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By Jake Todd Troop 301 Eagle Scout Project


This Eagle Scout Project has been sponsored by the Scripps Ranch Civic Association.


Scripps Ranch Through The Years: 1890 – 2010

by Jake Todd


Introduction I started this project in April 2010, and now almost three and a half years later I am finally finishing it up. It all started when the Scripps Ranch Civic Association (SRCA) was looking for someone willing to delve into the community’s rich history in preparation for Scripps Ranch’s upcoming 40th Anniversary celebration. The idea of doing an Eagle Scout Project that allowed me to learn about the community that I grew up in really appealed to me. Originally, the primary goal was to build a 5-panel history wall of photos and captions that documented the history of Scripps Ranch, starting in 1890 with the purchase of the land by E.W. Scripps. In order to do this, I decided I needed to create a chronology of events, find interesting photos from over the years and interview community members to learn what they thought was important to include in the history wall. Well, it turns out I collected so much information that the project took vastly longer than I estimated and changed in scope. (I certainly never finished by the 40th anniversary.) In the end, I suggested, and the SRCA agreed, that it would be more useful to the community if I compiled the information into a book rather than a wall of photos. And so here it is before you. This community’s history is incredibly deep, and much more complex than I anticipated. From the beginning, this community has been characterized by a spirit of activism. This community spirit is what sets Scripps Ranch apart from many other very nice places to live and has bound the people who live here together in a completely unique way. Like all history, it is sometimes triumphant, sometimes tragic, and sometimes quirky. But it is uniquely our history. At this point, it’s fitting to thank all those who have been a part of this process. Thank you to my mother and father for helping me edit the project, providing transportation for me, and for allowing me access to printer, scanner, computer, and paper. Thank you to everyone who was interviewed or filled out a survey. Thank you also to everyone who was an interviewer for this project, especially Elinor Reiss, who enthusiastically interviewed an incredible number of people. I also appreciate the work of everyone who provided information, documents and/or photos for the chronology or pored over old newsletters to support this project. Thank you to Bob Dingeman, Adam Grofcsik, Wes Danskin and Will Lofft for providing invaluable information about the history of this community and to Victoria Mazelli for her information about Scripps Ranch and graphic design. Given the huge number of people that helped me with this project, I don’t have space to thank them individually. However, I could not have accomplished this project without their assistance. And, last but not least, a large thank you to the SRCA for supporting this project, both financially and in a multitude of other ways. In doing this project, I had the opportunity to meet a number of community members that have been actively involved in Scripps Ranch. It was a great experience that I will always treasure. If, when you finish reading this book, you have learned something more about this community, this project will have accomplished its goal. I hope reading this leaves you with a greater sense of appreciation for what Scripps Ranch was, is, and will be. --Jake Todd


Table of Contents The Early Years: 1890 - 1969........................................................................................... 1 Photos from the Early Years.......................................................................................... 15 The 1970s ......................................................................................................................... 55 Photos from the 1970s..................................................................................................... 75 The 1980s ....................................................................................................................... 103 Photos from the 1980s................................................................................................... 121 The 1990s ....................................................................................................................... 141 Photos from the 1990s................................................................................................... 163 The 2000s ....................................................................................................................... 201 Photos from the 2000s................................................................................................... 235 Scripps Ranch Voices ................................................................................................... 281


SCRIPPS RANCH CHRONOLOGY The Early Years (1890-1969)

Edward Willis Scripps (E.W. Scripps) was born on June 18, 1854 near Rushville, Illinois to James Mogg Scripps from London and Julia Adeline Osborne from New York. E.W. was the youngest of five children born to James and Julia. James had seven additional children from two previous marriages. E.W. Scripps’ older halfsister, Ellen Browning Scripps, acted as E.W. Scripps’ surrogate mother, protector and was the only one from whom he would take advice. “E.W. Scripps was also the most disagreeable and unlikable member of the family. His irascible nature generated nicknames like Turkey Egg as a boy, to Damned Old Crank and Contrary Old Bastard as an adult.” E.W. Scripps married Nackie Holtsinger, a shy reverend’s daughter, in October 1885. E.W. and Nackie had six children, James George Osborn Scripps, John Paul Holtsinger Scripps, Dorothy Blair Scripps, Edward Willis McLean Scripps, Robert Paine Scripps and Nackey Scripps. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair) 1890

In 1890, E.W. Scripps made his first visit to the west coast to visit his ailing sister, Ellen Browning Scripps. On November 22, 1890, E.W. Scripps arrived in San Diego after taking a four-day steamship trip to San Diego and shortly thereafter rode out to a mesa. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 111) On December 2, 1890, he purchased 400 acres of land for $5,000 with an option to buy more, and built his Miramar Ranch. His ranch was named after the castle in Trieste, Italy that he and his sister, Ellen, had seen on a trip to Europe. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 65 and Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 113) Others described the area as “semi-arid mesa land, stony, treeless and bare, with no water, no roads, buildings or improvements.“ In one of his later writings, E.W. Scripps stated that one of the things that made San Diego seem attractive to him was “that San Diego was off in the extreme corner of the United States—a busted, broken down, boom town. It was perhaps more difficult of access than any other spot in the United States.” E.W. Scripps’ ranch was 14 long miles, a day’s journey by horse and buggy—from San Diego. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 115) Originally, the name of E.W. Scripps’ ranch was going to be Dolly Blair Ranch, a tribute to his grandmother, who claimed some historical prominence in that her forebears were “the Blairs” who settled in Williamstown, Massachusetts during the colonization. However, the name Miramar Ranch meaning “view of the sea” won out. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 11, 112)


 



 


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The climate appealed to E.W. Scripps because it reminded him of North Africa, the only place he had ever been free from the colds that had plagued him in earlier years. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 66) One reason for purchasing the ranch was to provide E.W. Scripps’ brother, Fred, with the job of establishing the ranch. Fred had needed financial help to achieve his goal of developing a lemon orchard. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/87) E.W. Scripps and his sister, Ellen Browning Scripps, agreed that life in the barren inland valleys of San Diego and the hard work of establishing a ranch would help Fred grow up. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 120)

2/1891

Water was the first critical concern for the ranch. Fred Scripps’ 100-acre lemon orchard had been a failure because of the drought. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/87) E.W. Scripps realized that he would have to collect and store all of the available rain and stream runoff if he wanted to have water year-round, so he built several ponds. One of the small canyons selected for a dam was in a large pasture north of present day Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/95) In February 1891, a 300-foot long, 70-foot wide, 20-feet deep dam was completed on the adjoining land of Gordon Surr under an agreement with Mr. Surr. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 122) Dr. Alonzo De Jessup, who later became a San Diego jeweler and optometrist, helped build the earthen dam. He recalled being paid $0.75 a day to drive a team of horses pulling a small earth scraper. The scraper did the same job as today’s bulldozer, but much more slowly. Another dam was built on Carroll Creek, which ran along where Pomerado Road is today. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/95) Note inconsistency: According to descendants of the Vasey family, the first family to settle in the area (on the now northeast corner of Miramar, west of I-15), the Surr dam and the corresponding lake were actually there four years before E.W. Scripps purchased the land. (Source: Tour d’Elegance Program Guide)

[1895?]

While Miramar was being built, E.W. Scripps and his family lived in a Victorian house he had bought for his wife in downtown San Diego. The three-story home was historically known as the Britt-Scripps Townhouse, with Judge Britt being the first owner. E.W. Scripps spent eight years supervising construction of Miramar. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 69)

1895

The Surr dam failed within three years of its construction and was rebuilt in 1897 “on the most practical spot nearest the old dam.” (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 122) The rebuilt Surr dam was in use and retained a small lake of water until Miramar Reservoir was erected. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/95)

1897

Through continual additions of property to the ranch, E.W. Scripps ended up owning 2,110 acres. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 113) E.W. Scripps was told that he was helping the poor homesteaders in the area who could not make a go of it because of a lack of water. Some homesteaders needed money to move away, so E.W. Scripps bought the nearly worthless land and hired people who


 



 


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wanted to stay to clear land and build. (Source: C. Preece Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/87)

1898

The adobe east wing of the mansion was completed. The house mirrored E.W. Scripps’ fond memories of his Algerian days. He used North African architecture in building 3 sides of a square around a paved courtyard with a fountain in the center, and turreted rooms on three corners. The fountain installed in the courtyard was bought at the St. Louis Exposition at a cost of $250. E.W. Scripps said he would “have to rebuild the whole damn ranch to match it.” (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 69)

1898

E.W. Scripps’ son, Robert, donated eight rattlesnakes to the San Diego Zoo and received a lifetime pass to the zoo. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 69)

1900

Miramar was originally intended as a winter home for E.W. Scripps’ Illinois family, but E.W. Scripps made Miramar his permanent home and seldom left it between 1900 and 1917. Miramar was the site of E.W. Scripps’ many cabinet meetings. E.W. Scripps’ inquiring mind was challenged by the likes of many famous and frequent visitors, including Judge Ben Lindsey, Gifford Pinchot, Governor of Pennsylvania, Hiram Johnson, Governor of California and U.S. Senator, Attorney Clarence Darrow, Lincoln Steffens, city editor of the New York Post, William Allen White, newspaper owner and editor, and Williams Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 71-73)

Early 1900s

Description of Miramar: A predominantly one-story home consisting of 47 rooms. All 17 bedrooms had fireplaces. There were 13 bathrooms and a living room measuring 40’ x 50’ with a 16’ ceiling. E.W. Scripps’ bathroom, named the Throne Room, contained dentist and barber chairs and was said to be the most lavish bathroom in San Diego County and perhaps the state. E.W. Scripps is rumored to have come up with the idea for United Press International (UPI) while sitting in the dentist chair. E.W. Scripps commissioned sculptor, Arthur Putnam, to create larger than life bronze figures representing the human history of California (the Padre, the Indian and the Plowman) for the property. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 71) The home was one story except for one corner, which had a 2nd story suite, called the Tower Room. The mansion had so many rooms, so that each child could have a suite with a bedroom, sitting room, and a bath. E.W. Scripps also provided rooms for his poorer relatives who might come to visit. (Source: C. Preece, Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/87) The ranch later boasted an olympic size swimming pool, a stable of thoroughbred horses, an aviary for daughter Nackey and a garden filled with unusual plants from all over the world. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 71)


 



 


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E.W. Scripps built roads to places he needed to go. One road went from Miramar to Ellen’s La Jolla home across the present site of MCAS Miramar; another from La Jolla to San Diego; one from La Jolla to Del Mar through Torrey Pines Park Canyon; and from Miramar north to Escondido and south to San Diego. These roads were the basis for the present freeway system comprising I-5, I-8, 1-15 and routes 163 and 395. E.W. Scripps was appointed chief road commissioner by San Diego County (he being one of 3 millionaire road commissioners). (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 74) E.W. Scripps engaged Kate Sessions, San Diego’s leading horticulturist, to help him landscape the estate. Great boxes of exotic plants began arriving, including eucalyptus trees, several thousand pine trees (including the nearby coast’s native and rare Torrey Pine), pineapple plants, orange and olive trees and a large collection of cacti. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 123) During the early days of development of the ranch, E.W. Scripps built three boarding houses: one for the teamster help, another for the gardeners who pruned the citrus groves and tended the gardens, and another for the household staff, including chauffeurs and kitchen and housekeeping staff. Some 50 workers were employed to keep the ranch and grounds in order. Two houseboys, a chef and helper, a waiter and four maids were employed in the house. In addition, two chauffeurs were on the staff to drive Mr. and Mrs. Scripps and their customary large number of guests. A total of 61 persons were on staff. (Source: Souvenir brochure from Scripps Miramar Ranch tours) 1911

Scripps hired 20-year-old Chauncy Irgens “Jerry” Jerabek as head gardener and instructed him to raise the trees already on the ranch and plant 20,000 more eucalyptus trees. Jerabek and six workers planted the trees. Pickles and Cucumber, two of E.W. Scripps’ daughter Nackey’s many dogs, were with Jerry most of the time. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 68) Miss Kate Sessions had written a letter of recommendation to E. W. Scripps for Jerabek, and he was hired within the week. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/77) Jerabek was born upstairs in the Ellendale, North Dakota train station on January 10, 1890 to Frank Charles Jerabek, Jr. (a ticket agent in Ellendale, North Dakota) and Henrietta Maria Irgens Jerabek. (Source: Doreen Kellogg) More than 300 varieties of eucalyptus were planted, for the purpose of selling them to the railroad for ties. Unfortunately, the wood was too brittle and split when a nail was hammered in. E.W. Scripps opted to continue cultivating them for their beauty. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss) Jerabek lived in a cottage near what is now Hendrix Pond and close to the Ellen Scripps Davis Horse Ranch. Jerabek’s home served as the Miramar Post Office for a brief time, with Jerabek being the Postmaster. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 68) The Post Office for much of this


 



 


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time was in the General Store in Vasey Ville, which was located west of what is now I-15 on the northeast corner of Miramar Air Station. (Source: Peters, Ruby. Miramar Before the Planes, 39, 158) Jerabek decorated the Scripps gymnasium every Halloween when dances would be held and where he met his wife, Hulda Schultz, a teacher. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 68) Mrs. Jerabek operated out of a one room wooden schoolhouse in the center of what was called Vasey Ville and ultimately became Mira Mesa. At the time, it was the only structure in the area and she drove a horse and buggy to school. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss) Mr. Jerabek recalled in a 1978 letter “when [his] wife taught school in Miramar, the building that housed the school was out in the center of what Mira Mesa is today. At that time, it was the only structure throughout that area. She drove a horse and buggy, some kids rode on ponies, but most walked and thought nothing of it. The outside of this wooden building was pockmarked with holes. Everything would be peaceful inside then all of a sudden the teacher and the kids would hear rack, tack! tack! An old woodpecker or yellow hammer would be making another hole getting ready to move to a new subdivision.” (Source: Letter dated May 1978 from Chauncy Jerabek to Joan Gass) Jerabek may also have been responsible for planting the eucalyptus trees in Balboa Park in time for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition held in Balboa Park. Note inconsistency: other sources provide that Jerabek started working at Balboa Park in 1918. However, based on comments gleaned from the back of photos provided to Doreen Kellogg, Jerabek may have been involved with plantings at Balboa Park prior to 1915. As a family friend and history buff, Doreen Kellogg received Jerabek family photos over the years from Mr. Jerabek, copies of some of which she provided to Jerabek Elementary. Ms. Kellogg’s grandmother attended the same church as Mr. Jerabek in later years and was courted by Mr. Jerabek when they were both widowers, but to no avail. Ms. Kellogg has no independent way of verifying the information. (Source: Interview w/Doreen Kellogg) Jerabek told how at that time one acre of land in La Jolla sold for $10. (Source: Doreen Kellogg)

1916


 


During a period of drought in San Diego, the City more or less entered into a contract with a well-known rainmaker, Charles Hatfield, to bring rain. In particular, the city was interested in enough rainfall to fill up the lake behind its new Morena Dam. Hatfield went to work and the rain did fall. It began raining on January 5, with large rains again on January 10 and a real torrent on January 18. The backcountry was severely flooded and some city streets were flooded as well. While the floods outraged most citizens of the city, Charles Hatfield saw them as a sign of his success and presented a bill for his services to the City Council. The Council denied there was a contract and refused to pay. A lawsuit ensued until the courts dropped it in 1938 after finding that the rains were an Act of God and not Charles Hatfield. (Source: 
 


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Starr, Raymond. San Diego A Pictorial History, 130-132) In the general vicinity, only E.W. Scripps had a telephone in 1916 and he warned Sorrento Valley about the flood. (Source: Peters, Ruby. Miramar Before the Planes, 158)

Winter 1916

E.W. Scripps had built 7 dams on the ranch at Miramar, including Surr dam, now the present Miramar Reservoir; the Evans dam, located southwest of the water filtration plant; and North, A, B, C and the Soledad dams, which went out in the winter of 1916 and washed out a mile of the Santa Fe railroad tracks in Sorrento Valley. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss) Evans Pond, located by the library, was named for the original family who farmed the area and built the earthen dam for the pond. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

1916

E.W. Scripps’ daughter, Nackey, eloped with Thomas Meanley, E.W. Scripps’ personal secretary for many years and then currently the foreman of his Fanita Ranch (in what is now Santee). E.W. Scripps was very unhappy about the marriage. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 105)

1917

America’s entry into WWI prompted E.W. Scripps to move to Washington, D.C. where he supervised the editorial coverage of the war. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 102)

1917

Camp Kearny was established by the Army on 12,721 acres of land on a mesa north of San Diego. This area included part of the 2,130-acre Miramar Ranch, which had originally been established by E.W. Scripps. It was later sold to the Jessop family. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

11/17

E.W. Scripps suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed and retired from business. E.W. Scripps recuperated as a semi-invalid on a rented 60’ yacht. He ultimately sailed along the Atlantic Coast, through the Panama Canal and back to San Diego. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 105)

1917-18

Chauncy Jerabek left Miramar Ranch at the end of World War I. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/89) Kate Sessions was again instrumental in helping Jerabek find work, this time with the Park Board. Mr. Jerabek became the head horticulturist of Balboa Park. (Source: Doreen Kellogg and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/77)

1920

Electricity came to Miramar and the surrounding area. Villages newsletter, Spring 1994, Volume 1, Number 5)

1920’s

Camp Kearny was largely abandoned after 1920 but was retained by the government for use as a military and civilian airfield. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)


 



 


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(Source: Scripps Ranch


1921

The death of his son, Jim, brought E.W. Scripps out of retirement with one final job: to protect and unify his empire. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 106)

1921

The Poway school district consolidated with the Merton and Bernardo school districts, and the school board members renamed the district Pomerado, a name incorporating Poway, Merton and Bernardo. This name was later given to Pomerado Road. Merton was a community of small farms developed in the late 1880s and 1890s around what is today the intersection of Poway and Pomerado roads. (Source: The San Diego Union-Tribune 6/12/05)

6/12/22

Robert Edward Dingeman was born at Fort Mills, Corregidor, Philippine Islands to Blanche C. Dingeman and Captain Ray Edward Dingeman.

