The South Dakota Cattleman | Convention 2022

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South Dakota Cattleman the

Convention 2022
The official publication of the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association

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Calendar of Events

December 12-13: 74th Annual Trade Show & Convention, Pierre

January 25-26, 2023: SDCA Board Meeting & SDCA Day at the Capitol, Pierre

February 1-3, 2023: Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show in New Orleans

Advertising Opportunities

The South Dakota Cattleman is published six times a year and sent to SDCA members including beef producers, beef industry supporters, property owners, allied industry partners, as well as state and local government officials with a circulation of 1,000�

Advertising deadline is the 5th of the month prior to publication�

The SDCA newsletter, The Cattle Guard, is emailed to all SDCA members every week The Cattle Guard contains updates and news from SDCA, Industry Partners, and NCBA�

Follow us on our social media platforms to stay informed of the latest SDCA news, events, and information�

SDCA Convention Preview

Midwest Ag Export Summit Recap

SDCA Affiliate Contact Information

In Every Issue Western Perspective 2 From the Cattle Pen ������������������������������������������������������������� 4 The Cattlemen's Outlook ������������������������������������������������������ 7 NCBA Membership Form 7 SDCA Working for You 8 Your Beef Checkoff Dollars at Work ������������������������������������� 18 Features Give the Gift of Beef ������������������������������������������������������������� 11 Moes Feedlot, LLC 14 701x 22 SDSU Extension: New Rules for Veterinary Medicine ��������� 24 United States Senator John Thune �������������������������������������� 29
News
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30 sdcattlemen SDCattlemen
South Dakota Cattlemen's Association
Association & Industry
SDCA Region Roundup Recap
SDCA

The Western Perspective

Eric Jennings, SDCA President

People often reminisce about the “good ole days” which most of the time means they are referring to a simpler and more wholesome time. We in agriculture are often guilty of wanting to go back to the way things were, back when there were less regulations to follow, fewer animal diseases to vaccinate, and fewer absentee landowners. We certainly hear a lot about wanting to go back to the days of regional packers and consumers – buying their meat from the local butcher.

I am occasionally guilty of trying to hold on to the past. I still move cattle with a horse and utilize some older machinery to avoid dealing with electronics. Even though I try to stick with the traditional ways in my ranching operation, I recognize that life is much easier now thanks to modern advances. I am glad I don’t have to pitch hay on a wagon by hand, only to pitch it off again to feed cows in the winter, like my grandfather once did. I enjoy feeding cows by unrolling a round bale from my heated cab and having heated water tanks instead of chopping ice.

I will never be accused of being an early adopter of technology, but I do recognize it’s made our lives better and is here to stay. While we may fondly remember the “good ole days”, and not be happy about all of the changes that have occurred in the cattle industry, we can’t roll the clock back and get back to the way it was 30 or 50 years ago. I am sure we all have known producers who didn’t embrace advancements, only to go out of business because they couldn’t compete. Some of the ideas that seemed impossible 30 or so years ago are now commonplace. Many of us pregnancy check our herds through ultrasounding, synchronize cows for artificial breeding, and sell cattle on a satellite auction. We use quality grids to capture the value that we add through good genetics, and the genetics we selected are attributed to the Expected Progeny Differences (EPD) numbers that we now have available to us. We no longer have to call our neighbors in the early morning or late evening to catch them at home; we just call them on their cell phone anytime.

Even though most of us utilize newer technology in some form or another, as an industry we struggle to embrace new developments. As you read through the policies of South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association, you will notice that we advocate for protecting and enhancing opportunities for cattlemen, whether that be for developing new market opportunities, new ideas for conservation practices, or advancements through technology.

Being open to change is an important attribute of SDCA because our industry needs to be able to adapt to consumers changing their attitudes and values. In the “good ole days” we didn’t have to address consumer’s concern for how we raise cattle or that raising cattle can affect the environment. Today, we have a more socially and environmentally aware consumer who is used to being able to easily access product information. It is hard for us to imagine what information the consumer will want or require in the future, but whatever that level of information is, we need to be able to provide it. Embracing technology available today is an important step in satisfying consumer’s appetite for information in the future.

Although predicting what information tomorrow’s consumer will require is unknown at this point, we are continuing to develop the technology to carry the information they may seek and store electronically. Animal movements is one data point that can be stored and accessed electonically by the use of electronic identification tags. This data can be used to provide information to consumers, as well as significantly reduce the trace back time in case of animal disease outbreaks.

Even though we may not know what information the consumer will require, we can position ourselves to be ready to provide it through the use of technology. It is important that we stay progressive and keep our options open by learning about how we can incorporate new technologies into our operations. As with any new advancement, there are challenges to overcome, such as keeping this data secure. Cybersecurity is a similar concept to learning to lock our pickup doors when we go to town, something we didn’t need to do in the “good ole days”.

This year’s SDCA convention will offer information on the new technology and cybersecurity now available to us. Whether you are an early adopter of technology or hesitant to try something new, learning about what new technology is available is important to stay current and viable within the industry. The traditional ways of the “good ole days” may get some jobs done on the ranch, but they aren’t going to pay the bills moving forward.

2 Convention 2022
800.482.2428 | bhfcu.com

SDCA Leadership

Eric

Warren

Carl

Craig

Jeff

Regional Representatives

Jay Jones, Northern Region

Sal Roseland, Northern Region

Drew Edleman, Northeast Region

Nick Wilkinson, Northeast Region

Cory Eich, Southeast Region

Austin Havlik, Southeast Region

Casey Heenan, Southern Region

Kory Bierle, Southern Region

Britton Blair, Western Region

Devin Stephens, Western Region

The South Dakota Cattleman 3
Jennings, President
Symens, Vice President
Sanders, Secretary/Treasurer
Bieber, VP of Membership
Past
Reisch, Cattle Feeder Council
Knock, Cow-Calf Council
Peterson, Young Cattlemen Council Council Members
Smeenk,
President Officers John
Jared
Emily
Taya Runyan Executive Director trunyan@sdcattlemen.org Lorrin Naasz Director of Communications & Outreach lnaasz@sdcattlemen.org SDCA Staff For additional information, visit sdcattlemen.org Ad Index Farm Credit Services of America Front Inside Cover Black Hills Federal Credit Union 2 Endovac 6 Multimin 90 10-11 701x 10 MLS Tubs 16 Premier Equipment 16 Agtegra 24 Redd Summit Advisors 27 Steele Financial Services, LLC 29 Ranchwork.com 31 First Dakota 31 Advertise with SDCA 31 South Dakota State Fair DEX Back Inside Cover

From the Cattle Pen

Warren Symens, SDCA Vice President

Today was a long day of weaning calves and the last thing I wanted to do was sit down and write, but that’s what happens when you procrastinate, so I digress. Weaning has been happening here every fall for several generations. Grandpa and his brothers, dad and his brothers, and now we continue this seasonal event just like thousands of other farms and ranches – it’s nothing new. But some things have changed over the years like the breeds we are weaning.

Grandpa began breeding a three-way cross in the early 50’s His final cross was a Hereford x Red Angus x Shorthorn calf. He didn’t adopt this technology from a university study or from experts in the field. He looked at how corn varieties were developed, and began applying it to cattle. This added longevity to his cowherd and pounds to his calves, which resulted in profitability for him and more beef for the consumer.

Fast forward to 1982, Dad and his brothers were on their second production sale, selling 100 registered Limousin bulls. The sale lots fit on six pages in the catalog and the only information available was pedigree, birthdate, birthweight, and adjusted weaning and yearling weights. Expected Progeny Difference (EPD’s) hit the catalog in 1989 - there were four of them. I’m sure the brothers attended many meetings about what they all meant, how they were calculated, and how to apply them.

Today, as we go into our 42nd year, the catalog used 24 pages for 100 bulls. Each lot contained 14 EPD’s, and could have contained more. Digital photography has made it easier to include quality pictures, much improved from the grainy black and white shadows of the old days. Our customers each have their favorite technology they use, where some prefer the ultrasound data, some the EPD’s, and some still rely mostly on the adjusted weights -- but who doesn’t love a great eye-catching photo?

A few years back, we began to pull DNA from every calf. That data is now applied to enhance EPD’s, as is the carcass ultrasound data we’ve collected. Actual carcass data from slaughter calves goes into the mix as well. These technologies have been adopted by cattlemen who want to be out in front of change. Many meetings, conferences, and seminars held opportunities to gather this information and apply it back home. Increased profitability is always the goal, but a better calf and satisfied customers are happy byproducts.

