14

OCTOBER 2017


news | trends | shopping

Home cooking , refined

5 ����� PURE

Compiled by Hasmita Amtha. Photographs supplied. Prices are correct at the time of print and are subject to change without prior notice

DINNER IN

Find this delicious Moroccan chicken recipe on page 53.

“Quick and easy” is the order of the day for whipping up a midweek meal. Knorr inspires you to keep it real, with the new Knorr Naturally Tasty range. This latest Knorr product line contains sustainably farmed natural ingredients that undergo traditional drying processes to lock in authentic flavours. Knorr Naturally Tasty is available at Pick n Pay stores at a recommended retail price of R18,99 per sachet. For more information, visit whatsfordinner.co.za.

WIN!

Start or end your day on a decadent note with a delicious spoonful (or more) of Clover’s Bliss Double Cream Yoghurt. Available in a delectable range of dessert flavours – from Strawberries & Cream to Black Forest, Choc Chip and Hazelnut – Bliss is Clover’s creamiest yoghurt, and holds all the nutritional goodness and benefits you’d expect from a yoghurt, in a more luscious form. Offered in three tub sizes to suit your and your family’s needs, you can pick up Bliss at your favourite supermarket for a recommended retail price of R8,99 for 175g, R19,99 for 500g and R32,99 for 1kg. For more information on Clover Bliss products, visit clover.co.za.

�������� �����������������

WITH CTIA

FIVE READERS WILL EACH WIN A PÂTISSERIE MASTERCLASS VOUCHER, VALUED AT R2 500! Picture a gracefully tiered cake, the layered confection elegantly rounded off with just the right amount of icing that has trickled, intentionally and artfully, from the topmost layer down the sides – a culinary masterpiece that’s beautiful to behold. Think of a biscuit perfectly balanced in sweetness and crunch; buttery shortbread that melts in the mouth; biscotti so light and crisp, it’s almost a shame to dip it in tea. Participants will learn the nuances of trendy techniques like drip- and mirror glaze icing, and bake and ice the increasingly popular and always striking “naked” cake. For more information on CTIA, contact a campus near you on their national number, 087 941 CHEF (2433), or visit ctia.co.za.

THE PRIZE The esteemed Chefs Training & Innovation Academy (CTIA) is giving away five vouchers to five lucky readers (valued at R2 500 each) to attend a four-part series pâtisserie masterclass. The vouchers include all material and ingredients that will be utilised, as well as a certificate upon completion of the masterclass. TO ENTER SMS PATISSERIE followed by your full name, ID number and postal address to 48405. Each SMS costs R1,50; free SMSs do not apply. Competition closes on 31 October 2017. The prize cannot be transferred to cash and is not exchangeable. Transport and taxes are not included. Visit foodandhome.co.za for the full Terms and Conditions.


Loraine S teyn chocolate and wine lover, Loraine Steyn knows it’s all about a healthy equilibrium: Eat. Nourish. Repeat. I started my blog as a creative outlet to express my passion for food, fitness and overall health. My friends would often tell me: “You should start a blog!”, because I would spend more time in the kitchen than anywhere else. I studied molecular biology... I think I saw the kitchen more than I saw the inside of the labs or lecture halls! My food philosophy is all about balance: nourishing your body with healthy, wholesome food and regular exercise, while still enjoying the little pleasures in life – in moderation. I love drinking wine and eating chocolate, pizza and burgers – so I allow myself those naughty little nice-to-haves from time to time. However, this hasn’t always been my philosophy. I have a slow metabolism and an endomorph body type [soft body build with a high proportion of fat tissue] – so I’ve struggled with body image issues, countless diets etc. Today, I eat healthily, listen to my body and exercise routinely, because those are the things that make me feel good – not because I’m driven by 16

OCTOBER 2017

an obscure picture of what I want to look like – and I know my body will reward me for that. Balance has been the key to destroying an unhealthy relationship with food. Don’t allow food to have too much power over you. In essence, having a good body image is 100% a mental game. It’s a mind shift from focusing on how you look to how you feel (getting into shape is a welcome side effect). The more you restrict yourself and focus on the treats you can’t have, the more you obsess and are unhappy in your own skin. Food makes me happy! I appreciate the art of preparing a visually stimulating meal, the pleasure of tasting delicious food, and the energy and nourishment that await on a healthy plate. But above all, I find joy in how food brings people together! Cliché or not, so many memorable moments and special occasions are enjoyed around a table filled with fare. In my opinion, the secret ingredient should always be cheese! I struggle to make a dish that doesn’t contain some form of cheese.

I love cooking for my mom the most. She always compliments my food and eats it with sincere enthusiasm (even when it’s a flop). Seeing my blog grow is incredibly motivating. Noting increased traffic on my site and receiving positive feedback from my readers – those are the motivators that keep me going! I’m always on the lookout for something different. I’ll find inspiration and then change it to suit my needs. The sweet potato flatbreads [see above] were inspired by sweet potato “toast”. I preferred a more caramelised and creamy texture than almost crunchy, more chewy toast. I also wanted to create a variety of exciting toppings, different to what I had seen on the web. And I enjoyed making them look really tasty. Eat with your eyes first! LORAINESTEYN.COM

Compiled by Imka Webb. Photographs by Amalia Dos Ramos; Leigh Kotze; Loraine Steyn and Matthew Samuels

BLOGGER OF THE MONTH

FOR THIS SWEET POTATO FLATBREADS RECIPE, VISIT LORAINESTEYN.COM/ 2017/06/5-AMAZINGWAYS-MAKE-SWEETPOTATO-FLATBREADS/


EAT OUT@ CAPE TOWN

LA BELLE BISTRO & BAKERY It’s a suburban favourite for friends lunching on crispy calamari or quiche and salad, or aunties taking their teenage nieces for a sweet treat. La Belle is not new, but remains popular for morning or afternoon tea on the terrace under vintage oaks. Pastry chef Ludwig Peters van Tonder previously worked at Delaire Graff in Stellenbosch. He oversees pastries and cakes baked at The Alphen Boutique Hotel. “We do high teas for big groups, on request. Otherwise, it’s whatever is fresh, seasonal and on display: morning or afternoon,” he says. During one Sunday at teatime, a chocolate torte slice scored high with our six-year-old: intense, moist and dense, with a crackly top like a brownie. Lush and eye-catching, the salted caramel tartlet oozed richness through its double caramel layers. Toppings may change, but baked New York cheesecake never goes off this menu: there is a regular- or gluten free option. Berry frangipane tart was my choice for natural fruit sweetness that isn’t cloying, with chewiness from its almond butter filling on a pastry base. You might also find Greek shortbread and lemon meringue-topped cupcakes with tangy curd centres. The perfect pairing? Flutes with bubbles... The Alphen, Alphen Drive, Constantia; 021-795-6336. By Kim Maxwell

PR ETOR I A

INDUSTRIAL COFFEE WORKS Situated in the relatively new Centurion Square building, a towering construction of contemporary design, Industrial Coffee Works is a welcome addition of trendiness and modernity. Feast your eyes on upcycled decor pieces, industrial design and a sense of spaciousness, as your nose is hit by the scintillating aroma of their specially blended Outlaw coffee. They offer breakfast, lunch and dinner until late. I can’t imagine a better spot for sundowners in Centurion, watching the lazy traffic crawl by, as you sip on some interesting shots or simply a cuppa. The burger offerings are intriguing and mouth-watering. I chose the Wonder Lust Burger – a bulging mushroom patty stuffed with red onion and broccoli, with pickled beetroot, and a meltingly good serving of mozzarella and cashew mayo dripping down the sides. My partner tried a Dark Night Burger with feta, beetroot and red onion purée, coffee-balsamic reduction, a handmade beef patty and deep-fried bacon. He didn’t speak for many minutes. Other choices include Banting salads and moreish gourmet sandwiches. It definitely gets my thumbs up as the perfect, vibey getaway from the office (or the kids). Corner Hendrik Verwoerd Drive and Heuwel Road; 071 678 8399. By Kamanee Govender

JOB U R G

NAKED KITCHEN & COFFEE BAR Greeted by the neon sign: “You’re my favourite addiction”, I, who crave my caffeine kick, feel right at home. By Shaun Els and Victor Barbosa – who established Naked Coffee in Melrose Arch – the duo brings to Morningside a trendy coffee spot that was designed by Tristan du Plessis of Studio A. Taking their trade seriously, Naked offers an extensive coffee menu with everything from espresso frappés to flavoured lattes that include roast hazelnut and chai. When it comes to their meal offering, this eatery provides a quick and easy deli section (ideal for lunch) with an array of salads, starches and proteins, along with sides, pickles and sauces to choose from; while their standard all-day breakfast menu, which is displayed on the walls, comprises everything from slow-cooked rolled oats to eggs Florentine. My companion heads for the deli and selects slow-cooked meatballs, savoury rice and a vegetable curry. I decide to go à la carte and choose the baked eggs, aubergine chermoula and chevin shakshuka, served with a slice of kitka... absolutely delish! And then there were bakes... we were tempted into sharing a citrus-infused custard cruffin, fresh from the oven – and I’m so glad to have caved! Morningside Shopping Centre, Rivonia Road, Sandton; 011-883-0291. By Hasmita Amtha foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

17


MARKET of the MONTH gs with r Knaap, loves thin de n va sa Li , er it Freelance wr flavour and is constantly on the lookout for new

Field Market

t... and plates to try ou to go to es ac pl , ts eating hotspo

indecisive), paired with a beer on tap: The Brew Bus and Bullcook Brewing Company Rolling BeerBikes do notable craft options. Whatever you do, make sure you try the glazed pork belly skewer (atop Asian slaw) from Good Thyme. How would I describe it? Sublime, tender, delicious and magnificently moreish! But their braaied lamb flatbread also looked mouth-watering. If strolling leaves you ravenous, a burger from Chrystal’s Mobi Gourmet is just the thing! Go classic or opt for something more decadent, like smoked mozzarella and bacon; Camembert and cranberry; or blue cheese and avo. If you prefer to eat now Bring the whole family (pooches too) for a fun day in and take home for later, Roland’s (showcasing and celebrating the sun. From the moment you walk in, you know it’s all things German) is a must. The brätwurst is packed with a market you’re going to love. There’s a jungle gym, herbs, which makes it fresh, light and seriously toothsome. plus horse rides to keep little ones entertained – there’s even Plus, the meat used in the deli items giant communal Jenga for anyone who – pâtĂŠs, bacon, eisbein and more – wants to try their hand at it. “Bring the whole family (pooches too) is authentically cured and properly With your cup of coffee − or freshly for a fun day in the sun. From smoked, as per traditional methods. squeezed juice − in hand, as you start For dessert, you cannot go wrong to make your way through the market (it the moment you walk in, you know with something from Pink & Cinnamon basically follows one big loop), you are it’s a market you’re going to love.â€? Cakery – carrot cake, brownies or their met with everything from handmade, oversized white chocolate and oat slightly quirky mugs and cards from cookies (which made an easy on-the-go choice, as we were on Paper Ponies Boutique to an array of jewellery, baby clothes, our way out, although you will be hard-pressed to leave with just fresh flowers, gorgeous handcrafted gifts and more. one thing). The Field Market treats your taste buds to a global On the food front, home-made rusks and biscotti at The Fat adventure with Portuguese fare, Serbian street food, vegan Rabbit is compulsory and, seeing that there’s just too much to loaded nachos... there’s even a bacon doughnut for the Banters choose from, my companion and I decided to share our way among us! Whatever tickles your fancy, supporting local with through the offerings. We started off with a few tasty morsels wordly flavour has never tasted this good. from Jozi Dim Sum (one of each, as we were clearly feeling a little

Market on every second Saturday of the month, 10am – 3pm; free entry.         18

OCTOBER 2017

Photographs supplied

he Field Market in Parkmore, Sandton, is centrally located and easy to reach, with a little bit of everything, for everyone – plus, the excess space makes it “pleasantly busy�, without ever feeling manic in an overcrowded room. There are tables scattered around, as well as live music, which all add to the vibey atmosphere.


LOW IN GI, HIGH IN FIBRE, LENTILS ARE A CLEVER CARB CHOICE FOR ALL OF US. WE’VE PULLED TOGETHER THREE QUICK AND EASY MIDWEEK MEALS WITH THIS GOOD-FOR-YOU INGREDIENT RECIPES BY CLAIRE FERRANDI ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH-JANE WILLIAMS

Lentil and sun-dried tomato hummus Tomato-braised lentils with greens Serves 2 EASY 40 mins Heat 100g butter in a medium pot over medium heat, and fry 1 peeled and diced onion until soft and translucent, about 10 minutes. Add 2 peeled and minced garlic cloves, 15ml (1 tbsp) cumin seeds, 5ml (1 tsp) coriander seeds, and 1 peeled and chopped red chilli, and fry over low heat, 2 minutes. Add 3 diced tomatoes, 5ml (1 tsp) dried oregano and 10ml (2 tsp) smoked paprika. Simmer over low heat, 20 minutes, before adding 2 x 400g tins drained lentils and a splash fresh cream. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve topped with steamed greens of your choice.

Serves 4 EASY 15 mins Place 1 x 400g tin drained lentils, 30ml (2 tbsp) tahini, the juice of 1 lemon, 5 marinated sun-dried tomatoes, 60ml (4 tbsp) marinade of the sun-dried tomatoes, 10ml (2 tsp) ground cumin, 5ml (1 tsp) ground coriander and 1 peeled and minced garlic clove in a blender. Blitz to a smooth purée, adding a little more sun-dried tomato marinade or warm water to thin down, if needed. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, and serve drizzled with a little olive oil.

Lentil dhal Serves 4 EASY 40 mins Heat a drizzle olive oil over medium heat, and fry 1 peeled and diced onion until soft and translucent, about 10 minutes. Add 2 peeled and minced garlic cloves, 15ml (1 tbsp) ground cumin, 10ml (2 tsp) ground coriander, 10ml (2 tsp) grated fresh ginger, 10ml (2 tsp) dried turmeric and 5ml (1 tsp) chilli flakes, and fry over low heat, 2 minutes. Add 3 x 400g tins drained lentils and 150ml coconut milk. Simmer over medium-low heat, 10 minutes, before seasoning with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Add a squeeze lemon juice and a large handful coriander leaves. Serve with dollops plain yoghurt, if desired.


news | trends | shopping OH, SUGAR SUGAR Medium storage jar (with wooden lid) in Sugar Pink, R590. lecreuset.co.za

THINK

pink

DESIGNER CURVES Visu Wood Base Chair by Muuto, R7 800 (incl. VAT). cremadesign.co.za

CRUSHING ON MILLENNIAL PINK, WE’VE ROUNDED UP SOME OH-SO-PRETTY PIECES TO REFRESH YOUR HOME THIS SUMMER... COMPILED BY HASMITA AMTHA

LUST & LIGHT Lolita Table Lamp by Moooi and Nika Zupanc, R21 742. edgeinteriors.co.za

BOLD + BLUSH Large textured vase in pink and gold, R349. hm.com/za

A SCANDI-LOUS AFFAIR Flynn two-seater sofa in Sunday Dusty Rose with smoked oak legs, R11 299. sofacompany.com 20

OCTOBER 2017

LOVE ME LOCAL Geometric cushion cover, from R450. esque.co.za

Photographs supplied. Prices are correct at the time of print and are subject to change without prior notice

THE FINISHING TOUCH Nakoda rug by Sixth Floor, R999 for 230cm x 160cm. superbalist.com


PLANTING PLANNER

Of bean stalks and brinjals THE STALWARTS OF THE SUMMER GARDEN – BRINJALS (AKA EGGPLANTS OR AUBERGINES) AND BEANS – ARE TWO SURE-FIRE ABUNDANT PROVIDERS BY JANE GRIFFITHS ILLUSTRATIONS BY SARAH-JANE WILLIAMS

BRINJALs

From Jane’s Delicious A – Z of Vegetables (Jane Griffiths)

Beans Both runner (aka pole-) beans and French (aka dwarf- or bush-) beans are easy and rewarding crops to grow. French beans bear earlier than runner beans, but not as prolifically or for as long as runner beans, which yield two to three times more than French beans for the same amount of space. There are many varieties to choose from: yellow-, purple-, green-, filet-, snake-, haricot-, wax- or string beans. Sow seeds directly into the soil from late August until January in areas with cold winters. In milder parts of the country, beans can grow all year round. Beans need regular water. If the climate is really hot and dry, sprinkle water from above in the mornings to create humidity and keep well mulched. Beans may be attacked by beetles, aphids and grasshoppers. A few pests eating the leaves won’t affect the harvest, but if they become too much of a problem, use an organic spray. To save seeds, leave pods to mature on the plants until papery and crisp. Shell the beans and store in a cool, dry and dark place.

Also known as eggplants or aubergines, brinjals come in a wide variety of shapes and colours – from tiny, round, green varieties to long, thin, white ones. A native of the tropics, it likes full sun and a long, warm growing season. Start off early in spring by sowing seeds in seed trays. Transplant seedlings when they are about 12cm high (about a month to five weeks old). Brinjals are heavy feeders, so enrich the soil well before transplanting. Provide regular moisture, and keep their roots well mulched and weed free. When flowers start forming, feed the plant regularly with potassium-rich organic fertiliser. Plants often need staking once they start bearing. Fruit will be ready to pick about four months after transplanting. Start harvesting as soon as the fruit is glossy and big enough to use; this will encourage the plants to bear more. A healthy plant will produce anything from six to 12 brinjals. Cut off the fruit. They have strong stems and twisting or pulling could damage the plant. Eat as soon as possible after harvesting, because they turn bitter if kept. Cutworms love young brinjal seedlings, so protect them with the inner cardboard tubes of toilet rolls pushed into the ground around the stems. Adult plants can be attacked by spider mite and leaf beetles, which eat the leaves, leaving them in lacy tatters. Marigolds repel beetles and scented pelargonium repels spider mites. Garlic drives away both beetles and mites, so plant with garlic or, as a quicker solution, garlic chives. foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

21


CH EF ON TOU R

A PÂTISSIÈRE’S

paradise Megin Meikle

COMPILED BY HASMITA AMTHA RECIPE AND STYLING BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE RECIPE AND PROFILE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DYLAN SWART ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS SUPPLIED

recently Saxon, Megin Meikle e th X R LD at ef ch Pastry of all things hopped on the big bird and flew north to France – the home d! this culinary wonderlan art of a six-week trip, decadent – to indulge in

Megin was awarded the opportunity of a lifetime by the South African Chefs Association (SACA) and Le Calabash Petit Conservatoire de la Cuisine in the Loire Valley – a French cookery school run by chefpatrons, Alison and Sidney Bond.

A TRIP TO FRANCE WOULD OPEN UP A WHOLE NEW WORLD FOR ME! Being a pastry chef, I could not think of a better place to be submerged in all things pastry. I wanted to experience a macaron, éclair, croissant and baguette – by the French masters themselves. I was blessed with the most amazing culinary tour guides: chefs Alison and Sidney, who took me on a tour of the Loire Valley, which included the Cave des Producteurs de Vouvray, the kitchen of Le Château de Chenonceau, dinner at Jacky Dallais’s La Promenade in Le PetitPresigny and more. Through staying with the Bond family in rural France, I was exposed to the French lifestyle, firsthand; sharing meals were as educational as they were fun. I ACCOMPANIED SIDNEY TO METRO (a chefs’ retail paradise) to buy ingredients for the week to follow. This, alone, was incredible. Sidney kept on telling me: “Wait until you see the Rungis Market...” I didn’t think any culinary shopping experience could get better than this! On the same chilly Saturday morning, 22

OCTOBER 2017

we headed into Tours. I was taken to Les Halles, just another chefs’ browsing utopia, except this market welcomes the public too. It was completely mesmerising! And on this morning my life changed forever... I tasted croissants aux amandes for the first time and went straight to pastry heaven! This delight is an amazing way for the pâtisseries to make use of croissants not purchased on the day. The out-of-date croissants are halved and soaked in a rum syrup. They are filled with frangipane, topped with flaked almonds and baked, then dusted with icing sugar as they come out of the oven. It is for all of these reasons that a dessert paying homage to this pastryfilled Saturday morning had to be on the LDR X the Saxon menu. This dessert is a hit at home too! ANOTHER HIGHLIGHT was my visit to the mushroom farm at La Cave des Roches. Before we left for the caves, Sidney asked me to bite into a mushroom purchased at the supermarket. He told me to remember the texture and the taste. It tasted just like the mushrooms here in SA... We then arrived at the limestone caves – seven levels deep and at a constant temperature of 12˚C throughout the year (the perfect temperature for growing mushrooms). The limestone in the caves was used to build the châteaux in the surrounding areas. We were shown around the caves and saw the mushrooms at their different phases

of growth. It was at the last stage where we were given the opportunity to taste these mushrooms, straight from the soil. They are the exact opposite to any mushroom I have ever tasted before: crisp in texture and with a pungent mushroom flavour. The mushrooms are then sold to a select few chefs holding Michelin stars around France. This experience was another game changer for me that inevitably prompted a petit fours concept that we called Jardin de Champignon at LDR. Being a dreamer and perfectionist who escapes to other worlds to seek inspiration whenever I get the chance, I could not return home without newfound imaginativeness, of course...

Megin's trave l tips

�� ������� ��������� ������� Find a pâtis serie or boulangeri e and eat your way throu gh their pa stries, one break fast at a tim e! �� ������� ����������� ��� just take a ride. Jump off whene ver you se e something that catch es your eye. T he buses a re a great wa y to see Pa ris, without bre aking the b ank.


Croissant, CHOCOLATE and pear pudding

30ml (1 tbsp) dark rum 60ml (4 tbsp) castor sugar 50g chocolate chips

Serves 6 EASY 1 hr

whipped cream, to serve

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 15ml (1 tbsp) butter 1 pear, peeled, cored and thinly sliced 3 croissants 60ml (4 tbsp) Nutella 50g aked almonds 3 extra large eggs 200ml fresh cream 60ml (4 tbsp) milk

HOW TO DO IT Preheat the oven to 180ËšC. Place a large frying pan over medium-high heat and melt the butter. Fry the pear slices, 5 minutes in total. Remove from pan and set aside in a medium bowl. Lightly grease a round, ovenproof dish with a diameter of about 16cm, 7cm deep. Set aside until needed. Slice open the croissants and spread Nutella

1

2

generously inside one of the croissant halves. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds, close the croissants and slice widthways into 2 pieces. Repeat these steps with the remaining croissants. Place the croissant pieces in the greased dish and layer the fried pears among the croissants. Whisk the eggs, fresh cream, milk, rum and castor sugar in a jug until combined. Pour the mixture over the croissants and allow to rest at room temperature, 10 minutes. Sprinkle over the chocolate chips and bake the pudding, 40 minutes or until the custard has set. Serve with whipped cream.