1923

E.W. Scripps started a journey around the world on a 180’ long seagoing yacht, the Ohio. He traveled with family, a full-time nurse, a male secretary and female researchers of scientific journals. His marriage with Nackie was no longer on an even keel and they had become incompatible. E.W. Scripps gave up his beloved oasis, Miramar, and adopted the sea as his sanctuary. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 107-09)

3/12/26

E.W. Scripps’ yacht, the Ohio, was anchored off Monrovia, Liberia. After an evening with dinner guests when E.W. Scripps had drinks and smoked his usual large Havana cigars, he became ill and died of apoplexy within twenty minutes, at the age of 72. The age he had remarked to his sister, Ellen Browning, was the normal age for a Scripps to die. His will had specified that West Chester, Ohio was to be his burial place. However, the crew of the Ohio followed his sealed orders and buried E.W. Scripps at sea from the yacht, the Ohio. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 109)

1926

E.W. Scripps’ heirs took over Miramar Ranch, with families living in suites in separate wings and making many improvements. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115)

1927

The Ryan Aircraft Company used the former parade grounds at the Camp Kearny airfield to flight-test Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

Circa 1930


 


Bert and Katherine Hendrix moved into a house located on the Miramar Ranch property that was near a pond that was ultimately named after them. Bert Hendrix worked for James and Robert Scripps. The pond, formerly known as the “C” dam and part of an extensive water collection system, was present when they moved in and was formed by rain runoff. Per Lois Hendrix Rogers, daughter of Bert and Katherine, the pond still looked much the same in 1989 as it did when she grew up on the property. Ms. Rogers noted that during the ‘80s, there were conflicts with developers 
 


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over the pond. They wanted to fill the pond and put condos there. Community activists fought to save the pond from destruction. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/89)

11/16/30 E.W. Scripps’ wife, Nackie, died. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115). Shortly thereafter, Tom and Nackey Scripps Meanley bought 100 acres from the estate, and designed and built a large mission revival style home, named Mira Mesa. The house was constructed in the shape of a square with rooms around a central courtyard, with the inclusion of two large cisterns to collect and store water for use in the house, with Evans Pond serving as a source of water for the surrounding plantings and the horse stable. In the ensuing years, the Meanleys became very successful breeders of American Saddle Horses, a continuation of Nackie’s earlier breeding business at Fanita Ranch. Mrs. Nackey Scripps Meanley was also a successful breeder of purebred Hereford cattle. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 203, Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87) Their son, William Meanley, established the Meanley and Son Tru-Value Hardware store on Girard Street in La Jolla and as of August 1987 his grandson still operated the business. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87) The Meanley ranch was given its name Mira Mesa by Tom Meanley Jr. when he was ten years old. He was discussing the naming of the ranch with his mother, Nackey, and he said that he could see the ocean which reflected like a mirror and at that time the entire mesa below allowed you to see for miles. Hence, the name “Mira Mesa” was given to the Meanley Ranch. (Source: Background History Notes – prepared by Karen Kissane based on interviews with Thomas Meanley, Jr.) At the time, what is now Scripps Ranch Boulevard was called North Dam Road and Scripps Lake Drive was called Mary Ellen Road. (Source: Background History Notes – prepared by Karen Kissane based on interviews with Thomas Meanley, Jr.) The Evans Family was the original homesteading family that owned the area known as the Meanley Ranch and sold the land to E.W. Scripps. According to Alice Dietrich, her grandfather, John Evans, originally sailed from Sheffield England where he was a blacksmith at Laird’s Shipyard in Liverpool, England in approximately 1886. John Evans sailed to New York and settled in Brooklyn, where he was a blacksmith. A son of John Evans, William Frances Evans, came to San Diego by train to settle. Based on her recollection, Ms. Dietrich stated there was no real reason for her Uncle Bill, as she called him, to come to San Diego, other than he knew it was a wonderful place. She remembered that most homesteading plots of land were for 160 acres, which she felt was the size of the Evans Homestead. The original Evans home stood in an area down the hill to the southwest of the Meanley House. After not really making a go of the ranch in this area of present day Scripps Ranch, her uncle bought a chicken ranch in Ramona. (Source: Research Notes/Evans Family History prepared by Karen Kissane based on an interview with Mrs. Alice Dietrich)


 



 


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Circa 1934

During the Great Depression, a stonemason came to the Meanley mansion with his three children and asked Nackey Meanley if she had any work. He told her of his specialized skills and said he would do any stonework she wanted in exchange for food for his children. Nackey agreed and had the stonemason build a variety of decorative garden paths, walkways, and an impressive 6’ x 200’ wall. The large stone wall ran the length of one side of the home and included a double set of stairs leading down to the trail past Evans Pond to Nackey’s prized horse stables. The wall can be seen on the property at the site of the Scripps Miramar Ranch Library on Scripps Lake Drive. Note: the original wall was saved from destruction by a grassroots group known as “Save our Scripps Ranch” and is now a registered San Diego historical site. (Source: Interview with Betty Meanley by Victoria Mazelli)

1934

By declaration of the American Association of State Highway Officials, U.S. 395 was extended to San Diego, California. The road underlying the current Pomerado Road was designated as part of Federal highway U.S. 395. U.S. 395 meandered like a snake through San Diego County in ways that seem odd today. Road engineering back then could not move as many mountains and flatten grades in ways we view as natural today. So, at the time, U.S. 395, a north-south route, took a definitive and extended “east” turn through Scripps Ranch. At that time, there was no way the route could have been aligned directly north over the Penasquitos Creek as it did after the 1949 bridge was completed because the hills north of Pomerado, which were later flattened for post-1949 U.S. 395 and I-15) were impassable, and such long spanning bridges were beyond the ability of machinery or budget to design and implement. The southern approach to U.S. 395 (Pomerado) was from what is now designated Kearny Villa Road through MCAS Miramar. U.S. 395, before the current Kearny Villa Road existed, turned east at the present day Miramar Road-Pomerado Road bridge. Although the current Pomerado asphalt buries beneath it most of the original slab concrete roadway of U.S. 395, vestiges of the pre-1949 U.S. 395 layout can still be seen in the white-dashed raised asphalt curbs bordering the south side of Pomerado. The pre-1949 U.S. 395 was just a few feet narrower than the current Pomerado that inherited its alignment. Sailors would drive up U.S. 395 from the naval bases, manage the switchbacks in Scripps Ranch and down the Poway Grade, and then go drinking at the Big Stone Lodge on Old Pomerado. (Source: Interview with Derrick Garbell, U.S. 395 historian, and http://garbell.com/US395-old/395.htm, http://www.floodgap.com/roadgap/395/old/u3/, http://www.floodgap.com/roadgap/395/history.html)

1938

Robert P. Scripps remodeled the original living room of the Miramar Ranch mansion to a 2,000 square foot expanse with 16-foot ceilings. With the exception of the original living room and a small study, which was added in 1940, all rooms of the mansion were part of the original structure designed by E.W. Scripps. (Source: Souvenir brochure from Scripps Miramar Ranch tours)


 



 


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1938

Robert Paine Scripps died at 43 aboard his yacht, like his father, E.W. Scripps. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115)

1940s

Both the Navy and the Marine Corps occupied Miramar. East Miramar (Camp Elliott) was used to train Marine artillery and armored personnel, while Navy and Marine Corps pilots trained on the western side. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

1942

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Army took up residence at Mira Mesa, the Meanley Ranch, for approximately two months to utilize the eucalyptus as cover. They also used a 14-foot tall playhouse platform tower that Thomas Meanley Jr. had built at the age of 12 as a look-out post. (Source: Background History Notes – prepared by Karen Kissane based on interviews with Thomas Meanley, Jr.)

After World War II

Tom Meanley Jr. remembered that at Camp Kearny, “There was a strip there where planes could land, and one time Lindberg [sic] Field was closed and civilian planes were routed to Miramar. I remember getting our cars out to go over there and help light the field with our headlights.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/90)

5/1/46

The Navy departed Camp Kearny and the station became Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

6/30/47

After only a year, the Marines closed MCAS Miramar and moved all units to El Toro. The Navy redesignated Miramar as a Naval Auxiliary Air Station. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

1949

Pomerado Road lost its U.S. 395 designation when a newer Highway 395 freeway was completed 2 miles to the west in the alignment later to become Interstate 15. (Source: http://www.garbell.com/US395-old/395.htm)

1949

Natural gas was installed at Miramar and the surrounding area in 1949. All of the mail was picked up at the post office at Vasey’s general store until 1949. (Source: Scripps Ranch Villages newsletter, Spring 1994, Volume 1, Number 5)

4/1/52

NAAS Miramar was upgraded to NAS. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/ MCASMiramar.html)

1954

Following the Korean War, the Navy faced cutbacks and offered NAAS Miramar to San Diego for $1 and the city considered using the base to relocate its airport. But it was deemed at the time to be too far away from most residents and the offer was declined. The Navy decided to keep Miramar open and eventually built the station into one of the Navy's biggest bases. (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)


 



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1956

The first Miramar Air Show was held. The Navy’s precision jet flying team, the Blue Angels, first started performing in the Miramar Air Show sometime during the 1950s. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miramar_Air_Show and http://legacy.utsandiego.com/news/metro/20071218-0635-1bo18airshow.html)

9/15/60

Dedication of Lake Miramar Dam and Reservoir completed as part of the second San Diego Aqueduct. At its maximum operating level, Lake Miramar contains 1,807 million gallons of water and is 103 feet deep. (Source: The Miramar Water Treatment Plant Construction News, Winter 2006) Miramar Reservoir was built about 300 to 400 feet down-canyon from the old Surr dam, which was covered in the process of filling the lake. (Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 122 and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/95)

1961

NAAS Miramar was designated for fighter squadrons only and was unofficially known as "Fightertown." (Source: www.militarymuseum.org/MCASMiramar.html)

1962

The Miramar Water Treatment Plant was put into commission. (Source: The Miramar Water Treatment Plant Construction News, Winter 2006)

4/63

Chauncy Jerabek led nature walks at Miramar Ranch in conjunction with the San Diego Vassar Club, which was conducting the first public tour of the estate, then owned by Margaret Hawkins, widow of Robert P. Scripps. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss)

1965

California Western University received a Federal land grant for a new campus in the Scripps Ranch community. The property was previously part of Camp Elliott, a Marine Corps training facility (Source: alliant.edu)

1967

California Western University changed its name to United States International University (USIU) to reflect its expanded commitment to a global perspective. (Source: alliant.edu)

1968

Construction began on the Scripps Ranch campus of USIU. (Source: alliant.edu)

1968

Macco Corporation (Macco) purchased 1,180 acres of Miramar Ranch from Margaret Scripps Hawkins, widow of Robert P. Scripps, for $4.2 million, promising to preserve the 47-room mansion as a tourist attraction. The sale of Miramar was not a unanimous decision in the family. E.W. Scripps’ grandsons, Charles, Bob and Ted were in favor, while their sister Nackey Scripps Loeb, wife of the well-known New Hampshire publisher William Loeb III objected. (Source E. Reiss and Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115) At a luncheon for San Diego City and County civic officials and members of the press held at Scripps Miramar Ranch, William C. Baker, president of Macco stated “Our plan is basically an extension of Mr. E. W. Scripps original plan. Essentially, he planned and developed a home in a gracious, countryside surrounding for his family, friends and


 



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himself. Our concept is simply to extend that plan, retaining the same type of environment in making it available for a large number of families.” (Source: Macco Corporation press release dated July 29, 1968) There were plans for “three advanced-standard schools and a large high school.” Macco promised to preserve the original character of the ranch and protect the large eucalyptus and pine trees. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

12/68

Nackey S. Meanley sold a 1,067-acre piece of land on the north side of Miramar Reservoir to a limited partnership called Lago Dorado for $2.4 million. The limited partnership worked for a year to put together a master plan for a master plan development project based around a golf course. Then during the administration of Mayor Pete Wilson, a furor erupted over Mira Mesa and its problems, such as schools, access and extended utility services, and the city eventually put a building moratorium on the whole area. According to Sidney Rose, one of the original partners in Lago Dorado, the moratorium on building together with the fact that the interest rate “also went to a staggering 6%,” which all of the partners thought was too high, led the partnership to option the property to two development firms. Eventually, the property was sold in 1979 to a Canadian development company. (Source: San Diego Daily Transcript article, 11/19/79)

3/15/69

Tours of the Scripps Miramar Ranch home and 15-acre grounds commenced. (Source: The Penny Press, No. 1, Fall 1969) There were over 20,738 viewers who toured the premises by July 1970. (Source: E. Reiss) The admission was $2 for adults, $0.90 for children. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss) Visitors walked through massive Italian Renaissance doors into the living room. The 17 bedrooms, each with a different décor, were accessed by 4 100-foot corridors. Over the years, most rooms were modernized except for E.W. Scripps’ office.

1969

The replacement cost of the estate was estimated at $1,500,000. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss)

Fall 1969 The developer, Macco, produced The Penny Press, naming it after The Cleveland Penny Press, which was the name of the first newspaper controlled by E.W. Scripps. E.W. Scripps’ paper started in 1878, was limited to 4 pages, and sold for one cent. According to E.W. Scripps, the original Penny Press was the greatest moneymaker of any of the Scripps family newspapers. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 29) The first issue of the Penny Press included an item about the unique streetlights in Scripps Ranch. “Ranch architects have shed light on yet another restoration. Inspired by an old lamp on the mansion patio, they have developed unique streetlights for Ranch neighborhoods. Of cast aluminum, the lamps have an antique epoxy finish. Because they are mounted on 16 foot tall posts, shorter than the standard streetlight poles, they’re placed closer together, giving better uniform lighting and lending a distinctive touch to the neighborhood.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10) 
 



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9/28/69

“Grand Opening” sales presentation was held by Leadership Homes (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Macco Corp.). The Park Series homes – prices ranged from $33,000 to $39,000 and the Woods Series – prices ranged from $29,000 to $32,500. Park homes featured 4 floor plans, 18 elevations, 1,658 sq. ft to 2,737 sq. ft. Woods homes had 5 floor plans, 12 elevations ranging from 1,402 sq. ft to 2063 sq. ft. (Source: The San Diego Union 9/28/69) One hundred fifty homes were sold before the public even saw the models at the Grand Opening weekend. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss) Model homes were reached by a red asphalt road adjacent to Hendrix pond. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

12/31/69 Paul and Sheila Donigan, the first residents of Scripps Ranch, moved into their home. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/10) When the Donigans moved in, they didn’t have a neighbor for months. There were no schools, fire department, shopping, police protection or phone service. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/10)


 



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Left: Often reproduced photo of E.W. Scripps at Miramar Ranch, circa 1910-1916. Source: San Diego Historical Society.