Shortly after I came back from college in 1999, I began to tell dad about a few things I’d picked up while working at the SDSU research feedlot. I learned that bunk scoring and reading what the cattle told me intakes. We both decided to attend the feedlot short course that Dr. Pritchard offered during the summer. Twenty three years later, I attended the South Dakota Feeder Council tour that was offered this summer. In both cases, there were technologies that I picked up, both new and old, that were presented by both academia and by boots on the ground people. You're never too old to take advantage of new learning opportunities like these and like the ones offered by the South Dakota Cattlemen's Education Series during convention.

The 74th annual South Dakota Cattlemen’s Convention and Trade Show will focus on technology. For a couple of days in Pierre, we can gather together and find a thing or two that we can bring home to apply to our own operations. Academia will be there to promote the results of countless hours of study and research, and so will lots of boots on the ground efforts to offer their version of something new that they adapted to make profitable changes. It can be hard to put faith in something new. “It won’t work on our place” is something I hear over and over. But ideas can be modified and reshaped by input from colleagues, friends, and neighbors (often over a beer at the end of the session). That’s one of the things I like best about convention. I enjoy getting together with other folks in the cattle business to hear something new and discuss what it means for us as individuals.

The policy discussions that guide the direction of the association is also extremely important. With a changing industry and new and improving technology, it’s important to keep up with changes and make sure our policy reflects the members. Whether it is new ideas to implement on the ranch or new policy, we can learn a lot from each other. So bring your thoughts and ideas to other attendees and even to those researchers I mentioned earlier. There’s lots of good ideas out there and there’s no reason not to bring them with you to Pierre in December. I hope to see you then, and may your weaning weights be heavy!

4 Convention 2022

Agtegra

Allied Industry Members

Prime Members

Aaladin Cleaning-Revier Pressure Washers

Creative Ag Production Solutions, LLC

Diesel Machinery, Inc

First Fidelity Bank

For-Most Inc.

Corporate Members

Choice Members

3D Security, Inc.

Animal Clinic, Ltd. - Winner

Bankwest, Inc. - Pierre

Blindert Insurance

Bryant State Bank

C-Lock, Inc.

Cattlecents Consulting, Inc.

Chase Consulting

Deer Equipment

De Smet Veterinary Service

De-Tye Vet Supply, Inc.

Select Members

Dakota

Standard Members

First Interstate Bank

Millborn Seeds

OLS Tubs, Inc.

Renner Corner Locker

Rock Veterinary Clinic

Rush-Co

SD Trucking Association

Steele Financial Services, LLC

The Nature Conservancy Walsh Trading

White Insurance P&C Inc.

SD Trucking Association

Supporting Members

Ed's Produce

NDEco

Farmers

First

First National Bank - Ft. Pierre

Huron Veterinary Hospital

Kingbrook Rural Water System, Inc.

Lilace Lane Media

Liphatech (Rozol)

Lyle Signs Inc

Moly Manufacturing LLC / SILENCER

Montrose Veterinary Clinic

Rivers Edge Bank

Sioux International

Sioux Nation, LLC

Statewide Ag Insurance - Winner

Stockwell Engineers

Twin Lakes Animal Clinic

US Premium Beef

Y-Tex Corporation

The South Dakota Cattleman 5
& Merchants State Bank
Interstate Bank-Hot Springs
Membership
Allied Industry
information available online at sdcattlemen.org
Cooperative Central Farmers Cooperative
Ethanol, LLC Nutrient Advisors

MORE than Just a Vaccine Anytime, Any Season, All Cattle

Healthy calves just mean less expense. We just don’t have extra time and labor to put into treating cattle in a pasture setting. We’ve got a man on the place that can rope or do anything that needs to be done. But the fact of it is, he hasn’t used that rope one time this year for treating any of these calves. As they grow and they develop we just have less issues if we can keep them healthier. ENDOVAC-Beef is the product that is making all the difference in the world. We like cattle to look good and to stay sound and have good feet. We’ve enjoyed the results basically no pinkeye and no foot rot issues. I can tell you from an end user standpoint it’s making us money. Find

6
Dan Leo, APEX Cattle
your nearest
at EndovacBeef.com or call 1-800-944-7563
rep

The Cattleman's Outlook

The Region Roundup meetings hosted in communities across the state were a great opportunity for prospective members to learn about SDCA, meet current members and staff and engage in conversations on policy and industry issues with board leaders and legislators. Thirteen new members joined the SDCA at the meetings!

In addition to learning about the benefits of SDCA and about the work being done at the state level, we discussed the benefits of being a member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). NCBA represents the livelihoods of cattlemen and women nationwide. Becoming a member will also give you access to education and member benefit programs and discounts on brands like Ram, John Deere, Dell, Roper, Tin Haul and more.

SDCA has 226 members of NBCA, and as a state affiliate, our voting power and benefits are related to our membership level. SDCA currently holds two votes on the NCBA board, and we are close to receiving an

additional vote if we increase our membership.

So, if you have been on the fence about a dual membership, please consider signing up today at www.ncba.org. Supporting NCBA also supports the state association in the form of funding that can be used to fund state initiatives. NCBA provides valuable support services to state affiliates through their member services staff.

NCBA CEO Collin Woodall will be addressing the members and guests at our annual convention and trade show in Pierre. Please consider attending to learn more about our national partner.

Join SDCA and NCBA today!

1-100 $150 101-250 $300 251-300 $450 501-750 $650 751-1000 $900 1001-1250 $1,150 1251-1500 $1,400 1501-1750 $1,650 1751-2000 $1,900 2000+ (# hd___x38c) + $1,900 = STOCKER/FEEDER (# hd___x38c) + $150 = ASSOCIATE

The South Dakota Cattleman 7 JOIN NCBA TODAY. Fill out and mail back this form to:
us at
OR Join online at
NAME BUSINESS/RANCH NAME ADDRESS LINE 1 ADDRESS LINE 2 CITY/STATE/ZIP HOME PHONE OFFICE PHONE EMAIL RECRUITED BY PAYMENT METHOD Check Visa Mastercard American Express Card # EXP Signature CVC Checks payable to National Cattlemen’s Beef Association
PRODUCER
TOTAL AMOUNT PAID
PO Box 173778, Denver, CO 80217 Call
866.233.3872
NCBA.org
NCBA PRODUCER MEMBERSHIP COW-CALF
HERD SIZE
MEMBERSHIP NON-CATTLE OWNING, NON-VOTING Individual $150 Business $200 Student $50 (24 or younger)
Sign me up for auto-renewal
SDCA NCBA

SDCA Working for You Taya Runyan, SDCA Executive Director

SDCA ELECTIONS

Nominations for regional directors were accepted through October 25th. Candidates that met the requirements will be placed on the ballot. Online voting will open November15 - December 2. Regional Directors will be announced at the annual business meeting. The Leadership Recruitment Committee will nominate at the annual business meeting candidates for the following elected offices: president, vice president, secretary/treasurer, and vice president of membership.

BYLAW BREAKDOWN

In September, the SDCA Board of Directors met in Pierre and considered several bylaw amendments. The board voted to recommend adoption of four amendments by the general membership at the annual meeting:

Fiscal year adjustment. Changing the fiscal year from October1 - September 30 to July - June 30. This was considered and recommended by the Resource Committee during the budget process, and further recommended by the Board. This allows the organization to capture the bulk of its revenue at the beginning of the fiscal year, allowing for better management of resources and expenditures through the year based on actual income versus projections.

Director elections. Last year after the board restructure was approved by membership, the election for new regional directors took place via online voting. The Board felt that worked well and allowed for more member participation since they would not have to attend an in-person meeting to vote. The Board has recommended amending the bylaws to allow for future online elections and allow for nominations to be received at regional meetings. The candidate receiving the most votes in the election will be announced at the annual meeting.

Affiliate and Council responsibilities. Affiliate and Council responsibilities were found both the bylaws and in the Policy and Procedure handbook.

bylaws. They will remain in the handbook, but with more flexibility to adjust those responsibilities as needed.

Clean up. The final recommendation is to clean up various outdated references, spelling errors, and make the bylaws easier to read.

The full text of all bylaw amendments that will be considered at the annual meeting is available on the website.