3

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

23


BY ANNA TRAPIDO PHOTOGRAPHS BY CRAIG SCOTT

the

unsung

hero

TUTU ZUMA’S FLOURISHING FOOD GARDEN IN THE TOWNSHIP OF MPOPHOMENI, OUTSIDE HOWICK, KZN, IS A VERDANT WONDER TO BEHOLD. F&HE VISITED HER AMIDST HER COMFREY CROP REAP WHAT YOU SOW I was born on a farm in Lidgetton, KZN, but had to leave the farm with my family and many others in 1969. I was only two when we came to Mpophomeni. Life was very hard, but my grandmother grew everything she could. She planted what we call the “three sisters” – mealies, pumpkins and beans – together. It’s a perfect example of traditional Zulu companion gardening. The mealies grow tall and the beans (we called them “bombom”) use the mealies for support. The pumpkins spread over the earth, creating shade for the roots and conserving water. And so, the “three sisters” work together, like family. The garden my grandmother started became my garden that I nurture, still today. I have improved the soil, but some of the fruit trees come from her time. In winter, cabbages, spinach and peas rule. Summer belongs to guavas, grapevines and granadillas. The sweet smell of herbs is present across all seasons.

HERBS ARE STRENGTH I’m so happy when I’m in the garden. It’s hard work, but when I smell the herbs, I feel blessed. I dream of having a small farm where I can grow organically, and keep cows and chickens as well. I love growing herbs. I’m fascinated by how many layers of usefulness they have. I add comfrey to my compost, but I also use it to soothe sprains and swelling. Yarrow stops cuts and bleeding; others are great for rashes and skin complaints. I make teas from mint and lemon balm. Herbs are so generous

in the way they give and keep on giving – in different areas of our everyday lives. Herbs keep me strong.

WASTE NOT! People often don’t realise that they throw away so many things that can be functional in a garden. I go around Mpophomeni with a wheelbarrow, collecting cut grass, manure and discarded plants. The people don’t want them and they don’t recognise that they can become handy compost. They’re thankful that I’m clearing up what they think of as rubbish. The only thing I have to ask for is manure, because in the Zulu culture, women can’t go into the kraal, so the men put it outside for me. I’m happy to share vegetables with my neighbours – especially with those less fortunate than me – because life is about give and take. I also practise seed saving, so as to distribute seeds to other gardeners in the community.

PLOUGHING BACK I was part of a cookbook project put together by the Mpophomeni Conservation Group. We received financial support from the N3 Toll Concession (because our township is situated close to the N3 highway) and all the proceeds from the book are worked back into the garden initiative. Our book is called Mnandi, which means “delicious” in isiZulu. My favourite chapter is the recipes on how to make herbal teas. MNANDI – A TASTE OF MPOPHOMENI; R200; MNANDISALES@COWFRIEND.CO.ZA; MPOPHOMENICONSERVATIONGROUP.WORDPRESS.COM


touch, paws, engage

Pets ’

Pozzie

AT F&HE, OUR FURRY FRIENDS’ NEEDS AND NICE-TO-HAVES MATTER TO US AS MUCH AS THOSE OF OUR READERS!

Compiled by Hasmita Amtha and Anzelle Hattingh. Photographs Fotolia and supplied. Prices are correct at the time of print and are subject to change without prior notice

QU

ES V

IS S E R

With our eye on cancer awareness this month, we find it important to note that cancer is a prevailing disease in cats and dogs too. Dr Jacques Visser – veterinary surgeon at Oaklands Vet in Joburg (oaklandsvet.co.za) and co-presenter of Diere-dokters, a reality show on DStv’s VIA, channel 147 (kicking off with a new season this month) – shares his expertise.

DR

C JA

Though our pets generally live longer – in a good, domestic home – in comparison to 50 years ago, cancer is diagnosed in our four-legged friends now, more than back then. However, today we do have (among other aspects) the addition of complete food and advancement in science when it comes to the treatment of the disease, as well as preventative medicine like parasite control, assisting us in keeping our pets healthy and happy! There are various kinds of cancers found in pets, from skin- and bladder cancer to even breast cancer. Although there are few or no indications early on, keep an eye out for warning signs, very similar to that in people: a lump or a bump, a wound that doesn’t heal, any swelling, enlarged lymph nodes, a lameness or swelling in the bone or abnormal bleeding. As the saying goes, “prevention is better than cure”. Breast cancer is a reality in female cats and dogs, and a preventative measure would be to consider spaying the female animal at a young age, preferably before her first heat, at about six months. In so doing, the chances of a female animal developing mammary cancer (cancer in the milkproducing gland) will lessen. Another cancer to be wary of is skin cancer. Some skin cancers are caused by the sun, like the squamous cell carcinoma (in the epidermis or skin’s upper layer) and can be prevented by carefully planning the amount of sun your pet is exposed to. It is mainly applicable to dogs with white or unpigmented skin, like some Bull- and Jack Russell Terriers.

I often advise pet owners to use Kyron’s PetScreen SPF23 Dog & Cat Sunscreen Spray (containing four different agents to give complete coverage of the UV spectrum, available at realpet.co.za: R89,50 for 100ml) on the unpigmented areas or to keep their pets indoors between 10am and 3pm, if practical. While these are merely pre-emptive approaches, it’s most important to have your furry friend examined annually for something untoward. At any sign of weight loss, lethargy or unusual behaviour, do not hesitate or wait too long before contacting your vet. The sooner cancer is diagnosed and treated, the better the chances are of recovery. We have advanced a lot in the treatment of the big C – however, this largely depends on the type of cancer and where in the body the growth is situated. Some growths are removable by surgery, while in certain cases chemotherapeutic drugs are used (very successfully); other cancers respond best to radiation.

Doc’s

PICK

Pets with cancer or receiving cancer treatment have special nutritional requirements. Hill’s nutritionists and veterinarians developed the a/d Canine/Feline wet food (at a recommended retail price of R20 for a 156g tin), specially formulated for dogs and cats recovering from a debilitative state, with high levels of digestible protein and fat (to increase energy); antioxidants to support the immune system; raised levels of B vitamins and zinc to support convalescence, skin recovery and natural body defences; and added potassium to combat depletion. Puppy- or kitten pellets are also generally higher in nutritive value and are a great addition to your pets’ diets during this difficult time.

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

25


WITH OCTOBER BEING BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH, WE TAKE A LOOK AT THE MAGICAL MEDICINAL MUSHROOM, REISHI, WITH ITS STAGGERING CANCER- AS WELL AS OTHER DISEASEFIGHTING BENEFITS BY MALU LAMBERT PHOTOGRAPHS BY MYBURGH DU PLESSIS

26

OCTOBER 2017


MUSHROOM GURU

The views and opinions expressed in this article are not necessarily those of, and should not be attributed to, Food & Home Entertaining and/or Caxton Magazines

�����Đ����Ġ�������Ē�� t’s known as the Mushroom of Immortality, the Supernatural Mushroom, the Mushroom of Longevity…”, rattles off Craig Fourie, owner of Mushroom Guru. He’s standing behind a partition that has drawings of mushroom spores scribbled on the glass with markers. Clad in a white lab coat, as well as surgical gloves, he transfers mycelium* into a nutrient dish. The mushroom of many names is globally recognised by the moniker, reishi (Ganoderma lucidum). “Reishi is the highest form of medicinal mushroom available,” says Craig matter-of-factly. The list of its purported health benefits is dazzling: everything from being anticancer to aiding with the prevention of diseases like hepatitis and diabetes. This is thanks to the powerful antioxidant,

polysaccharides, as well as the high levels of ganoderic acid found in the mushroom. A study titled “Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) inhibits cancer cell growth and expression of key molecules in inflammatory breast cancer”, by MartinezMontemayor MM, et al was published in Nutrition and Cancer, 2011. The study showed that ganoderma-spore extract selectively kills metastatic inflammatory breast cancer cells, with no effect on noncancerous breast epithelial cells, which is extracted from the mushroom. “Polysaccharides – alpha- and beta glucans – have been scientifically proven to be effective in anti-tumour treatment, as it not only enhances the immune system, but also inhibits blood perfusion through tumours,” elaborates Craig. (There are many published studies supporting this claim in The National Library of Medicine [NLM], nlm.nih.gov.) “In a nutshell, reishi puts your body in a state of harmony, so it can use your energy where it’s needed most. When you’re feeling better and sleeping better; you’re going to be better.” While the

concept of medicinal mushrooms is a fairly new one in South Africa, it’s an ancient practice in countries like China and Japan. This fantastical fungus has a long history, stretching back over 2 000 years to when it’s said to had been discovered in the Changbai Mountains in Ancient China around 396 BCE. It was revered for its antiageing properties and was used by emperors who sought immortality. Mushroom Guru – a small warehouse in an industrial area of Strand, Cape Town – is where they grow the mushrooms, as well as extract the medicinal components. They sell it as a tincture, of which you take a tablespoon a day (straight or mixed into a beverage of your choice), but it’s now also available in capsule form under the name Ganoderma Gold, with the recommended dosage of one capsule daily. They also offer workshops and training courses in the warehouse on mushroom cultivation for those wanting to do this at home or commercially. They’ve

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

27


MUSHROOM GURU

THE MUSHROOM GURUS AT WORK IN THE FUNGAL LAB, FROM LEFT NIKKI FOURIE, ABONGILE MKOSANA AND CRAIG FOURIE

coined this community of like-minded mushroom lovers, the Fungkifriends. Our conversation is taking place upstairs, in the Fungal Lab, where spores are germinated, mycelium stored and samples tested. “We have over 56 species of edible and medicinal mushroom cultures,” says Craig, turning around and opening a fridge door behind him. Inside are petri dishes stacked atop one another. “This is our culture library,” Craig says with a smile. “We’re foster parents to all of our mushroom babies,” says his wife, Nikki Fourie, with a smile equally as big. Also wearing a lab coat, she’s a petite lady with auburn hair that hangs in waves, framing her face. “It started off as a hobby,” says Nikki. “Only in Cape Town would something as crazy as a mushroom education business work.” The couple has been married for 10 years. They met in Port Elizabeth, where Nikki worked for a corporate sunglass company, while Craig was employed as a mechanical tradesman. A promotion for Nikki saw them relocating to Cape Town and it was in 2013 that Mushroom Guru was officially launched, born out of passion and yes, necessity. While Craig tinkered in the garage with mushrooms, his funds were slowly depleting, so “Why not?” he thought and turned to propagating fungi for his finances. Nikki soon joined as director of the company, swapping selling shades for a “more soul-satisfying endeavour”. “Corporate is corporate,” she says sagely. “It eats you up and spits you out at some

28

OCTOBER 2017

point. We’re good partners – in love and in business.” Both Craig and Nikki lost their moms to breast cancer – though it was many years before they embarked on their fungi-forhealth journey – and today, their losses propel them forward and lend even more meaning to their work. Craig offers me a spoonful of the tincture. Reishi, though edible, is not particularly tasty and has a bitter flavour. Besides, you wouldn’t be able to eat it to maximise from its health benefits anyway: “The cell wall of the mushroom contains chitin and is more difficult to digest, resulting in stomach aches in some people. The tincture extracts the medicinal value from the mushroom, so there is no need to eat the cell wall.” In fact, Craig says all mushrooms should be cooked at high heat. “It helps break down the cell wall, though it doesn’t disappear completely.” He explains further: “There are two major groups of fungi – primary decomposers and secondary decomposers. Reishi, shiitake, miatake, lion’s mane and all other exotic mushrooms are primary decomposers, which means they decompose dead organic material. These mushrooms need to be cooked well, so that we as humans can break them down properly without any gastric issues. Secondary decomposers, like the button mushroom, decompose composted organic materials, and can be consumed uncooked, yet it is advised to cook all mushrooms.”

Craig continues: “There are some wellness stores selling powders that are just dried and ground up mushrooms, cell wall with chitin included. It needs to be a bioavailable compound for your body to be able to absorb it. Our method is to extract the goodness out of the mushroom and then encapsulate it.” Mushroom Guru’s reishi-encapsulated double extract product is manufactured and packaged in a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) regulated lab. Craig says he happily supplies people with all the data: “If it’s peace of mind you’re after, then data is what you’re looking for.” So what does the data say? “Our extraction potency is breathtaking!” Nikki exclaims. “Globally, Craig is the first person to achieve such a high potency extract.” “We’ve managed to match the levels found in wild mushrooms,” Craig chimes in. He attributes this to his growing method. “We are the first people in the world to grow it so straight and long – and how we do it is my trade secret. People normally grow reishi in the conk form; the way we grow it creates incredible levels of ganoderic acid [that amazing breastcancer fighting compound].” Another positive to cultivating the mushrooms this way means people don’t have to go into the forests and strip it of mushrooms. “It takes six to eight months for reishi to grow to maturity. If you pick it in the wild, you remove its opportunity to reproduce, thereby reducing the wild population of reishi in the forest – it’s like picking mussels from the shore.”


*Mycelium refers to the threadlike body of a mushroom fungus (this is actually the main part of the fungus), which lives inside the substrate (wood, straw, grain and so on). The mushrooms that we eat are actually just a small visible part of the organism. The mycelium can span for kilometres without the need to produce a mushroom. When it’s under threat, it produces mushrooms – that’s why you’ll often find plenty of mushrooms that have “bloomed” after a downpour, as the rain cuts off the mycelium’s air supply, actually suffocating it. The mushrooms are its reproductive organs and act as a survival mechanism. A MUSHROOM A DAY… Doctors Beyond Medicine combines nutritional, natural and alternative medicine practices in their cancer treatment programme. The doctors work nationwide; contact them for information on where they’ll be working next or if you would like to set up an appointment. We chat to cancer specialist, Dr Sakeena (Jackie) Harmsen about her experience with reishi.

It’s a small team. Abongile Mkosana (and Dexter, the beloved pet dog) completes the picture. Abongile is responsible for the (top secret) grow room. In fact, it’s so secretive, we sign a confidentiality agreement before we’re allowed inside. A blast of earthy, humid air greets us, as we push open the door and enter the space – and that’s all I can tell you. What I can share is the otherworldly beauty of the spindly mushroom. The base of the stem is dark and it lightens in a gradient to the tip, ending in yellow and white. It looks like a wand for casting spells. And if its health properties are anything to go by, then it really is one magic(al) mushroom. 021-854-5126; MUSHROOMGURU.CO.ZA

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO INCORPORATE REISHI INTO YOUR TREATMENTS? We incorporated it into our protocols because of its healing properties, and influence and effect on the immune system – so highly required when the body is fighting cancer or any disease.

DR SAKEENA

HARMSEN

HOW HAVE YOU NOTICED REISHI WORKING? We recorded additional improvement of well-being in patients, as a consequence of consuming a probiotic made with reishi, combined with our programme. Seeing tumours receding and immune counts improving, CD4 counts rising, we have seen hundreds of patients who have benefited from the reishi probiotic already. DOCTORSBEYONDMEDICINE.COM foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

29


DRINK WHAT TO DRINK, WHEN, WHERE & HOW... BY MALU LAMBERT

Clinking FOR A CAUSE ctober is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and, as such, we’ve dedicated this month’s wine recommendations to wine estates that support breast cancer consciousness – either through wine sales, fundraising events or -projects. Notable surgeon, Professor Justus Apffelstaedt is one of SA’s top experts in breast health. The head of the Tygerberg Hospital Breast Clinic, he is a champion of early detection: “Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women globally and in South Africa, about one in 10 women in urbanised areas will be affected by breast cancer in their lifetime,” says the professor. “While this statistic may seem alarming, breast cancer is a highly curable disease when detected early. It is important that women follow a strict regimen of screening and self-examination. Events that take place during October are very important for raising cognisance, but for me, every month is breast cancer awareness month and we need to make sure we are consistently talking to our wives, daughters, mothers and sisters about breast cancer and the importance of early detection.” 30

OCTOBER 2017

L’ORMARINS BRUT ROSÉ 2013, R185 A blend of chardonnay and pinot noir, this Cap Classique is lively and crisp, offering a punch of juicy red fruit on the palate with flavours of cranberries, raspberries and pomegranate. The lengthy finish is creamy and textured. A wonderful 10% of the proceeds from sales of this wine are donated to Pink Trees for Pauline, a charity providing valuable practical and physical support to cancer patients.

CREATION RESERVE PINOT NOIR 2015, R340 An elegant tribute to Hemel-en-Aarde pinot noir, the first impression is one of spice: think peppercorn, clove and an underlying hint of liquorice. The palate enters smoothly, with some red fruit and a warmer tone of dried apricot too. Lovely, supple tannins keep you going back to the glass for more. Read more about Creation’s Pink October event (28 October) on page 31.


raise your glass

14 October VREDE EN LUST CASEY’S RIDGE WHITE MISCHIEF 2016, R79

KUMALA ZENITH MERLOT/CABERNET SAUVIGNON/SHIRAZ 2016, R42 This blend enjoys the aromas of red fruits laced with Christmas cake spice – and some floral whiffs, thanks to the 10% addition of viognier. Freshly picked bramble and forest berries refresh the palate, with notes of milk chocolate and ground black pepper. Kumala Wines is a sponsor of PinkDrive: an organisation which deploys mobile mammography and educational units throughout SA.

A blend of six white cultivars from an Elgin vineyard, Casey’s Ridge, this wine is fruitforward and easy-drinking, yet the multicultivars add interest and complexity. Expect a melange of citrus, floral and tropical notes on the nose that continue on the palate with juicy white pear and pineapple flavours. Join the Pink Xtreme Trail Run at Vrede en Lust Estate on 15 October or get creative at the Pink Lady Crafts for Cancer Workshop on 14 October – see details alongside. AURELIA VINTAGE MCC BRUT ROSÉ, R165 Honey, lime and dried apricot sing up from the glass, and the flavours evolve onto the full-bodied, creamy palate. It’s a biscuity bubbly, with acidity balancing out the richness. Aurelia MCC is the own-label brand of Groote Post’s winemaker, Lukas Wentzel. A portion of the proceeds from the MCC sales go to Drakenstein Palliative Hospice, “as they looked after my mother so well,” Lukas affirms. Both the Aurelia MCC Brut Rosé and Brut are in honour of Lukas’s late mother and his wife, a breast cancer survivor.

Pink Lady Apples have once again teamed up with Tru-Cape Fruit Marketing, co-sponsoring the Pink Lady Crafts for Cancer Workshop at Vrede en Lust Wine Estate. Attendees will learn the craft of string art, followed by a Pink Lady Apple-inspired lunch, with Vrede en Lust’s wines, while being entertained by pop and blues singer, Luna Paige, who recently headed the theatre production called Korreltjie Kantel, setting to music, the love letters between Ingrid Jonker and André P. Brink. Tickets are R310 pp and can be purchased via pinkladycraftsforcancer.co.za. All funds raised from the event’s ticket sales will be donated to the Tygerberg Hospital Breast Clinic Fund.

20 – 22 October Celebrate the Robertson Wine Valley on the banks of the Breede River at the annual Wine on the River festival. Taste wine from almost 30 wineries, and sample local fare from chefs and producers, while you relax and breathe in the fresh country air. There will be a dedicated kids’ area, boat cruises and more. Book tickets via webtickets.co.za; early bird: R250 pp; normal weekend tickets: R280 pp.

28 October

MULDERBOSCH CABERNET SAUVIGNON ROSÉ 2017, R70 Think hints of rose petals and an edge of stony minerality on the nose, while things get fruitier on the palate with flavours of watermelon and ruby grapefruit; a zesty acidity wraps it all up. Mulderbosch supports and contributes to the Breast Health Foundation with proceeds from the Cabernet Sauvignon Rosé.

Pink October at Creation Wines starts at 9am with breakfast canapés. Professor Apffelstaedt will lead an interactive talk about breast cancer, after which guests are invited to stay on to attend “The Story of Creation Pairing” (a food and wine pairing). Tickets are R250 pp and bookings can be made through emailing reservations@creationwines.com or calling 028-212-1107. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Tygerberg Hospital Breast Clinic Fund.

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

31


raise your glass

���ğ�������Ē������Ġ������� Mushrooms, as well as mushroom extract, are used across the globe to help fight the risk of cancer and to enhance immune response. So, which mushroom goes best with what wine? OYSTER Mirror the creamy texture of this fine fungus with an oaked chardonnay. SHIITAKE Pair these earthy mushrooms with earthy wines, like nebbiolo or pinot noir. BUTTON Light goes with light; if used in a creamy sauce, pair with a sauvignon blanc to cut through the richness.

A GINGER BREEZE Summertime seeks one thing: thirst-quenching ginger beer. Let’s toast sunny days with Frankie’s Good Old Fashioned Ginger Beer in hand! Zhoosh up your summer punch by using Frankie’s Traditional Ginger Beer as a mixer that provides the perfect combination of spritz, spice and all things nice. Available at leading retailers for a recommended retail price of R12,99 (500ml). clover.co.za

��Ġ����������Ġ�� WIN! MADE IN LIMITED QUANTITIES, THE ART OF CREATION RANGE INCLUDES A PREMIUM PINOT NOIR AND CHARDONNAY. ONE READER WILL WIN BOTH, PRESENTED IN A LUXURIOUS CASE, WORTH R1 750. Inspired by nature and meticulously crafted by cellar master Jean-Claude Martin, each single-vineyard wine in this range is the ultimate expression of its terroir, and indeed an exquisite and multifaceted artwork in its own right. To enter, email your full name, postal address and ID number with CREATION in the subject line to foodhome@caxton.co.za by 15 October 2017. Competition is open only to SA residents who are 18 years or older.

32

OCTOBER 2017

Q&A Born and bred in the Cape Winelands, Carolyn Martin of Creation Wines in the Hemel-en-Aarde Valley is married to Swiss winemaker, Jean-Claude Martin. In the early 2000s the couple bought a small tract of land on the Hemel-en-Aarde ridge, which is now the home of Creation Wines. The wine estate has become well known for its delicious and innovative food and wine pairings. The Martins have two children, Glenn (17) and Emma (15). Every October Carolyn hosts the Pink October event at the estate to help raise funds for transport to and from Tygerberg Hospital’s Breast Cancer Unit for women in the local community. The event includes a talk by Professor Justus Apffelstaedt, as well as refreshments and canapés. Carolyn shares what Breast Cancer Awareness Month means to her. HOW DID THESE EVENTS START? I noticed that women in Hermanus did not have much information on breast cancer, as I increasingly heard of cases where screening was done too late. NAME SOME OF THE HIGHLIGHTS Prof. Apffelstaedt’s great sense of humour, candid approach, knowledge and empathy on the sensitive and scary subject – unfortunately one that needs to be addressed and discussed by women to create consciousness and save lives. WHAT ELSE COULD BE DONE FOR BREAST CANCER AWARENESS? I don’t think there is an adequate annual community screening programme for women over 40. We need to understand that the subject of breast wellness is not taboo and we must share information. HOW CAN PEOPLE ASSIST IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITIES? Knowing how to do self-examinations would be a good start: so getting a professional nurse to explain this in the community at the local clinic and having awareness talks, like we do at Creation. All the women on my staff are invited to attend this talk.