Bottom left: Nackie Scripps, wife of E.W. Scripps, poses with five of her six children in 1896. Standing left, James George, 10, and right, John Paul, 8. Seated left is Edward Willis Mclean, 5, and right, Dorothy Blair “Dolla,” 6. In his mother’s lap is Robert Paine, approximately 6 months old. Nackey Elizabeth, their sixth child, was not yet born. Source: San Diego Historical Society. Bottom right: E.W. Scripps’ favorite caricature of himself, drawn by a Scripps-Howard cartoonist. Caricature donated to San Diego Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch by Thomas M. Meanley, Jr. in 1987. Source: San Diego Public Library.

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Above: Family portrait taken at Miramar Ranch at the time of George H. Scripps’ death in 1900. Front row: Eliza Virginia Scripps, Ellen Browning Scripps, E.W. Scripps, sons Robert and John, Nackie Scripps, Mrs. James Scripps, E.W. Scripps’ mother, Julia Osborn. Back row: Frederick Scripps, Mrs. William Scripps, William Scripps, James E. Scripps. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Oho University Libraries.

Left: Ellen Browning Scripps, the eldest half sister of E.W. Scripps, was a significant confidant of E.W. Scripps throughout his life. Photo taken at Knox College 1856-9 when Ellen was between 21-23 years old. Source: San Diego Historical Society Ticor Collection.

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Right: William A. Scripps, older halfbrother to E.W. Scripps, plays chess with sister, Ellen Browning Scripps, in her La Jolla, California home in 1910. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Bottom left: Ellen Browning Scripps, one of the few women to be featured on the cover of Time Magazine, graced the cover of the magazine on February 22, 1926. She was honored for her philanthropy and the editors of the magazine declared her “the most beloved woman in Southern California.� Source: www.scrippscollege.edu.

Bottom right: Ellen Browning Scripps circa 1925. Source: Victoria Mazzelli.

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Above: View of Miramar Ranch, E.W. Scripps’ home, shortly after completion circa 1906. Photo taken prior to trees and other landscaping filling in the space. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Right: Bird’s-eye view of Miramar Ranch, circa 1900-1910. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Left: Corridor facing main courtyard at Miramar Ranch, circa 1890s. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

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Left: Dining room at Miramar Ranch, circa early 1890s. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Right: In the early 1900s, E.W. Scripps commissioned sculptor, Arthur Putnam, to create five larger than life bronze figures representing the human history of California for display at Miramar Ranch, including this sculpture of “The Plowman.” Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Below: Aerial view of the house and surrounding property circa 1930. The small circle in the middle of the house’s courtyard is a fountain purchased by E.W. Scripps at the St. Louis Exhibition. Scripps stated that he would “have to rebuild the whole damn house to match it.” Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

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E.W. Scripps hired 20-year old Chauncy “Jerry� Jerabek as head gardener for Miramar Ranch in 1911. Jerabek was instrumental in planting the many eucalyptus trees that are now a symbol of Scripps Ranch. Upper left: Chauncy Jerabek as a young boy. Upper right: Jerabek as a young man. Bottom: Jerabek lived in this cottage with his wife near what is now Hendrix Pond and close to the current Ellen Scripps Davis Horse Ranch. Jerabek met his future wife, Hulda Schultz, while decorating the Scripps gymnasium for a Halloween dance. Source: Doreen Kellogg.

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Right: E.W. Scripps (on the left) and a companion display fish caught in one of the Miramar Ranch lakes, circa 1907 – 1910. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Left: John P. Scripps, second son of E.W. Scripps, at work on his books as manager of Miramar Ranch, circa 1907 – 1910. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

Right: Nackey Scripps Meanley as a young girl in corridor at Miramar, circa 1907 – 1910. Source: E.W. Scripps Papers, Mahn Center for Archives & Special Collections, Ohio University Libraries.

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Right: Aerial photo of house and immediate surroundings, 1963. Notice the house’s incomplete square design, which allowed carriages and early model cars to enter a reception area in the inner courtyard. Ellen Browning Scripps’s apartment was on the upper story of the lower right corner of the building. Source: Dale Gordon.

Lower left: Hendrix or Evans pond on the Scripps property, photo probably taken in the 1960s Source: San Diego Public Library.

Lower right: Dirt road on the Scripps property, 1968. Source: Macco Corp., San Diego Public Library Meanley Collection.

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Upper left: The front door of Miramar Ranch. When the mansion was torn down in 1973, William “Willie” Scripps, great-grandson of E.W. Scripps, purchased the door and used it in his Rancho Santa Fe house. Source: Dale Gordon.

Upper right: “A tranquil atmosphere is evident in the inner courtyard of Scripps Miramar Ranch. The peaceful sounds of an old marble fountain bring back the feeling of a bygone life in this isolated retreat of E.W. Scripps.” Source: 1968 Macco Corp. postcard provided by Gary/Lois Reed.

Left: Front of the house. The 2nd story held one of the mansion’s many suites, with a bedroom, bath, and sitting room. Source: 1968 Macco Corp. postcard provided by Gary/Lois Reed.

Left: Miramar stables. Source: 1968 Macco Corp. postcard provided by Gary/Lois Reed.

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Below and right: Statues in the inner courtyard of the mansion. Below, two cougars. On the right, a sculpture of man fighting beast. Note that the photo on the right provides a closer look at the courtyard fountain purchased at the St. Louis Exhibition. Source: Dale Gordon.

Below: “Known as the ‘nerve center’ of the Scripps-Howard newspapers, the library and study served as the base of operations for E.W. Scripps during the years he lived at Miramar Ranch. Manuscripts, letters, and pictures of EW Scripps line the walls of this important room.” Source: 1968 Macco Corp. postcard provided by Gary/Lois Reed.

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Left: A sitting room in one of the mansion’s suites. Each suite had a bedroom, bath, and sitting room. When members of the Scripps family moved out, they kept their suite and used it on visits. Source: Dale Gordon.

Right: E.W. Scripps’ bathroom was known as the Throne Room. “It has been said that United Press International was founded in this pretentious room. Hand-laid Italian tile covers the floor and walls. In the northwest corner sets the dentist chair which E.W. Scripps used for haircuts and dental work.” Source: 1968 Macco Corp. postcard provided by Rick Marrone.

Left: The Great Room, located in the front of the house, was 60 feet long and had a 16-foot ceiling of bleached red cedar and a fireplace that an adult could stand in. Source: Dale Gordon.

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Left: Miramar kitchen. Source: Dale Gordon.

Right: Office of Mrs. Margaret Scripps Hawkins, widow of Robert P. Scripps and the last family resident to live in the home. Source: Dale Gordon.

Left: Mrs. Hawkins decorated doll houses for a hobby. She would dress the dolls and make miniature furniture. This picture shows some of her handiwork. Source: Dale Gordon.

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Left: Tom and Nackey Scripps Meanley, sonin-law and daughter of E.W. Scripps, near the front entrance of their home named Mira Mesa circa 1956. Tom Meanley, secretary to E.W. Scripps, eloped with Nackey Scripps when she was eighteen. Despite the disapproval of E.W. Scripps, the couple had a long and happy marriage. After E.W. Scripps’ wife, Nackie, passed away in 1930, Tom and Nackey Meanley purchased 100 acres from the estate and built their home, which was located near the current Scripps Miramar Ranch branch of the public library. Source: San Diego Historical Society Ticor Collection.

Below: Nackey Scripps Meanley, 60, 1958. Photo taken from Lago Dorado, the 1,067 acre parcel north of Miramar Lake. Penasquitos Canyon is in the background. Source: San Diego Historical Society Ticor Collection.

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Prior page: 1n 1934, U.S. Highway 395 was extended to San Diego and the road underlying the current Pomerado Road was designated as part of U.S. 395. This map of San Diego County circa 1937 shows the unlabeled Pomerado segment of U.S. 395 east of the word “Miramar.” Below: In 1949, Pomerado Road lost its U.S. 395 designation when a newer Highway 395 was built to the west (which highway ultimately became I-15). Over time, segments of Pomerado Road were straightened and various sections of the old Highway 395 were abandoned. This aerial shot depicts an “orphan” section of Highway 395 east of the section of Pomerado Road that leaves Scripps Ranch and enters Poway. Right: This photo taken from the end of the “orphan” section shown below, faces west towards Scripps Legacy, circa 2000s. Source: Derrick Garbell, http://garbell.com.

29


Photos taken August 1959, prior to construction of Miramar reservoir. Right: The main dam area from the upstream side looking southwest. Surr Dam, which had been in use during E.W. Scripps’ time at Miramar is in the left corner.

Left: Photo of the general reservoir area looking northeast from the south abutment. The Miramar dam was built about 300-400 feet downcanyon from Surr dam, which was covered in the process of filling the lake.

Right: This photo depicts the main area of the existing earthen dam and looks northwest from the south abutment. Source: Jeff Pasek, San Diego City Public Utilities Dept.

30


Right: Skeleton of water treatment plant prior to completion in 1960. Below: Looking west across water treatment plant and dam before it was filled. Source: Jeff Pasek, San Diego City Public Utilities Dept.

Lower left: View of the dam fill and north abutment taken from the top of the outlet tower. Lower right: The downstream face of the dam seen from low on the south abutment. Source: Jeff Pasek, San Diego City Public Utilities Dept.

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The dedication ceremony for the Miramar Water Treatment Plant and Dam was held on September 15, 1960. Upper left: The outlet tower emitting water from the west saucer on the day of the dedication ceremony. Upper right: Spectators at the dedication ceremony. Below: 1960 aerial photo depicting partially-filled reservoir. Source: Jeff Pasek, San Diego City Public Utilities Dept.

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On September 28, 1969, Leadership Homes, a subsidiary of Macco Corp., held its “Grand Opening” sales presentation for the first homes to be built in the new residential development, Scripps Miramar Ranch. The following eight pages depict Leadership’s marketing brochure. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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34


35


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37


38


39


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41


First edition of the marketing newsletter produced by the developer. It hearkens back to the first newspaper controlled by E.W. Scripps, the Cleveland Penny Press. Source: Gary/ Lois Reed.

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Upper left: View of area that will become Hoyt Park in 1969. Below: Aviary Drive, just north of what will become the “old� Vons shopping center, 1969. Source: Jerry Anders.

Lower left: View from the hill above what is now Canyon Lake Drive, 1969. Lower right: View of home construction looking east from Kemah Lane, 1969. Source: Jerry Anders.

43


Developer’s original July 1969 price list for the Citation Series of homes. By the time of the Grand Opening two months later in September 1969, the development had been renamed the Park Series. Source: Gary/ Lois Reed.

44


Elevations of largest floor plan offered in the Park series. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

45


The price list for the Today series, which was later renamed the Woods Series. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

46


Elevations of smallest floor plan offered in the Woods series. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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When Macco Corporation purchased 1,180 acres of Miramar Ranch for residential development, it promised to preserve the 47-room mansion and 15-acre grounds as a tourist attraction. In March 1969, tours commenced and by July 1970 over 20,000 visitors had toured the premises. This trifold brochure was used to promote the tour of Miramar Ranch, “San Diego’s Newest Adventure for Visitors.” Source: Macco Corp. 1969 provided by Gary/Lois Reed.

48


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Visitors taking the tour of Scripps Miramar Ranch were provided with this pamphlet, which is full of interesting facts about Miramar Ranch and its owner, E.W. Scripps. Source: Macco Corp. 1969 provided by Jerry Anders.

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SCRIPPS RANCH CHRONOLOGY 1970s 2/70

The closest grocery store was the Big Apple in Kearny Mesa. (Source: E. Reiss)

3/26/70

The first Scripps Ranch baby, Nicole Klein, was born to parents Barbara and Hart Klein, the fourth family to move into Scripps Ranch. Scripps Ranch was considered so far out that no diaper service would deliver. Disposable diapers had not been invented yet. (Source: E. Reiss, Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/10) At this time only a few paved roads existed and the only other buildings nearby were the old Scripps mansion and a trailer located at Hendrix Pond with renderings of the model homes to come. (Source: B. Klein Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/05)

6/9/70

The City Council adopted the Scripps Miramar Ranch Master Plan. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/scrippsmiramarranch/pdf/ introduction.pdf)

7/70

A letter from Mike LoCelso went out to Scripps Ranch homeowners announcing the intention of forming a Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association to protect “our collective interests in its (the community’s) well being that it will grow and prosper to our hopeful expectations.” (Source: E. Reiss)

Late 1970

People lost interest in the Scripps Mansion and the tours were cancelled at the end of 1970. However, the mansion remained available for meetings of the Cub Scouts, the SRCA (Ivor Lemaire was installed president in front of the grand fireplace in the living room) and for private meetings (Melisa Moriatry organized a gathering for the Democratic Caucus that hosted presidential candidate George McGovern) (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss) After tours of Miramar were canceled, Scripps heirs removed valuable furniture, most furnishings and artwork from the mansion. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 116)

9/70


 


Miramar Ranch Elementary School I opened in a temporary building with four teachers and approximately 125 students in K-2nd grade. The school had portable classrooms and was located on Red Rock Road near Scripps Ranch Blvd. The principal was Bill Berner, who was also the principal of a school in Mira Mesa where the students had attended prior to the opening of Miramar Ranch. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss, MRE Dedication Ceremony Program Brochure 11/3/76) At the time, older kids were bused to Einstein Jr. High School and Kearny High School (Source: B. Klein Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/05)


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Fall 1970 Schools Committee was formed under chairmanship of Ivor Lemaire. The committee campaigned relentlessly to get a permanent school in Scripps Miramar Ranch. Rapid growth soon necessitated split sessions, double sessions and more temporary buildings at another site. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss) Ivor Lemaire and Dr. Phil Halfaker, the community’s elected School Board representative, pushed the community’s need for schools through the school district. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) 10/8/70

First officers of Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association were elected at a meeting of the Block Chairmen: Mike LoCelso, President; Ted Wrobel, Vice-President; Bill Connell, Secretary, Renee Weddell, Treasurer; and Jerry Monroe, Director. First standing committees established in response to a survey conducted among homeowners: Relations with Developer; Relations with City, County, State; Relations with Miramar Naval Air Station; Park Committee; Schools; Home protection, fire, vandalism, pets; Shopping Center; Utilities; and Radio Interference. (Source E. Reiss)

Fall 1970 First annual Scripps Ranch Fall Clean-up Day took place. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/89) Fall 1970 Scripps Ranch Campfire Girls started to hold meetings. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/72) Fall 1970 Board of Directors of Scripps-Miramar Homeowners Association sponsored Cub Scout Pack No. 616. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss) 10/26/70 First newsletter of the Scripps-Miramar Homeowners Association distributed (Source: E. Reiss) 1971

“There were approximately 200 houses on the Ranch and it was common for all residents to turn out for community meetings.” These meetings were more like ‘town councils’, often taking place in the old Scripps mansion before a roaring fire.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/77)

1971

Opening of the Little Bear Country Store, the first market in Scripps Ranch, located approximately where Chase Bank is located on Scripps Ranch Boulevard. Little Bear opened around the same time as the streetlights were put in. (Source: Interview with Jim and Barbara Wells)

2/71

Leadership Housing Systems, Inc., now a subsidiary of Cerro Corp., wrote that it had acquired 200 acres of land from Macco and was no longer related to the former company. At that point, they also reported that the second temporary school site had been rough graded. Single-family residential construction near there would start the next month; one area contained 77 lots and the other 47 lots. 300 hundred multifamily units were scheduled to start moving into the area at the intersection of Scripps Ranch Blvd. and Appaloosa Rd. in about seven months. Units would range from 950


 



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– 1,180 square feet and be located on only one side of the street. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss) 2/71

The Pool and Recreation Committee formed when Jean Stubbs and Helen George agreed to be co-chairs. Ms. Stubbs had asked what was being done to insure completion of the pool and the answer was “nothing,” which prompted the formation of the committee that went on to organize the completion of the pool and the building of the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

3/71

First “Official Newsletter of the Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association” is published. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter)

Spring 1971

The interim swimming pool for the Scripps Ranch homeowners was under construction near the mansion and would be completed in June, per the spring 1971 issue of the Penny Press (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

4/15/71

Miramar Ranch Elementary School Site II, a temporary school site located at Red Cedar and Aviary Drives, officially opened. With room for expansion, it was planned to hold 300 students. It opened with 100 children in grades 3-6 in three bungalow buildings. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss) The additional campus was needed as student population had grown to approximately 300 students midway through the first year of the school’s existence. (Source: Miramar Ranch Elementary Dedication Ceremony Brochure, 111/3/76) Both temporary school sites did not have cafeterias. The District couldn’t provide cafeterias for temporary schools due to lack of funds. The temporary facilities were provided by Leadership Housing and thus were limited to classroom and administrative spaces. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/73) The future of a permanent school facility depended on the outcome of a $133 million bond issue on the June ballot. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/06)