SUPREME COURT HEARS WOTUS CASE WHILE EPA CONTINUES RULE MAKING

In early October, the United State Supreme Court heard Sackett v Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the latest case that addresses the definition and regulation of Waters of the United States (WOTUS). After decades of ever-changing policy, the Court is seeking to define a test under the Clean Water Act that landowners would understand and rely on, as well as stand the test of time. Even while the Court considers the Sackett case, the EPA and U.S. Army Corps are moving forward with a rule making process to define WOTUS. It is unknown if the final rule will be announced before the Supreme Court issues a decision. As this case plays out and as that final rule is proposed, we will continue to keep you updated.

CLIMATE SMART COMMODITIES

Google recently announced that they are developing a new search feature that will allow consumers looking up recipes to see the emissions data from certain ingredients. Unfortunately, Google relies on data not designed for this purpose. This tool fails to provide a complete calculation of an ingredient's carbon impact by ignoring critical components of food production. Beef provides economic, environmental, and social value that should be represented in any sustainability calculation. Our partners at NCBA have been working with Google to share the cattle industry’s concerns with their faulty data and urge Google to reconsider this feature, while also sharing some key sustainability facts about the industry.

8 Convention 2022

While there is a market demand for climate-smart commodities, accurate data is critical and search features like the one announced by Google has the potential to misinform consumers. Here in South Dakota, work is being done to not only compile accurate data, but also give producers the tools to use that data to educate consumers. SDSU was recently awarded a historic $80 million dollar grant to fund its “The Grass is Greener on the Other Side: Developing Climate-Smart Beef and Bison Commodities” project. The project will create market opportunities for beef and bison producers who utilize climate-smart agriculture grazing and land-management practices. The project will guide and educate producers on climate-smart practices most suited for their operations, manage large-scale climate-smart data that will be used by producers to improve decision-making and create market demand for climate-smart beef and bison commodity markets.

FMCSA- HOURS OR SERVICE

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) quietly let the national hours-of-service exemption that was in place for over two years expire. The FMCSA failed to extend the Hoursof-Service (HOS) Emergency Declaration. During the pandemic, the exemption gave truck drivers and carriers more flexibility to deliver shipments of livestock, medical supplies, vaccines, groceries, and diesel fuel by waiving hours of service restrictions. While there was a steady decline of many kinds of cargo being hauled under the exemptions, the livestock and animal feeding haulers continued to use the exemption and supported an extension.

We will continue working with our federal partners to find further flexibilities within the HOS space and advocate for a permanent exemption for livestock haulers. As a reminder, the electronic logging device delay for livestock haulers is still in place until December 15, 2022. Keep an eye on our social media for any further updates.

BEEF BOOTH FUNDRAISERS

The annual Beef Booth events at Dakotafest and the South Dakota State Fair were once again a success!

Thanks to the dedicated members that organize and volunteer at these events, and the businesses and customers that support the SDCA, we raised just over $30,000.

SDCA ORGANIZATIONAL DECALS

South Dakota vehicle license plates can tell you a lot! Many of us have learned all the numbers and can identify what city or county someone is from by their license plates. In the last several years the Department of Revenue rolled out a new option that allowed people to display organizations they support on their license plate. These special organizational plates have room on the left side for a special decal and a series of letters and numbers beginning with “W”. Members interested in displaying their support of SDCA can purchase organizational plates through their local county treasurer. Approved non-profit organizations, like SDCA, can raise additional funds through sale of the decals. We recently went through the approval process and will have decals available for sale at the Annual Convention & Tradeshow and on our online store. For more information about organizational plates, visit dor.sd.gov.

The South Dakota Cattleman 9
10 Convention 2022 YOUR BEST SHOT AT IMMUNITY Multimin® 90 is a one-of-a-kind trace mineral injection that supports immune function. Research shows Multimin 90 in a calf vaccination program improves vaccine response from 53% to 80% as measured by a four-fold increase in antibody titers. Superior immune response provides better protection against BRD, while improving overall herd health and productivity. Optimize your vaccination ROI with Multimin 90. See corresponding page for prescribing information. Improve immune response to vaccines by 27%* www.multiminusa.com *Data on file. © 2022 MULTIMIN® USA Joe Rancher CONNECT WITH US! info@701x.com 1.844.444.7019 701x.com FORGET THE DAYS OF LOSING YOUR RECORDS AND YOUR CATTLE.

ACTIVE SUBSTANCES PER ML:

Zinc 60 mg/mL

Manganese 10 mg/mL Selenium 5 mg/mL Copper 15 mg/mL

OTHER SUBSTANCES:

Chlorocresol 0.1% w/v (as preservative)

Give the Gift of Beef

CAUTION:

Slight local reaction may occur for about 30 seconds after injection. A slight swelling may be observed at injection site for a few days after administration. Use standard aseptic procedures during administration of injections to reduce the risk of injection site abscesses or lesions

WITHDRAWAL PERIOD:

Meat 14 days. Milk zero withdrawal.

DIRECTIONS: This product is only for use in cattle

MULTIMIN® 90 is to be given subcutaneously (under the skin) ONLY

It is recommended to administer the product in accordance with Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) guidelines

Minimum distance between injection sites for the MULTIMIN® 90product and other injection sites should be at least 4 inches

Inject under the loose skin of the middle of the side of the neck. Max volume per injection site is 7 ml.

Subcutaneous injection in middle of side of neck.

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Growing up, we always had Beef Bucks, it seemed to be a household staple. Just like any other gift card, Beef Bucks could always be found shoved in the desk drawers, wallets, or the center console of every vehicle we owned. Stocked up from the many times we had received them as gifts, only to be used as gifts in a pinch. Being a household staple though, didn’t mean that I actually knew what they were used for or who they benefited. After volunteering with the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Auxiliary, I quickly found out that not only were consumers confused but producers were also puzzled about the Bucks.

While promoting and advocating for beef, the Auxiliary uses Beef Bucks as a prize or an incentive for people to interact with us. For example, at the Expo for Her event, we have participants take a survey to be entered to win Beef Bucks. The questions we heard were always the same, “What are Beef Bucks?” and “How do they benefit me?” So, let’s answer those questions!

The Beef Bucks program is a non-profit organization incorporated to promote the beef industry by making beef more accessible to the everyday person. The program was established in 1997 in De Smet, South Dakota, and is led by a volunteer board of directors. Beef Bucks can come in the form of pre-paid checks or VISA cards that can be used to purchase beef or beef meals, just like cash.

Beef Bucks can be used in 40 states at places such as restaurants, grocery stores, butcher shops, etc. Retailers accepting Beef Buck need only to deposit the check as they would any other check accepted at their establishment.

The proceeds from the sale of Beef Bucks is used to fund the program, several scholarships, the Beef Recipe Collection, and the annual golf tournament. The beauty of Beef Bucks is that they can be put towards any beef or beef meal sold at the establishment. These versatile bucks are great gifts and with the holidays coming up, they make wonderful stocking stuffers.

Beef Bucks aren’t meant to be shoved in drawers or wallets; they are meant to drive up that demand for the commodity that drives our economy. They are meant to be used by organizations such as the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Auxiliary to educate consumers about beef and highlight an industry that works hard to produce some of the best beef known to man. So next time you find crumpled-up Beef Bucks in the backseat of your truck or find yourself re-gifting some Bucks, just take pride in knowing that those have and will continue to make a huge impact on beef demand.

Visit www.beefbucks.org or call 1-888-640-MEAT to get the perfect gift for the upcoming season.

Learn more and become a member of South Dakota Cattlemen's Auxiliary.