Dark chocolate-glazed black cat doughnuts

DOUGHNUTS

your...

Be a cool mom with these cool cats for the kiddies’ Halloween table party – fun and oh, so easy to make! Makes 6 EASY 15 mins THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS DARK CHOCOLATE GLAZE 200g dark chocolate, chopped 45ml (3 tbsp) sunflower oil 30ml (2 tbsp) fresh cream black gel food colouring

glaze to run off, before placing them on a wire cooling rack. If the glaze cools too quickly and becomes too thick, you can give it a short blast in the microwave to re-melt it. For the royal icing, combine the sifted icing sugar and lemon juice in a small bowl, and whisk until you are left with a thick and pourable icing (it must not be runny, though). Add a few drops black gel food colouring and mix until black is achieved. Cover with cling film to prevent a skin from forming on the top and set aside until needed. To decorate the faces, fill a small piping bag (fitted with a small, round nozzle) with the melted white chocolate. Pipe the eyes, nose, mouth and whiskers onto each doughnut and add a tiny dot black royal icing on each eye to form the cat’s pupils. Repeat these steps with the remaining doughnuts. Store them in an airtight container (best eaten on the day they are made).

3

4

CAT FACES store-bought plain doughnuts 12 pecan nuts 60g white chocolate, melted ROYAL ICING 75g icing sugar, sifted 10ml (2 tsp) lemon juice black gel food colouring HOW TO DO IT To make the chocolate glaze, place the chopped dark chocolate, sunflower oil and fresh cream in a microwaveproof bowl that is wide enough to dip the doughnuts into. Microwave on high, 1 minute, stirring at regular intervals, until melted. Add a few drops black gel food colouring, and stir until incorporated and the chocolate is black in colour. For the cat faces, insert 2 pecan nuts on either side at the top of each doughnut as the cat’s ears. Dip the doughnuts into the glaze, allowing the excess

1

MN

D YL AN

LE LO

REC IPE A

34

SW ART

CUB E

2

SE

WHETHER YOU NIP IT, TUCK IT, DRESS IT UP OR DOWN, ADD COLOUR, FLAVOUR OR A NEW DIMENSION, EACH MONTH WE’LL HELP YOU ZHOOSH UP AN ITEM, PRODUCT, DISH OR DRINK TO ADD EYECATCHING INTRIGUE AND ON-TREND FLAIR

OCTOBER 2017

ND STYLIN

GB

O YN

VU M

P HO T

OG

P RA

H

BY


WHEN YOU NEED A TASTE OF INSPIRATION

JWT69711

Start Your Great with Kellogg’s Granola. A delicious blend of crunchy rolled oat clusters with crisped rice, plump cranberries, raisins, coconut shavings, banana chips and nutty sunflower seeds. It’s the best way to feel inspired and fuel your potential.


DIGESTING THE LATEST ON THE CULINARY SHELVES... BY HASMITA AMTHA

WIN!

1 1

BREAKING BREADS – A NEW WORLD OF ISRAELI BAKING BY URI SCHEFT (ARTISAN, R558) If the warm waft of baking bread has your mouth watering in anticipation of slathering a slice with a thick layer of butter, you certainly share this trait with author, Uri Scheft. Extending his passion for the love of baked loaves and pastries alike, Uri has materialised Breaking Breads and “revitali[s]es traditional recipes to suit modern tastes with better quality ingredients, new fillings or different shapes,” as he emphasises. With chocolate and orange confit challah or poached pear and goat cheese brioche buns, and offering dips and preserves to indulge in alongside, there’s no doubt you’ll surprise your family and friends with a feast of stuffed sweet- and savoury breads to make Uri proud this Sukkot (4 – 11 October).

36

OCTOBER 2017

2

SIMPLY VEG – A MODERN GUIDE TO EVERYDAY EATING BY SYBIL KAPOOR (PAVILION, R378) In her latest cookbook, award-winning food writer, Sybil Kapoor heroes the humble vegetable, even in meaty dishes. With an array of recipes that are organised in a flow from spring to winter, Simply Veg highlights which vegetables are in season, when – and then proposes a couple of ways to prepare these fresh ingredients, so as to shine to their full glory. Dream up asparagus, prawn and spring onion tempura for a light summer lunch, or perhaps a wild mushroom and barley risotto for a hearty dinner... these are merely two of the many dishes that Sybil puts forth: quickly and easily, and ideal for midweek mealtimes. Keeping to her promise, from cover to cover, Sybil guides you in achieving your five-a-day veggie consumption goal, quite effortlessly.

3

ITALIAN STREET FOOD – RECIPES FROM ITALY’S BARS AND HIDDEN LANEWAYS BY PAOLA BACCHIA (SMITH STREET BOOKS, R555) Transporting you to the cobblestone roads of Naples, Florence and even Palermo, Paola Bacchia whisks you up and down the boot of Italy for a real taste of Italian street food in this debut cookbook. Based in Melbourne, Australia, Paola was born to Italian migrant parents, into their food culture – which is what moved her to start her food blog, italyonmymind.com.au. Bringing to light dishes prompted by the experience of little-known eateries, this cookbook serves up original polpettine, arancini, fiadoni, zeppole, tarallini and cannoli... covering everything from humble bites to home-made gelato. If you’re in search of inspiration for authentic fare for an Italian feast, then look no further: Italian Street Food is it!

Photograph by Dylan Swart. Styling by Claire Ferrandi. Prices are correct at the time of print and are subject to change without prior notice

FIVE LUCKY F&HE READERS CAN EACH WIN A COPY OF BREAKING BREADS – A NEW WORLD OF ISRAELI BAKING BY URI SCHEFT (ARTISAN) FROM EXCLUSIVE BOOKS. TO ENTER, EMAIL YOUR FULL NAME, CONTACT NUMBER, ID NUMBER AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO FOODHOME@CAXTON.CO.ZA, WITH BREAKING BREADS IN THE SUBJECT LINE. ENTRIES CLOSE ON 15 OCTOBER 2017.


read all about it

2 4

3 5 TOP 10 COOKERY TITLES 1 Kook en Geniet S.J.A. de Villiers 2 The Real Meal Revolution Prof Tim Noakes et al 3 Boerekos met ’n twist Annelien Pienaar

4

DELICIOUSLY ELLA WITH FRIENDS BY ELLA MILLS WOODWARD (YELLOW KITE, R363) Ella Mills Woodward, better known as Deliciously Ella (as per the name of her blog – deliciouslyella.com) is no stranger to the culinary scene – in particular, the popularity of healthy eating. In her latest cookbook, Ella presents a whole lot of motivation for those embracing the wholefood and plant-based dietary lifestyle, especially when inviting friends and family over for a healthy bite. With details like menu suggestions for breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner, Ella gets you excited about sharing meals when there are baked sweet potato and sesame falafels, and warm Moroccan cauliflower “rice” salad on display... and to cool off: coconut and mango ice lollies. Don’t fear when Ella is near; simply get yourself a copy of this refreshing cookbook and dish up!

5

VIVEK SINGH’S INDIAN FESTIVAL FEASTS BY VIVEK SINGH (BLOOMSBURY PLC, R669) London-based Indian chef, restaurateur and media personality known for his innovative take on Indian cuisine, Vivek Singh brings us his most recent endeavour. Rooted in Vivek’s childhood: “memories of growing up in India are of food being the centre of every event” (as noted in the introduction) and with the sub-continent being one filled with cultural diversity, he covers all religions and regions across India, with his very own approach to these customary plates. Each chapter focuses on a popular festival, delving into Vivek’s fond recollections and significance of the specific celebration. Paging through, this publication pulls you in, with the imagery of fragrant dishes igniting a longing need to be a part of the festivities.

4 Living the Healthy Life Jessica Sepel 5 Welcome to my Table Siba Mtongana 6 Super Food Family Classics Jamie Oliver 7 Wholesome Sarah Graham 8 Jump on the Bant Wagon — Quick and Easy on a Tight Budget Nick Charlie Key 9 Johanne 14 — Real South African Food Hope Malau 10 Curry — Stories & Recipes Across South Africa Ishay Govender-Ypma

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

37


HOW DO YOU LIKE YOUR STEAK? IN AVOIDING INCIDENTS OF STEAK NOT COOKED TO YOUR GUESTS’ LIKING, WE’VE PUT TOGETHER YOUR RIGHT-HAND GUIDE TO COOKING THE PERFECT STEAK, FROM MISE EN PLACE TO SERVING WORDS AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI ASSISTED BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE PHOTOGRAPH BY DYLAN SWART

Grass-fed vs grain-fed Conventionally reared cattle are usually grain-fed and free range/pasture-reared beef, often grass fed. Grass-fed beef is usually more expensive than grain-fed, and there can be subtle differences in taste, so it’s really up to you which flavour you prefer, and which beef suits your budget and lifestyle – there is no wrong or right answer.

38

OCTOBER 2017


The first step in cooking the perfect steak is selecting it at your local butcher or grocery store. The cut you choose depends on your preference. These are our favourites for pan-frying... FILLET: This prized cut of steak is very tender and costly; however, what it makes up for in tenderness, it generally lacks in flavour (compared to other cuts). Best served as rare as you like it. SIRLOIN: Considered a prime steak, similar to fillet, with more flavour but less tender. Best served medium-rare. RIB EYE: Flavourful with a thick strip of fat. Best served medium-rare. RUMP: Flavourful and more affordable. Best served medium-rare.

Preparing your steak MARINATING: Remove your steak from the fridge 30 minutes before you plan to fry it and place it in a large, flat dish. Rub with just enough olive/canola/avocado oil to lightly coat the steak. Bringing your steak to room temperature will ensure it cooks evenly. Although the jury is out on whether to salt your steak before or after cooking, I prefer to season it generously with sea salt flakes and a good crack of freshly ground black pepper 30 minutes before cooking (any earlier and you risk the salt drawing moisture from your steak). You can either simply marinate as per above or add these flavour twists after marinating with oil and seasoning, by rubbing it with: �� ���������������������������������������������� �� ���������������������������������������������������������������������� �� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������

Cooking your steak THE PAN: I love using a heavy-based cast iron pan to cook steak, but any heavy-based pan will do (a heavy base heats evenly and gets very hot – essential to getting that delicious charring on the outside of your steak). FRYING: Heat the pan, without oil (you’ve already used oil to marinate your steak), over very high heat. When the pan is sizzling hot, add the steak (if your steak has a layer of fat, fry that first, about 1 minute, holding the steak in this position, to crisp up the fat), then lay the steak in the pan and start your timer. Flip your steak only once and 1 minute before the end of cooking, add a big knob of butter to the pan for a creamy flavour. Baste the steak with the pan juices. As tempting as it can be, don’t overcrowd your pan – if cooking several steaks, cook them in batches. HOW DO YOU LIKE IT DONE?

THE LOOK

COOKING TIME: 3,5CM THICK

COOKING TIME: 2CM THICK

BLUE

still a dark colour, almost spongy; with no purple; just warmed through resistance

1 minute 30 seconds per side

1 minute per side

RARE

maroon in colour; some flowing juice

soft and spongy; with slight resistance

2 minutes 15 seconds per side

1 minute 30 seconds per side

MEDIUM-RARE

pink; a small amount of pink juice flowing

soft, spongy and springy

3 minutes 15 seconds per side

2 minutes per side

MEDIUM

pale pink in the middle; hardly any juice flowing

firmer and springy

4 minutes 30 seconds per side

2 minutes 15 seconds per side

WELL DONE

only a small amount of pink in the middle; not dry

firm and slightly springy

Cook for 4 – 5 minutes per side, depending on the thickness.

THE FEEL

Post-cooking RESTING: Leave your steak to rest on a chopping board for 10 minutes – doing this ensures your meat retains its juices and the fibres relax for a tender steak. SLICING: Using a very sharp, non-serrated knife, slice your steak across the grain for a more tender, easier-to-chew meal. To do this, look for the long striations that run across the steak and slice against them, not with them (you may have to move your steak as you slice, as the grain doesn’t always run in the same direction through the entire steak). SERVING: Sprinkle with a little more sea salt flakes, if desired (I prefer a very well-seasoned steak). Serve with béarnaise sauce, herb butter or creamed horseradish.

KITCHEN FILES

Before you start - Selecting your steak


, A O H W

BLUEBERRY, ! M A L A B BAM ROCK THE KITCHEN WITH TWO BLUEBERRY-LICIOUS, LUSCIOUS BAKES AND A ROAST TO LEAVE YOU WANTING MORE! RECIPES AND STYLING BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DYLAN SWART

40

OCTOBER 2017


3 WITH 1

Blueberry and carrot bread with flavoured cream cheese Makes 2 loaves EASY 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS BREAD 4 extra large eggs 250g demerara sugar 330ml vegetable oil 10ml (2 tsp) vanilla essence 400g cake flour 15ml (1 tbsp) baking powder 7,5ml (1½ tsp) bicarbonate of soda 2,5ml (½ tsp) salt 7,5ml (1½ tsp) ground cinnamon 10ml (2 tsp) ground ginger 200g blueberries + extra, to sprinkle 1 large carrot, peeled and grated 6 (1½ cups) bananas, mashed 100g pecan nuts, roughly chopped FLAVOURED CREAM CHEESE seeds of 1 vanilla pod 230g smooth cream cheese, at room temperature 30ml (2 tbsp) icing sugar, sifted zest of 1 orange 15ml (1 tbsp) lemon juice pinch salt HOW TO DO IT Preheat the oven to 180˚C. Grease 2 loaf tins (of 1L capacity each) and line them with baking paper. Set aside until needed. Cream the eggs and demerara sugar together in a medium bowl using hand-held beaters, 3 minutes or until pale and creamy. Add the vegetable oil and vanilla essence, and beat until the mixture is well combined. Sift together the cake flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, salt, ground cinnamon and ground ginger, and add these dry ingredients to the egg mixture. Add the remaining ingredients and fold together until just combined. Pour the mixture into the prepared loaf tins and scatter extra berries on top. Bake, 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted in the centres of the loaves comes out clean. Allow the loaves to cool in the tins, 5 minutes, then turn them out onto a wire cooling rack.

5 6

For the flavoured cream cheese, combine all of the ingredients in a serving bowl and stir until combined. Serve the blueberry and carrot loaves with the flavoured cream cheese alongside for spreading.

Blueberry glazed pork fillet with barley salad Serves 4 – 6 EASY 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SALAD 300g pearl barley 10ml (2 tsp) honey 10ml (2 tsp) Dijon mustard zest of ½ lemon squeeze lemon juice salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 150g blueberries, some halved and others kept whole handful mint leaves, chopped

3 spring onions, chopped 1 grapefruit, peeled and segmented 1 avocado, peeled and wedged GLAZE 100g blueberries 2 fresh rosemary sprigs, chopped 1 garlic clove, peeled and grated pinch cayenne pepper 15ml (1 tbsp) maple syrup 30ml (2 tbsp) soya sauce 60ml (4 tbsp) balsamic vinegar 5ml (1 tsp) paprika salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1

2

3

4

BLUEBERRY AND CARROT BREAD WITH FLAVOURED CREAM CHEESE


3 WITH 1

PORK 600g pork fillet avocado oil, to brush salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste black salt, to garnish HOW TO DO IT Preheat the oven to 220˚C. Cook the barley in a small saucepan with salted water over medium-high heat, 20 – 30 minutes or until soft. Drain through a fine mesh sieve and transfer to a medium bowl. Mix in the honey, mustard, lemon zest and juice, and

2

3

basting occasionally with the glaze, until chargrilled on all sides, 10 minutes in total. Remove the pork fillet from the griddle pan and season to taste. Transfer the meat to a roasting dish and roast in the oven, 20 minutes. Continue basting with the blueberry glaze, every 5 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to rest, 10 minutes. Cut into thick slices, serve alongside the barley and sprinkle with black salt. COOK’S TIP Rubbing the pork with avocado oil keeps the meat moist and juicy.

Spiced blueberry and chocolate honeycomb tart Serves 8 EASY 1 hr 30 mins + 2 hrs/ overnight, to chill THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SHORTCRUST PASTRY 450g cake flour + extra, to dust 45ml (3 tbsp) icing sugar pinch salt 200g butter 100ml cold water FILLING 300g brown sugar 125ml (½ cup) water 400g fresh blueberries + extra, to serve juice of 1 small lemon 10ml (2 tsp) ground cinnamon 2,5ml (½ tsp) ground nutmeg pinch ground cloves pinch salt 15ml (1 tbsp) water 30ml (2 tbsp) cornflour 2 x 40g bars Cadbury Crunchie chocolates, crushed 15ml (1 tbsp) milk 1 egg, beaten

T

AI

5A

CON

D AY

250ml (1 cup) thick/double thick cream, to serve

NS

R

1

season to taste. Add 150g halved and whole blueberries, the mint leaves and spring onions, and stir through until well incorporated. Serve on a platter and top with the grapefruit segments and avocado wedges. For the glaze, combine all of the ingredients and season to taste. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the berries start to burst and the glaze reaches a thick, syrupy consistency, about 10 – 15 minutes. Pour into a small bowl and set aside until needed. For the pork, heat a griddle pan over medium-high heat and rub the pork fillet with avocado oil. Fry,

1 O F YO

BLUEBERRY GLAZED PORK FILLET WITH BARLEY SALAD

U

HOW TO DO IT Preheat the oven to 190˚C and grease a round (24cm-diameter), loosebottomed tart tin. Set aside until needed. For the shortcrust pastry, sift the cake flour and icing sugar into a large bowl. Add a pinch salt and the

1 2


3 WITH 1

200g butter, and rub in the butter with your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Add the 100ml cold water and mix to form a soft dough. Knead the dough briefly on a flour-dusted surface. Divide the dough into two discs. Wrap in cling film and allow to chill in the fridge, while preparing the filling. For the filling, in a large saucepan over medium-high heat, stir in the brown sugar, 125ml (½ cup) water, blueberries, lemon juice, ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg, cloves and a pinch salt. Simmer, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently until the sugar has dissolved. Mix 15ml (1 tbsp) water with the cornflour to form a paste, then whisk the paste into the blueberry mixture. Continue cooking, stirring constantly, until it thickens to a coulis, about 15 minutes. Set aside to cool down to room temperature and fold in the crushed Cadbury Crunchies.

3

4

5

Remove the dough from the fridge and on a lightly flour-dusted surface, roll out the first disc to a thickness of about 0,3cm. Line the greased tin with the pastry, covering the base, the pastry coming up the sides. Trim the edges off the pastry overhang. Spoon the filling into the pie’s crust. Roll out the second disc to a thickness of 0,3cm. Using a cookie cutter, cut out pastry shapes as per your preference and layer these shapes over one another around one section of the top of the pie for a decorative touch. Brush the crust with the egg wash, made by mixing the milk with the beaten egg. Bake, 1 hour or until the

6

crust reaches a deep, golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Allow the pie to cool, at least 30 minutes and chill in the fridge, 2 hours or preferably overnight. Remove the pie from the fridge about 15 minutes prior to serving, to take the chill off. Serve the pie with the cream and garnish with the extra blueberries.

8

7

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

43


COMPETITION

WIN!

�Ġ�Ġđ�Ġ������� ONE LUCKY READER WILL WIN A FINE EXPERIENCE FOR TWO FROM THE THORNYBUSH LUXURY GAME LODGE COLLECTION,

WORTH R30 000 To enter SMS THORNYBUSH followed by your full name, ID number, email address and postal address to 48405. Each SMS costs R1,50; free SMSs do not apply.

he Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge Collection consists of 12 luxury lodges, 11 of which are located in the Thornybush Private Nature Reserve in the heart of the lowveld savannah and one in the northern part of Sabi Sands. Situated within 14 000 hectares of pristine wilderness, the Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge Collection is a well known destination for local and international travellers alike. The reserve recently dropped its eastern boundary fence and is now open to the greater Kruger National Park. The collection has earned its reputation as one of the country’s finest bush experiences. This top-class haven, which is just over five hours’ drive from Johannesburg, has scooped numerous

world firsts – for conservation, as well as hospitality. Thornybush Private Nature Reserve has evolved over the years into a visitor’s paradise that offers something for everyone – bush lovers can lose themselves, not only in the Big Five, but in the region’s remarkable fauna and flora as a whole. Those looking for something a little less adventurous can recoup from the madness of city life and relax in the luxurious surrounds, enjoying delicious cuisine and pampering themselves at one of the spas. Whatever your preference, a stay at a Thornybush property always leaves a lasting and memorable impression. 011-253-6500; THORNYBUSH.CO.ZA

The prize A two night stay for two people, sharing, at a Thornybush Collection lodge (excluding Simbambili Game Lodge, Shumbalala Game Lodge, The River Lodge and n’Kelenga Self Catering Bush Camp) situated in the Thornybush Private Nature Reserve, subject to availability. The prize includes air-conditioned, en suite accommodation; meals, teas, coffees and snacks; dawn- and dusk game drives and optional bush walks. The prize excludes the conservation fee and Tourism Marketing South Africa (TOMSA) levy; bar, telephone, laundry, curio purchases; spa treatments and facilities; anything of a personal nature or not specified; transport to and from the lodge.

This prize is valid until 31 May 2018 and excludes long weekends, public- and seasonal holidays. Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge Collection reserves the right to allocate accommodation, subject to availability at the time of booking. Please note that this offer is not exchangeable and cannot be transferred to cash. Once booked and confirmed by Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge Collection, should the reservation be cancelled within a 60-day period prior to the travel date, this auction offer will be forfeited. Competition closes on 31 October 2017. Visit foodandhome.co.za for the full Terms and Conditions.


GUAVAS | RED ONIONS | RHUBARB | STRAWBERRIES | TURNIPS

TRICK THE FAMILY WITH A CHEAT’S VERSION VEGGIE PIZZA AND TREAT THEM TO FINGER-LICKING, FRESH, SEASONAL GOODNESS. OR WHY NOT GET THE GIRLS TOGETHER FOR A SUMMER LUNCH IN AID OF BREAST CANCER AWARENESS? RECIPES AND STYLING BY ILLANIQUE VAN ASWEGEN PHOTOGRAPHS BY ADEL FERREIRA

what else is in season? VEGGIES artichokes, baby marrows, beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, green beans, kale, leeks, mealies, mushrooms, parsnips, peas and spinach FRUIT blueberries, gooseberries, grapefruit, kiwifruit, mulberries, naartjies, oranges, papaya and tomatoes


IN SEASON

46

NS

R

T

AI

5A

CON

D AY

COOK’S TIP As an alternative, the edamame beans can be replaced with shelled broad beans or peas.