5/71

Residents signed a petition informing Macco Corp. of their displeasure to the rezoning of what they thought was going to be a residential area to be a “wide open commercial zone.” Negotiations between homeowners and Macco resolved the matter, avoiding a lawsuit. Other concerns of the day were noise from Miramar Naval Air Station, “wholesale destruction of trees on the ranch,” dues at Scripps Miramar Club, conditions of the parks on the ranch and school issues. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

6/71

The school bond measure that would have raised funding to construct permanent schools in the community failed to garner sufficient votes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

6/15/71

Pool opened after extensive efforts by the Pool and Recreation Committee. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)


 



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Summer 1971

Scripps Ranch organized a backyard swim program in conjunction with the Miramar Ranch PTA and the American Red Cross, with swim lessons offered for children at various residents’ pools. This program continued for over eight years and was organized by Mibs Somerville. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/71, 12/77)

7/3/71

The first annual 4th of July parade and Scripps Ranch Picnic, which included games for all ages, was held. “After the beer and soft drinks started to run out they all adjourned to the pool for some more contests.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/71)

7/71

A street light maintenance district was established for the special lights located in the Ranch. The estimated 12-month assessment of $10.42 upset homeowners who felt they were being double taxed for streetlights. The Special Assessment and Commercial Development Department explained that the special lights were approved by the City with the understanding that property owners would pay any extra costs. As the area lit by the unique lights was smaller than that lit by regular lights, there are two special lights at each intersection instead of one and the lights are closer together. So while the cost per streetlight is roughly the same, the number of streetlights was higher in Scripps Ranch and the additional cost was borne by the homeowners. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

8/23/71

Leadership acquired approximately 154 acres of additional land in the heart of Scripps Ranch, which was zoned for single family, multi-family and commercial usage and was part of the original development plan approved by the City in the Spring of 1979. Leadership announced it plans to develop the property in accordance with the approved development plans. This acquisition insured orderly development and prevented other builders and developers from introducing product lines and development concepts inconsistent with the established plan. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

9/71

By the start of its second year, the student population at Miramar Ranch Elementary had grown from 125 students to over 500 students. (Source: Miramar Ranch Elementary School Dedication Ceremony Program, 11/3/76)

Late 1971

10/71


 


A new tradition of “newcomers luncheons” was instituted on the Ranch. New residents were invited to attend monthly lunches, which consisted of 10 people, 5 old residents and 5 new ones. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/71) Bill Hartford, President of the Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association, explained the proper role of the Board of Directors and the officers of the Homeowners’ Association in the October newsletter. It was his intent to fulfill the fundamental purpose stated by Mike LoCelso in his initial letter regarding the establishment of the Homeowners’ Association, which was “to keep everyone informed as to what is happening. The Board of Directors, is not nor was it intended to be, an “action” 
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group. … Action and community involvement is [everyone’s] job.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71) 10/71

Schools Committee Chairman, Ivor Lemaire, and others were very active in efforts to bring schools to Scripps Ranch. The Schools Committee requested that the developer donate land so that the community would have something of a permanent nature for its schools. LHSI stated that it was not prepared to donate land since providing permanent schools was the responsibility of the Board of Education, but it was willing to offer the District a 5-year lease option on Miramar Ranch School 2 and the two permanent elementary school sites. Over the objections of Mira Mesa and Scripps Ranch residents, the School Board designated Montgomery Junior High and Mission Bay High as the schools to be attended by Scripps Ranch students. The School Board did not have any portable classrooms available for the Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

10/71

Aviary Drive south of Scripps Ranch Blvd and down to the southerly boundary of the new recreation property was in the process of being graded and improved. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/71)

12/1/71

Leadership filed a law suit against the City of San Diego petitioning the court to set aside a City Council decision disapproving a subdivision map for a 129-lot subdivision that Leadership proposed to construct in Scripps Ranch. Leadership argued that “if it was prevented from continuing its development at Scripps, it would be forced to discontine its active role in providing schools.” A copy of a press release issued by Leasdership announcing the law suit was provided to then current Scripps Ranch residents. (Source: Press Release for Leadership Housing Systems, Inc. dated December 1, 1971, “Builder Sues City in Development Halt,” provided by Gary/Lois Reed)

12/6/71

The County Grand Jury returned “indictments charging grand theft and stock manipulation in connection with the use of substandard lumber in construction of about 195 homes at the Scripps Miramar Ranch development.” The framer’s employees were instructed to remove “utility grade” markings from the lumber and apply higher-grade markings with a counterfeit stamp. The affected homes were not deemed unsafe, and civil remedies were available to the residents. The defective lumber was replaced, and the houses continued to be enjoyed. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss, citing a December 7, 1971 San Diego Union article)

Late 12/71


 


Ten homeowners filed a class action suit against the developers and their financial backers for allegedly entering into a scheme with the intent of defrauding the homeowner. The homeowners claimed that many of the promises made by the developer regarding the facilities had not been fulfilled. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss)


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Early 1970s

Lots of kids and nature in Scripps Ranch. Kids could take their sleeping bags and go “camping” right around the corner. Parents met with other new arrivals at the “club” for parties and weekly get-togethers. (Source: Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

1972

The Miramar Mounds, located on then-NAS Miramar and which contained unique soil features called “mima mounds” found in only three or four locations in the country and rare vernal pools found only in California, was designated a National Natural Landmark. (Source: http://www.nature.nps.gov/nnl/registry/usa_map/states/california/nnl/mm/index.cfm)

3/72

Homes were being built on land east of Scripps Ranch Blvd., between Pomerado and Aviary. In this area, a gas station might have been built if residents had not combined their efforts and stopped a proposed rezoning of this property from residential to commercial. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/72)

3/72

The library bookmobile started making weekly stops in Scripps Ranch at Scripps Ranch Blvd. and Red Rock Drive, near the elementary school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/72)

3/26/72

More than 900 people turned out for a family-style picnic to celebrate the opening of the $500,000 recreation center for Scripps Ranch residents. San Diego City Councilwoman Maureen O’Conner, a former exhibition swimmer, dedicated the center. The center was one year in the planning, designed to specifications of a homeowners’ committee and would be operated by Leadership. That day was the public’s only opportunity to visit the center, as it would operate as a private club for homeowners following the dedication. This club replaced the interim pool and became the current Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club on Aviary Drive. (Source: San Diego Union 4/2/72)

5/1/72

The City of San Diego proclaimed May 8th-14th as Town Council Week and recognized “the diligent efforts being made by the Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association to improve its community and further urge more San Diegans to become involved in town council activities in their neighborhood.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/72)

5/9/72

The School Board accepted Leadership Housing’s offer to continue to provide elementary school facilities until August 3, 1975. Since the temporary school situation was stabilized, the Schools Committee focused its efforts on the quest for permanent schools for Scripps Ranch. The Schools Committee successfully petitioned the Board of Education to designate Taft Junior High School as the school for Scripps Ranch students starting in Fall 1972. The district did not pay for transportation to Junior and Senior High School and the buses cost parents an average of $.60 per day. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/72)


 



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5/72

Five open space parks (Hoyt Park East, Meanley, Gordon Grove, Fox Grove and Jerabek Park) were completed. Two additional open space parks (Derenbaker Grove and Hoyt Park West) were essentially complete. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/72)

6/72

Annual membership dues for the Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association were $2.00. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/72)

6/13 – 7/1/72

Burglars systematically looted antique decorations, chandeliers, carved wood panels, tiles, marble fireplace mantels and doorknobs from the Scripps mansion. Police estimated that $50,000 worth of antique figures were stolen. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 116)

7/6/72

The City Council, in part based on objections raised by the SRHA, sent back for redesign a plan that would have widened Pomerado Road to 4 side-by-side lanes without regard for tree location. Work on the redesign was suspended until approximately 1977 when the State Highway Dept. was expected to widen the bridge over I-15 to 4 lanes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/73)

9/3/72

An Opening Day Fishing Derby was held at Hendrix Pond, which was stocked with 250 lbs. of catfish. Leadership permitted Scripps Ranch residents to fish in Hendrix Pond from sunrise to 9:30 a.m. and from 5:00 p.m. to sunset. “The area is important to house-sales and so residents using the pond should conduct themselves in a way that will not interfere with these operations.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/72)

10/28/72 Scripps Ranch Recreation Club held its first party, an old-fashioned Halloween Costume Party, $2 per couple. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/72) 11/72

Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association had 235 member families out of over 500 families eligible for membership. The annual dues rate was reduced to $1, which was used almost exclusively for publication costs. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/72)

11/72

The Navy Firefighting School located south of Pomerado Road (where Navy housing is currently) was rumored to be closing soon. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/72) The Navy discontinued its used at some point and by July 1977 it was leased to USIU as a maintenance station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/77)

1/16/73

School Board instructed District Staff to prepare papers to purchase School Site 2, for use as a permanent elementary school in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/73)

1/22/73

The Scripps-Miramar Homeowners Association changed its name to the Scripps Ranch Civic Association. (Source: E. Reiss and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/73)


 



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2/73

SR Civic Affairs Committee pushed for a night stop by the bookmobile in addition to the regular Friday morning stop since University City and Penasquitos were getting branch libraries. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/73)

2/10/73

72 Scripps Ranch kids entered the trout derby at Hendrix Pond. Leadership Housing had stocked the pond with 400 8-inch trout 2 days prior. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/73)

2/19/73

SRCA Board of Directors voted to divide Scripps Ranch into 12 community districts, an expansion from the current 7 districts, in light of the rapid growth of the community and the desire to properly represent the various areas of the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/73)

2/20/73

At a special Schools Committee meeting, the community voted not to join Mira Mesa in its efforts to petition for a separate school district. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/73)

3/73

As a result of requests by the SR Civic Affairs Committee, the City agreed to install roadway barriers at all entrances to Hoyt Park East to prevent cars from driving in the park, paint definition stripes on Pomerado Road and install “no shooting” signs south of Pomerado Road east of the Navy Firefighters School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/73)

4/73 – 7/73

San Diego County Water Authority installed an 84” water line through the community, starting at Hoyt Park East. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/73)

6/73

The developer declared the Scripps mansion unsafe, citing the recent vandalism and the condition of the foundation. Community agencies were offered the chance to preserve the mansion, but declined due to lack of funds. Within one week, the developer razed an estate that took 8 years to build “to protect the safety and welfare of the more than 500 families living in Scripps Ranch.” (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss and Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 116) Some of the building supplies were left at the end of the property for residents to take. For example, Paul and Sheila Donigan bordered their front garden with bricks from the mansion. Other items from the mansion were offered for sale. Muriel Bossert bought hand-painted tiles, storing them for 25 years until she remodeled her home. After the demolition, only the stables and aviary were left. (Source: Sentinel 2/8/02 E. Reiss)

6/73

Leadership Housing presented its Master Plan, called Scripps Ranch II, to the City Planning Department for the approximately 740 acres northeast of the then-current Scripps Ranch, which plan included a golf course and related recreational facilities and 3 types of residential development ranging from single-family detached to condominiums. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/73)


 



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6/73

A study of sites for a proposed San Diego International Airport was completed. Four locations were singled out: Carmel Valley, Miramar, Lindbergh and Brown Field/Tijuana (dual use). The front-runner was Carmel Valley (Source: E. Reiss)

7/73

The SRCA adopted a new logo, which incorporated the distinctive old-fashioned street light and eucalyptus tree. The logo was drawn by Anne Acevedo based on a sketch by Bill Anderson. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/73)

8/73

The SRCA had about 220 member families out of a possible approximately 850 families. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/73)

9/20/73

First meeting of Troop 3012, the first Girl Scout troop formed in Scripps Ranch and sponsored by Leadership Housing, was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/73)

11/73

Unified Leasing acquired the commercial land around the Little Bear Market. The developer planned to start building the full center in a couple years. Current Scripps Ranch population was about 4,000 residents and was projected to be 13,300 in 1978. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/73)

12/73

The operations of the Scripps Ranch Recreation Club became more formalized. Leadership Housing leased the property to Scripps Ranch Recreation Club, Inc., a non-profit corporation, and the Club’s Advisory Board hired its first manager. Further expansion of the facilities depended on City Council approval of a proposal to build some additional 300 more homes over the next two years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/73)

1/74

Leadership Housing announced the beginning of construction for “The Village Woods,” a 154-unit condominium development to be located south of Willow Creek. Homes would be in the $30,000 - $40,000 range. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/74)

2/74

Unified Leasing accelerated its plans for the shopping center and broke ground for smaller shops on the end of the center in spring 1974. Little Bear will be replaced by a larger market, Lavicio’s Deli Mart, which would expand its offerings once it moved to the larger space to include “a complete line of fresh meats, a delicatessen and, possibly, spirits.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/74)

2/74

The SRCA board decided to start work towards creating a Community Planning Group that will include representatives from homeowners, land owners, businesses and USIU and would have the goal of establishing development plans for the community. The City government recognized and would consider the recommendation of community planning groups and the SRCA did not have the same status of recognition that a community planning group carried. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/74)


 



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2/74

Explorer Post 2616, an adventure group for boys and girls that are 14 ½ or older, was formed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/74)

3/74

The initiation fees for new members to the Scripps Ranch Recreation Club were $150. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/74)

5/29/74

Cub Scout Pack 616 split into two packs, Pack 616 and Pack 1216, due to size constraints. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/74)

6/74

Dixie Stewart presented the Scripps Ranch Dixie Stewart Dancers in a dance review at the Puppet Theater in Balboa Park. During this time period, there were very few local extracurricular activities for children, particularly girls. One of the few things you could do was participate in Mrs. Stewart’s dance classes and be one of the Dixie Stewart Dancers. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/74 and interview with Julie Ohrmund Rose, a former participant in Mrs. Stewart’s dance classes)

7/11/74

The Parks and Aesthetics Committee met and approved a general concept for the developments of parks in Scripps Ranch. It was determined that the “neighborhood park” of roughly 5 acres of flat-grassed area didn’t work in Scripps Ranch. Instead, a series of pocket parks of 1 to 2 acres in size to be developed in conjunction with the open space was deemed more acceptable with a community park of 15 to 25 acres with ball fields and buildings to be developed sometime in the future. Two of the pocket parks would be Hoyt Park West (create a lawn and maintain better) and at Avenida Magnifica and Mesa Madera Drive. These recommendations were forwarded to the City. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/74)

10/3/74

The City Council voted to create an international airport and proposed to relocate Lindbergh Field to NAS Miramar. An Ad Hoc Committee was formed to meet with the Department of the Navy regarding the possible joint military/civilian use of Miramar. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/74)

10/74

The Parks and Aesthetics Committee galvanized a strong community effort to “Save Hendrix Pond” and prevent grading for new condominiums adjacent to Hendrix Pond. The proposed condominiums would ring the pond and threaten the existence of the Pond itself through run-off contamination. Pat Anderson spearheaded the “Save Hendrix Pond” effort. The community sent over 40 letters to the City’s Environmental Department, additional letters from Brownies were mailed to Mayor Pete Wilson and approximately 1,300 signatures were collected to demonstrate sufficient public interest to have the City Engineer responsible for the project appeal the matter to the City Council. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/74 and 3/77)

11/74

In connection with the expansion of the SR Recreation Club, the architect went to great lengths to save many of the more established trees, however certain plants and trees were targeted for removal. Anne Humphrey, with a large number of additional concerned citizens and city staff personnel, worked together to see if they could move plants designated for destruction to other specified areas within Scripps Ranch.