The South Dakota Cattleman 11 KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN
An injectable aqueous supplemental source of zinc, manganese, selenium, and copper
CAUTION: FEDERAL LAW RESTRICTS THIS DRUG TO USE BY OR ON THE ORDER OF A LICENSED VETERINARIAN.
BULLS 1300 1400 ANIMAL WEIGHT (lbs) 50 100 150 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 CALVES UP TO 1 YEAR 1 ml/100 lb BW 0.5 ml 1 ml 1.5 ml 2 ml 3 ml 4 ml 5 ml 6 ml 7 ml CATTLE 1 - 2 YEARS 1 ml/150 lb BW 5.3 ml 6 ml 6 6 ml 6.5 ml 7 ml CATTLE > 2 YEARS 1 ml/200 lb BW 5 ml 5.5 ml 6 ml BEEF COWS DAIRY COWS CALVES HEIFERS 3 times per year (program gives planned dates that can be varied to suit management programs) 4 weeks before breeding 4 weeks before calving 4 weeks before calving 4 weeks before insemination at dry off at birth at 3 months and/or weaning every 3 months –especially 4 weeks before breeding SUPPLEMENTATION PROGRAM DOSAGE TABLE Packaged in 100 mL & 500 mL size NDC No 49920-006-01 NDC No 49920-006-05 MANUFACTURED FOR: MULTIMIN® NORTH AMERICA, INC. Fort Collins CO 80528 DOSAGE RECOMMENDATIONS: CALVES: Up to 1 year 1 mL/per 100 lbs bodyweight CATTLE From 1 2 years 1 mL/per 1 5 0 lbs bodyweight CATTLE: Over 2 years 1 mL/per 200 lbs bodyweight PRECAUTION: Selenium and copper are toxic if administered in excess Always follow recommended label dose. Do not overdose It is recommended that accurate body weight is determined prior to treatment. Do not use concurrently with other injectable selenium and copper products Do not use concurrently with selenium or copper boluses Do not use in emaciated cattle with a BCS of 1 in dairy or 1 3 in beef Consult your veterinarian

SDCA officers and staff hit the road during the month of September for the 2022 Region Roundups. These meetings, which served as the SDCA regional nominating meetings, were designed to bring the association to its members – to provide information to the state’s cattle producers and gather their valuable input to chart the course for the SDCA. Association members and guests were invited to learn more about the organization, bring their input and ideas, have the conversations for the betterment of the very industry that supports them, and enjoy a delicious meal with new and old friends. Also at the events were sponsors, area legislators, and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) staff to provide important updates. The 2022 Roundup meetings were held in Mobridge, Spearfish, Murdo, Winner, Yankton, Salem, and Watertown.

Mobridge Roundup

The first meeting kicked off at Rick’s Cafe in Mobridge, SD. Cattlemen leadership in attendance included Vice President (VP) Warren Symens, VP of Membership Craig Bieber, and Regional Director Jay Jones. The group discussed the gassroots policy process that was used to recently bring a resolution to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Summer Business meeting. The issue that led to this resolution is that Pasture Range Forage (PRF) does not include adequate cover for a lot of the grids in South Dakota, and Noninsured Crop Assistance Program (NAP) coverage is better suited to meet the needs of producers. SDCA board member Lyle Perman brought forth the policy suggestion and the result was a grassroots solution to a problem to be addressed. The SDCA brought the policy resolution that expanded the NAP to include buy up coverage on grazing land the same way that you are able to buy on mechanically harvested acres. The policy was adopted by NCBA and will be carried to Capitol Hill.

Other topics included carbon credits, eminent domain, and foreign ownership of ag land. We also had State Senator Bryan Breitling and Representative Charlie Hoffman at the meeting, to answer questions and learn more about SDCA’s policy. It was great to have them attend Mobridge and hear the lively discussion.

Spearfish Roundup

Cattlemen gathered at Killians in Spearfish, SD for the second stop. Leadership in attendance included President Eric Jennings, Secretary and Treasurer Carl Sanders, and VP of Membership Craig Bieber, Region Directors Britton Blair and Devin Stephens, and former SDCA President Larry Stomprud. President Jennings led the discussion about country of origin labeling and whether the SDCA policy is keeping up with industry trends. Attendees also had the opportunity to hear from Dr. Amanda Blair, with SDSU, who’s recent $80 million grant from the USDA’s Climate-Smart Commodities initiative, will create market opportunities for beef and bison producers who utilize Climate-Smart agriculture grazing and land-management practices. This opportunity will assist SDSU with ensuring sustainable agriculture for generations to come.

Representative Scott Odenbach, Representative Mary Fitzgerald and Senate candidate Randy Diebert were on hand to give legislative updates and talk to members.

Murdo Roundup

The next meeting was held in Murdo, SD at the Covered Wagon Cafe. President Jennings, Secretary/Treasurer Sanders, VP of Membership Bieber, and Director Kory Bierle led the program.

The discussion focused on Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling (MCOOL), Mesonet weather stations, and processing capacity. Regional Director Bierle had the opportunity to discuss his participation at recent Farm Bill roundtables with U.S. Senator Mike Rounds and U.S. Representative Dusty Jonson. At each region meeting Executive Director Taya Runyan and Director of Communications and Outreach Lorrin Naasz highlighted the new South Dakota Cattleman magazine, and the strategic communication efforts to keep members informed while being a regional industry resource as well.

Winner Roundup

Day two of the Roundup ended in Winner, SD at the Winner Country Club. There was a great crowd and active discussion led by President Jennings. Secretary/Treasurer Sanders, and Regional Directors Kory Bierle and Casey Heenan. The meeting focused on issues of marketing, traceability, and MCOOL. One of the administrative topics covered at every meeting was membership, including SDCA's new ranch membership option. Ranch memberships allow for multiple members in a family or operation to be combined under one account. The primary membership is $150 and each additional membership is $75. Additional memberships can be spouses, partners, children, and ranch staff. The staff heard from members that they wanted to involve more family members, but didn't want the hassle of multiple invoices and mailings. Ranch memberships have only one invoice and one magazine mailed to each separate mailing address. Each additional member has full voting rights and can hold office within the organization. In Winner, we were excited to welcome a family of five as our newest ranch members!

Yankton Roundup

President Jennings and Regional Director Austin Havlik were joined by Senator Jean Hunhoff, of Yankton, and Shirley Thompson of the South Dakota Beef Industry Council. Senator Hunhoff, a longtime member of the appropriations committee, was interested to discuss the funding mechanism for the association, as well as how checkoff dollars are collected and used. The group also discussed recent Cooperative Interstate Shipment Grants, food security, processing capacity and limitations, and workforce issues. At each meeting, including the event at JoDean's Steakhouse, SDCA had the opportunity to hear from USDA FSA. Most topics included Farm Bill policies and coverage available for producers including the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP), Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), Farm Storage Facility loans, and others. It was great to hear of programs available to producers. If you have any questions on programs available, contact your local FSA office.

Salem Roundup

The Brewery in Salem was the gathering place where President Jennings led a discussion about the upcoming Farm Bill and what the SDCA’s priorities include. The group also talked about the carbon pipeline that is affecting much of the state, and zoning issues in the Salem area. VP of Membership Bieber, and Regional Directors Austin Havlik and Cory Eich, were included in attendance. SDCA Partners with many organizations across the state and we were able to highlight the work we do with the Beef Industry Council, South Dakota Cattlemen’s Foundation and many more.

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Watertown Roundup

VP Symens, VP of Membership Bieber, and Regional Directors Nick Wilkinson and Drew Edleman, led the group at Harry’s Restaurant in Watertown. In addition to Farm Bill and the policy presentations, the group talked about easements, eminent domain, and foreign ownership of ag land. One program that was highlighted by FSA at this event was the Farm Storage Facility Loan Program. This program provides low interest loans to build on farm storage for grain both whole or cracked, silage, and hay, among many other commodities that may be of interest to members of the SDCA.

Nominations for Regional Directors to serve on the Board of Directors officially opened at the Roundup. The nomination period remained open through October 25th. There was also a call for nominations for Friend of SDCA and Cattlemen of the Year awards. The awardees will be recognized at the SDCA’s 74th Annual Convention and Trade Show that will take place December 12-13, 2022.

The South Dakota Cattleman 13
Thank you, Sponsors!

Moes Feedlot,

"If you don't use technology,

Moes Feedlot, LLC, owned by John and Donita Moes of Florence, South Dakota, started out as a 30 bred cow operation while they raised their kids April, Amber, and Bryan. Fast forward to today, the kids are grown and you’ll find more hands on the farm, including Sarah, Bryan’s wife, and their five sons: Layne, Carl, Oliver, Bellamy, and Guy.

The Moes family grew their black angus herd up to 200 head and were selling their calves after weaning in January, when they knew that the calves would do good at market and the same people would purchase them. The Moes’ realized that if the same people were purchasing their cattle year after year, it was a sign to capture more of the market, so they transitioned their operation into a feedlot and started finishing cattle.

“We had limited ability to purchase more acres to increase our row crop operation,” said Bryan Moes, operations manager of Moes Feedlot. “So we decided to focus on what we knew…cattle husbandry.”

In 2007, the Moes family built a finishing mono-slope barn and in 2011, they expanded again to a Class B Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) of nearly 2,000 head capacity. Around that time is when the Moes family started implementing and utilizing technology and automation to work more effectively and efficiently with their day-to-day tasks. The primary piece of that technology included using Performance Livestock Analytics, which is part of Zoetis.