2 O F YO

U

OCTOBER 2017

TURNIP GNOCCHI WITH BACON, EDAMAME BEANS AND SAGE BUTTER (RECIPE ON PAGE 52)


STRAWBERRY BLOODY MARY GAZPACHO

BLACK AND WHITE PIZZA

NO TRICKS, JUST TREATS

MONSTER BURGER

HALLOWEEN SCONES


NT

Black and white pizza A delicious gourmet vegetarian pizza made easy with a few cheat’s version ingredients Serves 4 EASY 30 mins Preheat the oven to 190°C. Peel and thinly slice 1 large (250g) turnip. Heat 15ml (1 tbsp) butter and 15ml (1 tbsp) olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the turnips and fry, 3 – 4 minutes. Season lightly with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Divide 100g basil pesto between 2 plain 30cmdiameter pizza bases and spread evenly. Arrange the turnips on top. Add 150g halved, pitted black olives and 100g crumbled feta. Bake until crisp and golden, 12 – 15 minutes. Scatter a handful basil leaves on top and garnish with a few drops balsamic vinegar reduction. COOK’S TIP Use a Chinese mandolin or a very sharp chef’s knife to easily slice the turnips into thin discs. The thinner they are, the quicker they will cook.

AIN

YO

CO

U R 5 A D AY

in season

S 1. 5 O

F

Strawberry bloody Mary gazpacho A fuss-free raw soup that is served chilled Serves 4 EASY 30 mins Combine 225g chopped strawberries, 375ml (1½ cups) tomato juice, 200g chopped fresh tomatoes, 60ml (4 tbsp) vodka, 30ml (2 tbsp) lemon juice and 15ml (1 tbsp) Worcestershire sauce in a food processor, and blitz until smooth. Add a few drops Tabasco sauce and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Refrigerate, at least 15 minutes or up to 1 hour. Divide 40g sliced black olives among the servings. Garnish each portion with ½ strawberry and 1 small celery stalk with its leaves on. Serve with additional Tabasco sauce and freshly ground black pepper. COOK’S TIP Ready-made cheese straws make the perfect accompaniment to this delicious soup.

Monster burger A fun-scary burger – perfect for the whole family! Serves 4 EASY 45 mins

Halloween scones Scones with chunky rhubarb jam and chocolate cobwebs for a touch of Halloween Serves 4 EASY 30 mins Combine 300g chopped rhubarb, 225g chopped strawberries, 125ml (½ cup) berry juice, 60ml (4 tbsp) castor sugar and 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla essence in a pot over medium heat. Bring to a boil and simmer, 10 minutes. Stir in 50g toasted flaked almonds, 30ml (2 tbsp) rose water and 15ml (1 tbsp) chia seeds. Allow to cool. Serve the jam with store-bought warmed scones and whipped vanilla cream. Decorate with chocolate cobwebs. COOK’S TIP To make 8 chocolate cobwebs, melt 80g dark chocolate and transfer it to a small piping bag made from baking paper. Cut a small hole in the piping bag to act as the “nozzle” and pipe 8 cobwebs onto a sheet of baking paper. Allow to cool and use to decorate the scones. 48

OCTOBER 2017

Combine 250ml (1 cup) apple cider vinegar, 45ml (3 tbsp) sugar and 5ml (1 tsp) crushed garlic in a small saucepan, and simmer, 2 minutes. Pour it over 210g thinly sliced red onions, season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, and allow to cool. Combine 500g minced beef, ½ (60g) finely chopped red onion, 60ml (4 tbsp) chopped gherkins, 30ml (2 tbsp) sun-dried tomato pesto, 5ml (1 tsp) salt and a pinch freshly ground black pepper. Shape the mince mixture into 4 thick patties. Heat a little olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Fry the patties, 3 minutes per side. To make the monster eyes, press an indent in the centre of 8 (80g) bocconcini balls and fit a pimento-stuffed green olive inside each of the indents. Place them on toothpicks. Add a little mayonnaise, lettuce, pickled onions and the patties to 4 burger bun halves. Arrange small Cheddar triangles on the patties to look like the monster’s teeth. Add the remaining bun halves to close the hamburgers and insert the monster eyes on top of each bun. COOK’S TIP For a quicker alternative, use good quality, ready-made, store-bought patties.


in season RHUBARB JUICE

SMOKY RED ONION AND MUSHROOM TARTLETS

girly gEt-together MEATBALLS AND GUAVA TABBOULEH SALAD

STRAWBERRY CAKE SANDWICHES


Smoky red onion and mushroom tartlets Serves 6 EASY 40 mins Sauté 10ml (2 tsp) olive oil and 1½ (150g) finely chopped red onions in a small saucepan over medium heat, 1 minute. Add 30ml (2 tbsp) sugar, 5ml (1 tsp) balsamic vinegar, 5ml (1 tsp) finely chopped garlic and simmer, 4 minutes. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, and cool, 10 minutes. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Cut 6 (10cm-diameter) discs from 400g defrosted store-bought puff pastry. Make an indent inside each with a smaller (8,5cm-diameter) cutter and brush with milk. Arrange on a lined baking tray. Spread 5ml (1 tsp) crème fraîche on each disc and divide the onions among the tartlets. Add 1 thick slice smoked mozzarella and scatter 150g cooked wild mushrooms over each one. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste and bake, 25 minutes. Blitz 30ml (2 tbsp) fresh marjoram/15ml (1 tbsp) dried marjoram and 125ml (½ cup) olive oil together until smooth. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste and drizzle the marjoram oil over the tartlets. Garnish with marjoram leaves, if desired.

Rhubarb juice Makes 1,5L EASY 30 mins Combine 300g chopped rhubarb, 300g sugar, 310ml (1¼ cups) coconut water, 15ml (1 tbsp) lime juice, 5ml (1 tsp) vanilla essence and 5ml (1 tsp) grated ginger in a saucepan, and simmer over medium heat, 15 minutes. Blitz to a smooth purée and strain through a fine sieve. Once cooled, combine with 500ml (2 cups) water and 500ml (2 cups) coconut water. Serve the juice over ice, and garnish with a handful mint leaves and lemon slices. COOK’S TIP Serve the juice topped with a splash sparkling wine to easily turn it into a fun, pink Bellini.

A fun, non-alcoholic vegan pink drink – lovely for a leisurely ladies’ lunch

Heat 60ml (4 tbsp) fresh cream and 50g finely chopped white chocolate in a double boiler until smooth. Do not allow the bottom of the top boiler to touch the water below it. Remove from heat and whisk in 250g crème fraîche and the seeds of ½ vanilla pod. Refrigerate, 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat a griddle pan over high heat. Slice a 400g Madeira loaf into 12 slices with a thickness of about 1,5cm each. Grease the griddle pan with non-stick cooking spray and grill each Madeira slice, 8 – 10 seconds per side. To assemble, spread 6 of the cake slices with ½ of the white chocolate-crème fraîche mixture. Divide 240g sliced strawberries and 50g toasted and finely chopped hazelnuts among them. Spread the remaining cake slices with the other ½ white chocolate-crème fraîche mixture and close the six sandwiches. Slice into triangles and serve garnished with mint leaves. COOK’S TIP For those allergic to nuts, simply replace the hazelnuts with chocolate shavings, coconut shavings or finely crumbled meringues. 50

OCTOBER 2017

TA

INS

OU

CON

Madeira cake sandwiches filled with layers of strawberries, hazelnuts and white chocolate crème fraîche – eating with your hands is compulsory! Serves 6 EASY 40 mins

R 5 A D AY

Strawberry cake sandwiches 1. 5 O F

Y

Meatballs and guava tabbouleh salad A deliciously filling salad that is ideal for easy entertaining Serves 4 EASY 30 mins Simmer 180g bulgur wheat, 625ml (2½ cups) water and 10ml (2 tsp) crushed garlic together over medium heat, 15 minutes. Once cooled, stir in 1 (100g) finely chopped red onion, 2 (150g) chopped guavas, 60ml (4 tbsp) finely chopped fresh parsley, 60ml (4 tbsp) finely chopped fresh mint, 30ml (2 tbsp) olive oil, and a pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper. Blitz 2 (180g) chopped guavas, 60ml (4 tbsp) brown sugar, 60ml (4 tbsp) water, 30ml (2 tbsp) tomato sauce, 15ml (1 tbsp) balsamic vinegar, 15ml (1 tbsp) Worcestershire sauce and 1,25ml (¼ tsp) paprika together until smooth. Transfer to a saucepan, season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste, and simmer, 3 minutes. Add 400g readymade cocktail meatballs and simmer, 1 minute. Serve the meatballs and sauce atop the tabbouleh salad, and garnish with a handful toasted pine nuts and basil leaves.


IN SEASON

COOK’S TIP The granita mixture can be coloured with a few drops pink food colouring, if desired, before the freezing process. This will provide a brighter pink colour once the mixture is frozen.

ROSY YOGHURT PANNA COTTA WITH RHUBARB GRANITA (RECIPE ON PAGE 52)

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

51


IN SEASON

Turnip gnocchi with bacon, edamame beans and sage butter A modern take on an Italian classic: the turnips add a lovely mustardy tang to the gnocchi that is quite different from regular potato gnocchi Serves 4 A LITTLE EFFORT 1 hr 30 mins + 1 hr/overnight, to chill THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS GNOCCHI 5 (800g) large turnips, peeled and chopped 500g cake flour + extra, to dust 1 large egg, whisked 5ml (1 tsp) salt 2,5ml (½ tsp) ground cumin pinch freshly ground black pepper TO SERVE 15ml (1 tbsp) butter 15ml (1 tbsp) olive oil 200g streaky bacon, chopped 160g edamame beans 12 sage leaves 20g Parmesan, finely grated salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste basil leaves, to garnish (optional) HOW TO DO IT Place the turnips in a pot of cold, salted water. Bring to a boil and simmer over medium heat, 25 minutes. Strain, return the drained turnips to the pot over medium heat and cook, 5 minutes. This process allows any additional moisture to evaporate from the cooked turnips. Mash the turnips, and stir in the cake flour, egg, salt, cumin and a pinch pepper. Cover and refrigerate the dough, at least 1 hour or overnight. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over medium heat and line a baking tray with baking paper. Turn the gnocchi dough out onto a flour-dusted surface and sprinkle a little flour on top of the dough. Use your hands to lightly knead in the flour to make it less sticky. Halve the dough. Dust the surface and the top of the dough with flour once more. Use your palms to flatten the first ½ of the dough to a thickness of 2cm. Press a

1

2

3 4

round cookie cutter (with a diameter of 3cm) into flour and use it to press out the gnocchi discs. Place the discs on the prepared tray. Repeat these steps with the remaining dough. Cook the gnocchi in simmering water in 2 or 3 batches, 4 minutes per batch. Remove with a slotted spoon and place on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Heat the butter and olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the chopped streaky bacon and fry, 3 minutes. Add the gnocchi and fry, 2 – 3 minutes, until golden. Stir in the edamame beans and sage leaves, and cook, 1 minute. Scatter the Parmesan on top and season to taste. Garnish with basil leaves, if desired.

5

6 7

Rosy yoghurt panna cotta with rhubarb granita Rhubarb provides the perfect pop of colour and tartness to accompany the decadently rich panna cottas Serves 6 A LITTLE EFFORT 1 hr + 5 hrs, to freeze + 3 hrs/overnight, to chill THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS GRANITA 300g rhubarb, chopped 375ml (1½ cups) berry juice 110g castor sugar 15ml (1 tbsp) lemon juice seeds of 1 vanilla pod PANNA COTTA 15ml (1 tbsp) powdered gelatine 30ml (2 tbsp) cold water 500g double cream yoghurt 125ml (½ cup) fresh cream 110g castor sugar 60ml (4 tbsp) milk 15ml (1 tbsp) rose water + extra, if desired 130g Turkish delight/chocolatecoated Turkish delight, finely chopped 50g salted pistachios, finely chopped HOW TO DO IT For the granita, combine all of the ingredients in a pot over medium heat and simmer, 12 minutes, until fork-tender. Blitz to a smooth purée. Allow the mixture to cool down, transfer to a freezerproof container

1

and freeze, 1 hour. Scrape the surface with a fork and freeze, a further 1 hour. Repeat the process 3 more times. For the panna cotta, sprinkle the gelatine powder over the cold water in a small espresso cup and stir. Set aside until firm. Combine the yoghurt, fresh cream, castor sugar and milk in a pot over medium heat, and cook, 2 minutes, until the mixture is lukewarm and the sugar has melted. Place the espresso cup with the gelatine in it in a little boiling water, without allowing the water to run into the cup. Stir until melted. Stir some of the warm yoghurt mixture into the melted gelatine mixture, then pour everything back into the yoghurt mixture. Whisk until smooth. Stir in the rose water and add more, if desired. Stir in the Turkish delight bits. Divide the mixture among 6 ramekins or small serving jars and refrigerate, at least 3 hours or overnight until set. To serve, top each panna cotta portion with a little granita and add a sprinkling chopped pistachios over the top.

2

3

4

5

6


promotion

Au naturel NOT ONLY IS THIS DISH DELISH, IT’S QUICK AND EASY TO WHIP UP, AND – BEST OF ALL – IT’S MADE WITH NEW KN ORR NATURALLY TASTY RECIPE MIX, PACKED WITH NATURAL INGREDIENTS AND AUTHENTIC TASTE

moroccan chicken

FH8417/10/17 Photograph and product shot supplied

Serves 4 EASY 30 mins THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 15ml (1 tbsp) vegetable oil 500g skinless chicken breasts, cubed 1 x 63g sachet Knorr Naturally Tasty Moroccan Chicken recipe mix 300ml water 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes 1 baby marrow, sliced 100g dried sultanas 300g couscous, to serve 30ml (2 tbsp) toasted almond flakes, to serve (optional)

Knorr Naturally Tasty sources the finest fresh ingredients that are hand picked before undergoing the traditional drying process to lock in their natural flavours. The range is available at select Pick n Pay stores.

HOW TO DO IT Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat and fry the chicken until golden, about 10 minutes. Combine the contents of the Knorr Naturally Tasty sachet with the water and add the sauce to the pan, along with the tomatoes, baby marrow and sultanas. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, reduce the heat, cover and simmer, 15 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through. Meanwhile, cook the couscous according to the packaging instructions. Serve the Moroccan chicken atop the couscous and sprinkle over the toasted almond flakes, if desired.

1 2

3 4 5

Available in selected Pick n Pay stores. For more Naturally Tasty recipe inspiration visit www.whatsfordinner.co.za


PROMOTION

Love thy dairy A GLASS A DAY KEEPS THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON AWAY… WITH ITS MANY BENEFITS, WHY DON’T YOU JUST ADD MILK? Whether you have fresh milk in your morning cuppa or added to your breakfast smoothie, milk plays an important role in our daily routines and the nutritional properties of it often go unnoticed. We’ve rounded up five nutritive facts about dairy you need to know:

1

The protein in fresh milk contains all nine essential amino acids – these are the building blocks of protein, and they help build cells and muscle, as well as repair body tissue; they even help to support a healthy immune system. Our bodies can’t produce essential amino acids, so we need to get them from our diets. Milk is a good source of calcium and it also contains potassium – these are both essential for healthy bones and teeth. Choosing fresh milk over sugary drinks is one of the best things you can do to help prevent tooth decay and cavities. Drink a glass of fresh milk after a yoga- or gym session to give your body what it lost during your workout – milk contains protein, carbs, calcium and electrolytes (which help muscles to recover), plus it also packs a rehydrational punch. If you’re feeling stressed, milk can help. Thanks to minerals like magnesium in milk, it can help to soothe muscles and calm nerves. Fresh milk also contains the amino acid, tryptophan, which promotes sleep – a great reason to have a glass of warm milk after a long day at the office or just before bed! Dieticians recommend two to three servings of dairy a day (a glass of milk is a serving of dairy) per person. Because it provides nutrients like vitamins B2 and B12, calcium, magnesium, potassium and zinc, milk is an excellent drink for children and adults alike.

2

4 5

Only Clover Fresh milk undergoes 100+ quality tests to ensure you give the best to your family.

FH8404/10/17 Styling by Vickie de Beer Assisted by Julia van Maarseveen Photographs by Charles Russel, crphotographic.co.za

3


Meet the Good Guys:

We’re here on a mission to tell you about all the good things that make Clover Fresh Milk way better. I mean, you wouldn’t eat bread that’s stale right? Or an old apple? Why would you have milk from a box that could be 6-months old and tastes processed, when you can have the best? Only, Freshaaa is Bestaaa! With better quality and better taste, it is better for you – capiche? Show la familia some amore with Clover Fresh Milk.

4841/CLOVERSA/FRESHMILK/ENG


MARK & CARMEN

A match MADE IN

heaven

WHEN THE GROOM IS A RENOWNED FORMER SA CRICKETER, THE BRIDE A RAVISHING LOCAL BEAUTY, THE SETTING A RUGGED EASTERN CAPE FARM AND THE WEDDING ORGANISER, A MAN OF CREATIVE FLAIR EXTRAORDINAIRE, THE RESULT IS NOTHING LESS THAN DIVINE BY ANDREA PAFITIS-HILL PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHANNA JONES PHOTOGRAPHY AND CATHARINE SWAYDE PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN

56

OCTOBER 2017

ABOVE THE BRAND NEW MR AND MRS BOUCHER! FAR RIGHT CARMEN BOUCHER WITH HER BRIDESMAIDS AND FLOWERGIRLS


MARK & CARMEN

MUSSEL AND SAFFRON SOUP

aught and bowled (over) might be an apt way to describe how South African cricket’s one-time wizard of wicketkeeping – Mark Boucher – felt when he first laid eyes on the exquisite Carmen Lotter at Café Caprice in Camps Bay, Cape Town in 2012. In Mark’s own words: “As she came around the corner, I said to my friend, ‘I’m going to marry that girl one day.’” Cue 29 July 2017 when 250 of Mark and Carmen’s nearest and dearest gathered at a venue particularly close to the bride’s heart – her childhood home, Die Erfie farm outside Jeffreys Bay. A 10-minute drive down a pastoral lane off the main road, Die Erfie lies close to the banks of Swartrivier. Here, on the farm’s sprawling 70 hectares, lies a ceremonial amphitheatre, where Carmen and Mark’s marriage vows were taken in front of the rugged panorama across which the farm’s breeding herd of disease-free wildlife command the landscape. As much as its mesmerising fauna creates an impact second to none, so too does Die Erfie’s The Rose Barn, a function venue that is the passion project of Carmen’s mom, Sandra. Petite and super-stylish, Sandra is a welcoming lady who has left no country pebble unturned in ensuring that this charming rustic spot offers the A to Z of requirements for any occasion. With 500 rose trees personally tended to by Sandra, a function’s floral needs are, literally, on the doorstep of The Rose Barn – and the talented Tanya Gräbe of Must Love Flowers, The Rose Barn’s in-house florist, is available to style blooms for events, if commissioned. Enter one of SA’s most innovative wedding planners, Otto de Jager. A man who prides himself on professionalism delivered with lashings of panache, Otto is to weddings what cream cheese is to bagels. In creating a theme that combined 18th century baroque with café de Paris chic and château Provençal charm, Otto achieved nothing less than a design hat trick. Moreover, the organic layout of the wedding reception, which featured


two rooms through which guests were encouraged to flow, mingle and select their choice of sexy coffee-based cocktails by the award-winning baristas of InFood – a much-loved Jeffreys Bay bakery, roaster and deli owned by Jayne Davies, whose list of accomplishments includes catering for Prince William’s 21st birthday. Of the liquid delights I tried (for research purposes, of course), the Russian “lava” coffee infused with syrup, honeybush tea, vodka and cream got my vote. With guests encouraged to sit where they liked – be it on a Louis XV chair or Rococo loveseat – Otto explained: “Sandra and Carmen wanted the wedding to be a casual affair with cocktail seating. I got so excited about this idea and grew it into the concept of a cocktail lounge, with the reference of an antique shop, almost as if people could wander around and purchase items. This, in conjunction with the fact that it was a winter wedding, inspired the rich colours.” As for the food? Oh la la… In perfect harmony with the setting, Eastern Cape-based Aqua Food and Catering made an entrance second only to the bride with baskets, platters, urns and silver salvers that flowed through the night and into the early hours. Loaded with bobotie cigars with chilli tomato relish, wheel upon wheel of Grand Brie with roasted olives, garlic and lemon, mussel and saffron soup, venison ragout over home-made pappardelle with shaved pecorino and, oh, so much more, Aqua Food and Catering’s chef-owners, Celia van der Walt and Tricia Honey, tirelessly delivered this first-class fare with a trusty team of culinary Trojans. With their philosophy of “fresh, perfect ingredients” being the starting point to any great menu, Celia and Tricia pride themselves on delivering unfussy flavours that pack a punch. This down-to-earth duo – who gathers inspiration from cookbooks, magazines and fellow chefs alike – believe collaboration is key to a successful business. “This is very much the Eastern Cape ethos,” affirms Tricia. Now, gentle reader, you and I both know that no matter how much a lady doth protest that she simply cannot ingest another morsel, the mere sight of an elegant dessert trolley being wheeled over somehow loosens her resolve (and her corset strings) a little. And how can

VENISON RAGOUT WITH HOME-MADE PAPPARDELLE AND PECORINO SHAVINGS

TOP CARMEN’S LOVELY PARENTS, CASPER AND SANDRA LOTTER, WITH CARMEN’S OLDER BROTHER, CASSIE RIGHT THE INIMITABLE OTTO DE JAGER BELOW LEFT OTTO’S ADORABLE DACHSHUND, SARAH

TSITSIKAMMA HONEY ON THE COMB, WHOLE GORGONZOLA, RED WINE POACHED PEARS AND PEPPER APPLE CHIPS

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

59


you blame her when perfect and painstakingly made Florentines, brownies, blondies, custard slices, almond and white chocolate ganache macarons, Nutella fudge with pretzel crunch, and lemon-blueberry cheesecake present themselves? All created by InFood, this veritable smorgasbord of sweet seduction was carefully crafted to suit both classic and contemporary tastes. For me, the pièce de résistance was their sublime tarte Tatin – made with locally sourced Tsitsikamma butter and pears, its base of croissant pastry was a novel twist! Yes, there was no doubt love was in the air and the fare that night. And by my score, the new Mrs Boucher fits Mark like no other glove could. So, without further ado, the F&HE team and I wish them a lifetime of happiness made all the more memorable by food, glorious food! On that note, our advice to the newlyweds would be to keep reading a certain amazing food magazine. Nudge, nudge. Wink, wink. OTTO DE JAGER EVENTS, ODJEVENTS.COM; THE ROSE BARN, THEROSEBARN.CO.ZA; MUST LOVE FLOWERS, MUSTLOVEFLOWERS.CO.ZA; AQUA FOOD AND CATERING, AQUAFOODANDCATERING.CO.ZA; INFOOD, INFOOD.CO.ZA

Shanna Jones is a professional Cape Town-based photographer, who also photographs weddings globally. Call +27 (0)79 945 9014 or visit shannajones.com for more information.