 



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Chauncy Jerabek returned to Scripps Ranch to join Scouts and residents in trying to save plants that had been planted in the 1890s. They transplanted the shrubs to preserve that link with the past. The highlight of the day was Jerabek’s replanting of a tree in Jerabek Park. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/74) 11/74

“After four plus years of frustration, [the community] finally assured our children of permanent, full activity elementary school facilities.” Proposition XX passed, which was a lease-purchase measure for the construction of 22 separate school building projects, including Miramar Ranch no. 1 (at Red Cedar) and Miramar Ranch no. 2 (at Avenida Magnifica and Mesa Madera) and a junior/senior high school in Mira Mesa. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/74)

Late 1974 The idea for Scripps Ranch Little League (SRLL) began when the Mira Mesa Little League told Pete Vogt, a Navy enlisted man, that he was too late to sign up his kids for the 1975 season. The Mira Mesa Little League de-annexed Scripps Ranch from its territory and within 2 months, the SRLL was up and running with the help of other residents, including Bob Blatchley (first President), Joe Gerszytn (first Treasurer and President in Year 2) and Arnold Gass (Safety Officer, years 1-5). (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99) 12/74

Leadership Housing consented to sell the 5.6 acres surrounding Hendrix Pond to the residents of Scripps Ranch provided the transaction could be completed within one year. The Parks and Aesthetics Committee, with the assistance of attorney Roger Hedgecock, determined that the most viable alternative to halt development was to create an assessment district to purchase the parcel since it qualified as open space and couldn’t be purchased using the park money that the City had already collected from residents via assessments. The committee conducted a survey and determined there was sufficient support for the creation of an assessment district and ultimately presented the City with a petition signed by 60% of the Scripps Ranch residents supporting the assessment district. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 112/74 and 1/75)

1974

The San Diego Public Library’s bookmobile came to the corner of Ironwood Road and Scripps Ranch Blvd, across the street from the first temporary school. Residents could order any book in the San Diego library system and have it delivered to the bookmobile. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06) The City’s last bookmobile was a $37,000 vehicle bought in December 1973 and, when fully loaded with about 4,000 books, weighed 12.5 tons. (Source: http:www.sandiegoyesterday.com/wpcontent/uploads/2010/05/Bookmobiles.pdf )

Early 1975


 


Leadership Housing announced that it would not be building a golf course in the area designated as Scripps II, which was along a dirt road called Red Cedar Drive. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/75) Leadership sold its rights to the Scripps Miramar Ranch development to the Corky McMillin Company of Chula Vista. 
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(Source: Schaelchlin, Patricia. The Newspaper Barons, 202 and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/05) Spring 1975

Opening Day for SR Little League and all games were played on an open lot that is the present site of Jerabek School. There was no grass, only some topsoil that was brought in to smooth out the infields; it alone distinguished the infield from the outfield. There were 2 fields build to support the four Major and four Minor teams. A total of 96 players participated the first year and the SRLL operated on a budget of $14,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

3/75

The City Parks Department recommended, in accordance with the wishes of the community as documented by surveys, that the City purchase the two smaller park sites when funds become available. There were sufficient funds in Park Fee District #235 to cover the cost of the 2 acres on Aviary. But there was not enough funds remaining in Park Fee District #234 to cover the cost of the 5-acre middle terrace on Avenida Magnifica. The community did not, at that time, want to only invest in one large park on Avenida Magnifica given the then-current size of the community. When the community’s population reached 18,000, which is the required “standard” for a community park, then the community would at that time take another serious look at purchasing the larger 20-acre parcel. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/75)

8/75

Battalion Chief Bruce Blauvelt visited Scripps Ranch to evaluate the potential fire hazard of the parks and canyons. In a letter to the Parks and Aesthetics Committee, Assistant Fire Chief R.C. Phillips of the San Diego Fire Department stated: “Chief Blauvelt’s conclusion was that the trees and groundcover in that area do not present a significant fire hazard.” Chief Phillips further explained by phone, that “should a fire erupt, the fire department could control it quite easily and that our homes would not be in any immediate danger.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/75)

9/75

The SRCA was notified by San Diego County of its intention to develop and operate a 500-acre sanitary landfill site, approximately 1.5 miles east of Scripps Ranch in a canyon adjacent to Carroll Canyon, with the planned primary access route being Pomerado Road. The SRCA and the Planning Group filed an appeal primarily objecting to the use of Pomerado as the access route. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/75)

10/1/75

Initiation fees for SR Swim and Racquet Club increased from $150 to $250. Monthly dues increased from $15 to $20. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/75)

10/15/75 NAS Miramar put “hush houses” into operation to mitigate jet engine noise. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/75) Originally, Scripps Ranch residents were commonly woken up several times each night by the deafening roar of jet engines being tested at NAS Miramar. The noise was so powerful that it made the houses vibrate. Tom Johnson, a Scripps Ranch resident, led the charge to mitigate the noise. When his initial contacts with NAS Miramar were unsuccessful, Tom contacted the local 
 



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congressman, Claire Burgener, for help. While NAS Miramar had requested a “hush house” testing facility in 1973, funding was denied in an attempt to reduce the Federal budget. Mr. Johnson and Ms. Burgener vigorously pursued funding and ultimately were successful in having a hush house installed on the air base. As of July 1977, approximately 50 hours of jet engine testing per week was being done at night and the community rarely noticed it anymore. A second hush house was installed in late 1977. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/77) 11/75

The Mira Mesa/Scripps Ranch Pop Warner Association was formed, with a number of teams created with a combination of Mira Mesa and Scripps Ranch boys. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/75)

11/22/75 First Annual Scripps Ranch Community Cleanup was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/75) Early 12/75

2/76

Spring 1976

3/76


 


Leadership turned the deed to Hendrix Pond over to the City. Assessments for the Special District to cover the cost of the purchase of Hendrix Pond, ranged from $1,500 for the homeowners bordering the pond to $100 for homeowners farthest from the park, with the assessment to be paid over a 10-year period. Controversy continued for several months regarding whether the community should have created the assessment district, but ultimately the majority of the community was in favor of protecting Hendrix Pond from adjacent development and the Hendrix Park Assessment District was approved by the City Council on March 10, 1976. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/75, 3/76, 4/76) McMillin-Scripps started grading for construction in the area east of Avenida Magnifica along Pomerado Road. 310 single-family homes were to be built, and would range from 1,900 to 2,400 square feet, one and two stories, four bedrooms and average $69,900. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/76) The School District announced that it could not buy the property slated for the Avenida Magnifica school site since there were not sufficient students in the area to warrant the school at the present time. The District wanted to extend its option to purchase the parcel from Leadership for another 3 years. Leadership offered the District the opportunity to obtain the park site located on Avenida Magnifica at no cost as long as they purchased the adjoining school site before August when the current option on the site expired. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/76, 4/76) Currie/Samuelson Development Group had begun developing its master plan for the 80-acre first phase of the Scripps Ranch Business Park and was in the process of selling and leasing sites to firms in research and development, light manufacturing and office use. Some of the companies soon to settle there were Martin-Wolfe, Imed, Motorola, and Simmons Construction. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/76, ScrippsScenes Spring 1978 published by CSDG) 
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5/76

Immanuel Baptist Church, the first church to be located in Scripps Ranch, purchased the parcel on which the temporary Site I school had been located. Local residents met with Pastor Jorn Swearingen and received assurances that the trees on the property would remain and that the existing building would be used as is without additional construction on site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/76)

6/15/76

School Board voted to purchase the site for the Avenida Magnifica Elementary School, but did not vote to construct the school at the current time. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/76) A letter writing campaign and meetings with district representatives continued efforts to get the School Board to approve using Proposition XX funds to construct the school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/76)

7/4/76

The annual 4th of July picnic featured a real buffalo barbecue in Hoyt Park, along with all the draft beer one could drink for $1. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/06) A time capsule was sealed on the grounds of the Swim and Racquet Club with the goal of opening it 100 years later at the Tri-centennial. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/76)

7/76

SRCA representatives requested that i) the City’s Transportation and Land Use Committee make a further study of alternative routes to the Northeast Landfill to be located near Scripps Ranch before considering whether or not to impose a weight limitation on Pomerado Road and ii) the conditional use permit granted by the City to the County to operate the Northeast Landfill be revoked and be made contingent on the opening of the Southeast Landfill near Tierrasanta. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/76)

8/3/76

School Board approved the construction of the Avenida Magnifica elementary school using Proposition XX funds. “This happy outcome should prove once and for all how effective our efforts can be if we are organized and willing to spend the time to petition for the needs or our community.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/76)

9/13/76

Mira Mesa Junior/Senior High School on Mira Mesa Blvd. opened, with students in grades 7-12. The school held double sessions with 9-12 graders attending class from 7:30 – 11:30 am and 7-8th graders holding classes from 12:10 – 4:20 p.m. until all of the permanent buildings were complete. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/76)

11/3/76

Permanent site of Miramar Ranch Elementary School opened on Red Cedar Dr. with a 45,000 square foot, 18 classroom building, designed to conform to the split-level wooded site. (Source Sentinel 9/28/01 E. Reiss)

12/76

The City and Navy agreed that a western portion of NAS Miramar could be used for landfill and that the Northeast Landfill (near Scripps Ranch) and the Southeast Landfill (near Tierrasanta) can be “land banked,” i.e., saved for future use. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/77)


 



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1/10/77

Chauncy Jerabek celebrated his 87th birthday by visiting the children at Miramar Ranch Elementary School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/77)

3/77

SRCA dues were $3 per year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/77)

3/2/77

The San Diego Police Dept. installed a citizens band radio in SDPD Unit #131 (channel 9) that covered Scripps Ranch and Mira Mesa. CB operators on the Ranch used this capability to either call for assistance or to report an emergency. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/77)

3/23/77

Scripps-Miramar Ranch Planning Committee held its initial meeting. At the meeting, the City Planning Department reviewed the role and responsibility of planning committees. The group adopted a resolution seeking official recognition from the City Council and voted to accept planning services from Rick Engineering. This company was ultimately instrumental in helping develop the Scripps Ranch Community Plan. Al Tarvyd was elected as chairperson and Paula Oquita as vice-chairperson. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/77) Members of the planning group included Nada Borsa, Ivor Lemaire, George Coleman, Jr. and Bob Petering. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/08)

6/1/77

City Council formally recognized the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan committee as the official planning committee for Scripps Ranch and work commenced on the SMR Community Plan. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/77, 11/85)

8/77

The City’s Park and Recreation Dept. proposed a regional park around Miramar Reservoir. A Scripps Ranch community group was formed to investigate sources of funding and to lobby for the park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/77)

6/18/77

A free “Concert-On-The-Green” was held at Hoyt Park. The City-County Band, composed of between 20 and 35 professional musicians, played light classical, jazz and show tunes. The San Diego City Parks and Recreation Department, San Diego County, the Musicians Trust Fund and the SRCA sponsored the concert. The concert was organized through the efforts of the SRCA with the thought that this event could possibly become an annual affair, with the community helping in the future to defray rehearsal costs through donations. This concert became the basis for the Symphony in the Park series later established by the Scripps Ranch Women’s Athletic Club and the Scripps Ranch Old Pros. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/77 and Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

Summer 1977


 


The Scripps Ranch Men’s Slow-Pitch Softball League, the predecessor to the Scripps Ranch Old Pros, sprouted over the summer and blossomed over the fall because a “mixed bag of nonathletes, fading superstars and self-proclaimed jocks yearned for recreation with a bat and ball. … ‘It was going to be a men’s – women’s league,” 
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explained Arnie Gass, ‘then the women broke off (rebelled?) to form their own league. What could we do?” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/77) 9/77

Wangenheim Junior High School opened in Mira Mesa. Only 7th graders attended Wangenheim the first year, with all 8th through 12 graders attending Mira Mesa Junior/Senior High School. Jim Vlassis, better known as Mr. V, Wangenheim’s first Principal, greeted all incoming 7th graders in a tux to welcome them to secondary school. (Source: B. Klein Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/77, 7/05)

9/77

The Scripps Miramar Ranch Planning Committee resolved that the park to be located adjacent to the Jerabek School should be named “Vivian Rumph’s Park” in honor of the long and outstanding contributions made by Vivian “Dolly” Rumph on behalf of Scripps Ranch. Ms. Rumph, who passed away in September 1977, served the community in many capacities, including as SRCA President, and district director and was actively involved in getting an adequate East-bound off-ramp from I-15 to Pomerado Road and bus service to the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/77, 10/77)

1/78

The Miramar Ranch PTA established its Block Parent Program, where concerned parents and other people who were likely to be home during the hours when children were usually home or going to or from school would be available to help children in need. A Block Parent volunteered their home, in case of an emergency (such as a child being injured or bothered by a stranger or older child), for a child going to or from school. Bright orange signs with pictures of Mickey Mouse and the words “Scripps Ranch Child Watch” were placed in the window of homes participating in the Block Parent program to alert children. This program lasted for more than 5 years and was helpful in creating an emergency phone tree and search parties when children did not return home when their parents expected them to. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/77, 2/83)

Spring 1978

3/78


 


Currie/Samuelson Development Group (CSDG) announced the development of the 53-acre Phase II of the Scripps Ranch Business Park. Plans for the business park’s second unit placed an emphasis on attracting “clean industries” in San Diego County. The $10 million phase would be on the South side of Willow Creek Rd. and would extend from the Frontage Road and I-15 on the West to the property’s easterly boundary at Appaloosa Rd. (Source: ScrippsScenes - Spring 1978 published by CSDG) At this point in time, there was only one way in and out of Scripps Ranch, Pomerado Road. Cal Trans closed a Frontage Road the prior year in connection with construction on the 163. In December 1977, the back exit off Red Cedar was closed. Community members were urged to contact their councilman to petition for more access to Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/78)


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4/78

The first delegation of 53 5th and 6th grade students at Miramar Ranch went to the Rice School on the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona under the long-running Apache Exchange Program. This program was the brainchild of Joan Gass, who saw a 1977 court ruling that each elementary school have a Race-Human Relations committee and thought the concept would benefit both the children of the San Carlos Reservation, where she had recently lived for 3 years, and the children at Miramar Ranch. Mrs. Gass had to organize the entire program and coordinate all aspects of the program, including approvals from the Apache elders and the San Diego Unified School District. The following month, 32 Apache children stayed a week and visited in San Diego. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/10, Interview w/Mrs. Gass on 1/17/11)

6/16/78

The Scripps Ranch Community Theatre presented its first production, Old Town, at the USIU little theater. Open auditions had been held in the multipurpose room at Miramar Ranch Elementary in April. The idea for a community theater came from B.J. Scott, a Scripps Ranch resident who had appeared in a Patio Playhouse production in Escondido and was tired of the commute. She advertised in area newspapers and got a great response from interested thespians. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/78, 11/06)

7/4/78

138 runners competed in the first annual 4th of July Ranch mini-marathon, which held quarter and half marathon races. The races started at the corner of Corridor and Ironwood Road, and lapped the lake. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/78) The organization of this marathon had much help from Carol Brown (and her husband, a realtor) and became the predecessor to the ‘Old Pros 10k Run.’ (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

7/18/78

City Council adopted the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan. (Source: City of San Diego website). This Community Plan became the Scripps Ranch portion of the City General Plan and served as a guideline for future development within the planning area. At that time, it was planned that i) SR would consist of 75% singlefamily homes and 25% attached units, and ii) 25% of developed land was committed as open space and dedicated to the City of San Diego. The Community Plan covered the area south and east of Miramar Reservoir, north of the then-current present community and south of Pomerado Road. Miramar North didn’t exist yet. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/85)

8/78

The second production of the Scripps Ranch Community Theatre, Pure as the Driven Snow, was performed outdoors on a concrete slab near where the older Vons on Scripps Ranch Boulevard stands today. Lighting was provided by Steve Tuttle via “the longest extension cord you ever saw” from his dental office. Dr. Arnold Gass was the prime volunteer who helped to get this production started. During its first six seasons, the SRCT did not have a steady venue for its performances. They performed at USIU, Wangenheim Middle School, the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club, and an outdoor basketball court. They couldn’t publicize plays too far in advance


 



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because they didn’t know where they would be performed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/78, 11/06, Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) 11/78

The City Planning Commission approved the revision to the Conditional Use Permit to allow the Immanuel Baptist Church to run a kindergarten through 12th grade school at its present site. Strict conditions were imposed, calling for no further building. Initially, the Church had sought to build a high school and proposed a 500% increase in buildings, quadrupling the number of parking spaces and the removal of many trees. The community heavily opposed the creation of the school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/78, 12/78)

11/13/78

Jerabek Elementary School opened, with 18 classrooms using solar energy. On the first day of class, school children paraded en masse down Scripps Ranch streets from their old school (Miramar Ranch Elementary) to the brand new elementary school. Chauncy Jerabek was present for the dedication of Chauncy I. Jerabek Elementary. There the children sat in the auditorium for the first time in a huge circle surrounding Chauncy Jerabek as he told them of the trees he planted throughout Scripps Ranch. In a film documenting the occasion, Jerabek thanked Jo Tarvyd because he felt the school wouldn’t have been named after him except for her efforts. (Source: Sentinel 10/26/01 E. Reiss) He also recalled that Mrs. Scripps was the most gracious and generous person he had ever met, as she always remembered the ranch employees and people in smaller areas around the ranch. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 68) The children started the school year at Miramar Ranch with teachers who moved with them to Jerabek Elementary when it opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/93, 12/77, 5/78, 12/78)

12/1/78

Chauncy Jerabek passed away. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/79)

1979

SRCA awarded the Volunteer Community Service Award to Robert E. Dingeman.