“I cannot count how many hours I used to spend updating feed rations, feed batch sheets, and tracking them through pen and paper,” said Bryan. “It was also frustrating to sit down at the computer at the end of the month and try to make sense of what numbers I had scribbled down on paper the whole month before on 7-10 batch delivery pages, assuming the wind, rain or spilled coffee hadn’t ruined them. We could not have been happier at the end of the first full month of using Performance Livestock Analytics came around and we were done with billing and month-end reports in less than an hour.”

Moes Feedlot utilizes Performance Beef to feed cattle accurately, track ingredient usage, project average daily gain for cattle based on delivered feed, track animal health and performance, as well as document vaccination schedules and reminders for what needs to be processed to ensure a pen is safe for shipment.

Performance Beef gives Moes feedlot a quick way to check on closeouts of a group of cattle on feed.

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technology, you'll lose it." Feedlot, LlC

“As a result, this allows an immediate check of our breakevens on that group of cattle from anywhere with a cloud connection,” said Bryan. “This makes marketing strategies and decisions easier to make due to the data being at the tip of our fingers versus sifting through piles of paperwork at the office.”

Another benefit of utilizing Performance Beef is that it has allowed Moes Feedlot to feed faster and more accurately. “The ease of changing a ration makes a person more willing to change the pounds of feed delivered to meet pen needs instead of waiting a few days longer to see if they truly do need feed increased,” said Bryan. “Additionally, John and I have the capability to edit or change feed amounts while we are not on the farm and allow more people the ability to feed our cattle while giving us instant data on what was loaded or fed, and how that could affect feed intakes.”

The Performance Beef app also can track the health of their cattle. The app allows Moes Feedlot to process cattle with the use of electronic identification tags and track them throughout their lifecycle. “A quick scan of the tag and all of that calf’s treatment, vaccination, implant, and weight data at the touch of our fingers,” said Bryan. “This allows us to watch if the rate of gain is consistent and monitor real-time information to see if the calf needs extra attention with a low daily rate of gain, or if it’s a top performer that needs to be a first load of fats that is destined for someone’s dinner plate.”

Performance Beef isn’t the only technology that Moes Feedlot has used to their advantage. Other technology includes cameras during calving season. This is especially useful because it allows Bryan to monitor a cow that is calving and make sure she is progressing without him interrupting the progress. In addition, he can keep feeding cattle while monitoring that cow’s progress without having to physically check every few minutes. Besides these precision ranching platforms, the Moes family has embraced

other data sharing platforms and digital tools to keep every member of the operation informed and on task.

One of the reasons Moes Feedlot is moving forward is because of their willingness to try new technology and procedures on their operations. “John and I both agree that if you don’t use technology, you are going to lose it,” said Bryan. “That means if we don’t challenge our paradigms to think and work with technology, we are going to lose the opportunity to do things more easily and efficiently. It may be daunting and challenging at the start, but you must start somewhere. By taking small steps into technology, you will slowly be able to see the positive outcomes it can have on your operation.”

The South Dakota Cattleman 15
"If you don't use technology, you are going to lose it. That means if we don't challenge our paradigms to think and work with technology, we are going to lose the opportunity to do things more easily and efficeintly. "
16 Convention 2022 Learn More & Stay in Touch MLS Territory Managers: mlstubs.com info@mlstubs.com Midcontinent Livestock Supplements MLS Proven Performance ® MLS #15 Hi Energy Improve forage digestibility and increase intake this winter with MLS Tubs that are available 24/7. calving and breed back for your herd. ® Don’t Gamble With Cow Body Condition MLS Tubs Are A Sure Bet Bryan Sundsbak 605-209-0559

It’s an exciting time for many producers in the beef industry. The fall run is upon us and producers are being paid well for the product they are producing. This is not to say that this past summer hasn’t presented its challenges to beef farmers and ranchers along the way. Some areas have experienced lack of rain, too much rain, rain with hail and wind. Yet, ranchers and farmers across this great state of South Dakota are resilient folks, just as they always have been.

Your Beef Checkoff Dollars at Work

Your Beef Checkoff Dollars at Work

The more things change the more they stay the same and with this being said we have exciting things happening at the South Dakota Beef Industry Council (SDBIC). Suzy Geppert has resigned as the South Dakota Beef Industry Council Executive Director and will be the Director of Beef Logic, the new non-profit organization that will host the Build Your Base with Beef Program. The Build Your Base Program was created right here in South Dakota by Suzy Geppert and her staff at the SDBIC. Beef Logic will be next door to the new South Dakota Beef Industry Council office at 122 East Sioux Ave. Suite D in Pierre. This allows both entities, SDBIC and Beef Logic, to have their own office space but continue to work collaboratively throughout projects in the future. We are all truly excited about the opportunities that Beef Logic will bring to the table working alongside the SDBIC to better enhance our ability to build the demand for beef. We’re also excited to announce that Jodie Anderson, a familiar face to many members of SDCA, will take on the role as the Executive Director of SDBIC on November 1st.

Here is what the South Dakota Beef Industry Council has been up to lately:

Sanford International Senior PGA was in Sioux Falls September 14 – 18, 2022 with thousands in attendance as BEEF was the premier protein of this year’s tournament. The barn burner brisket sandwich, the official sandwich at “The Ranch”, was a huge hit with event goers. A new and well received event was the Beef BBQ Contest of Champions that took place on Saturday, September 17. Five BBQ Teams competed for this year’s title of being named the 2022 Beef BBQ Champions. progra

ms curriculum and 2022 help as advocates consisted participated including Horse in December and Council Nutrition Rapid to the SDBIC snack for by and Medicine. Beef as well partnership programs. board during Black and In addition universities program based of their The 51 South participating. spent by doing

18 Convention 2022
VeaBea

ms are designed to help enhance teachers’ classroom curriculum to include more beef cuts, preparation, cooking and nutrition education within the classroom.

2022 Beef BBQ Contest Champions: 509 BBQ Baltic, South Dakota (pictured on previous page).

2022 Beef BBQ Contest of Champion People’s Choice Winners: 605 Barbecue Company Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Events like this take an immense amount of support from local businesses. Fireplace Professional/BBQ Heaven, Primo Ceramic Grills and Dakota Butcher teamed up alongside the South Dakota Beef Industry Council to make this event a fun evening for folks to stop by and vote for their favorite BBQ Beef!

2022-2023 FACS, Ag & ProStart Beef Programs

These programs are designed to help enhance teachers’ classroom curriculum to include more beef cuts, preparation, cooking and nutrition education within the classroom.

2022 Team BEEF

2022 Team BEEF South Dakota Team BEEF S.D. continues to help share the beef story through team members serving as advocates for the industry. This year’s Team BEEF SD consisted of approximately 140 members. Team members participated in races from February through October, including a new addition to the race schedule the Crazy Horse Marathon. Registration for the 2023 season will open in December of 2022. South Dakota Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Conference The South Dakota Beef Industry Council helped support the South Dakota Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics conference on September 15-16 in Rapid City, SD by sponsoring beef during a breakout session to the dietitians and dietetic students in attendance. The SDBIC provided a BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com beef wrap snack during a break alongside beef information including promoting the online beef educational webinars. The virtual webinars provide evidencebased educational opportunities that have been approved for continuing professional education units by the Commission on Dietetic Registration and the American College of Sports Medicine.

South Dakota Team BEEF S.D. continues to help share the beef story through team members serving as advocates for the industry. This year’s Team BEEF SD consisted of approximately 140 members. Team members participated in races from February through October, including a new addition to the race schedule the Crazy Horse Marathon. Registration for the 2023 season will open in December of 2022.

Beef Featured at Collegiate Football to share beef’s story, as well as, the Build Your Base message by continuing our partnership with four South Dakota universities athletic programs. This fall South Dakota beef producers and SDBIC board members and staff participated in beef events held during collegiate football games at Augustana University, Black Hills State University, South Dakota State University and University of South Dakota.

South Dakota Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Conference The South Dakota Beef Industry Council helped support the South Dakota Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics conference on September 15-16 in Rapid City, SD by sponsoring beef during a breakout session to the dietitians and dietetic students in attendance.

In addition to events held during these game days, all four universities participate in the Build Your Base program. This program helps provide young athletes with scientifically based information about how beef can be a wholesome part of their training and nutrition routine.