Catharine Swayde Photography & Design, located in Jeffreys Bay, specialises in photographing weddings and portraits. Visit catharineswayde.co.za for more information.


ESE RECI TH

ZA O.

FOOD

AN

S AT PE

FIND

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT THE WEDDING “CAKE” – A DECADENT SLAB OF CALLEBAUT 70% DARK CHOCOLATE; CROISSANT PASTRY-BASE TARTE TATIN MADE WITH TSITSIKAMMA BUTTER AND PEARS; GRAND BRIE WITH ROASTED OLIVES, GARLIC AND LEMON; TENDER-STEAMED OCTOPUS

D H O M E.C


THE CHICKEN AND THE EGG


WORLD EGG DAY PARSNIP RÖSTIS WITH SHREDDED CHICKEN, SOFT-POACHED EGGS AND SPINACH

NEVER MIND DEBATING WHICH CAME FIRST – WE’D RATHER PLAY IT FAIR BY CELEBRATING THE FABULOUS FOWL TOO ON WORLD EGG DAY, 13 OCTOBER! RECIPES AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI PHOTOGRAPHS BY DYLAN SWART

All recipes contain both chicken and egg – paying tribute to these two staples coming together in the kitchen. So many dishes can be elevated by simply adding an egg or some chicken, not to mention that both ingredients are nutritional powerhouses

Parsnip r stis with shredded chicken, soft-poached eggs and spinach Serves 4 A LITTLE EFFORT 1 hr 15 mins THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS PARSNIP RÖSTIS 1 medium potato, unpeeled and coarsely grated 300g parsnips, scrubbed and coarsely grated 100g butter, melted salt, to taste olive oil, to shallow-fry POACHED EGGS 4 – 8 very fresh extra-large eggs (check the sell-by dates for the

latest when shopping) splash white wine vinegar SPINACH olive oil, to fry 400g baby spinach 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced pinch chilli flakes salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste TO SERVE cooked chicken breasts, shredded fresh chives, chopped fresh dill, chopped blackened vine tomatoes lemon wedges, to squeeze salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste crème fraîche (optional)

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

63


HOW TO DO IT For the röstis, combine the grated potato, parsnips, butter and salt in a medium bowl. Mix well to combine (using your hands is best). Heat a few generous glugs olive oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. For each rösti, fry 2 tablespoonfuls mixture in the olive oil (use a spatula to press and flatten the röstis). Fry, 2 – 3 minutes per side, until crisp and golden, then set aside until needed (warm them briefly in the microwave before serving). Break an egg into a cup/ramekin and set aside. (It’s best to use the freshest eggs possible – look for the latest sell-by date.) Bring a large pot of water to a gentle simmer. Add a splash white wine vinegar. Vigorously stir the water in a circular motion to create a well in the centre of the water. Pour the egg from the cup/ramekin into the well in the water. Repeat this process with the remaining eggs and poach each egg, one at a time, in the simmering water, 3 – 4 minutes for soft. Carefully remove with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl of warm water to rinse off the vinegar, then drain on paper towel. For the spinach, wipe out the rösti pan and heat another glug olive oil over high heat. As the oil starts to smoke, add the spinach, garlic and chilli, and season to taste. Fry over high heat until wilted, about 2 – 3 minutes. Serve the röstis in a stack, each rösti topped with the shredded chicken, a soft-poached egg, sprinkled with the chopped chives and dill, with blackened vine tomatoes alongside and lemon wedges for squeezing. Season to taste. Serve with dollops crème fraîche, if desired.

1

2

3

4

Chicken pie with savoury shortbread pastry This pastry is deliciously short, crumbly and buttery, melting in one’s mouth... Serves 6 A LITTLE EFFORT 2 hrs

CHICKEN PIE WITH SAVOURY SHORTBREAD PASTRY

64

OCTOBER 2017

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SHORTBREAD PASTRY 200g butter, cubed 250g cake flour + extra, to dust pinch salt 1 extra-large egg yolk 1 beaten egg, to brush


WORLD EGG DAY

PIE FILLING 100g butter 1 onion, peeled and diced 3 leeks, sliced and washed 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced 30ml (2 tbsp) thyme leaves 500ml (2 cups) fresh cream 250ml (1 cup) milk 10ml (2 tsp) cornflour, mixed with 15ml (1 tbsp) boiling water salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 whole rotisserie chicken, flesh shredded + bones and skin discarded chopped dill, to garnish (optional) HOW TO DO IT For the pastry, place 200g butter cubes, the cake flour and salt in a food processor, and blitz to a fine crumb. Add the egg yolk and blitz briefly to incorporate. Carefully shape the dough into a disc (it will be fairly soft and buttery), wrap in cling film and refrigerate, at least 1 hour. While the shortbread pastry is chilling, make the pie filling by placing 100g butter, the onion and leeks in a large pot. Fry over medium heat until the onion and leeks are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and thyme leaves, and fry, a further 3 minutes, before adding the fresh cream, milk and cornflour paste. Bring to a simmer, 3 minutes, then remove from heat and season to taste. Place the shredded chicken in a rectangular roasting/casserole dish of about 30cm x 20cm. Pour over the cream mixture and combine to make sure the cream and chicken are evenly distributed around the dish. Insert a large piping nozzle in the centre of the dish if you don’t have a pie bird. Place the chicken filling in the fridge to chill, at least 30 minutes.

1

2

3

4

Preheat the oven to 200°C. Using extra cake flour to dust a surface, roll the pastry out into a rectangle large enough to fit over the top of the dish to cover the pie filling. The pastry will be very buttery and delicate, so you’ll need to work quickly to avoid it warming up too much. Simply patch up any tears that develop during handling. Fit the pastry over the dish, trimming off any overhang and using a fork to crimp the edges of the pastry all around to secure the filling. Decorate the top of the pie with chicken pastry cut-outs, if desired. Brush with the beaten egg and bake in the preheated oven, 30 – 40 minutes or until the pastry is golden and cooked through. Serve immediately, sprinkled with chopped dill, if desired.

Soothing Asian-inspired noodle soup Serves 2 EASY 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 6 lemongrass stalks, roughly chopped 4 thumbs fresh ginger, sliced 3 garlic cloves, peeled 4 fresh lemon leaves, bruised (optional) 1 red chilli, seeds discarded 10ml (2 tsp) sesame oil 1 onion, peeled and quartered juice of 1 lime 60ml (4 tbsp) soya sauce 1,5L vegetable stock 2,5ml (½ tsp) cornflour, mixed with 5ml (1 tsp) boiling water 300g exotic mushrooms 100g dried wholewheat noodles 100g baby bok choi TO SERVE soft-boiled eggs, halved 2 cooked chicken breasts, shredded fresh coriander, roughly chopped

spring onion, roughly chopped lime halves, to squeeze HOW TO DO IT In a medium pot, place the lemongrass stalks, sliced fresh ginger, whole garlic cloves, lemon leaves, red chilli, sesame oil, onion, lime juice, soya sauce and vegetable stock. Simmer, 30 minutes. Pass the liquid through a sieve and return to the pot, discarding the bits. Bring to a simmer again and add the cornflour paste, mushrooms, noodles and bok choi. Simmer, a further 7 minutes. Divide between 2 bowls and top with soft-boiled egg halves, shredded chicken, a sprinkling chopped fresh coriander and chopped spring onion. Serve with lime halves alongside for squeezing.

1

2

3

Mexican chicken skewers with egg pancakes Serves 2 – 3 A LITTLE EFFORT 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS CHICKEN SKEWERS 700g skinless, deboned chicken thighs 15ml (1 tbsp) cumin seeds 15ml (1 tbsp) smoked Spanish paprika 15ml (1 tbsp) dried oregano 2,5ml (½ tsp) chilli flakes olive oil, to drizzle salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste QUICK MEXICAN BEANS olive oil, to fry 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced 10ml (2 tsp) cumin seeds 5ml (1 tsp) ground coriander pinch chilli flakes 1 x 400g tin red kidney beans, drained and rinsed


MEXICAN CHICKEN SKEWERS WITH EGG PANCAKES (RECIPE ON PAGE 65)

66

OCTOBER 2017


N

TA

YO

CO

U R 5 D AY A

WORLD EGG DAY

INS 2.5 OF

SOOTHING ASIAN-INSPIRED NOODLE SOUP (RECIPE ON PAGE 65)

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

67


WORLD EGG DAY

SHREDDED CHICKEN KEDGEREE

68

OCTOBER 2017


200g store-bought Mexican salsa handful fresh coriander leaves, roughly chopped squeeze lime juice salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste EGG PANCAKES 2 eggs large pinch salt 30ml (2 tbsp) milk coriander leaves, to serve lime wedges, to squeeze HOW TO DO IT For the chicken skewers, place the skinless, deboned chicken thighs in a bowl. Pound the 15ml (1 tbsp) cumin seeds with a pestle and mortar until roughly ground but not to a fine powder. Sprinkle the cumin seeds, smoked Spanish paprika, dried oregano and 2,5ml (½ tsp) chilli flakes over the chicken thighs, then drizzle generously with olive oil and toss to coat the chicken. Season to taste, cover with cling film and allow to chill in the fridge until just before frying. For the beans, heat a drizzle olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic, 10ml (2 tsp) cumin seeds and ground coriander, and fry, 3 minutes, before adding a pinch chilli flakes, the red kidney beans and the store-bought salsa. Just before serving, heat up the mixture, then stir through a handful fresh coriander, lime juice and season to taste. Returning to the skewers, heat a frying pan over high heat and place the chicken thighs in the pan once it is hot. Fry, tossing, until the chicken is just cooked through, about 5 – 7 minutes. Thread the chicken onto skewers to serve. For the egg pancakes, whisk all of the ingredients together until smooth and well combined. Heat a non-stick frying pan sprayed with cooking spray over medium heat. Pour a little egg mixture into the pan, swirl to coat the base of the pan, then pour any excess back into the uncooked egg mixture. Cook until the egg pancake is cooked through, about 1 – 2 minutes, flip and cook, a further 1 minute. Remove from pan and repeat these steps until all of the mixture has been used up. Serve the skewers warm with the quick Mexican beans, egg pancakes,

1

2

3

4

5

coriander leaves and lime wedges alongside for squeezing.

Shredded chicken kedgeree Kedgeree is believed to have originated with the Indian rice-and-bean or rice-and-lentil dish, khichri, traced back to 1340 or earlier. It is thought that the dish was exported to the UK by returning British settlers who had experienced it in India and introduced it to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times, which became part of the en vogue Anglo-Indian cuisine of the time. This dish works particularly well as supper too! Serves 6 – 8 EASY 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 1 onion, peeled and diced 30ml (2 tbsp) butter 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced seeds of 3 cardamom pods, crushed 2,5ml (½ tsp) ground turmeric 1 cinnamon quill 2 fresh/dried bay leaves 500g basmati rice 1,25ml (¼ tsp) chicken stock salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste large handful fresh flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped large handful fresh dill leaves, roughly chopped 4 cooked and shredded chicken breasts, to serve medium-boiled egg quarters, to serve lemon wedges, to squeeze HOW TO DO IT Put the onion and butter in a large pot, and fry over medium heat until the onion is soft and translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, cardamom seeds and ground turmeric, and fry, a further 2 minutes. Add the cinnamon quill, bay leaves, basmati rice and chicken stock, and simmer over medium heat until the rice is tender, but not mushy. Season the rice, then stir through the herbs. Serve in bowls, topped with the chicken and the egg quarters, and with lemon wedges alongside for squeezing.

1

2


U

BE

RG

IN

E

WI

TH

BL

AC

KS

ESAM

E HUMMUS

F OR GOTHAM

NS

R

T

AI

5A

CON

D AY

SO MI

3 O F YO

U

-R

O

T AS

ED

A


DARK & DECADENT

IN A LONELY ALLEY ON A MOONLESS NIGHT IN OCTOBER, SOMETHING LURKED IN A COLD CORNER… AND AS THIS DARK FIGURE SWEPT AROUND, ITS BLACK CLOAK REVEALED WHAT WOULD SEND SHIVERS DOWN YOUR SPINE – A GOTHIC BANQUET TO REVERE BOTH HERO AND VILLAIN RECIPES, STYLING AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY KATELYN WILLIAMS ASSISTED BY CASSANDRA UPTON

BLACKBERRY, VODKA AND SMOKING ROSEMARY MARTINIS (RECIPE ON PAGE 76)


Miso-roasted aubergine with black sesame hummus Serves 2 EASY 1 hr 15 mins

Onion-ash goat's cheese with poppyseed crackers and black garlic jam

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS MISO-ROASTED AUBERGINE 2 large aubergines 15ml (1 tbsp) miso paste 15ml (1 tbsp) honey 2,5ml (½ tsp) sesame oil 75ml hot water

Serves 4 A LITTLE EFFORT 2 hrs 30 mins

BLACK SESAME HUMMUS 80ml (cup) black sesame seeds, toasted + extra, to garnish 250ml (1 cup) vegetable oil 1 x 400g tin chickpeas, drained and rinsed 1 garlic clove, peeled 10ml (2 tsp) ground cumin juice of 1 lemon, to taste salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

POPPYSEED CRACKERS olive oil, to grease 240g cake flour + extra, to dust 5ml (1 tsp) baking powder 5ml (1 tsp) salt 5ml (1 tsp) sugar freshly ground black pepper, to taste 60ml (4 tbsp) activated charcoal (find at health stores) 60ml (4 tbsp) olive oil + extra, to drizzle 125ml (½ cup) water 125g poppyseeds black salt, to sprinkle

HOW TO DO IT For the aubergine, preheat the oven to 180°C. Halve the aubergines lengthways, score the flesh with a knife, cutting deep into the flesh, without piercing the skin: make diagonal cuts, about 2,5cm apart and then repeat these cuts in the other direction, so you are left with a diamond pattern. Combine the miso paste, honey, sesame oil and hot water, and toss the aubergines in the marinade. Allow to rest, 30 minutes. Place the aubergines on a large roasting tin (flesh-side down) and roast, 20 minutes, until caramelised. Turn the aubergines over and roast, a further 15 minutes, until very soft. To make the hummus, place all of the ingredients in a food processor or blender and blitz until smooth, scraping down the sides occasionally. Divide the hummus between 2 plates and spread with the back of a spoon. Place the aubergines atop and garnish with black sesame seeds.

1

2

3

4 5 72

OCTOBER 2017

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS ONION-ASH GOAT’S CHEESE 2 small onions, peeled 1 x 100g log plain goat’s cheese

BLACK GARLIC JAM 30ml (2 tbsp) balsamic vinegar cloves of 2 whole heads black garlic, peeled (find at select Woolworths stores) 30ml (2 tbsp) honey HOW TO DO IT To make the onion ash, preheat the oven to 190˚C. Slice the onions as thinly as possible and spread the slices out evenly on a non-stick roasting tray. Cook until black, completely dry and brittle, 1½ – 2 hours. Allow to cool, then tip into a food processor and blitz to a fine powder. Roll the goat’s cheese in the onion ash.

1

2

For the poppyseed crackers, increase the oven’s heat to 220˚C. Lightly grease two baking sheets with olive oil. Whisk together the cake flour, baking powder, salt, sugar, pepper and activated charcoal. Using a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook – or by hand – mix the 60ml (4 tbsp) olive oil and the water into the flour mixture, until the dough forms a rough ball. Divide the dough into 2 halves. On a flour-dusted surface, roll one half out to a rectangle of 30cm x 20cm, about 0,2cm thick. Lightly drizzle with a little olive oil, sprinkle with ½ the poppyseeds and transfer to one of the prepared baking sheets. Continue to roll out the dough, until it nearly reaches the edges of the baking sheet. Repeat these steps with the remaining dough half. Bake, 6 minutes and allow to cool. Break into shards and sprinkle with black salt.

3


DARK & DECADENT ONION-ASH GOAT’S CHEESE WITH POPPYSEED CRACKERS AND BLACK GARLIC JAM

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

73


COLD BREW COFFEE AND CARDAMOM JELLIES (RECIPE ON PAGE 76)

74

OCTOBER 2017


DARK & DECADENT

SOME ARE BORN to sweet delight,

SOME ARE BORN  FROM AUGURIES OF INNOCENCE BY WILLIAM BLAKE

BLACK VELVET BRUSHSTROKE CAKE WITH BURNT VANILLA ICING (RECIPE ON PAGE 76)

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

75


DARK & DECADENT

4

To make the jam, place the balsamic vinegar, black garlic and honey in a blender or pestle and mortar, and blitz or pound until thick and smooth. Serve the black garlic jam alongside the onion-ash goat’s cheese and poppyseed crackers.

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS 65g coffee beans 2 cardamom pods 1L (4 cups) cold water 135g dark muscovado sugar 12 (20g) gelatine sheets, soaked

45 – 60ml (3 – 4 tbsp) milk black gel food colouring

Blackberry, vodka and smoking rosemary Martinis

HOW TO DO IT Put the coffee beans and cardamom pods in a pestle and mortar and crush to a very coarse consistency – there should still be small chunks of coffee beans and cardamom pods in it. Place the crushed coffee-cardamom mixture and cold water in a large glass jar. Stir well to combine, seal and chill in the fridge to infuse overnight, a minimum of 12 hours (24 hours is best). Strain the mixture through a fine mesh sieve or muslin cloth. Remove 250ml (1 cup) of the coffee mixture and gently heat in a small saucepan over low heat. Add the muscovado sugar and soaked gelatine sheets, and stir until dissolved. Pour the gelatine mixture into the remaining coffee mixture and mix well. Divide among 6 greased jelly moulds (with 80ml capacity each). Chill in the fridge, at least 2 hours or until set.

HOW TO DO IT For the cake, preheat the oven to 180˚C. Grease and line 3 cake tins (20cm diameter) with baking paper. In a large bowl, sift together the dry ingredients and make a well in the centre. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, coffee, buttermilk, canola oil and a few drops black gel food colouring. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and whisk until just combined. Divide the batter among the tins and bake in the preheated oven, 30 – 40 minutes or until springy to the touch and a skewer inserted in the centres of the cakes comes out clean. Allow to cool in the tins, 5 minutes, before turning out onto a wire cooling rack to cool down completely. To make the icing, place the vanilla pod on a baking sheet in the oven and roast, 5 minutes, until fragrant. Scrape the seeds from the pod and discard the pod. Place the seeds in a blender or pestle and mortar and blitz or pound to form a fine powder. Cream the butter until light and fluffy, then add the vanilla powder, 60g cocoa, the icing sugar, milk and enough gel food colouring to make a black icing. Beat until smooth and completely combined. For the brushstrokes, line a baking sheet with baking paper. Mix the powder colouring into the melted baking chocolate. Drop a teaspoonful coloured chocolate onto the baking sheet, then use the back of a spoon to smear the chocolate like a brushstroke over the baking sheet. Repeat until all of the chocolate has been used up. Allow to set before peeling off the brushstrokes. Assemble the cake by layering the sponges with burnt vanilla buttercream icing between each layer. Cover the entire cake in icing and smooth out with a palette knife. Using dollops icing, stick the brushstrokes on the front of the cake to decorate.

Serves 2 EASY 45 mins THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SIMPLE SYRUP 30ml (2 tbsp) sugar 30ml (2 tbsp) water

1

2

MARTINI 250g frozen/fresh blackberries, defrosted if frozen 60ml (4 tbsp) simple syrup (from above) 4 large sprigs fresh rosemary + extra, to garnish 4 orange slices 120ml good quality vodka 60ml (4 tbsp) soda water 2 dashes orange bitters

3

HOW TO DO IT Make a simple syrup by placing the sugar and water in a small saucepan over medium heat. Heat gently until the sugar has completely dissolved, bring to a boil, then remove from heat and set aside to cool down completely. Pulse the blackberries and simple syrup in a blender. Pass the mixture through a fine mesh sieve. Strip the leaves off 2 fresh rosemary sprigs and muddle with 4 orange slices in a cocktail shaker. Add ice. Add 160ml of the blackberry syrup and the vodka to the cocktail shaker. Shake and pour into 2 glasses with ice. Top up with soda water and add a dash orange bitters to each glass. Garnish each glass with fresh rosemary sprigs and set the sprigs alight, so they smoke.

Black Velvet Brushstroke Cake with Burnt Vanilla icing

1

2 3 4

Cold Brew Coffee and Cardamom Jellies Serves 6 EASY 20 mins + overnight/ 24 hrs, to steep + 2 hrs, to set

76

OCTOBER 2017

Serves 8 A LITTLE EFFORT 2 hrs THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS BLACK VELVET CAKE 240g cake flour 490g castor sugar 100g cocoa powder 10ml (2 tsp) bicarbonate of soda 5ml (1 tsp) baking powder large pinch salt 2 large eggs 180ml (¾ cup) strong coffee, cooled 320g buttermilk 125ml (½ cup) canola oil black gel food colouring BURNT VANILLA ICING 1 vanilla pod, halved 125g butter, softened 60g cocoa powder, sifted 300g icing sugar, sifted

BRUSHSTROKES black powder food colouring 100g dark baking chocolate, melted

1 2

3

4

5

6


the heal DOPPIO ZERO D

! th

I S OE

IN

Wh

at

AG


PROMOTION

SUPERFOOD BUZZWORDS ARE BANDIED ABOUT WITH INCREASING EMPHASIS THESE DAYS, BUT DO YOU REALLY KNOW WHEN YOUR BODY COULD DO WITH A TURMERIC TOPUP OR A LITTLE MORE MATCHA? NOT TO WORRY – DOPPIO ZERO HAS DONE YOUR HOMEWORK FOR YOU WITH THEIR WHAT THE HEALTH! FRESH MENU THAT PERFECTLY BALANCES NATURAL GOODNESS WITH ON-TREND FLAVOUR

ike any well-researched menu worth its weight in golden lattes, Doppio Zero’s What the health! Fresh Menu 2017 is the latest in their series of summer dishes that have been honed and improved over eight years. This means that every ingredient – be it in the acai berry yoghurt with chia seeds, fresh strawberries and flaked almonds or the Buddha bowl brimming with bulgur wheat, crispy chickpeas and feta – is part of a finely tuned and flavourful recipe. “Fresh is our annual spring campaign to kick-start our summer menu. We formulate the selection around fresh and healthy

ingredients,” says chef Cassie Davis, who spearheads recipe development for Doppio Zero. “For this menu we’ve brought in a lot of superfoods and some really interesting ingredients, including turmeric, matcha, acai powder, edamame beans and black rice,” highlights Cassie. Through September and October, you’ll find the Fresh menu at every Doppio Zero restaurant, along with sample shots of the juice of the day (free to each customer). Freshly squeezed juices and power shots will be sure to provide you with the boost you need to make the easy transition from winter into spring. Pair that with a bright, fresh and breezy atmosphere and make the health kick fun and contagious. Doppio Zero has done the hard work for you, working with dietician, Kelly Ansley, to put together bowls full of balanced goodness packing a powerful nutritional

DOPPIO.CO.ZA

punch – so all you have to do is order and enjoy, knowing that anything you choose from the Fresh menu will support your new spring cleaning resolutions. There’s no need to wave goodbye to the warm hug of a frothy latte. Get that feel-good vibe with an extra kick, from a turmeric-, matcha- or spiced Rooibos latte. Earn superfood brownie points as you sip... with the Fresh menu in hand, it’s easy to wean yourself off winter comfort foods and rediscover the healthy summer you crave. Welcome spring and summer this September and October with Doppio Zero.