6/79

The City Council passed an ordinance requiring developers to pay $800 per new home being developed in Scripps Ranch for park fees, which rate adjusted upwards by 8% per year for inflation. At the time, developers of new subdivisions were only required to pay $200 per house in park fees for the purchase of parks in a new development. But this per home amount was established in the early 70’s and was no longer adequate to purchase necessary parkland. The Scripps Ranch Planning Committee tried several avenues to finance the purchase of parkland. After much give and take with the City Parks Department and a last minute challenge by the entire construction industry of San Diego, the ordinance was passed with the support of the SR developers. The developers, particularly McMillin, were instrumental in convincing the construction industry association that Scripps Ranch was unique and the passage of the ordinance would not create a dangerous precedent for the rest of the city. McMillin also agreed to hold the land around the reservoir until the community was able to purchase it. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/79)


 



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Fall 1979 “One Sunday evening, Bob Stillwell and Ray Calhoun were soaking their aching knees in Ray’s hot tub, while soaking their insides with a little more beer to top off the weekend. They were talking about their second love, softball, and how it could be made better with fewer hassles over umpiring (imagine that). They also wanted to have some voice with the local recreation department so Scripps Ranch could get a few decent fields. Bob also wanted to have a vehicle to raise money for local kids to become Olympic stars. Hence the concept of a men’s athletic club was formed. Ray called the first organizational meeting and invited 12 guys to a breakfast at Maxwell’s. Everyone looked around and right away noticed the total lack of beer and that was the first and last breakfast meeting the club ever had. The next few meetings were held at Mark Neumann’s house (he sprang for the beer) and the [SR Old Pros] was off and running” with a club charter of “To promote sports and have a good time.” (Source: www.srop.org/history.html) 11/79

Lago Dorado, the 1,067-acre piece of land on the north side of Miramar Reservoir, was sold again, for the second time in as many weeks, with the price more than doubled. Newport Beach-based Daon Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of the same-named Canadian developer, purchased the property for about $20.3 million. At the beginning of November, the seller, Markborough Properties, Ltd., another Canadian firm, bought the land from a San Diego partnership for about $8 million. This particular parcel was being used to from the core of a larger development called Miramar Ranch North and was expected to have about 2,715 homes on it. (Source: San Diego Daily Transcript, 11/19/79)

1979

By its fifth year, Scripps Ranch Little League had expanded to almost 300 players. Previously, the school district had informed the league that construction on Jerabek School would be starting and the league would have to abandon its two fields. Jack Ahrens and other community leaders received approval to construct a field at the foot of Scripps Lake Drive and after much hard work, the SRLL moved to the new “Ahrens” field in 1979 or 1980. The Pee Wee division played at Miramar Ranch Elementary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)


 



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Right: Looking east along Pomerado Blvd near the southeast corner of the pasture owned by the Meanleys (east of what is now I-15 and north of Pomerado), 1971. Picture was taken just east of the creek and the bridge, standing in the middle of the intersection of Pomerado and the gravel access road (in the left foreground) that led up to the model homes. Source: Jim/Barbara Wells.

Left: Pomerado Road facing east, circa early 1970s. Source: Rick Marrone.

Right: Adobe sign for Scripps Miramar Ranch, located further east on Pomerado Rd. past the gravel access road to the model homes, circa early 1970s. Deer were known to eat breakfast early in the morning on the hill behind the sign. Source: Jim/ Barbara Wells.

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Left: Pomerado Road facing east near the Camp Elliott turnoff, circa early 1970s. Source: Rick Marrone.

Right: Pomerado Road just east of U.S. 395, circa early 1970s. Source: Rick Marrone.

Left: Pomerado Rd. facing east, circa early 1970s. The asphalt road leading off to the left is east of Scripps Ranch Boulevard and led to the third housing series offered in Scripps Miramar Ranch, the “Timbers.” This new development offered a “selection of exterior elevations designed to blend with the theme of the existing elevations of the ’Woods’ and ’Park’ series.” Source: Rick Marrone and Penny Press, Volume 4.

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Left: Jerry Anders and his daughter, Valerie, exploring their future home on Kemah Lane, 1970. Source: Jerry Anders.

Right: The first Scripps Ranch baby, Nicole Klein, was born to parents Barbara and Hart Klein on March 26, 1970. The Kleins were the fourth family to move into Scripps Ranch. Scripps Ranch was considered so remote that diaper services would not deliver and disposable diapers had not yet been invented. Source: Elinor Reiss and Victoria Mazelli.

Left: The first Scripps Ranch baby with her parents 35 years later in 2005. Source: Elinor Reiss and Victoria Mazelli.

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Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Volume 4 of the Penny Press newsletter published by Leadership Homes, 1971. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Back side of Volume 4 of the Penny Press. Miramar Ranch Elementary School Site II opened at the corner of Red Cedar and Aviary in April 1971 with 3 bungalows to help accommodate the rapidly growing number of children in Scripps Ranch. At that time, two temporary elementary school facilities operated in Scripps Ranch. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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In the Spring of 1971, a number of homeowners were dissatisfied with the actions of the developer, Leadership. They believed that Leadership had not followed through on the promises that it had made with respect to a number of issues relating to the establishment of the neighborhood. These residents passed out flyers outlining their grievances to potential buyers in the parking lot of the model homes and distributed the above letter to all Scripps Miramar Ranch residents. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Front page of one of the first Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association newsletters. Source: Wes Danskin.

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By the end of 1970, people had lost interest in the Scripps Mansion and the tours were cancelled. However, the mansion and the grounds were still available for group meetings and community gatherings, such as the first annual Fourth of July parade and Scripps Ranch picnic held in 1971 on Saturday, July 3rd. According to the Scripps Ranch newsletter, “After the beer and soft drinks started to run out they all adjourned to the pool for some more contests.� Source: Scripps Family Archives located in loft of Scripps Miramar Ranch branch library.

Right: Valerie Anders participating in 1971 Fourth of July parade. Source: Jerry Anders.

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Right: During Summer 1971, the Miramar Ranch PTA in conjunction with the American Red Cross organized a backyard swim program offered at various residents’ pools for children of all ages. Source: Files of Miramar Ranch FFA.

Below: Through the efforts over a one-year period of a community-led Pool and Recreation Committee and the developer, the Scripps Ranch recreation center opened on March 26, 1972. This rec center ultimately became the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Source: April 1973 Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association newsletter, centerfold.

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In declaring May 8 through 14, 1972 Town Council Week, the City recognized the Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association for its efforts in improving its community. Source: July 1972 Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association Newsletter.

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Source: 1972 Scripps Ranch Homeowners Association newsletters.

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Since its inception, children’s groups, such as the Campfire Girls and the Boy Scouts, have been an integral part of the Scripps Ranch Fourth of July parade. Source: Jim/Barbara Wells.

In 1972, the Fourth of July picnic moved to Hoyt Park. Source: Jim/ Barbara Wells.

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Above: Cub Scout Pack 616 helps seed a Scripps Ranch meadow with California wildflower seeds donated by Leadership Housing, March 17, 1973. Source: Library archives, photo by Robert W. Young.

Below: The Scripps Ranch Civic Association changed the masthead on its newsletter in August 1973 and used a logo with a eucalyptus tree and street light for the first time. Source: August 1973 SRCA Newsletter.

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The Parks and Aesthetics Committee galvanized a strong community effort to “Save Hendrix Pond� and prevent the construction of new condominiums that would encircle the pond and threaten the existence of the pond through run-off contamination. The community created an assessment district to purchase the land and saved the pond. Source: November 1974 SRCA Newsletter.

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Above: Map shows Scripps Ranch streets in existence as of February 1974. Source: 1974 SRCA Newsletter.

Left: Grading for first permanent elementary school in Scripps Ranch, Miramar Ranch, 1975. Temporary school site in background. Source: Miramar Ranch Elementary School FFA Archives.

Right: Pouring concrete pads for Miramar Ranch Elementary School, 1975. Source: Miramar Ranch Elementary School FFA Archives.

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Right: Construction of main building at Miramar Ranch, 1975. Below: Children outside air-conditioned bungalows at temporary Miramar Ranch Site II, while construction of permanent school takes place. Source: Miramar Ranch Elementary School FFA Archives.

Below: Cover of program from dedication ceremony for Miramar Ranch, November 3, 1976. Source: Carla Latimer.

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Above: Rancho Mesa News clipping, May 6, 1976, regarding Heritage Fair At Miramar Ranch Elementary. Source: Carla Latimer. Left: Annual Easter Egg Hunt held at Hendrix Pond, April 1977. Source: Jim/ Barbara Wells.

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Scripps Ranch streets in existence as of 1977. Source: 1977 SRCA newsletter.

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Aerial photo of the eastern portion of Scripps Ranch as of September 8, 1978. Source: Mike McLees.

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Left: The Hazard Family made their old-fashioned steam calliope , which had been restored from its old circus day, available for the Fourth of July parade. Circa late 1970s. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Below: In 1978, 138 runners competed in the first annual 4th of July mini-marathon, which held quarter and half marathon races. The start was at the intersection of Corridor Street and Ironwood Road. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Interesting information on the derivation of certain Scripps Ranch street names. Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Left: Chauncy Jerabek was on hand to help open Jerabek elementary school on November 13, 1978. On the first day of class, school children paraded down Scripps Ranch streets from their old school (Miramar Ranch) to their new school. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Next Page: Chauncy Jerabek celebrated his 87th birthday (1/10/77) by visiting Miramar Ranch Elementary School. That day he was interviewed by Joan Gass. In May 1978, he wrote Mrs. Gass this letter, which was written on the back side of floral wrapping paper. Mr. Jerabek taped cutouts of flowers on the outside of the manila envelope. Source: Joan Gass.

Right: On the first day of school at Jerabek Elementary, the children sat in a huge circle surrounding Mr. Jerabek as he told them of the trees he planted throughout Scripps Ranch. Source: Doreen Kellogg.

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Left: First place winners of a childrens swim relay held at the Swim and Racquet Club, summer 1978. Left to right: Tana Figueras, Julie Ohrmund, Lynette Figueras. Below: In the late 1970’s/early 1980’s, few extracurricular activities were available for kids in Scripps Ranch, particularly for girls. However, in the second story room overlooking the pool at the Swim and Racquet Club, a lady named Dixie Stewart taught tap, jazz and ballet classes to the girls. This was the only dance studio in Scripps Ranch. This photo is the Dixie Stewart Dancers jazz class in costume for their dance “I’m Your Boogie Man.” Source: Julie Ohrmund Rose.

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SCRIPPS RANCH CHRONOLOGY 1980s 1980

Scripps Ranch Old Pros incorporated and membership grew quickly to 35. (Source: www.srop.org/history.html)

1980

The Scripps Ranch Community Theatre’s production of Mousetrap qualified the SRCT for membership in Associated Community Theatres (ACT) and SRCT was first represented at the Aubrey Awards. (Source: http://www.scrippsranchtheatre.org/SRT-History/SRT-History-Part1.html)

3/4/80

The City Council adopted the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan, which plan allowed for 4,100 homes to be constructed in Miramar Ranch North, including development on the hills above Lake Miramar. The Planning Area included two lightindustrial parks, two commercial areas, two elementary schools, and two neighborhood parks. The Plan also provided for the development of, and shared use of, secondary school facilities, a community park, a library and a fire station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/80, 10/89) A group of Scripps Ranch citizens under chairs David Prewitt and Karen McElliott, including Lynn Parke, Marc Sorensen, Claudia Unhold, Dennis Downs, Wes Danskin and others, helped prepare the Community Plan for Miramar Ranch North. The group incorporated many of the lessons learned from the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan, such as preserving 25% of the land as open space and a need for adequate parks, schools and other infrastructure. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/08)

6/80

The SRCA solicited community opinion regarding the design for the 9-acre neighborhood park next to Jerabek School in order to demonstrate community support to the various City committees, boards and the City Council. The plan would be to include playing fields, tennis courts and an amphitheater on this site, rather than on the community park site next to Miramar Reservoir in order to keep the lakeside park a naturalized “Kate Sessions” type of park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/80)

10/80

Corky McMillin Realty offered 5 different models at Glenwood Springs, at Alderbrook Drive at Scripps Lake Drive, priced from $90,400. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/80)

12/80

Families joining the SR Swim and Racquet Club paid i) an entitlement fee, that goes with the homeowner’s property, of $600, ii) an initiation fee of $300 and monthly dues of $25. Starting on January 1, 1984, these three amounts increased to $720, $360 and $30, respectively. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/80)

12/80

The City Fire Department established a temporary fire station in a trailer on Scripps Lake Drive, which was fully operational with two men and an 800-gallon pumper in service. The station was a double-wide mobile home with two bedrooms and two


 



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bathrooms. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/81, The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in Station 37) The SRCA helped orchestrate the location and establishment of the temporary two-man station at the Water Treatment Plant premises. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

12/80

The City Council adopted a re-districting plan in order to break the council districts into more nearly equal population segments. As a result, Scripps Ranch was moved from the First District to a new District 5. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/80)

1981

Scripps Ranch was loyally served by the bookmobile for 7 years, which came once a week. When Scripps Ranch registered the greatest use of any bookmobile in San Diego in 1981, a second day of service was added. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/87, 2/06)

1/81

Homes in the Park Series, one of the original two Scripps Ranch developments, which originally sold for $33,000 to $39,000, were now selling for $130,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/81)

2/81

The City Engineers designed a split four-lane road to replace the existing two-lane road for the first mile between the new I-15 interchange and Scripps Ranch Blvd. The SRCA and the Planning Committee conducted a survey of community residents regarding whether they were in favor of the proposed improvements or not. The results of the survey showed 122 residents against the plan and 83 for the plan proposed by the City, in part because the proposed modifications failed to address the more significant safety issues further down Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/81, 6/81, 2/82) By this time, Pomerado Road had become a major traffic-carrying road with 60-70% of the traffic coming from Poway. It needed improvement as it was a winding, dangerous road which had motorist and motorcyclist deaths occurring regularly. One tree claimed no less than three accidents and deaths. The Community Plan called for improvement. The City decided to improve the road into a four lane divided highway stretching from I-15 to Scripps Ranch Boulevard, but not beyond. Bob Dingeman and others argued with the City road engineers, including George Richardson, that the entire road needed to be made into a safe two-lane road. Bob Dingeman helped the City’s team of road engineers to design a safe road that included Scripps Ranch community funds as well as City funds. Many eucalyptus trees had to be cut, and the timber was sold for firewood. An agreement was reached to close the road to Poway traffic until completion of a connecting road. So the road was barricaded. This worked for two years. Poway took the City to court. The City lost and had to reopen the road before Poway had completed their share of the road modifications, i.e., the Pomerado Road extension). Poway and the developers eventually completed the work on the extension seven years later. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11, See entries 6/22/82, 1/18/83, 6/90 and 5/16/91)


 



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2/24/81

Boy Scout Troop 616 celebrated its 10th anniversary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/81)

3/14/81

Grand opening and dedication of the new Scripps Ranch Fire Station, Scripps Ranch Quick Attack, Station 37, was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/81) After realizing the community was being shortchanged, with only two personnel on the engine when every other engine in the city had a minimum of four professional firefighters, Bob Dingeman called for action. Shortly thereafter in 1982, Station 37 grew in size by adding two additional firefighters and one additional trailer with two bedrooms and one bathroom for crews’ quarters. Ultimately, the second trailer fell apart with wood rot. The squirrels took all the insulation for their nests, and the walls inside were wet when it rained. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/98, The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in Station 37)

5/81

The Scripps Ranch Old Pro’s announced the Fifth Annual Summer Softball League. This is the first time the “Old Pro’s” were mentioned in the newsletter by that name. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/81)

5/12/81

The SRCA adopted a new Redistricting Plan to accommodate the expansion of Scripps Ranch and to anticipate further construction. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/81)

5/31/81

Mrs. Nackey Scripps Meanley, age 82, last surviving daughter of E.W. Scripps, passed away. She and her husband, Thomas Meanley, were the oldest residents in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/81)

Spring 1981

The Scripps Ranch Soccer Club was formed, enabling SR children to play soccer under a Scripps Ranch banner for the first time starting in fall 1981. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/81)

7/81

The Hazard Family made their old-fashioned steam calliope, which had been restored from the old circus days, available for the Scripps Ranch 4th of July parade for the third year in a row. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/81)