The SDBIC provided a BeefItsWhatsForDinner. com beef wrap snack during a break alongside beef information including promoting the online beef educational webinars. The virtual webinars provide evidence-based educational opportunities that have been approved for continuing professional education units by the Commission on Dietetic Registration and the American College of Sports Medicine.

The Jr Beef Ambassadors program continues to grow with 51 South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors from across the state participating. South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors have spent the year promoting beef within their communities by doing activities such as providing presentations. Jr Beef

Beef Featured at Collegiate Football to share beef’s story, as well as, the Build Your Base message by

continuing our partnership with four South Dakota universities athletic programs. This fall South Dakota beef producers and SDBIC board members and staff participated in beef events held during collegiate football games at Augustana University, Black Hills State University, South Dakota State University and University of South Dakota. In addition to events held during these game days, all four universities participate in the Build Your Base program. This program helps provide young athletes

a

by continuing our partnership with four South Dakota universities athletic programs. This fall South Dakota beef producers and SDBIC board members and staff participated in beef events held during collegiate football games at Augustana University, Black Hills State University, South Dakota State University and University of South Dakota.

routine.

In addition to events held during these game days, all four universities participate in the Build Your Base program. This program helps provide young athletes with scientifically based information about how beef can be a wholesome part of their training and nutrition routine.

The Jr Beef Ambassadors program continues to grow with 51 South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors from across the state participating. South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors have spent the year promoting beef within their communities by doing activities such as providing presentations. Jr Beef Ambassadors presented Beef Impact bags to thank beef farmers and ranchers attending the South Dakota State Fair. Beef Impact bags were also presented to consumers as a thank you for choosing beef.

The Jr Beef Ambassadors program continues to grow with 51 South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors from across the state participating. South Dakota Jr Beef Ambassadors have spent the year promoting beef within their communities by doing activities such as providing presentations. Jr Beef Ambassadors presented Beef Impact bags to thank beef farmers and ranchers attending the South Dakota State Fair. Beef Impact bags were also presented to consumers as a thank you for choosing beef.

Home for the Holidays with Beef is the SDBIC holiday campaign that will highlight beef by providing new beef recipes and opportunities to win beef bucks. Be sure to follow along on the SDBIC social media platforms for other holiday beef giveaways and great beef recipes ideas for you and your family during the upcoming holiday season.

Home for the Holidays with Beef is the SDBIC holiday campaign that will highlight beef by providing new beef recipes and opportunities to win beef bucks. Be sure to follow along on the SDBIC social media platforms for other holiday beef giveaways and great beef recipes ideas for you and your family during the upcoming holiday season.

The SDBIC recently approved the Fiscal Year 2023 budget of $4,122,233 during the SDBIC’s annual Board of Directors meeting on September 7, 2022. Plans are already underway for an exciting year as SDBIC Staff work on upcoming projects and events. The next quarterly board meeting will be held at Drifters Conference Center in Ft. Pierre, SD on Wednesday, December 7, 2022. Please contact the office at 1.605.224.4722 if you plan to attend so that meal arrangements can be made.

The SDBIC recently approved the Fiscal Year 2023 budget of $4,122,233 during the SDBIC’s annual Board of Directors meeting on September 7, 2022. Plans are already underway for an exciting year as SDBIC Staff work on upcoming projects and events.

The next quarterly board meeting will be held at Drifters Conference Center in Ft. Pierre, SD on Wednesday, December 7, 2022. Please contact the office at 1.605.224.4722 if you plan to attend so that meal arrangements can be made.

The
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South Dakota Cattleman
with scientifically based information about how beef can be
wholesome part of their training and nutrition

Convention & Trade Show

Sponsors

Convention 2022
December 12-13
Register to Attend Become a Vendor
Pierre, SD Ramkota Hotel & Conference Center

Agenda

The South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association is gearing up for the 74th Annual Convention andTrade Show slated for December 12 - 13, 2022, in Pierre, South Dakota. The Annual Convention andTrade Show provides a forum for our members to network with fellow cattlemen, craft the policy that will guide SDCA staff and leadership in the coming year, and learn about the latest industry happenings.

The convention theme is focused on the various aspects of technology that impact farmers, ranchers, and the entire agriculture industry, such as precision ranching and cybersecurity. Convention programming will provide awareness, education, and solutions to help producers to continue to maximize efficiencies and adopt new practices.

Monday, December 12th

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM - Exhibitor Heavy Equipment Move-In

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM - Exhibitor Move-In

1:00 - 8:00 - Trade Show

1:00 - 2:00 PM - Ag & Food Policy Committee Meeting

1:00 - 2:00 PM - Tax & Credit Committee Meeting

2:00 - 3:00 PM - Live Cattle Marketing & International Trade

3:15 - 5:30 PM - Cattlemen's Education Series sponsored by NCGA

5:45 - 6:45 PM - PREM / Federal Lands Committee Meeting

5:45 - 6:45 PM - Cattle Health & Wellbeing Committee Meeting

6:45 - 8:00 PM - Best of Beef Happy Hour

Tuesday, December 13th

7:00 AM - 6:00 PM - Registration

7:15 - 8:45 AM - Breakfast & Industry Updates by NCBA

9:00 - 8:30 PM - Trade Show

9:00 - 10:15 AM - Cow-Calf Council Meeting

9:00 - 10:15 AM - Cattle Feeder Council Meeting

9:00 - 10:15 AM -Young Cattlemen's Council Meeting

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM - Annual Membership Business Meeting

12:00 - 1:45 PM - Lunch & Keynote

1:45 - 2:00 PM - Trade Show Time

2:00 - 4:30 PM - Annual Membership Policy Meeting

4:30 - 6:30 PM - Seminar I

4:30 - 6:30 PM - Seminar II

7:00 - 8:30 PM - Cattlemen's Banquet & Leopold Conservation Award

8:30 - 11:00 PM - President's Auction & Entertainment by Cody Henson Hullinger

Wednesday, December 14th

7:00 - 10:00 AM - Exhibitor Move-Out Additional information to come in the Tri-State Livestock convention Buyers guide!

Your Herd in Your Hands

For ranchers, record-keeping, and tracking cattle are two of the most critical and stressful jobs that they perform daily. Accurate record-keeping practices improve herd performance, expected progeny difference accuracy, and aid in making herd management decisions. Lost cattle records are a nightmare for any rancher. Even worse, unaccounted cattle can result in more stress and time to track them down, as well as lost profits.

Now, with the use of a mobile app and smart ear tags, ranchers across America can enter their data in the pasture, track animal location, and animal activity on their devices; which can be accessed from anywhere.

701x® Autonomous Rancher® is a cattle management platform for cattle ranchers to record all basic and performance data for their herd. The software integrates with breed associations so ranchers can import their data into the 701x® platform and export the performance data collected back to their breed association.

701x® Autonomous Rancher® can be accessed on various smart devices and features a mobile app that even works offline. Ranchers and their team members can record in the field and upload their data to the cloud once they have an internet connection. The platform allows any operation to have an unlimited number of users and the ability to assign specific permission levels. This allows operations big and small to keep data on every animal up to date in real time.

In addition to the software platform, 701x® developed smart ear tags that connect data directly to the software. The solar-powered xTpro™ model ear tag has GPS communication that records the location of animals in 15-minute intervals. The locations are reported once a day at the selected check-in time. Ranchers draw geofences within the app and assign cattle to the pen or pasture that aligns with the geo-ence. Geofences are virtual perimeters for real-world geographic areas.

If the animal crosses the geofence an out-of-fence alert is sent to the rancher right away, allowing them to locate the animal and see where the fence may need repair.

The xTpro™ has other alerts including a free-fall alert if an animal loses their tag, a no-movement alert to notify when an animal has not moved for an extended period, and a high-speed alert when an animal is moving above 29 mph. The goals of these alerts are to help monitor cowherds from near or far, all from the device of the rancher’s choosing.

The latest product release in the 701x® cattle management solution is the xTlite™ inventory tag. xTlite™ tags take out the guesswork and headaches of manually counting cows and running them through the chute when it can be avoided. It is simple to use, small enough for a calf, and cost-effective for the entire cowherd.

This new tag, when connected to a smart device, can be used for a quick and painless inventory process. The tag is equipped with Bluetooth™ which allows cattlemen and women to take roll calls of nearby cattle in seconds. This feature creates a list of animals based on selected filters. Each animal that meets the criteria will be listed and allows users to check them off once they have found them, or if connected to wearable devices, xTpro™ or xTlite™, the cattle will check in automatically. Additionally, users can add any sick animals to a watchlist to monitor them more closely.