FACEBOOK.COM/DOPPIOZEROSA

TWITTER.COM/DOPPIOZEROSA

INSTAGRAM.COM/DOPPIOZEROSA


A GIANT

spirit

LEFT THE MONGONGO NUT TREE THAT HAS PRIDE OF PLACE IN THE CENTRE (QUITE LITERALLY) OF ANNABEL HUGHES’ HOME TOP RIGHT ORANGE CHANTERELLES AND CHINYIKA MUSHROOMS FROM ANNABEL’S GARDEN BOTTOM RIGHT BAOBAB PODS – A FEAST FOR THE ELEPHANTS

TAKE A PINCH OF KISMET, ADD A SPOONFUL OF SERENDIPITY, AND WILD AND WONDERFUL THINGS OCCUR, AS OUR ED, ANDREA PAFITIS-HILL, FOUND OUT AT THE ELEPHANT CAFÉ ON THE BANKS OF THE MIGHTY ZAMBEZI PHOTOGRAPHS BY TERRY MCCORMICK, PAUL BUSSELL, SEAN EDINGTON, ANTHONY GROTE AND RACHEL TEMBO


elephant caf

his is the tree from whence it began,” says Annabel Hughes, gazing up into a canopy of handshaped leaves, at the ends of branches from which mongongo nuts grow. We’re carefully picking our way through the small-holding in Livingstone, Zambia, where, for the past four years, Annabel has lovingly brought to life a rambling organic garden, with everything from pineapples to squash flourishing with intertwined contentment. If there’s a Narnia of organic gardening, this is surely it. Recognising my childlike awe, Annabel grins: “What we do is ‘jungle gardening’ – we plant things at random and if they come up on their own, we leave them. I have a ‘roof’ of indigenous teak trees and their fragrant purple flowers attract the pollinating bees, while other flowers in the garden attract the wasps that prey on the garden pests... it’s such a dynamic and healthy environment that even our guavas never get stung by insects – it’s unheard of that guavas never get stung, but ours never do!” While this is the first time I’ve met Annabel, the fruits of her green-fingered labours are already well known to me via her garden-to-table blog, SavannaBel: Bush Gourmet in the Zambezi Valley (savannabel.com), featured in F&HE’s November 2015 issue. “The blog begets the garden and the garden begets the blog... they work very much in synergy,” Annabel says.

This synergy sparked a trifecta in the form of The Elephant Café, where selftaught Annabel has been executive chef since its inception in June 2016. With the 2017 Luxury Travel Guide award for Boutique Restaurant of the Year (Africa and the Middle East) being the latest in its string of accolades, it’s not just the elephants who are trumpeting about The Elephant Café’s arrival. Conceptualised and owned by seasoned hotelier, Steve McCormick – founder of Safari Par Excellence, a well-known Zambian tour operation – Elephant Café is an intimate 24-seater restaurant, housed on a Bedouin-tented wooden deck on the banks upstream of the Victoria Falls. The more I see and learn, the more my anticipation rises! So, when our water chariot (aka jetboat) arrives the next day to whisk us from the David Livingstone Safari Lodge & Spa – the comfortable, sprawling resort where we’re staying – to The Elephant Café for lunch, I’m already hovering anxiously on the jetty. I gratefully accept the hand extended to me by the jetboat’s driver and river guide, Masau Sakla, who tells me: “This is my 19th year working on the Zambezi. I love its mighty vibration. Mostly, I love watching the animals. I was born on the river.” The confident ease with which Masau steers us through the mini rapids and convoluted channels of his watery domain is comforting. And having only previously experienced safaris on Land Rovers rolling over rough turf, I’m thrilled by the sharp contrast of this smooth glide. Lost in a reverie as we cruise along, I smile as I’m reminded of the words of Wilbur Smith: “They say if you drink Zambezi water with your mother’s milk, you are always a slave of Africa, and I am.” And if I thought my hair was blown back on the jetboat, it’s the graceful group of gentle giants – namely, Madinda, Marula, Danny and Liwa, which I could swear are smiling as they head towards us in a slow trot, their foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

81


BOTTOM LEFT BARISTA AND HEAD WAITER, OLIVER SIANSYA FAR LEFT ANANT GANESH PATEL WITH DANNY – HE IS THE DOMINANT BULL OF THE ELEPHANT HERD, YET, IN ANANT’S WORDS, “THE MOST GENTLE MAN”. DANNY IS ALSO PICTURED ON THE FACING PAGE, MAKING A “TRUNK CALL”! ALONGSIDE EXECUTIVE CHEF, ANNABEL HUGHES

heads dipping in friendly greeting – that takes my breath away. Accompanied by their attentive handlers, each of these elephants has travelled its own dark and dusty road to this rescue and rehabilitation sanctuary, where visitors are encouraged to interact with them via feeding, not riding. There’s another reason we’re on sacred ground. For this is where The Elephant Café’s manager, Anant Ganesh Patel, has called home for 26 years. “Originally it was family land and it was bought as a farm, but because we’re in a national park, the farm didn’t work because the animals ate all of the crops! So, the land was leased to a safari camp next door – Thorntree River Lodge – which Steve took over in 1991 and then brought the elephants in. I previously worked at Thorntree and when Steve told me there was a job available here, I jumped at it... 82

OCTOBER 2017

“The elephants are in an environment that’s as close as they can be to a natural habitat... we’re in a game park, so they go off to the islands and do what elephants do. They are very special to me and my family, especially because we’re Hindu and we believe in the Elephant Headed God, Ganesh, which was also my father’s name. In fact, we’d named our home Ganesh Nivas, which means ‘Home of the Elephant God’ – this was before the elephants arrived, so it was pre-destined!” Anant continues: “We have a very deep connection to the elephants, from the time they arrived to the time my dad passed away. In the Hindu custom, when we have funeral ceremonies, we bring the coffin home and then we take it to the crematorium. On the way out, a herd of wild elephants blocked the procession of about 50 cars. They


elephant caf

wouldn’t move for at least 10 minutes. Then they parted and we had to drive through them.” As I blink away tears, the offer of a flute of bubbly is most welcome! Nestling at the bottom of the glass is a burgundy-coloured syrup, which Annabel tells me is made from the calyx of sindambi (rosella). Sipping on this elixir, I peruse the menu, my eye instantly drawn to the warm roasted butternut salad with tahini yoghurt, mixed basil paste, and mongongo nut and baobab dukkah. When I comment on the interesting mix of Middle Eastern flavours and indigenous ingredients, Annabel says: “I develop all the recipes, but the one person I am inspired by is Yotam Ottolenghi, because of how courageous he is with flavours. “Thai and South-East Asian cuisines also influence dishes like our duck breast with wild sourplum (which is like a sour maraschino cherry). I mix this with star anise, ginger and red onion,

and we also use a star anise and ginger rub over the duck before we cook it. I believe the protein is the supporting act to everything else – I’m adamant about this, because I think there are so many other interesting elements through veggies and the wild. I also don’t do fillet and chicken. I do rib eye and duck,” Annabel emphasises. I spot a dish comprised of Mongu rice and nzembwe with peppery leaves, mixed nuts and dried cranberries – I ask Annabel to tell me more about it. “Mongu rice is fragrant and soft, and we use nzembwe instead of quinoa. It’s a gluten free seed, a finger millet we find at the market... it has large grains and is quite a mouthful, so the Mongu rice eases it a bit. “None of our patrons have tasted nzembwe before, apart from locals, but even they have never experienced nzembwe cooked like this – Zambians would normally turn nzembwe into porridge and they’re wowed by how we incorporate it in our dishes. The same goes for the other indigenous ingredients.” Tasting my way through these dishes, including a heavenly Thai-inspired tilapia (bream) ceviche, its marriage of flavour,

TOP RIGHT MIRACLE NAWA (KNOWN AS “THE BOSS” AT THE ELEPHANT CAFÉ, DUE TO HER VAST KITCHEN EXPERIENCE) HOLDING MONKOYO ROOT BOTTOM RIGHT ALEX KATUNGU (FROM THE NEARBY REYNOLDS FISH FARM) PRESENTS HIS CATCH OF THE DAY – FRESH TILAPIA FOR THE ELEPHANT CAFÉ

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

83


elephant caf

ABOVE RIGHT MASAU SAKLA, RIVER GUIDE EXTRAORDINAIRE ALONGSIDE AN EXCITED GROUP OF RESTAURANT PATRONS MAKE THEIR WAY TO THE ELEPHANT CAFÉ WITH MASAU ABLY STEERING AT THE AFT OF THE JETBOAT BELOW ANNABEL WITH SENIOR CHEF, LOVEDALE NOMBWANA; SOUS CHEF, AUBREY TILIMBOI; AND SENIOR CHEF, ADELINA BANDA

texture and colour a sublimely crafted balance, I tell Annabel her menu should be called “yin and yang”! With a wide smile, she replies: “I would never be at The Elephant Café without Adelina Banda. She is the yin to my yang there. We are so good together.” As I am introduced to Adelina, her demure demeanour clearly belies a steadfast will to expand her horizons. Since 2012, Adelina has worked with Annabel in her home kitchen, as well as catering for events: “Everything Annabel and I did in our kitchen at home, we had to teach the staff at the café and we continue to teach them.” When I ask Adelina what her favourite ingredient is, she doesn’t hesitate: “Mongongo nuts. Many Zambians ignore them, believing they are for poor people only, but that’s not true. You can make many different types of dishes with them, like we do here at the café.” As she says this, dessert is placed in front of me, in the form of musika (Zambian tamarind) ice cream with a mongongo nut Florentine. The earthiness and crunch of the Florentine is offset by the ice cream, which is not too sweet and has a moreish tartness to it. Watching me savour this dish, Annabel says: “If you’re enjoying the tartness of that, you’d love the panna cotta I do with a wild root called monkoyo – it’s very white and Zambians make a drink out of it that has a sour taste, almost like a lassi.” Sipping on one of the best coffees I’ve ever had, I tell the barista, Oliver Siansya, that I could come back just for his brew! Chuckling, Oliver replies, “Everything we do at The Elephant Café is unlike anywhere else.” And as I look out over the deck to where Annabel and Anant are feeding Liwa and her calves, Nandi and Nyami, I think Ganesh would agree. MOSI-OA-TUNYA GATE, LIVINGSTONE, ZAMBIA; +260 97-340-3270; ELEPHANT.CAFE


ESE RECI TH

ZA

HUMMUS WITH MONGONGO NUT AND BAOBAB DUKKAH

O.

FOOD

AN

S AT PE

FIND

Visit our website at foodandhome.co.za/ lifestyle/travel to read about more fantastic Safari Par Excellence adventures on offer in Livingstone, Zambia.

D H O M E.C

THAI-INSPIRED TILAPIA CEVICHE WITH SESAME-INFUSED LIME, CUCUMBER, AVOCADO AND PICKLED RADISH

MUCHINGACHINGA MESS WITH LAVENDER

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

85


KEEPING THINGS

LEMON AND BLACKCURRANT STRIPE CAKE

SWEET

FROM THE OTTOLENGHI KITCHEN COMES THE SWEET SMELL OF OVEN-FRESH PROMISES. WE GIVE YOU A SNEAK PEEK OF WHAT’S COOLING UNDER THE TEA TOWEL… COMPILED BY ANZELLE HATTINGH PHOTOGRAPHS BY PEDEN + MUNK


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

here’s so much sugar in this book that we thought about calling it, well, Sugar,” reads the very first sentence in the cookbook’s preface. There’s no sugar coating here; if ever there was a warning, that was surely it – sugar overload alert! Sweet by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh, with Tara Wigley (Ebury Press, 2017) celebrates the sweeter things in life – one delectable delight at a time. London-based Yotam Assaf Ottolenghi (born in Jerusalem on 14 December 1968) is a well-loved chef, author and restaurateur. The Ottolenghi brand has grown from strength to strength, since Yotam and Sami Tamimi first opened shop in Ledbury Road, Notting Hill in 2002. Today their outlets cover: Belgravia, largely a takeaway deli; Islington, in

London’s West End; Soho: NOPI (North of Piccadilly) – the brasserie that opened in 2011 – with head chef, Ramael Scully; Notting Hill, from where manager Luana Knudsen will gladly send your order by taxi; and Spitalfields, the largest and latest of the delis. Yotam studied at Tel Aviv University and completed his master’s degree in philosophy and comparative literature, and worked for Middle Eastern/Israeli daily newspaper, Haaretz. He moved to Amsterdam (look out for Dutch recipe inclusions, like the Gevulde speculaas, a popular spiced shortcrust biscuit), and then to London in 1997. After six months’ training at Le Cordon Bleu Culinary and Hospitality School, Yotam’s stints included The Capital (a one-Michelin-starred restaurant in Knightsbridge), Kensington Place (rumour has it, one of the Queen’s favourite spots), followed by Launceston Place, Maison Blanc and, as head pastry chef, at the London boutique bakery, Baker & Spice (this is where Yotam met Sami Tamimi, business partner and

co-author of Jerusalem). Not forsaking his tendency for the written word, Yotam writes his own food column in The Guardian and treasures five titles in his apron pocket already: Ottolenghi, the cookbook (2008; relaunched in 2013); Plenty – Vibrant Vegetable Recipes from London’s Ottolenghi (2010); Jerusalem – a Cookbook (with Sami Tamimi, 2012); Plenty More (2014) and NOPI – the Cookbook (2015). Yotam’s other half in Sweet, Helen Goh is a pastry chef-psychotherapist from Melbourne, Australia, who was born in Malaysia, and migrated to Oz with her family when she was a little girl. After seven years as head pastry chef at Donovans in Melbourne, Helen moved to London and has been working as product developer at Yotam’s side for the past 10 years. This pair has endless philosophical discussions over the particularities and peculiarities pastry holds, and no crumb was wasted in their very proper tastetesting for Sweet. Yotam and Helen claim their handiwork to never be “free from anything”, but by

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

87


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

a fortunate accident, they created over 30 gluten free recipes while they were at it for this publication. If gluten free comes in the incognito form of flourless teacakes or a flourless chocolate layer cake with coffee, walnuts and rose water, sign us up! As one would expect from the Ottolenghi kitchen, all sweet dishes exude daring, exotic, international flavours: with influences from the Middle East to Asia and Italy (Yotam’s grandparents were Italian and many childhood memories were formed at their house in Florence). With rose petals and rose water, rhubarb, saffron, pistachios, cardamom, figs and star anise as hero ingredients, the show can be no less than thought provoking and encore evoking! After whipping egg white after egg white as a junior, assisting the head pastry chef in his first job, Yotam describes himself as a bona fide expert in the art of egg white whipping, with just the right amount of sugar, air and flair... which comes as no surprise, looking at the famous Ottolenghi meringues that have become their trademark. But think bolder than the whiff your nose leads you by, dear reader… So, how does the cookie crumble? “Cookies and biscuits are particularly happy-making,” the intro to the first chapter reads – and who could beg to differ? Speaking of which, have you ever deliberated the difference between a cookie and a biscuit? This is explained as: cookies bend and biscuits snap; cookies are typically sweet, while biscuits can be savoury and are often crisp. From cookies, on to cakes... and what could be more lavish than mini cakes? Saffron, orange and honey Madeleines; lemon, blueberry and almond teacakes; a chocolate Guinness cake with Baileys Irish cream, inspired by a Nigella Lawson recipe... the level of decadence that would make Marie Antoinette blush! There are cakes for all fairs – from loaf cakes, to rolled cakes, an X-rated rum and raisin cake with rum caramel icing (or how about a Grappa fruit cake after sending the kids off to bed?), to children’s party cakes and (gasp!) the pistachio roulade with raspberries and white chocolate... temptation is oh, so sweet. You get lemon meringues and then you get lime meringue cheesecakes... 88

OCTOBER 2017

if ever true for baking, Yotam believes cheesecake is the one sweet that should be broken down to its component parts: a base that can be made in advance, a filling that needs to be prepared beforehand, long enough to set and the topping that should be made as close to serving time as possible. And as cheesecake conjures up layered antici-ppp-ation; tarts and pies call for occasions, where baked chocolate tartlets with tahini and sesame brittle (or marmalade); rhubarb and blueberry galette or fig and pistachio frangipane tartlets can bedazzle the most discerning of guests. Of the 20 desserts included, Yotam and Helen say: “We like our fruit, we like our booze, and we very much like our desserts”. Creations like a saffron and almond ice cream sandwich; Campari and grapefruit sorbet; yoghurt panna cotta with basil and crushed strawberries; ginger crème caramel; rice pudding with roasted rhubarb and tarragon are but a few of the grand finale-slash-showstopping sensations to look forward to. Confectionery is not only for Christmas, but for Valentine’s- and Mother’s Day; Chinese New Year – and every other day! Think saffron and pistachio brittle; pecan and prosecco truffles (for a little Italian twist); almond and aniseed nougat; chocolate panforte with oranges and figs; Middle Eastern millionaire’s shortbread with a halva centre and glossy tahini caramel on top... A mouthful to take in all at once, we know, but we promise we’ll look the other way if we catch you with both hands in the cookie jar on this one, because, as Yotam and Helen advocate: “A house with a full cookie jar becomes a home” – we’ll be all too glad your jar is half full!

Lemon and blackcurrant stripe cake Serves 8–10 (it’s not a wide cake – just 14cm) 8 large eggs, whites and yolks separated 140g caster sugar, plus an extra 20g 1 tbsp lemon juice (grate the zest before juicing) 80g plain flour  tsp salt

finely grated zest of 1 small lemon (¾ tsp) icing sugar, for dusting BLACKCURRANT (OR MIXED BERRY) PURÉE 300g blackcurrants (or mixed berries), fresh or frozen and defrosted, plus an extra 40g to garnish 60g caster sugar BLACKCURRANT (OR MIXED BERRY) BUTTERCREAM 85g golden syrup (or corn syrup) 120g caster sugar scraped seeds of ½ vanilla pod 4 large egg yolks 300g unsalted butter, cut into 3cm cubes, softened 100g berry purée (see above)

1

Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C Fan/Gas Mark 6. Line a shallow 40 x 32cm baking tray with baking parchment and set aside. Place the egg yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place. Add 140g sugar and the lemon juice and beat on a medium-

2


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

high speed for about 3 minutes, until pale and thick. Transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl and sift the flour and salt directly over the egg mixture in two batches, folding through the mix with a rubber spatula after each addition. Sprinkle the lemon zest on top and set aside. Place the egg whites in a clean bowl of an electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place. Whisk on a medium-high speed until soft peaks form, then slowly drizzle in the extra 20g sugar. Continue to whisk until firm peaks form, then gently fold a third of the egg whites into the egg yolk mixture until incorporated. Finally, fold in the remaining egg whites until combined, then scrape the mixture into the baking tray. Even the top out with a small spatula and bake for 15 minutes, or until the sponge is a light golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool in the tray for 5 minutes before dusting the top lightly with icing sugar. Place a clean tea towel on top of the sponge, then flip it over so that the sponge is now lying on top of the tea towel. Carefully peel away the paper and trim the very edges of the sponge. Be careful not to cut away too much: you really just want to straighten out the edges.

3

4

Now, starting at the shorter edge of the sponge, carefully roll it up (along with the tea towel). This is to ‘train’ the cake, ready for rolling up again later. After about 20 minutes, or when the sponge is no longer warm, unroll the sponge. With the short end facing towards you, measure and cut three equal strips parallel to the long edge, each just under 11cm wide. (If you have a pizza cutter, this is a really easy way to cut the strips.) Cover with a clean tea towel and set aside. For the purée, place the blackcurrants or berries and sugar in a medium saucepan and place over a medium-low heat. Warm through for 4–5 minutes, until the blackcurrants or berries have softened and the sugar has dissolved. Transfer to a food processor and blitz to form a purée. Strain through a fine sieve set over a bowl to catch the purée: you need 150g, so save any extra in the fridge to spoon over yoghurt. To make the buttercream, place the golden syrup, caster sugar and vanilla seeds in a medium saucepan. Place over a low heat and stir until all the sugar dissolves: this is your sugar syrup. In the meantime, place the egg yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place. Beat on a medium-high speed until thick and pale lemon in colour. Leave the machine

5

6 7

on while you check the sugar syrup: when all the sugar has melted, stir again, increase the heat to medium and simmer until bubbles begin to appear. Swirl the pan gently and continue to simmer until there are large bubbles all over the surface of the syrup. Remove the pan from the heat and carefully pour the hot syrup in a slow, steady stream down the edge of the mixing bowl into the beating yolks. When all the syrup has been added, increase the mixer speed to high and continue to whisk the mixture for about 10 minutes, until the outside of the bowl is no longer warm. Gradually add the butter, one cube at a time, allowing it to be incorporated into the mix before adding the next. When all the butter has been added, scrape down the bowl and continue to whisk for another minute, until the buttercream is very smooth and light. Add 100g blackcurrant (or mixed berry) purée and mix on a medium speed until fully incorporated. To assemble the cake, spread each of the strips of sponge with about 80g blackcurrant buttercream: this should leave you with about 300g to ice the top and sides of the cake later. Take one strip of sponge and, starting with the short end, roll it up. Once this strip is rolled, position the exposed end at the beginning of the next strip and keep rolling. Again, once this is rolled – the cylinder will be getting wider now – position the exposed end at the beginning of the last strip and continue to roll. You now have a rolled cylindrical cake! (Imagine, for a moment, if you lined up the three strips end to end to create one very long strip. Then imagine rolling that very long strip up, from one end to the other. You should end up with a coiled barrel shape.) Turn the cylinder on to the serving plate so that it is standing on one of its flat ends. Spread the remaining buttercream all over the top and sides of the cake, smoothing with a spatula to create an even surface. Dribble the remaining 50g of blackcurrant (or mixed berry) purée on top of the cake and top this with the blackcurrants reserved for garnish. Set aside for at least 1 hour at room temperature (or in the fridge if it is a very warm day) before serving.