7/81

Homes in Whispering Woods Estates off of Semillon went on sale for $236,000 to $282,000. The homes were single level and split-level homes with 3 and 4 bedrooms, and 2,493 to 3,476 square feet. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/81)

8/81

The Scripps Ranch Planning Group continued working with the City on alternative ways to improve Pomerado Road without making a four-lane freeway bisect the Ranch. The goal of the Planning Group and the SRCA was to make the entire road from the I-15 to Semillon safe by proposing the removal of the most dangerous blind curves and hills. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/81)


 



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9/81

Membership dues for the SRCA increased from $3 to $5 per family. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/81)

1981

Becky McDonald founded the Welcome Wagon Club, a service organization that introduced new families to the area. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/85)

1/82

Boy Scout Troop 1216 formed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/82)

5/82

The SRCA elected Bob Dingeman as President for the first time. He followed Lew Robertson in the position. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/82)

5/82

Scripps Ranch residents protested the total destruction of the mature trees on the land on which Von’s planned to build its new facility. Many residents were saddened by the loss of the last of the trees planted by E.W. Scripps, when the last two large trees were felled to make way for the future Vons parking lot. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/82, 12/82)

6/22/82

The City Council unanimously voted to provide for a two-lane road the entire length of Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/82)

7/4/82

First annual 10K/Fun Run on the streets of Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/82)

11/82

The old Baptist Church’s portable buildings were removed from the site across from the shopping center. The owner of the land allowed the community to hold its annual craft fair on the property but had plans to develop the land in the future. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/82)

11/82

The Scripps Miramar Community Planning Group, which was instrumental in preparing the Scripps Miramar Community Plan, was honored by the American Institute of Architects with an Orchid Award for Urban Planning and Community Service. The Planning Group helped preserve the natural beauty and park-like setting of the Ranch, while working together with members of the Community and developers to achieve this. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/82) The Scripps Miramar Community Plan became the standard for others in the city. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/08)

12/14/82 At the first annual SRCA Recognition Night, the SRCA honored the following individuals as Scripps Ranch Good Citizens of the Year: Mibs Somerville, Mary Kelley, Ray Bussett, Karen McElliott, and Charlie Beman. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/82) 12/17/82 The newly landscaped I-15/Mira Mesa Blvd. off-ramp was dedicated. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/83)


 



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1/18/83

The City presented the final plan for the improvements to Pomerado Road and the Planning Commission voted to improve Pomerado Road by widening the 2-lane road up to Semillon Blvd. to 40 feet (12 foot lanes, with 8 foot shoulders). No major realignment of the roadbed will occur and the destruction of trees will be minimized. The curve in the road near the entrance to Scripps Ranch will be straightened and raised to resolve annual flooding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/83)

2/83

McMillin Development, Inc. reported on their new recreation facilities club to be built directly north of the Jerabek Fields. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/83)

Spring 1983

Currie/Samuelson Development Group opened the $2 million Eucalyptus Square, a three-building complex designed to provide Scripps Ranch Business Park with longneeded banking, retail shops, restaurants and office space. (Source: The Carli Letter, news brochure for Robert L. Carli And Associates, Spring 1983)

10/14/83 Groundbreaking ceremony was held in connection with Phase I of the improvements to Pomerado Road. The improvements will include a standard 2-lane road with 8-foot shoulders, a bike lane and a pedestrian walkway on the north side. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/83) 12/9/83

The Community held the first Christmas tree lighting ceremony with a native tree purchased for that purpose and planted outside the Home Federal Savings building in the Vons shopping center. School kids, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and the Welcome Wagon Club contributed money for the tree. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/82, 1/84) Councilman Ed Struiksma emceed the event. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) This event was the start of a long-lived annual tradition. A few days later, the Grinch stole the Christmas tree lights and destroyed and scattered the tree ornaments on the ground. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/84)

12/13/83 SRCA named the following people as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year: Charles and Elinor Stenzel, Mary Ann Martini, Lew Robertson, Rick Davis, Joan Gass, Robert E. Dingeman. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/82) 1983-84

The number of young ladies participating in SRLL continued to grow in the late 70’s – early 80’s. In 1983-1984, Mary Ann Martini and others organized the Girls Softball Division of the league, which began with 9 teams in 1984. By 1984, SRLL had just under 500 participants and 37 teams. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

1984

Construction began on the last subdivided lot at phase II of the Scripps Ranch Business Park, at the northeast corner of Old Grove Road and Business Park Avenue. (Source: ScrippsScenes 1984/1985 published by Currie/Samuelson Development Group).

6/9/84

Grand Opening of the second site of the SR Swim and Racquet Club was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/84)


 



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8/84

Vincent Frank, Chairman of the SRCA Parks Committee, announced that the City Park and Recreation Department had finally agreed to place “tot lot” neighborhood parks at Forestview Drive and Semillon. These lots were vacant residential lots owned by McMillin Development Corp. and the City still needed to acquire the land. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/84)

8/84

The Women’s Athletic Club of Scripps Ranch was founded. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/95)

9/84

Evans Pond, located on the Meanley property on Scripps Lake Drive, was drained to install an aqueduct, and would be refilled when construction was completed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/84) Evans Pond was named for the original homesteader who came to Scripps Ranch and whose property E.W. Scripps purchased for his large ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/00)

9/84

The new Mini Mart on Scripps Trail opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/84)

9/7/84

Pomerado Road was closed to Poway in connection with Phase I of the second section of improvements to Pomerado Road, which improvements were made on the section of the road from Scripps Ranch Blvd. to Avenida Magnifica. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/84)

9/31/84

Brush fire broke out in Jerabek Park green space, south of Sierra Court. No fire trucks were available because they were fighting a major blaze elsewhere. SR residents grabbed hoses, rakes and shovels to battle the blaze and were able to contain it. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/84)

10/19/84 Ribbon cutting ceremony was held for the opening of the Pomerado Terrace Navy Housing, with guest speaker Congressman Bill Lowery. This housing was located on the site of the former US Navy Firefighters School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/84) While the Pomerado Terrace homes were being built, the foundation of the dam erected by E. W. Scripps along Carroll Creek was uncovered and had to be removed to clear the channel again. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/95) When the Navy took back the property on which the old Navy Firefighting School was located from USIU (see entry 11/72), the SRCA was very interested in having a quality development built by the Navy to house their families, “not a run-of-the-mill affair,” according to Bob Dingeman. “John Stevens and I volunteered to work with the Navy architects in the design of the development to include many quality features and things like play areas and covered garbage racks.” These and other desirable enhancements would work to retain a quality development. Bob Dingeman claims to have recommended the name ‘Pomerado Terrace’ “which was adopted as appropriate


 



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for our Navy housing at the entrance to the Ranch.” (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

10/84

Currie/Samuelson led a cooperative effort of businesses to alleviate a traffic and safety problem; the intersection of Carroll Canyon Rd and Business Park Ave. was a severe bottleneck during rush hour. Upon approaching the City about installation of a traffic light, Currie/Samuelson officials were told that city priorities prevented any action until 1988. As a result, Currie/Samuelson contacted the six largest employers at SR Business Park in an effort to raise the $88,000 necessary to install traffic lights through private resources. The City cooperated by expediting permitting and processing and construction was scheduled to be completed in late summer 1985. (Source: ScrippsScenes 1984/1985 published by Currie/Samuelson Development Group)

11/15/84 Ribbon cutting ceremony was held for traffic light finally installed on Carroll Canyon Road in the business park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/84) 12/11/84 SRCA named Carol Gardyne, Bob Dingeman, Horst Ludwig, and Betty Robertson Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/85) 1/85

The first edition of the Star News, Mira Mesa/Scripps Ranch edition was published. This local paper replaced the Mirror newspaper. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/85)

1/14/85

The San Diego City Council approved funding for the first neighborhood park, Jerabek Park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/85)

Spring 1985

Scripps Ranch Little League won its first District 32 All Star Championship. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

6/85

The first homes built in Scripps Ranch by Leadership Housing that went for $32,500 in October 1970 were now selling for $180,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/85)

7/85

Following the Normal Heights Fire, fifteen years before the Cedar Fire, the San Diego Fire Department’s post-fire Fire Inspector said that Scripps Ranch was the perfect scenario for the same type of disaster with it’s brush and eucalyptus trees. His exact words were: “Someday there’ll be a fire there a mile wide and no one will be able to stop it.” (Source: San Diego Union Tribune, 11/2/03). Ultimately, the Fire Inspector was wrong. The path of the Cedar Fire was three miles wide. (Source: Email from Jerry Mitchell, Director of the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council, to Jake Todd dated 8/28/10)

7/4/85

For the first time, the 4th of July parade contained a marching band, the Mira Mesa High School Marching Band, and the “Smizer Mule Team” wagon sponsored by


 



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Vons. The old favorite entries included the Bruce Hazard Steam Calliope, the U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard, the Scripps Ranch Clowns and the Society for the Prevention of the Extinction of the Middle Class. The Los Angeles Times reported that the Scripps Ranch annual 4th of July parade was “one of the Ten Favorite Parades for an All American Fourth of July.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/85, 8/85)

7/7/85

The Scripps Ranch Women’s Athletic Club and the Scripps Ranch Old Pros held the first Symphony in the Park free community concerts with Harvey and the 52nd Street Jive. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/85) Walt Albright first presented the idea of the concerts to the Old Pros, and then Bob Johnson of the Old Pros and Donna Evans of the Scripps Ranch Women’s Athletic Club, chaired the project for many years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/10)

7/11/85

Pomerado Road was re-opened to Poway traffic after the completion of the improvements to Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/85)

9/3/85

The parish of St. Gregory the Great was founded in August 1985. The first Mass was celebrated on September 3, 1985 at Miramar Ranch Elementary School. For the next couple years, the faith community held services at a variety of locations, including in the living room and backyard of the founding Pastor, Father Jim Poulson. (Source: and http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/86)

10/25/85 Formal dedication ceremony was held for the Scripps Ranch Community signs, located on Carroll Canyon near the IMED building and on the south side of Pomerado. The business owners in the SR Business Park, who had gotten together to help pay for a traffic light at Carroll Canyon, wanted to install a special SR sign on Carroll Canyon. The community designed one with “Country Living” carved out of redwood that followed the pattern of the original For Sale signs used by the first developer. The community had sufficient funds to make two signs and installed the other sign on Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/85 and email from Bob Dingeman to Gloria Tran dated 3/4/10) 10/26/85 Formal dedication of Jerabek Park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/85) 1985

The Meanley estate was sold to Currie/Samuelson Development Group for $11 million with the provision that Tom Meanley remain in his home until his death; he had stipulated that the Meanley House was never to be used for public use. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115) Currie/Samuelson began developing Phase III of the Scripps Ranch Business Park on the property. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/85)

12/85

SRCA named Robert E. Dingeman, Lauren Frederick, John Royer and Ron Weiss Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/10)


 



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12/85

Thomas M. Meanley, Scripps Ranch oldest continuing resident died at 97. He lived on his ranch in Scripps Ranch for 71 years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/85)

1986

The Meanley estate was declared a historical site in the Scripps Ranch Community Plan. The Friends of the Library, led by Karen Kissane, were permitted to remove items of historical significance and usable materials appropriate for furnishing the permanent community library scheduled to be completed by 1991 on the site of the Meanley House. (Source: Preece, Charles. E.W. and Ellen Browning Scripps: An Unmatched Pair, 115, Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

2/11/86

A disastrous fire destroyed a Crowne Point home located at 11450 Caminito Armida. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/86)

2/23/86

Reverend Donald Fannin dedicated the Scripps Mesa Baptist Church. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/86)

4/5/86

The flagpole at Jerabek Park was formally dedicated with Linda Duke, the branch manager of the Great American First Savings Bank, making the presentation and Deputy Mayor Ed Struiksma accepting the flagpole on behalf of Scripps Ranch residents. Three flags were raised by members of the Scripps Ranch Little League during the dedication, 1) a US flag that had been flown over the Capitol and secured by U.S. Congressman Bill Lowery, 2) a State flag secured by State Congressman Bill Craven and 3) a Little League All-Star Championship flag. During the dedication, Ed Struiksma reviewed the history of the flagpole, recalling that Ron Weiss had stated at a recent SRCA meeting honoring the Little League all-stars and coaches, that the community did not have a flagpole from which to fly the championship flag and that comment sparked the action to secure the flagpole. Great American First Savings donated the flagpole in honor of the bank’s 100th anniversary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/86)

4/17/86

SR Friends of the Library held its first meeting at the French Gourmet restaurant on Carroll Canyon. The lease for the storefront library was almost complete; the book mobile had extended its hours until the storefront library opened. The storefront library would be located at 10635 Scripps Ranch Blvd. (at the intersection with Scripps Lake Dr., below the dam) and have about 20,000 volumes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/86)

5/86

Jerabek Park was accepted from the contractor and became a Neighborhood Park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/86)

5/86

Bob Dingeman toured the old Meanley mansion with Ron Currie of Currie/Samuelson Development Group, the developer of the business park on the former Meanley property. Mr. Dingeman had assumed that the building had considerable historical significance as one of the oldest buildings in San Diego. Mr. Dingeman discovered that the building did not lend itself to conversion into a community-type building. For example, the water for toilets came from Adams Pond


 



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and the drinking water system came from rainwater collected into a large cistern under the floor of the house. The house was not of the same type as E.W. Scripps’ Miramar Ranch, no adobe walls or Mexican tile floors. Discussions were had about the area alongside the Meanley’s pool would be an ideal location for a community building and park, and Mr. Currie suggested a donation of part of the site for the construction of a permanent community library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/86) After Mr. Meanley’s death, Currie/Samuelson ultimately agreed to donate $750,000 toward the construction of the library, as well as 8.2 acres of the property itself. They also agreed to make site improvements and maintain the property for 5 years after deeding it over to the City. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/91, 9/06)

5/86

The mural depicting hawks, the mascot of Miramar Ranch Elementary School, was painted in the entry hall of the school by students of Serra Junior-Senior High under the direction of Joe Myiri, teacher-mentor. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/86)

5/24/86

Hundreds of hopeful prospective homeowners camped out in line for the chance to purchase a home in the newly-planned Sunset Ridge Development being developed by the Corky McMillin Company in Scripps Ranch. Corky McMillin responded by hiking the prices by $15,000 -$20,000 per home on the day the sales office opened. The news media captured images of the tents and people in line. Ed Salvador, the first person in line, waited for 35 days. Homes were offered starting from $175,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/86, 8/86)

5/29/86

Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Planning Group approved the “County Island” amendment proposal, which aimed to annex the “Meanley Property” to the City of San Diego within the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan to allow development of the property. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/86)

6/86

A Scripps Ranch resident was murdered in the early hours of the morning on a quiet cul-de-sac. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/86)

7/4/86

For the first time, the annual 4th of July festivities included a fun bike ride sponsored by the SR Old Pros in conjunction with their 10K Run. The ride was set at distances of 12 and 45 miles. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/86) In addition, “library spirit overtook the Ranch! The 4th of July saw children dressed as their favorite storybook characters marching in the parade under a library banner.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06)

8/86

Homes in the Wine Country development were listed for sale at around $179,900 and homes in the Timbers development were listed for sale at around $141,900. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/86)

9/86

The community started planning the “Community Park.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/86)


 



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9/16/86

The City Council met to discuss three interrelated planning actions which impacted directly on Scripps Ranch, i) the realignment of Route 125, ii) the annexation of the County Island and iii) amendments to the Scripps Ranch and Miramar Ranch North Community Plans. One of the issues related to these actions involved the funneling of additional traffic generated in Poway and Bieler Canyon onto Pomerado Road. Scripps Ranch community members pushed for the building of Alternative 8 in Scripps Ranch North, but this route was estimated to cost $29 million and no funding was available. Another concern involved the annexation of county land by the City which would likely require the City to improve the connector portion of Pomerado Road that led into Poway for safety and liability reasons as that portion of the road was not up to safety standards. The community wanted to make sure that it was involved in “controlling its destiny” as the area was developed. Ultimately, at the council meeting it was determined that Scripps Ranch community members could meet with developers to further discuss ways to come up with a practical solution. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/86)

9/86

Average class size for kindergarten at Jerabek was 38 students. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/86)

9/86

Nancy Corbin Assaf became chief librarian for the Scripps Ranch branch. She remained in that position until her retirement in 2006. (Source: SRCA 9/06)

10/86

The “Scripps Ranch Song” was composed by Holly Hogan and Scripps Partners. It was an adaptation of John Denver’s “Thank God I’m A Country Boy.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/86) Scripps Ranch Is The Place To Be Well, life in the Ranch is kinda laid back, Ain’t much San Diegans out here can’t hack; Landscaping in the front and a pool out back, Scripps Ranch is the place to be! Well, the county living here never did me no harm, Raisin’ me a family in San Diego’s arm; My days are filled with an easy country charm, Scripps Ranch is the place to be! Well, I got me a fine place, I got some nice neighbors, And we’ll soon have Baskin Robbins with 31 flavors. When I look to the west, there’s a sunset I can savor; Scripps Ranch is the place to be! Well, the eucalyptus trees give us lots of nice shade In the neighborhood where Lissy/Liza Scripps’ name was laid; Our respect to Chauncy Jerabek is paid, Scripps Ranch is the place to be!