When near xTpro™ tags, users can also connect to the xTlite™ tags through Bluetooth ™ and receive relative GPS locations. The company suggests that users have one xTpro™ tag for every ten xTlite™ tags for best use.

“We just released presales for our xTlite™ tag in October with Bluetooth ™ capability. The tag features longer read ranges of 50-100 feet versus RFID wands requiring a rancher to be super close to the animal.

22 Convention 2022

Essentially, the tag allows your mobile phone to become your wand for an inventory check in seconds,” explained Max Cossette, VP of Business Development at 701x®

Research has proven that bull data collected by xTpro™ tags brings more value to ranchers. 701x® encourages users to access footstep data to understand which bulls are the most productive. Ensuring your bulls remain near your herd has proven to provide fewer open cows and more calves.

Easy-to-use tech and innovation for ranchers are what drive 701x®. They are developing innovative solutions continuously and take into consideration the feedback from ranchers utilizing the technology in their operations.

“We are hoping that ranchers will begin adjusting to our software and use the xTpro™ tags on their bulls. Then, the xTlite™ tags as they become available so ranchers will start adopting them more in their entire cowherd. We want to promote the efficiency of the operation to save labor costs by driving more profitability,” said Cossette.

To learn more about 701x® and their products, visit 701x.com or scan the QR code below: This article presented

The South Dakota Cattleman 23
by 701x®.

New Rules for Veterinary Medicine

Walk down animal health aisle at your local farm store and you’ll see all sorts of medications: vaccines, salves, pourons, and antibiotics such as bottles of penicillin or a carton of sulfa pills. These are available for any animal owner to buy off the shelf, take home, and use on their animals. It turns out, however, there are some changes ahead for that practice.

Have you ever wondered why those antibiotics are readily available to anyone while newer drugs like Draxxin or Zuprevo aren’t? Penicillin, sulfa, and tetracyclines are “over-the-counter”(OTC) antibiotics, in contrast to “prescription” drugs. Authorization from a veterinarian is required to buy a prescription antibiotic but not an OTC one.

Those older OTC drugs still have usefulness. Penicillin is still good for things like wound infections, while long acting tetracyclines still are effective for foot rot or pinkeye. But when a severe bout of respiratory disease or other bacterial infection hits a calf, cow, or bull, the OTC antibiotics usually are left on the shelf in favor of one of the prescription antibiotics. These newer drugs are much more effective for serious conditions.

The prescription status of an animal medication is more than just wording on a label, though. In order for a veterinarian to provide a prescription drug, there has to be a valid “veterinary client patient relationship” (VCPR) in place. This means the vet has to be familiar with your animals and their management.

What is the change we can expect to see at our farm stores, then, regarding these drugs? The Food and Drug Administration considers penicillin, tetracyclines, and sulfas to be “medically important” classes of drugs for people.

They are steadily working toward requiring veterinary input for all uses of medically important antibiotics. The move of feed-grade medications from OTC to Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) status is a recent example. In a similar manner, these injectable medications will move from OTC to prescription status over the next year or so.

After that, farm stores will require a prescription from a veterinarian to sell them – or they may just stop selling them, period.

What does this mean for livestock producers? Penicillin and tetracycline injections will still be available but it will be

24

M E R R Y

Christmas!

Holly Jolly Hosting

Prime rib is a Christmas season classic! Serve up this flavorful prime rib for your holiday celebrations!

Ingredients

One 6-7 pound bone-in

3 cloves garlic, sliced prime rib

Gravy Ingredients

1/4 cup all-purpose flower

3 cups low sodium beef stock

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

Preparation

1/4 cup kosher salt

2 tablespoons coarsely ground black pepper

3-4 sprigs thyme and rosemary

1 clove garlic, peeled and mashed

1 tablespoon sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

1. Use the tip of a knife to make slits into the fat of the prime rib and stuff with slices of garlic. In a small bowl, mix salt and pepper. Create a crust of salt all over the meat. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes. Place meat on a rack in a roasting pan.

2. Preheat oven to 450℉. Place roast in oven and immediately turn temperature down to 350℉. Allow about 15 minutes per pound to cook. For a medium rare roast, remove the roast from the oven when it reaches 120℉ on an internal meat thermometer. Remove meat to a cutting board, loosely tent with foil and let stand 20 minutes.

3. In the meantime, make the gravy. Pour fat from roasting pan except for about 1/4 cup. Place roasting pan onto the stove at medium heat. Whisk flour into fat and cook about 2 to 3 minutes. Vigorously whisk in the beef stock and Dijon mustard.

4. Add the herbs and garlic. Bring to a low boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Continue to whisk until the mixture begins to thicken. Add sherry vinegar and cook one more minute. Transfer to a serving dish.

5. Remove ties from prime rib. Slice prime rib and bones and serve with gravy.

Midwest Ag export sumMit

Hosted by the South Dakota District Export Council

This summer, the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association (SDCA) had the opportunity to collaborate with business and agricultural industry leaders across the region to help organize the Midwest Agricultural Export Summit. The goal was to bring together regional policymakers and business leaders from various agricultural states and sectors to discuss ways to promote and increase global exports.

Luke Lindberg, the former chief of staff and chief strategy officer at the Export-Import Bank of the United States, sits on the board of directors for the South Dakota District Export Council and took the lead planning the event. He commented on the importance of the United States’ ability to export quality beef and other agricultural commodities, “the world wants high-quality American beef and is willing to pay our ranchers and cattlemen a premium for their premier products. The Midwest Agricultural Export Summit brought together national, regional, and state leaders to explore ways we can do that more efficiently and with greater success, ultimately benefiting the farm families across the heartland.”

Many state associations were also present including representatives from soybean, pork, dairy, farm bureaus, and the SDCA. The SDCA was well represented in the discussions that took place, with Austin Havlik, Board Director, Taya Runyan, SDCA Executive Director (pictured above with Senator Thune Staffer Ryan Donnelly), and SDCA member Nick Jorgensen of Jorgensen Land and Cattle in attendance.

Bill Gassen, President and CEO of Sanford Health, a leader in access to rural healthcare, welcomed attendees to the Sanford Barn in Sioux Falls. The featured fireside chat with Representative Dusty Johnson-SD, and moderated by Ken Barbic, Head of Policy for Farmers Business Network. They discussed the efforts in Washington to help with market access such as the passage and implementation of the

Ocean Shipping Act and other critical issues like access to rail, and truck driver shortages.

Another panel featured experts including Kimberly Reed, former president and chairman of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, Ted McKinney, CEO of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture and former undersecretary of agriculture for foreign trade and agricultural affairs, and Kip Tom, former United States ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food, and Agriculture and chief of the United States Mission to the United Nations.

Global leaders and economic experts explored foreign markets for various United States’ ag commodities and trade around the world, followed by a regional export collaboration panel featuring representatives from the South Dakota Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the North Dakota Department of Agriculture, and the Nebraska Department of Agriculture. Over lunch, Kimberly Reed and Terry Brandstad, former U.S. Ambassador to China and former Governor of Iowa engaged in a frank conversation about trade with China, growing markets in Asia and Central American countries, and the importance of ag export agreements around the world.

Closing out the 2nd annual event was a fireside chat with Senator and Senate Minority Whip, John Thune-SD, moderated by Steve Censky, CEO of American Soybean. Plans are underway for next year’s Midwest Ag Export Summit as organizers seek to find ways our family farms can take advantage of the ever-changing global market dynamics to make sure we help feed the world.

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28 Convention 2022 FOR THE CATTLEKIDS! CATTLEKIDS! UFSLERW0n Rban EbE Hkcecni RTCARot IPG Use the images from above to unscramble the words! word Scramble How many? ,rewolfnuS ,nekcihC ,torrac ,nrab ,eeb gip

A Strong Farm Bill will Support South Dakota Cattle Producers

It’s been almost four years since the last farm bill became law – hard to believe, I know. Throughout my time in Congress, I’ve had the opportunity to work on four farm bills, and as I look to the next one, I am actively taking the feedback I receive and turning it into proposals that I hope to get included in the 2023 Farm Bill.

Over the past several months, I have held multiple roundtables across the state where I have been able to hear directly from farmers and ranchers. During these meetings, I have received valuable feedback about farm bill programs and ways to improve their effectiveness for the producers they support.