8

9

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

89


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

TAKE-HOME CHOCOLATE CAKE

ESPRESSO CINNAMON MASCARPONE CREAM (OPTIONAL) 375ml double cream 190g mascarpone scraped seeds of ½ vanilla pod 2½ tsp finely ground espresso coffee ¾ tsp ground cinnamon 2½ tbsp icing sugar

In the shops... we make it as a smaller cake (as seen in the photo) to be shared by four people after a meal. The name lives on though, even in the recipe for our larger version here. Serves 12

dissolved in 350ml boiling water 250g caster sugar 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 2 tsp vanilla extract 240g self-raising flour 30g Dutch-processed cocoa powder, plus 1½ tsp extra for dusting ¼ tsp salt

250g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into 2cm cubes, plus extra for greasing 200g dark cooking chocolate (70% cocoa solids), chopped into 2cm pieces 1½ tsp instant coffee granules,

CHOCOLATE GANACHE (OPTIONAL) 200g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids), broken or chopped roughly into 2cm pieces 200ml double cream 1 tbsp golden syrup 1 tbsp unsalted butter, softened

TAKE-HOME CHOCOLATE CAKE

90

OCTOBER 2017

1

Preheat the oven to 170°C/150°C/ Gas Mark 3. Grease a 23cm round cake tin and line with baking parchment, then set aside. Place the butter, chocolate and hot coffee in a large heatproof bowl and mix well until everything is melted, combined and smooth. Whisk in the sugar by hand until dissolved. Add the eggs and vanilla and whisk again until the mix is thoroughly combined and smooth. Sift the flour, cocoa powder and salt together into a bowl and whisk this into the melted chocolate mix. The batter here is liquid, but don’t think you have missed something: this

2


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

is how it should be. Pour the mixture into the prepared cake tin and bake for 60 minutes, or until the cake is cooked and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean or with just a few dry crumbs attached. The top will form a crust and crack a little, but don’t worry, this is expected. Leave the cake to cool for 20 minutes before removing from the tin, and set aside until completely cool. For the ganache, place the chocolate pieces in a food processor, blitz until fine and set aside. Put the cream and golden syrup into a small pan and place over a medium-high heat. As soon as bubbles begin to appear – just before it comes to the boil – remove from the heat. Get the food processor running again, with the chocolate still inside, and pour in the hot cream in a steady stream. Process for about 10 seconds, then add the butter. Continue to process until the mixture is shiny and smooth. You can also make the ganache by hand: just make sure the chocolate is chopped fairly finely before you scald the cream and golden syrup and pour it over the chocolate. Stir everything together with a wooden spoon until almost melted, then add the butter. Stir again until the ganache is smooth. Whether you make it in a machine or by hand, use a rubber spatula to scrape the ganache into a bowl and cover with cling film, with the cling film actually touching the top of the ganache. Set aside until it has set to the consistency you want, then use it to ice the cake: if you want a thin layer to spread over the cake, it can be poured over while liquid so that you get an even, light and shiny coating. For a thicker ganache with a spreading consistency, leave it for about 2 hours at room temperature before using a spatula or knife to ice the cake. To make the espresso cinnamon mascarpone cream, place all the ingredients in the bowl of an electric food mixer with the whisk attachment in place. Beat for 1–2 minutes until soft peaks form. Divide the cake between plates and spoon the mascarpone cream alongside.

PISTACHIO AND ROSE WATER SEMOLINA CAKE

3 4

5

6

7

8

PISTACHIO AND ROSE WATER SEMOLINA CAKE Serves 10–12 3 cardamom pods 150g shelled pistachio kernels, plus an extra 20g, finely chopped, to serve 100g ground almonds 170g fine semolina 1¼ tsp baking powder ¼ tsp salt 300g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cubed, plus extra for greasing 330g caster sugar

4 large eggs, lightly whisked finely grated zest of 1 lemon (1 tsp), plus 1 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp rose water (not rose essence) ½ tsp vanilla extract CREAM 200g Greek yoghurt 200g crème fraîche 1 tbsp icing sugar 1 tbsp rose water SYRUP 100ml lemon juice 80ml rose water 100g caster sugar

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

91


COOKBOOK EXTRACT

CRYSTALLIZED ROSE PETALS (IF USING) 1 large egg white 10g pesticide-free red or pink rose petals (about 40 medium rose petals) 25g caster sugar

1

Preheat the oven to 100°C/80°C Fan/Gas Mark ¼. Line a baking tray with baking parchment, and grease a 23cm springform cake tin and line with baking parchment. To crystallize the rose petals, if doing so, whisk the egg white by hand until frothy, then, using a small pastry brush or paintbrush, very lightly paint over both sides of each petal with the egg white: do this in two or three small batches, brushing and then sprinkling lightly over both sides with the sugar. Shake off the excess sugar and lay the petals on the lined baking tray. Place in the oven for 30 minutes, until dry and crunchy, then set aside to cool. Increase the oven temperature to 180°C/160°C Fan/Gas Mark 4. Use the flat side of a large knife to crush the cardamom pods and place the seeds in the small bowl of a food processor: you’ll have just under ¼ teaspoon of seeds. The pods can be discarded. Add the pistachios and blitz until the nuts are finely ground – the black cardamom seeds won’t really

2

3 4

grind down – then transfer to a bowl. Add the ground almonds, semolina, baking powder and salt. Mix together and set aside. Place the butter and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment in place. Beat on a medium-high speed until fully combined, but take care not to overwork: you don’t want to incorporate a lot of air into the mix. With the machine still running, slowly add the eggs, scraping down the sides of the bowl a few times and making sure that each batch is fully incorporated before adding the next. The mix will curdle once the eggs are added, but don’t worry: this will not affect the end result. Remove the bowl from the machine and add the dry ingredients, folding them in by hand and, again, taking care not to over-mix. Next fold in the lemon zest, juice, rose water and vanilla and scrape the batter into the tin. Level with a palette knife and bake for about 55–60 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the cake comes out clean but oily.

5

6

7

Make the cream while the cake is in the oven. Place all the ingredients for the cream in a bowl and use a hand-held whisk to whip everything together for about 2 minutes, until thick. Keep in the fridge until ready to serve. Start to make the syrup about 10 minutes before the cake comes out of the oven: you want it to be warm when the cake is ready. Place all the ingredients for the syrup in a small saucepan over a medium heat. Bring to the boil, stirring so that the sugar dissolves, then remove from the heat: don’t worry that the consistency is thinner than you might expect, this is how it should be. As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, drizzle all of the syrup over the top. It is a lot of syrup, but don’t lose your nerve: the cake can take it! Sprinkle over the finely chopped pistachios and set the cake aside in its tin to come to room temperature. Remove from the tin and scatter the rose petals over the cake. Serve with a generous spoonful of cream alongside.

8

9

WIN! Three readers will each win a copy of Sweet (worth R520) by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh. To enter, email your full name, ID number, contact number and postal address to foodhome@caxton.co.za with SWEET in the subject line by 15 October 2017.

Extracted from Sweet by Yotam Ottlenghi and Helen Goh, published by Ebury Press. Copyright © Yotam Ottolenghi & Helen Goh. Photography by Peden + Munk.


LEFT DOMAINE LES CRAYÈRES, AS SEEN FROM ABOVE. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHEL JOLYOT, JOLYOT.COM

WHEN IN REIMS...

94

OCTOBER 2017


TINY BUBBLES

IN CELEBRATION OF GLOBAL CHAMPAGNE DAY ON 20 OCTOBER, JENNY HANDLEY TRAVELLED TO THE CHAMPAGNE REGION IN THE NORTH OF FRANCE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THE DRINK THAT HAS, FOR 300 YEARS, CHRISTENED SHIPS AND MADE MANY CONVERSATIONS SPARKLE

monks, saying, “Come quickly. I am drinking the stars!” Stars and Champagne lovers have been drinking it ever since – currently more than 300 million bottles annually.

A 40-minute fast-train trip from Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris and we were in Reims, a city where you can walk from one Champagne house PHOTOGRAPHS BY JENNY HANDLEY, FOTOLIA to another – an ideal way AND SUPPLIED to stay sober. The first stop was at Champagne Pommery, housed in an Elizabethan-style building. We descended a few hundred steps, following the tour guide down into the cold, chalky caves dug out by the Romans. Surrounded by thousands of bottles, the mystique of the Méthode Champenoise was explained and the first of many Champagne corks were popped. Next on our itinerary was the famous NotreDame Cathedral of Reims, an impressive 12th century landmark of gothic architecture that has given this city the nickname of “The City of Coronations” – as all kings from France have been crowned there, from the year 987 to Charles X of France in the 19th century. It was in the house of Taittinger, where the Abbey of Saint-Nicaise once stood proud, that we learned a little more. These chalk cellars date back to the 4th century, Gallo-Roman Times. Both the Champagne region and these cellars were declared UNESCO World Heritage egend claims that Benedictine Sites in 2016. I stopped to admire the technique of the riddler – who, in these monk Dom Pérignon (cellar cellars, carefully turns the bottles by master in the Abbey Sainthand – and marvelled at the carvings in Pierre of Hautvillers in the wall from centuries ago. Taittinger Épernay) was mesmerised by is one of only five Champagne houses the bubbles that appeared in to cellar its wines in these famous “crayères” (caves) of Reims, owning the abbey’s sparkling wine. 4km, which are used to age their When unable to de-bubble prestige cuvées, and a further 10km the wine, for the rest of the cuvées. he called With the bright colours of the South his fellow African flag gently blowing a welcome

in the breeze outside, we sipped the entire range in their private tasting room. I questioned Mike and Linette Cox (who fly the Taittinger flag in South Africa as sole distributors) about what, in addition to being a family label, makes this brand so respected globally. “Quality, prestige and the range. It starts in the vineyards: Taittinger is one of only three houses that owns their own extensive vineyards – 288 hectares across 15 villages, most of them grand cru-rated, all vineyards of high quality. All juice harvested is from the first pressing for vintage Champagnes and mostly from the first pressing for the nonvintages. They use a minimum of 20% reserve wines. Minimum maturation is 36 – 42 months for non-vintages (other leading brands mature for 24 months), five to nine years for vintages, which they only produce in exceptional years,” said Mike. I discovered while tasting that these premium wines are light and delicate, with finesse, achieved by using chardonnay as the leading varietal. One cannot tour France without enjoying superlative cuisine – and at most restaurants the plat du jour (chef’s dish of the day) is the best way to eat on the ZAR. We lunched outdoors at Brasserie le Jardin with appropriate joie de vivre, starting with a country terrine, finishing with an apricot and thyme crumble. It was paired with Taittinger’s single vineyard Champagne les Folies de la Marquetterie – full-bodied, smooth and fruity with lightly wooded notes. After an afternoon of exploring the retail streets of Reims, we headed to Club Trésors de Champagne, a Champagne bar where the map of the region on the floor is as impressive as the Champagne bottle light fittings and the selection of bubblies on offer. Here we tasted Champagnes from private growers who make magnificent Champagnes, but are unable to compete with the volumes of the big houses. Champagnes owe their inimitable character to a unique combination of climate and soil composition, termed “terroir”. The chalky soil, and East- and North-facing aspects of the terroir provide the high acidity needed. I was keen to move from town to country to see the chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier grapes growing in the foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

95


TOP RIGHT CLUB TRÉSORS DE CHAMPAGNE’S CHAMPAGNE BOTTLE LIGHT FITTINGS RIGHT THE DOM PÉRIGNON STATUE AT MOËT & CHANDON BELOW CHAMPAGNE VINEYARDS AT SUNSET, MONTAGNE DE REIMS


TINY BUBBLES

vineyards – the varietals permitted in the production of Champagne. A 30-minute drive and we were in Épernay, home of the famous Avenue de Champagne. During the cellar tour of Moët & Chandon, one of the most popular of the 70 brands of Champagne imported to South Africa, I again marvelled at the history of the cellars, these stretching for 28km, knowing that in the years of war, it was not only wine that was hidden here. We tasted, then drooled at the gilt in their gift shop. More retail rendezvousing followed for the girls in the group, while the men visited Champagne Janisson-Baradon et Fils, where the president, Cyril Janisson, proudly poured his Champagne – one made with seven varietals, seldom used due to scarcity, to appreciative palates. The highlight of highlights was a private lunch in the breathtaking Taittinger family’s château, circa 1734. We were warmly welcomed by hospitality manager, Jean-Pierre Redont, with a glass of Comtes de Champagne blanc de blancs 2006, the jewel in their crown. I appreciated the notes of candied fruit and grapefruit in this signature wine that James Bond shows his preference for in the film, From Russia With Love. We admired the authentic art and period furniture in the château before venturing into the vineyards (with a panoramic view of the Côte des Blancs), to see where the miracle begins. Here, I discovered that their workers, unlike many other houses, are paid per time, rather than per picking, to ensure the quality for which they are renowned.

At the beautifully appointed luncheon table were menus printed on a painting of the château created by Vitalie Taittinger, artistic director and icon of the brand, and daughter of Pierre Emmanuel Taittinger, president of the eponymous house. During the Champagne and food pairing, I glanced up at the portrait of famous writer Jacques Cazotte (1719 – 1792), who penned his famous novels in the château, and realised how this visual splendour must have inspired his writing. We crossed the courtyard and went down to the cellar to see where harvested grapes are transformed into pure gold and to admire the family’s gleaming 1915 Renault CoupéChauffeur Type ES. A scenic drive whisked us pass vineyards to Armand de Brignac and the House of Cattier, one of the largest growers. Here, we descended into the cellars on one side of the road and came out on the other, after seeing impressive racks of their Ace of Spades metallic bottles, glistening in the dim light. We tasted and toasted their Clos

du Moulin (which I found rich yet subtle, with an aroma of lilac and honeysuckle, and a flavour of exotic fruits and spice too) and three bruts – rosé, antique and blanc de blancs. Champagne boasts many top restaurants, with one of the most lauded being two-Michelin-starred Domaine Les Crayères, in a château dating back to Napoleon III. With more than 600 vintage Champagnes on their wine list, it was a fitting platform for a farewell dinner. I slowly sipped my glass of Bollinger Rosé from the welcome trolley of Champagnes, watching the sun set over the seven hectares park. The last cork to pop was on a beautiful bottle of Belle Époque 2004, with hints of apple and lime, smoothly finished – the perfect partner for chef Philippe Mille’s surprise menu. As waiters in unison lifted the cloches, extraordinary dishes were revealed – like a pre-dessert of cauliflower and ginger. What a way to put the lid on an effervescent trip that had cemented my love affair with Champagne.

JENNY’S TRAVEL TIPS �� �������������������������������������������������������� �� ���������������������������������������������������������� autumn (September – December). �� ����������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

97


RECIPE AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI ASSISTED BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE PHOTOGRAPH BY DYLAN SWART DIETARY ADVICE BY MARYKE GALLAGHER, RD SA (BSC DIET, MNUTR)

Sesame-crusted tofu with prawns, butternut and cashew red sauce

salt, to taste 2 finely sliced spring onions, to serve coriander leaves, to garnish lime half, to squeeze

Warming, Asian-inspired flavours culminate in this nourishing bowl of goodness that’s the perfect pick-me-up. Serve with steamed greens or sautéed spinach for an extra nutritional boost! Serves 2 – 3 EASY 1 hr 15 mins

HOW TO DO IT For the roasted butternut, preheat the oven to 190°C. Place the butternut cubes in a roasting tin, drizzle with avocado oil, sprinkle with salt and chilli flakes to taste, and roast in the preheated oven until tender, about 45 minutes. For the cashew red sauce, place the raw cashew nuts in a blender and pour over the boiling water. Add the remaining ingredients and blitz until the cashews are smooth. Season and set aside until needed. For the sesame-crusted tofu, place the tofu cubes in a medium bowl. Drizzle over 15ml (1 tbsp) avocado oil and toss to coat the tofu cubes, then sprinkle over the sesame seeds and a pinch chilli flakes. Toss through to coat the tofu cubes. Heat a drizzle olive oil in a non-stick frying pan over high heat and fry the tofu cubes, turning after 2 minutes, until golden on the outside. Drain on paper towel, squeeze over a little lime juice and season to taste. For the prawns, wipe out the pan and heat another drizzle olive oil over high heat. Fry the prawns until just cooked through, then sprinkle with a pinch cayenne pepper and salt to taste. In bowls, arrange the butternut, tofu and prawns, garnish with the spring onions, coriander leaves and add a lime half for squeezing. Drizzle over the cashew red sauce. Store any extra sauce in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days and add to your favourite meals.

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS ROASTED BUTTERNUT 500g butternut, cubed avocado oil, to drizzle salt, to taste chilli flakes, to taste CASHEW RED SAUCE 100g raw cashew nuts 90ml (6 tbsp) boiling water 30ml (2 tbsp) sesame oil 30ml (2 tbsp) soya sauce pinch chilli flakes 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced juice of 2 limes salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste SESAME-CRUSTED TOFU 400g firm tofu, cut into 1,5cm cubes 15ml (1 tbsp) avocado oil 60ml (4 tbsp) sesame seeds olive oil, to fry pinch chilli flakes squeeze lime juice salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste PRAWNS olive oil, to drizzle 200g prawns, deveined and shelled pinch cayenne pepper

98

OCTOBER 2017

1

2

3

4 5

6

Research has shown that replacing high-fat animal foods and dairy products may decrease LDL cholesterol if at least 20g soya protein is consumed daily. Post-menopausal women may also see their blood pressure decrease when soya foods are included in their diets. Because the chemical structure of isoflavones is similar to that of oestrogen, questions have been raised about the safety and risk of the consumption of soya in the arena of breast cancer. Research has shown that soya foods – but not soya supplements – may lower the risk of developing breast cancer, with the greatest benefit for premenopausal women, due to soya’s phytoestrogen content. However, recent studies have shown that the consumption of soya lowers the risk of certain types of breast cancer, based on hormone receptor status. More research is needed to better understand the role soya has in breast cancer prevention. The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) states that one to two servings of soya foods per day do not increase (and may decrease) breast cancer risk and are, therefore, safe to ingest. Breast cancer survivors can safely consume about two servings a day. Women who have had oestrogen-sensitive breast cancers do not need to avoid soya isoflavones. It remains important that any woman who has had breast cancer should talk to her doctor about eating soya-containing foodstuffs.

For sources and links to websites, visit foodandhome.co.za

THE WORLD AS WE KNOW IT IS BECOMING MORE CARB CONSCIOUS. F&HE IS CASTING OUR BREAD UPON THE WATERS, AIDING YOU IN THIS JOURNEY TO MAKING CLEVER CARB CHOICES

TOFU Soya products are often in the spotlight and the safety of consuming them has been questioned. Soya products contain isoflavones, a class of phytoestrogens, which are naturally occurring compounds with oestrogen-like activity and have antioxidant properties that may contain health benefits. Two areas where soya has been found to play a beneficial role in well-being is heart health and breast cancer.


NUTRITIONAL FACTS

NS

R

T

AI

5A

CON

D AY

PLANT-BASED OILS Consumption of vegetable oils, including those that contain polyunsaturated fats, plant-derived omega-3 fatty acids and monounsaturated fats are important features of dietary patterns that reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Avocado- and olive oil are excellent sources of monounsaturated fats, while sesame oil is approximately equal in mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Both avocado- and olive oil don’t only have favourable fat profiles, but also contain other components that display antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. Oils that are high in monounsaturated fats have generally been shown to be better for frying and deep-frying. Avocado oil has a high smoke point and can be used for deep-frying.

1 O F YO

U


USE IT OR

LOSE IT Filo pastry Slow-roasted, spiced lamb pie with dried apricots and flaked almonds Serves 4 EASY 5 hrs

THERE ARE FEW THINGS MORE SATISFYING THAN FILO PASTRY GIVING WAY UNDER YOUR TEETH WITH A CRISPY CRUNCH. YOU’LL WISH YOU HAD MORE THAN JUST A LITTLE LEFTOVER PASTRY WITH THESE RADICAL RECIPES... RECIPES AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI ASSISTED BY NOMVUSELELO MNCUBE PHOTOGRAPHS BY DYLAN SWART

100

OCTOBER 2017

THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS FILLING 900g lamb knuckles (bones in) 1 onion, peeled and sliced 7,5ml (1½ tsp) cumin seeds 7,5ml (1½ tsp) coriander seeds 5ml (1 tsp) fresh rosemary 1 garlic clove, peeled 2,5ml (½ tsp) chilli flakes 2 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes 160ml water salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 100g dried apricots, roughly chopped PASTRY TOPPING 2 sheets filo pastry 100g butter, melted flaked almonds fresh mint sprigs, to garnish (optional) HOW TO DO IT For the filling, preheat the oven to 160°C. Place the lamb knuckles in a deep roasting tray and scatter over

1


use it or lose it

the onion slices. Place the cumin- and coriander seeds, fresh rosemary, the garlic clove and chilli flakes in a pestle and mortar, and pound until almost fine, then rub over the lamb. Pour over the tomatoes and water, and cover the roasting tray tightly with foil. Roast in the preheated oven, 4 hours, until the lamb comes away easily from the bone. Once cooked, remove the bones and discard, then shred the lamb. Place in a 25cm-diameter round pieor casserole dish, taste and season accordingly. Stir in the chopped dried apricots and add a splash boiling water, if needed – the mixture should make a juicy pie filling. For the pastry topping, tear each filo sheet into 3 pieces and scrunch the pastry pieces over the top of the lamb filling – you don’t have to do this very precisely, but the lamb should be completely covered and the filo should be scrunched for texture. Brush the filo with the melted butter and sprinkle with the flaked almonds. Return to the oven, 15 – 25 minutes or until the filo is crisp and golden. Serve hot, garnished with fresh mint, if desired.