In March, I introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Improvement Act to make the program a more attractive working-lands option by providing cost-share payments for all CRP practices for the establishment of grazing infrastructure, including fencing and water distribution. My bill would also increase the annual payment limit for CRP, which has not changed since 1985, to help account for inflation and the increase in land values.

I believe that these common-sense changes would greatly improve the effectiveness of CRP, and based off the conversations I’ve had with folks across the state, they agree.

I recently introduced the Livestock Disaster Assistance Improvement Act, which, among other things, would improve the effectiveness and timeliness of the Emergency Conservation Program and the Livestock Forage Program that assist farmers and ranchers in the aftermath of adverse weather events. My bill would also provide USDA with direction to help improve the accuracy of U.S. Drought Monitor conditions, which can trigger certain disaster programs.

The life of a farmer or rancher is a challenging one. The work often starts long before the sun rises and concludes long after the sun has set. And the

labor can be backbreaking. Our nation depends on South Dakota farmers and ranchers, and I am profoundly grateful for all of the determined men and women who have chosen this way of life and are committed to helping pass it on to future generations.

I am honored to represent South Dakota’s farmers and ranchers in the Senate, and I will continue to do everything I can to ensure that they have the resources they need to continue to feed and fuel our nation and the world. I look forward to ensuring that the 2023 Farm Bill reflects the priorities of agricultural producers in South Dakota and around our great country.

The South Dakota Cattleman 29

SDCA Affiliate Contacts

The South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association is the unified voice for cattle producers. SDCA provides a voice for cattlemen on all issues affecting your business and profitability.

Mission

To advance the interests of South Dakota Cattlemen through representation and promotion of the beef industry.

Vision

To be an organization where members can work together to protect their interests; seek solutions to industry problems; provide a unified voice, and to build the good will, esteem, and recognition the industry deserves.

SDCA advocates for producers in:

• State & National Lobbying

• Policy Development

• Marketing, Trade, and Environmental Issues

• Beef Promotion & Research

Your SDCA membership includes membership in your local affiliate. As a member, you can stay informed about the issues affecting your area and set policy direction on cattle industry issues at the annual convention.

Black Hills: Britton Blair, Vale • 605-347-0426 • britton.blair@yahoo.com

Central: Bryan Eden, Alpena • 605-352-7195 • edenfarms79@gmail.com

Clark Hamlin: Drew Edleman, Willow Lake • 605-881-2419 • dwedkenab86@gmail.com

Dakota Southern: Keith Dvoracek, Tabor • 605-661-4981 • kdvorace@hcinet.net

Davison-Hanson: Shirley Thompson, Mitchell • 605-360-6546 • shirley.thompson@zoetis.com

East Central: Peggy Vostad, White • 605-629-3859 • pvostad@gmail.com

Kingsbury: Nick Wilkinson, Lake Preston• 605-847-5080 • wilkinsonn77@gmail.com

McCook-Miner-Lake: Dave Miller, Howard • 605-772-5493 • djmmiller62@hotmail.com

Northeast: Nancy Johnson, Milbank • 605-432-5600 • mnjohn@tnics.com

North Central: Josh Bieber, Bowdle • 605-255-6302 • talebar1972@hotmail.com

Northern Oahe: Jay Jones, Trail City • 605-845-3082 • jones@westriv.com

Sioux Basin: Kelly Lyons, Garretson • 605-366-0791 • grandmeadow12@gmail.com

South Central: Kent Geppert, Kimball • 605-778-6227 • geppert@midstatesd.net

West Central: Bo Slovek, Philip • 605-454-8124 • boslovek@goldenwest.net

30 Convention 2022

If it seems like we’ve been helping farmers succeed since before South Dakota was even a state, that’s because, well... We have.

The South Dakota
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Cattleman
32 Convention 2022 Unisex Ladies New Membership Benefit New members and renewing members receive a coupon code to redeem a FREE member exclusive softshell jacket from our SDCA merch store. Thank you Zoetis! CHEER! T H E S T O C K I N G S W E R E H U N G W I T H C A T T L E M E N G I F T Y O U R L O V E D O N E S A M E M B E R S H I P T H I S Y E A R !

shows, concerts, auto thrill shows, and events throughout the year make this complex unmatched.

Brand Wall at the DEX Dakota Events CompleX WITH YOUR SUPPORT OF $2,500 your legacy will be recognized through your brand or name on display at the Brand Wall at the DEX *$2,500 for an initial brand. A donor can purchase additional brand(s) for $1,000 each. Make your mark on the Name(s): Address: Phone: Email Address: Total Donation: D o n o r I n f o r m a t i o n : n o G i f t I n f o r m a t i o n In support of the new Please make checks payable Contributions to the DEX are ‘DEX: Brand Wall at th brand wall. Additional family I / We intend to contribute th Name(s): Address: Phone: Email Address: Donor’s Signature: Total Donation: Date: D o n o r I n f o r m a t i o n : n o G i f t I n f o r m a t i o n In support of the new Please make checks payable Contributions to the DEX are ‘DEX: Brand Wall at th brand wall. Additional family I / We intend to contribute th D E X D a k o t a E v e n *Pictures are digital renderings and used with permission • The DEX will seat thousands of spectators from around the • The DEX will be a one of a kind, livestock and equestrian fa your legacy will be reco Contact: Peggy Besch, South Dakota State 605.353.7340 or peggy.besch@state.sd.us $ 2 Brand Wall at WITH YOUR SUPPORT OF your brand or name on *$2 500 for an initial brand A donor can purchase add : • Two full size equestrian arenas, and the ability to host large ‘ S U P P O R T T H hosting local and national events South Dakota never thought possible shows, and events throughout the year make this complex u Final product subject to change. D E X D a k o t a E v e n t s C o m p l e X • The DEX will seat thousands of spectators from around the globe, as they witness events brought to • The DEX will be a one of a kind, livestock and equestrian facility that will set a new standard for your legacy will be recognized through $ 2 , 5 0 0 Brand Wall at the DEX WITH YOUR SUPPORT OF your brand or name on display at the *$2 500 for an initial brand A donor can purchase additional brand(s) for $1 000 each : • Two full size equestrian arenas, and the ability to host large livestock shows, concerts, auto thrill ‘ S U P P O R T T H E D E X ’ hosting local and national events. South Dakota never thought possible shows, and events throughout the year make this complex unmatched J A *Pictures are digital renderings and used with permission from Dusty Anderson. Final product subject to change. • The DEX will be a one-of-a-kind, livestock and equestrian facility that will set a new standard for hosting local and national events. • The DEX will seat thousands of spectators from around the globe, as they witness events brought to South Dakota never thought possible. • Two full size equestrian arenas, and the ability to host large livestock
’ DONATE & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION South Dakota State Fair Manager 605.353.7340 or peggy.besch@state.sd.us D E X D a k o t a E v e n t s C o m p l e X *Pictures are digital renderings and used with permission from Dusty Anderson.
The DEX will seat thousands
spectators
events brought to
The DEX will be
kind, livestock and
facility that will set a new standard for your legacy will be recognized through ‘ S U P P O R T T H E D E X ’ D O N A T E & A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M A T I O N $ 2 , 5 0 0 Brand Wall at the DEX WITH YOUR SUPPORT OF your brand or name on display at the *$2 500 for an initial brand A donor can purchase additional brand(s) for $1,000 each : • Two full size equestrian arenas, and the ability to host large livestock shows, concerts, auto thrill ‘ S U P P O R T T H E D E X ’ hosting local and national events. South Dakota never thought possible shows, and events throughout the year make this complex unmatched W O L F A N G U S J A A N D E R S O N C A T T L E Final product subject to change. Send payment to: 1060 3rd Street SW, Huron, SD 57350 Name(s): Address: Phone: Email Address: Donor’s Signature: Total Donation: Date: D o n o r I n f o r m a t i o n : n o G i f t I n f o r m a t i o n : In support of the new Please make checks payable to Contributions to the DEX are tax deductible as provided by law. South Dakota State Fair Foundation ‘DEX: Dakota Events CompleX’ $2,500 Brand Wall at the DEX to have a livestock brand displayed on the brand wall Additional family brands are available for $1,000 per brand I / We intend to contribute the sum of Information on brand design will be requested at a later date. Total donation due by March 1, 2022
of
from around the globe, as they witness
a one of a
equestrian
Trade
December
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