2

3

4

Cheat's potato, pea and prawn samoosas with minted yoghurt dip Makes 15 EASY 1 hr THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SAMOOSAS 2 medium potatoes, peeled and roughly diced 2,5ml (½ tsp) vegetable oil 2,5ml (½ tsp) mustard seeds 2,5ml (½ tsp) cumin seeds 1 green chilli, seeded and finely chopped pinch ground turmeric 100g frozen peas, defrosted 150g cooked prawn meat, chopped handful coriander leaves, chopped salt, to taste lemon juice, to taste 3 sheets filo pastry olive oil, to drizzle MINTED YOGHURT DIP 250g double cream yoghurt

SLOW-ROASTED, SPICED LAMB PIE WITH DRIED APRICOTS AND FLAKED ALMONDS

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed small handful mint leaves, roughly chopped small handful coriander leaves, roughly chopped + extra sprigs, to garnish (optional) HOW TO DO IT For the samoosas, put the diced potatoes in a pot of water. Bring to a boil and cook until the potatoes are

1

tender, about 30 minutes. Drain the potatoes and mash until smooth, while they are still hot. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over low heat. Add the mustard seeds and fry until they crackle, about 1 minute. Add the cumin seeds and continue frying, a further 1 – 2 minutes, until the cumin seeds splutter and become slightly darker. Add the chilli and ground turmeric, and fry, 2 minutes. Stir through the foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

101


mashed potatoes, peas, prawn meat and a handful chopped coriander leaves. Taste the mixture and season accordingly with salt and lemon juice. Preheat the oven to 180˚C. To fold your samoosas, cut the 3 sheets filo pastry into 5 strips, widthways (so the strips are shorter, rather than longer). Cover the strips with a clean, damp tea towel to prevent the pastry from drying out. Working on 1 strip at a time, place 1 pastry strip in front of you on a surface, so that the narrow side is closest to you. Place a tablespoonful potato mixture in the bottom left-hand corner of the pastry strip. Lift the left-hand corner with the filling in it up and fold it over, ready to form the next triangle, then continue folding to the end of the strip, keeping the triangular shape. On the last fold, use a little water to stick the pastry together and seal the samoosa. Lay the folded samoosas on a baking tray. Repeat until all of the samoosas have been folded, then drizzle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt to taste. Bake in the preheated oven until crisp and golden, about 15 – 25 minutes, turning the samoosas over halfway through the cooking time. For the minted yoghurt dip, combine all of the ingredients in a serving bowl and season to taste. Serve the samoosas while still warm, garnished with fresh coriander sprigs and the minted yoghurt dip alongside.

2

3 4

CHEAT’S POTATO, PEA AND PRAWN SAMOOSAS WITH MINTED YOGHURT DIP

102

OCTOBER 2017


USE IT OR LOSE IT

Salted dark chocolate and olive oil slab with filo pastry twists Serves 8 – 10 EASY 1 hr + 1 hr, to set THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS DARK CHOCOLATE SLAB 30ml (2 tbsp) olive oil 80ml ( cup) fresh cream 5ml (1 tsp) fleur de sel + extra, to sprinkle 3 x 100g slabs good-quality dark chocolate, roughly chopped FILO TWISTS 4 sheets filo pastry olive oil, to brush salt, to taste HOW TO DO IT For the dark chocolate slab, line the base and sides of a small loaf tin/ rectangular plastic container of about 22cm x 10cm with a single piece of baking paper: cut a large piece of baking paper, and press it into the base and up the sides of the dish – there shouldn’t be any gaps where the liquid chocolate could escape and flow out of the confines of the baking paper. (The paper doesn’t need to be perfectly smooth – a few crinkles will result in lovely texture in the finished product). Put the 30ml (2 tbsp) olive oil, fresh cream and fleur de sel in a small pot, and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, add the dark chocolate and whisk until smooth. Pour the chocolate mixture into the lined loaf tin/container and place in the fridge to set, at least 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 180˚C. While the chocolate slab sets, make the filo twists by halving the filo sheets, lengthways. Proceed to cut each length into 3 strips, widthways, to form 6 rough rectangles. Brush each rectangle with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt to taste, then roughly twirl the rectangle up to make long twists. Lay the filo twists on a baking sheet and bake in the oven until crisp and golden, about 15 – 25 minutes. To serve, turn the chocolate slab out onto a serving plate and sprinkle lightly with a little extra fleur de sel. Scatter the filo twists around and slice to serve.

1

2 3

4

SALTED DARK CHOCOLATE AND OLIVE OIL SLAB WITH FILO PASTRY TWISTS

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

103


This month

JUNIPER BERRIES

WORDS, RECIPE AND STYLING BY CLAIRE FERRANDI PHOTOGRAPH BY DYLAN SWART ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH-JANE WILLIAMS

104

OCTOBER 2017


lthough the quintessential taste of London dry gin (which we all know and love), juniper berries do, however, have a few alternative uses. Of course, particularly useful for adding that “ginny” flavour to any bakes or cocktails and syrups, juniper berries also pair particularly well with meaty dishes. Easily available in a dried form in the spice section of Woolworths, these berries are a great addition to any kitchen cupboard. Juniper berries are used in northern European and Scandinavian cooking to add a sharp, tart flavour to meat dishes, especially wild birds and venison. The berries are also used to season pork, cabbage and sauerkraut. Here, we’ve created a simple gin and lime cake that’s perfect for tea.

juniper and lime cake with cream cheese icing Serves 10 – 12 EASY 2 hrs THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS CAKE 15 juniper berries 440g cake flour 2,5ml (½ tsp) baking powder 2,5ml (½ tsp) bicarbonate of soda pinch salt 225g butter, softened 350g sugar 2 extra large eggs 3 extra-large egg yolks zest of 2 limes 10ml (2 tsp) vanilla essence 250ml (1 cup) buttermilk CREAM CHEESE ICING 2 x 250g tubs cream cheese, at room temperature 200g butter, softened 460g icing sugar, sifted zest of 1 lime pinch salt 15ml (1 tbsp) vanilla essence lime wedges, to decorate HOW TO DO IT For the cake, preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease and line the bases

1

of 2 cake tins (with diameters of 20cm each). Using a pestle and mortar, grind the juniper berries to a fine powder and set aside until needed. Put the cake flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a bowl, and whisk to combine and remove any lumps. Place the 225g softened butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer (or use an electric hand-held mixer), and beat until light and fluffy. Add the eggs and yolks, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition, then add the lime zest, 10ml (2 tsp) vanilla essence and juniper berry powder, and continue beating. Fold the butter mixture and flour mixture together, alternating additions of the flour mixture with additions of buttermilk, and mix until just combined and the buttermilk has been folded in. Divide the batter between the prepared cake tins, smoothing out the tops. Bake in the preheated oven, 35 – 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centres of the cakes comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow the cakes to cool completely. While the cakes are baking and cooling down, make the icing by putting the cream cheese and 200g softened butter into the bowl of a stand mixer (or use an electric hand-held mixer). Beat briefly until smooth, then add ½ of the sifted icing sugar and

2

3

4

beat until combined. Add the other ½ of the sifted icing sugar and the remaining ingredients, and briefly beat until just smooth. Keep the icing at room temperature. To assemble, once the cakes have cooled down, add a dollop icing to a cake plate or -stand (this will anchor the cake). Place one of the cake layers on the dollop. Sandwich the cakes together by spreading icing thickly between the layers and lightly ice the sides of the cake, keeping the icing on top of the cake a little thicker. Arrange the lime wedges on top of the cake to decorate.

5

TRY THESE... �� ������������������������������� berries to your next slowroasted pork that is destined for shredding. �� ����������������������� syrup for lemon sorbet, add a small handful whole juniper berries, to taste, for a G&T flavoured sorbet, then strain them out before freezing (adding alcohol to sorbets and ice cream is difficult, as alcohol doesn’t freeze).

foodandhome.co.za

OCTOBER 2017

105


CLUE TO QUESTION 1

Trivia OF HEALTH, HALLOWEEN AND HEAVENLY BUBBLES!

1 The crunchy seeds of this fruit (also referred to as arils or rubies) are said to be rich in ellagic acid, a potent antioxidant that may inhibit an enzyme that plays a role in breast cancer development. 2 A great source of omega-3s, and vitamins B12 and D, this particular fish can provide your body with the nutrients it needs to regulate cell growth and prevent cancer. 3 This fruit is rich in antioxidants and phytochemicals, which are said to play a role in reducing oxidation and cancer cell formation in the body. 4 These types of vegetables (like broccoli, cabbage and kale) are known to assist in breast cancer prevention. 5 In the US region of New England, the night before Halloween is called . This night entails collecting rotten vegetables and leaving them at neighbours’ doors. 6 Where did the tradition of carving jack-o’-lanterns originate? 106

OCTOBER 2017

7 What were the original jack-o’-lanterns made of? 8 This little yellow, orange and white treat is an icon among Halloween candies. 9 What is the meaning of “veuve” in Veuve Clicquot? 10 Which style of sparkling wine begs to be paired with elegant appetisers like oysters and caviar? 11 Legend has it that this blonde American actress bathed in Champagne, using 350 bottles to fill her bathtub! 12 Approximately how many millions of bubbles are there in one bottle of Champagne? 13 What is the wire cage that fits over the cork of a Champagne bottle called? 14 How do you ensure that you don’t end up with a headache after drinking a glass (or more) of bubbles? FOR ANSWERS, TURN TO PAGE 108.

Photograph by Fotolia

COMPILED BY HASMITA AMTHA


1

3

2

6

5

4

7

BLOCKWORD 8

9

KNOW YOUR

10

���ė�� in pink

11

12

13

14

ACROSS 3 Sisters Shahar Ben Artzi and Or Lahat started this innovative business: & Cream. 4 Mark Boucher’s wife’s name 5 The process in the traditional méthode Champenoise by which the bottles are twisted in both directions and tilted at a more severe angle until all of the sediment is collected in one spot to be removed. 7 The (majestic) Elephant Café is situated on the banks of which mighty river? 10 Rib eye and rump are best served at what temperature? (6, 4)

12 What substance in the cell wall of mushrooms is not digestible by humans if uncooked? 13 Trending right now – cake 14 The immortal mushroom DOWN 1 Which berry gives gin its distinctive “ginny” taste? 2 A breast cancer-fighting compound, found in reishi – acid. 6 The father of Champagne (3, 8) 8 Who co-authored the latest Yotam Ottolenghi title, Sweet? (5, 3) 9 “Caves” in French 11 Which cut of meat has magnificent tenderness, but less flavour than other cuts?

ISSUE


OCTOBER 2017: PRETTY IN PINK

VEGETARIAN

FISH & SEAFOOD

Black and white pizza .............................. 48 Lentil dhal ...................................................19 Lentils with greens ....................................19 Onion ash goat’s cheese with poppyseed crackers and black garlic jam ..................72 Smoky red onion and mushroom tartlets .................................... 50 Strawberry bloody Mary gazpacho ........ 48

Cheat’s potato, pea and prawn samoosas with minted yoghurt dip .......101 Sesame-crusted tofu with prawns, butternut and cashew red sauce ............ 98

Spiced blueberry and chocolate honeycomb tart ........................................ 42 Strawberry cake sandwiches .................. 50 Take-home chocolate cake ..................... 90

DESSERTS & BAKING

DRINKS

Black velvet brushstroke cake with burnt vanilla icing .......................................76 Blueberry and carrot bread with flavoured cream cheese ...........................41 Caramel, peanut butter and chocolate poke cake .................................14 Cold brew coffee and cardamom jellies...76 Croissant, chocolate and pear pudding...23 Dark chocolate-glazed black cat doughnuts ........................................... 34 Halloween scones .................................... 48 Juniper and lime cake with cream cheese icing ................................ 105 Lemon and blackcurrant stripe cake ...... 88 Pistachio and rose water semolina cake ............................................91 Rose and lemon scented no bake cheesecake piled with strawberries ........10 Rosy yoghurt panna cotta with rhubarb granita ......................................... 52 Salted dark chocolate and olive oil slab with filo pastry twists ..................... 103

Blackberry, vodka and smoking rosemary Martinis .....................................76

VEGAN Lentil and sun-dried tomato hummus .....19 Miso-roasted aubergine with black sesame hummus .......................................72 Rhubarb juice ............................................ 50

MEAT & POULTRY Blueberry glazed pork fillet with barley salad ................................................41 Chicken pie with savoury shortbread pastry ..................................... 64 Meatballs and guava tabbouleh salad ... 50 Mexican chicken skewers with egg pancakes ........................................... 65 Monster burger ......................................... 48 Parsnip röstis with shredded chicken, soft-poached eggs and spinach ............. 63 Shredded chicken kedgeree ................... 69 Slow-roasted spiced lamb pie with dried apricots and flaked almonds ....... 100 Soothing Asian-inspired noodle soup .... 65 Turnip gnocchi with bacon, edamame beans and sage butter ............................. 52

ALTITUDE BAKING All baking recipes in this magazine have been tested at high altitude. Follow this guide for baking at sea level: Lower the oven temperature by 10°C For every 5ml (1 tsp) baking powder, increase by 1 – 2ml For every 220g (1 cup) granulated sugar, increase by 15 – 30ml For every 250ml (1 cup) liquid, decrease by 30 – 45ml For every 120g (1 cup) flour, decrease by 15ml (1 tbsp)

STOCKISTS Woolworths ...........................................................................................................0860 022 002

TRIVIA ANSWERS FROM PAGE 100 1 Pomegranate 2 Salmon 3 Blueberries 4 Cruciferous veggies 5 Cabbage Night 6 Ireland 7 Turnips 8 Candy corn 9 Widow, for the widowed Barbe-Nicole Clicquot 10 Champagne, of course! 11 Marilyn Monroe 12 About 58 million bubbles 13 Muselet (pronounced “mew-zeh-lay”) 14 Sip slowly, allowing the bubbles to dissipate before swallowing. If you drink Champagne too quickly, the bubbles will cause the alcohol to enter your bloodstream too fast, often causing a headache.

108

OCTOBER 2017


HOW IT WORKS 3 EASY STEPS We know you love Food & Home Entertaining magazine because, clearly, you are fond of convenience, innovation and keeping up with trends. So, we have no doubt you’re going to well and truly appreciate this new (and oh-soimproved) subscription experience. What’s it all about? Caxton Magazines and Woolworths have joined forces to make it simpler than ever to collect your subscription copy of Food & Home Entertaining each month. How? It’s as easy as apple pie. Sign up online for your annual subscription, then receive a monthly SMS voucher code to collect your issue at your local Woolies. It’s hassle free and reliable. Don’t let another minute tick by... click on www.magsathome.co.za/Magazing.htm for all the details and ensure you never miss another scrumptious issue of Food & Home Entertaining.

3 OPTIONS AVAILABLE SUBSCRIBE ONLINE: MAGSATHOME.CO.ZA/MAGAZING.HTM CALL: 087 405 2005 EMAIL: SUBS@MAGSATHOME.CO.ZA

RECEIVE YOUR MONTHLY MAGAZINE VOUCHER CODE VIA SMS

COLLECT YOUR MAG: SWIPE YOUR WOOLIES CARD AND HAVE YOUR VOUCHER CODE READY

WAS R432 | NOW R280,80

35% OFF YOUR 12-MONTH SUBSCRIPTION

GREAT OFFERS! As a subscriber, you will still enjoy the massive saving offered only to you! Special free gifts available only in magazines purchased at Woolworths will now also be available to you, as a subscriber who collects your magazine from a Woolworths store.

TERMS AND CONDITIONS 1. This offer is for new subscriptions only. 2. This voucher may be used with any other Woolies voucher. 3. The voucher must be used in conjunction with any of the following cards*: Woolworths Credit Card, Woolworths WRewards Card, Woolworths Store Card, MySchool MyVillage MyPlanet card. 4. This voucher may not be used for utility payments, gift cards or be redeemed for cash. 5. Misuse of this voucher constitutes fraud. 6. This voucher may not be redeemed at www.woolworths.co.za or Woolworths Food Stops at Engen. 7. This voucher cannot be replaced if lost. 8. This voucher is redeemable only in South Africa. 9. This voucher may be redeemed only once. 10. This voucher may be redeemed with another Woolies foods voucher in a single transaction. 11. This offer is not applicable to weekly magazine titles.


slice of life We meet the two entrepreneurial ladies behind the Crumbs & Cream brand, sisters Shahar Ben Artzi (left) and Or Lahat (right), who invite us over for the ultimate ice cream sandwich. Shahar shares how ���������������������� bite and opened �����������������Ŵ�

COMPILED BY HASMITA AMTHA

The way the

cookie

CRUMBLED

there. You can find, at any given time, Bantingfriendly cookies and sugar free (60 calories per scoop!) ice cream, refreshing vegan sorbets and heavenly vegan cookies (made with dark chocolate and pecan nuts). Each month sees a cookie and ice cream of the month (think red velvet, white chocolate and caramel cheesecake) and seasonal specials like waffle ice cream sandwiches, churros, sweet buns and cookie shakes (to name but a few). Some flavours are inspired by trends across the waters, like the Mexican churros and sweet buns, and some of them from local flavours like milk tart cookies. In Tel Aviv and central European cities, every third store is an ice cream shop. The ice cream market here is still virginal – from our perspective, South Africans love the creamy flavours; sorbets and vegan options are not as popular as they are abroad. In the beginning, we were surprised that the choc-mint was one of the bestsellers [perhaps owing to SA’s love for Peppermint Crisp tart!], because in many foreign ice cream parlours, choc-mint is not even an available flavour choice. WHEN WE FIRST STARTED, we had only the food truck outside the Watershed at the V&A Waterfront. This was designed to test the market, as we had no clue as to how Capetonians would respond. Luckily, we learned they were very open-minded; it exceeded our expectations (which are always high!). After we confirmed that the concept was suited to local taste buds, we opened our Sea Point flagship store. The reaction was amazing, even though it was winter. Growing in popularity in The Mother City, we received many requests to open a Joburg shop. We started to investigate Jozi. We saw the rental space in Illovo Junction and it was love at first sight... We opened this branch at the beginning of April and the locals welcomed us with open arms! Now you might ask: “Where’s next?” Well, we’re thinking of opening our next store in Pretoria, but have received quite a number of wishes for Durban as well, so it’s best to watch this space...

Photographs supplied

MY SISTER, OR, AND I WERE LIVING IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE WORLD. Or was self-employed and based in Cape Town, while I was working in advertising in our hometown of Tel Aviv, Israel. Both of us are mothers of toddlers and are career-focused; it was important to us to fulfil ourselves in a professional sense, but after we had our children, we noticed it became increasingly difficult for us (as it is for many other women) to give our all to our kids and our professions. You want to work, but you also want to be home – and combine everything to succeed. So, we thought, what next? We pondered on this a lot and decided we wanted to do something together that would make people happy – this had always been one of our childhood dreams. I visited Or in Cape Town, fell head over heels in love with the city and knew I wanted to relocate. We both saw a business opportunity in the ice cream market, compared to overseas. We were inspired by the ice cream sandwich concept in the USA and knew it would be a great idea to bring to SA. We took a chance and started to develop the brand from the bottom. After hours and hours of recipe development, and a million attempts, we created the ultimate ice cream sandwich, which resulted in the birth of Crumbs & Cream. OUR BRAND PHILOSOPHY IS HAPPINESS, which we take very seriously. We always try to keep the product young, with a cool vibe, music and, of course, customer service. We see customer service as one of the most important aspects in order to create the perfect encounter. We are blessed to have a trusty dream team who understands this, and do their best to serve our clientele in the most fun, passionate and interactive ways. THE CONCEPT OF CRUMBS & CREAM is creating your own dreamy ice-cream cookie sandwich by choosing two different freshly baked cookies, picking a scoop or two from the ice cream flavours, and then adding toppings and spreads. We try our best to have something for (almost) every sweet tooth out

CRUMBSANDCREAM.CO.ZA


PROMOTION

������� ���������� a creamy twist on a nicoise salad

Beat the heat with juicy pineapple skewers!


It’s not surprising that Krush is the number one 100% fruit juice brand in South Africa* – it’s enriched with vitamins A, C and E, it has no added sugar or sweetener.

GRILLED SUMMER FRUIT SKEWERS WITH KRUSH TROPICAL GRANITa

HOW TO DO IT Pour the Clover Krush Tropical into a shallow dish and cover with cling film. Freeze, 4 hours or overnight. Combine the melted butter, honey, Makes 6 EASY 16 mins + 4 hrs, to freeze lemon zest and juice in a small bowl. Thread the pineapple cubes onto THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS the 6 skewers. Heat a griddle pan 750ml (3 cups) Clover Krush Tropical over medium-high heat. Brush the 60g butter, melted pineapple skewers with the honey butter. 60g honey Grill, 2 – 3 minutes per side or until griddle zest and juice of 1 lemon, grated marks appear. 2 pineapples, peeled and cubed Scrape the frozen Clover Krush Tropical 6 bamboo skewers, soaked in water with a fork to loosen the icy crystals. Serve the grilled pineapple skewers with lime wedges, to squeeze the granita alongside and lime wedges for mint leaves, to garnish squeezing. Garnish with mint leaves.

1 2 3

4


nicoise salad Makes 4 EASY 25 mins THE FLAVOUR COMBINATIONS SALAD 500g baby potatoes, peeled 250g green beans, topped 30g butter handful fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped 30ml (2 tbsp) olive oil 500g fresh trout 50g baby herb and salad leaves 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 100g black olives 4 soft-boiled eggs, peeled and quartered

FH8404/10/17 Styling by Vickie de Beer Assisted by Julia van Maarseveen Photographs by Charles Russel, crphotographic.co.za * Krush was voted number 1 fruit juice brand by the Sunday Times Top Brands Awards 2015 and 2016. Clover was also voted an Icon brand though the Ask Africa brand survey for 2016 and 2017 ** Participants clearly distinguished Clover dairy cream in Cream O’Naise at research stage

DRESSING 60ml (4 tbsp) Clover Cream O’Naise zest of 1 lime, grated

HOW TO DO IT For the salad, place the baby potatoes in a medium saucepan filled with salted, cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer over medium heat, 10 minutes or until tender. Remove from heat. Cook the green beans in salted, boiling water over medium heat, 2 minutes. Heat the butter and fresh flat-leaf parsley in a frying pan. Fry the potatoes lightly or until well tossed with the butter. Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over high heat and fry the trout, 2 minutes per side. For the dressing, combine the Clover Cream O’Naise and lime zest. Arrange all of the salad ingredients on a serving platter. Serve with the lime and Clover Cream O’Naise dressing.

1

PROMOTION

2 3

4 5 6

Clover Cream O’Naise is the only mayonnaise made with real dairy cream**, as well as no added MSG, plus, it’s high in vitamin E! It’s so Cream O’Niceee!

www.facebook.com/creamonaise www.twitter.com/creamonaise


10dfvdfdvf  
10dfvdfdvf  
Advertisement