 



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On July the 4th we celebrate here in Hoyt Park For the Freedoms of America close to our hearts. Let’s all kick back—enjoy ourselves ‘til way after dark; Scripps Ranch is the place to be! Well, I got me a fine place, I got some nice neighbors, And we’ll soon have Baskin Robbins with 31 flavors. When I look to the west, there’s a sunset I can savor; Scripps Ranch is the place to be! 10/11/86 Scripps Ranch storefront library opened and the services of the bookmobile were terminated. Susan Roberts, the hardworking president of the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library, was the first winner of the Perpetual Award Trophy for Service to the Library as a result of her remarkable job in getting the storefront library up and running in eight months. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/86) The 4,630 square foot library opened with great fanfare, with a wine and cheese preview on the previous day. A balloon release was the finale at the grand opening ceremony for the Scripps Ranch storefront Library. (Source: Star News 10/16/86) Soon the library hosted lectures, children’s programs and concerts on the rug. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06) 11/4/86

City Council adopted an amendment to the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan that approved changing the land use designation for a 101-acre parcel (previously referred to in the Plan as Neighborhood Area B) from residential to industrial park use. (Source:http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/ scrippsmiramarranch/pdf/scripps_web.pdf)

12/9/86

City of San Diego declared it Bob Dingeman Day. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/87)

12/11/86 The SRCA hosted the 5th annual Scripps Ranch Recognition Night at Jerabek School and named the following as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year: Jean McPhee, Susan Roberts and Elinor Stenzel. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/87) 1/14/87

The School District held a meeting at Jerabek School to discuss its proposed plans to relieve overcrowding at Wangenheim Middle School by creating a temporary 7th grade school to be comprised of 42 portables and be located in western Mira Mesa and making Wangenheim for 8th and 9th graders only. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/87)

1/87

UCSD’s Elliott Field Station, 183 acres maintained in its natural state located off of Pomerado Road, served many uses for the university. In one area, seismic measurements were taken, another area was reserved as a “magnetic observatory” for the calibration of scientific equipment and in a third area, livestock and other animals


 



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used for medical research as part of the UCSD School of Medicine were kept. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/87)

2/87

Police Chief Bill Kolender announced that the San Diego Police Department would move their police academy to the Scripps Ranch area, most likely in June 1987 (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/87) Ultimately, the Police Academy moved to the Miramar College campus instead. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

2/87

School Board for the San Diego City Schools approved a long-range facility plan that identified Jerabek School as a school that will go on a 4-track year-round program. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/87)

4/87

City leaders conducted ongoing discussions regarding plans to open up Lake Miramar and seven other reservoirs to water skiing, catamarans, sail boarding and swimming. Mayor O’Connor, Deputy City Mayor McGrory, Councilman Ed Struiksma (the primary mover behind the recreation plan for the past three years) and others were party to the discussions. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/87)

5/21/87

The City Council amended the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan in a number of ways: 1) the number of permitted residential units increased as well as the amount of industrial and commercial uses; 2) a phasing plan was established to assure the provision of the expanded public facilities concurrent with or prior to actual need; 3) usable park acreage was significantly expanded, partly to offset the lack of an adequate community park site within the twin communities of Scripps Miramar Ranch and Miramar Ranch North; and 4) the planning area was modified with a net area reduction of 115 acres as a result of the boundary adjustments. On the north, the planning area was enlarged to include lands located between the present boundaries of the Sabre Springs and Miramar Ranch North Community Plans. The planning area was reduced to exclude lands covered by the concurrent Scripps Miramar Ranch community plan amendment. The southern boundary of the planning area reflected a land trade that had occurred between the City of San Diego and DAON. The new boundary followed the alignment of a drainage interceptor swale that protects the Miramar Reservoir from surface runoff originating in the planning area. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/pdf/cp/cpmrnappendices.pdf)

5/87

Mr. Honig, Superintendent of Schools, announced that Jerabek School received the Distinguished Elementary School Award issued by the California Department of Education (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/87)

6/12/87

County of San Diego Board of Supervisors and the City of San Diego each declared it Bob E. Dingeman Day.

6/29/87

The Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan was amended to incorporate into the community boundaries a 365-acre area located to the northeast of the original plan boundaries. When the city of Poway was formed, this area was originally part of a 425-acre county “island,” which was initially intended to be amended into the


 



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Miramar Ranch North Community Plan area. However, circumstances associated with the timing of future development in the area resulted in the incorporation of the major portion of the county island (386 acres) into this Community Plan. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/scrippsmiramarranch/pdf/scri pps_web.pdf) The amendment to the Plan also designated a 7-acre site as a church site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/97)

7/87

The Promontory at Scripps Ranch captured a prestigious Gold Nugget Grand Award honoring the new development as the best medium density residential community in the west. The annual “Best in the West” design competition was held each year as part of the Pacific Coast Builders Conference. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87)

8/87

SRCA annual dues rose to $10 per year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87)

8/87

Construction commenced on single-family homes on Timberlake Drive. Residents had been surveyed regarding desirability of a church on that site, but it was determined that the site was too small for that purpose. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87)

8/16/87

The Meanley Family made a donation for the new Scripps Ranch library “in memory of William A. Meanley and his parents, Nackey S. Meanley and Thomas M. Meanley, Co Founders of Meanley and Son Hardware, Inc., La Jolla.” The cover letter addressed to Karen Kissane stated “Your attempts to put together a library for Scripps Ranch, to include the Scripps Meanley memorabilia, sounds like a worthwhile project. Since the Hardware Store is the outgrowth of a T.M. Meanley dream, we, the family of William A. Meanley, his son, would like to show our support at this time…. P.S. Relative to the events that preceded this land allocation for the library, your work as it has unfolded in such a natural way, is probably the way in which it was intended, in order to bring about the harmony and purpose for this project. Many thanks.” (Source: Letter dated August 16, 1987 from a member of the Meanley family, signature undecipherable)

8/29/87

Friends of the Library held the Southwest Serenade, a special fund raising gala, at the Meanley House, the future site of the permanent Scripps Ranch Library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/87)

9/87

Body of 42-year old Charles Radley, an unemployed disabled furniture salesman, was discovered in the trunk of a car on Negley Avenue. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/87)

9/22/87

A Show and Tell meeting for the Scripps Ranch community was organized by both planning groups, at which developers and builders presented preliminary sketches, plans and models of their proposed future projects in Scripps Ranch. Citizens saw what was planned for Scripps Ranch and were able to talk with developers directly. Bob Dingeman stated, “We have found, as a community, that we can and should


 



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actively participate in a constructive manner from the onset of projects. In this way, we can insert our views prior to the plans becoming so fixed that we have to comment, usually in opposition rather than constructively, to improve same.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/87)

10/87

Southwest Cable TV presented the Southwestern Salutes award to the SR Friends of the Library (SRFOL) and Karen Kissane, the chairperson of SRFOL’s first major fundraiser (which collected nearly $15,000 for construction of the permanent library) in recognition of their commitment to their community. At the ceremony, Councilman Ed Struiksma noted that the FOL was instrumental in getting an interim library situated in Scripps Ranch years ahead of schedule and that with 250 members, the SR FOL is “by far, the most active and successful Friends of the Library organization in this city, especially considering that they were established just one year ago.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/87)

11/87

The SR Swim and Racquet Club board increased dues by $5 and initiation fees from $420 to $540, effective January 1, 1988. The SRSRC membership approved construction of a junior Olympic pool at the Scripps Trails site, which is hoped to open in summer 1988. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/87)

12/87

A new program was initiated to remove the trees in the community that were identified as infested with the longhorn borer. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/87)

12/15/87 Joint meeting of SRCA and Scripps Ranch Planning Group recognized hardworking individuals. Karen Kissane, Bob Johnson, and Aileen Heimlich were named Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/88) 12/87

The parish of St. Gregory the Great leased office space in an office complex on Treena Street (the GEICO building) for their parish center, which they used for the next 12 years. During that time, the parish grew from 200 families to over 1,300. (Source: http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml)

1987

The Blue Angels fly Boeing F/A-18 Hornets for the first time at the MCAS Miramar Air Show. (Source: Media Officer for the Blue Angels)

1987

SRCA named Robert E. Dingeman President Emeritus. (Source: Dingeman)

1/88

An anonymous Mira Mesa resident donated and planted drought resistant trees around Lake Miramar for the enjoyment of all. Eucalyptus trees around the lake and in other areas in Scripps Ranch had become infested with the Australian Borer. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/88)

2/88

Circulation of SRCA Newsletter has increased to 4,800 residences. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/88)


 



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Col. R.E.


2/88

US Navy expanded its testing of engines at NAS Miramar and installed new test stands, space age “Hush Houses” to dampen out the sound of the essential run-up procedures. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/87 and 2/88)

2/88

The Meanley home was razed to make room for the new library and property development. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/88)

3/88

Grand opening and dedication of 2 beautiful tot lots on Semillon and Forestview. Tot lots had been put into SR Master Community Plan in 1978 and finally came on line a decade later. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/88 and 1/89)

4/88

A new 4-way stop sign was installed at the intersection of Scripps Ranch Blvd. and Scripps Lake Drive, after a number of head-on car crashes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/88)

5/12/88

A Himalayan Cedar tree (Cedrus Deodora) was planted in Jerabek Park for use in the annual Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/88)

6/21/88

Jerabek School nationally recognized for its selection as the Best Elementary School in the San Diego Unified School District. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/88)

7/88

Children’s World, a childcare center, opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/88)

12/13/88 Chuck Adkison selected as Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/89) 1/89

The population of Scripps Ranch was 16,090. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

1/17/89

Jerabek School holds its first annual Jog-a-thon. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/89)

2/17/89

Jerabek School holds its first annual Invention Convention. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/89)

4/89

Scripps Ranch annual Maintenance Assessment District fee continued to be $32 per home. Community has increased from 900 homes to 5,368 homes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/89)

5/21/89

Grand opening of SR Swim and Racquet Club facility at Scripps Trails. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/89)

7/89

First year that the SRCA co-sponsored the Mira Mesa 4th of July Fireworks show. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/89)


 



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7/89

The SRCA Newsletter editor expressed concern regarding the operation of the SRCA newsletter at a financial loss in the future and the need to consider options to make newsletter an independently economically viable operation. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/89)

7/89

The Lake Miramar parking lot now open 7 days a week. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/89)

9/2/89

San Diego’s first Pet Parade held in Scripps Ranch, starting on Aviary Drive and ending in Hoyt Park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/89)

9/14/89

Scripps Miramar Ranch Maintenance Assessment District assumed control of more open space on Mira Lago (near Ashlar Place and Ancona) from McMillin. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/89)

9/89

Survey conducted regarding whether Jerabek should stay on multi-track year. Results showed more people in opposition of multi-track year round school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/89)

9/89

Gas fumes emitted from Scripps Trail storm drains. A leak was discovered in an unleaded tank at gas station in 1986 and the tank was removed at that time. Homeowners worked with air pollution agencies, property owners and City to solve the problem and fix it. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/89, 12/89)

10/10/89 Confusion and controversy erupt at the SRCA-sponsored City Council Candidates Forum occurred. One candidate, Linda Bernhardt, had failed to confirm availability after multiple attempts to contact her. As other candidates had confirmed availability for the event, the Candidates Forum was scheduled and publicized. Two days prior to event, Ms. Bernhardt’s campaign officer contacts the organizers to state she had other commitments. Ms. Bernhardt showed up late to the event, announces to the audience that the forum is a “charade” and refused to participate. The Forum proceeded with the other candidates present speaking and many in the audience of 200 were upset by the activities at the Forum. Ms. Bernhardt was elected to the City Council the next month. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/89) 10/89

Kevin Osgood, a 15-year-old Scripps Ranch resident, joined the Disney Channel’s Mickey Mouse Club. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/89)

10/89

Kathy Allman (who was the Advertising Manager for the SRCA Newsletter during the difficult transition into a self-sustaining operation) and Connie Reins (the Secretary of Jerabek School since its inception) were awarded the 1989 Scripps Ranch Women of Achievement Award. Prior winners included: Elberta “Bert” Fleming, Jane Merrill, Paula Oquita, Lauren Frederick, Becky McDonald, Jean La Duca, Christie Clark, Karen Assall, Barbara Nyegaard, Fini Wright and Jackie Corey. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/89)


 



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11/89

Scripps Ranch had 5,523 homes per the tax assessment rolls. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/89)

11/89

SR Friends of the Library kicked-off a fundraising drive to raise $250,000 for the construction of the new permanent library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/89)

12/14/89 SRCA named Robert E. Dingeman Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/90) 19891990


 


A huge controversy existed in the community regarding the proposed development north of the lake, ultimately to be known as Scripps Ranch Villages. In 1986, BCE Development, a landowner, proposed a plan amendment to the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan to increase housing density to 5,400 homes. At the same time, the County Island development amendment to the Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan was proposed to increase housing density by 1,500 homes. Residents of Scripps Ranch also became aware of Poway’s proposed industrial park. Residents opposed both amendments to the Community Plans. A task force was convened to review the development of the hillsides and explore the potential changes to the community. Multiple strong points of view regarding the development plans existed. Nine different organizations worked with the Miramar Ranch North Community Task Force to negotiate and broker a compromise plan for the community to minimize the protests regarding homes overlooking the reservoir. By working together, gains were made for the community, although compromises had to be made as well. Not all involved were happy with the outcome. The SRCA ultimately was in favor of the compromise plan, which called for 1) Scripps Ranch Blvd. being moved back from the view shed, 2) a decrease in the density of housing, 3) a substitution of single family homes for condos, 4) a reduction in the proposed industrial area, 5) a reduction in the quantity of housing to be built on the lakeside of Scripps Ranch Blvd., 6) the elimination of a diverter ditch, 7) an increase of approximately 19 acres of open space, and 8) increased funding by the developers to be used to fund more facilities. The Save the Lake Committee was against the compromise position and felt it had no voice. The Save our Children Committee felt that the Save the Lake Committee was holding up the development of schools to the detriment of the community. Emotions ran high, with many accusations of vicious verbal attacks between the various organizations and vandalism directed at the head of the Save the Lake Committee. Ultimately after many months of rancor and debate, the compromise position was adopted, which sped up the building of various roads by eight years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/89, 10/89, 11/89, 8/90)


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The City Fire Department established a “temporary� fire station in a doublewide mobile home on Scripps Lake Drive in December 1980. Scripps Ranch Quick Attack, Station 37 was dedicated on March 14, 1981. The temporary station was used until 2001 when the current fire station on Spring Canyon Road opened. Source: San Diego Fire Department, Station 37.

In 1982, Station 37 grew in size with the addition of two additional firefighters and one additional trailer. Eventually, the second trailer fell apart with wood rot. The squirrels took all the insulation for their nests, and the walls inside were wet when it rained. Source: San Diego Fire Department, Station 37.

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Right: The Dixie Stewart tap dance troupe doing their famous chorus line number in their one and only costume, June 1980. The Dixie Stewart Dancers would also walk in the annual Fourth of July parade in their costumes. Source: Julie Ohrmund Rose.

Below: The concept of a men’s athletic club with a goal of promoting sports while having a good time was developed during Fall 1979. In 1980, the Old Pros were incorporated and their membership rapidly grew to 35 members. The group was instrumental in supporting many worthwhile community events, including Symphony at the Park and the annual Forth of July festivities. The men below made up the 1984 Old Pros Fourth of July 10K run crew. Source: Bob Johnson.

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Aerial photo of the eastern portion of Scripps Ranch and part of Poway, January 26, 1983. Note that a portion of Miramar Lake can be seen on left border of the photo. Source: Mike McLees.

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The first annual tree lighting took place in December 1983 in front of the Home Savings Bank in the old Vons shopping center. In 1988, the celebration moved to Jerabek Park after the community planted a Himalayan Cedar tree for the annual ceremony. Upper left: Councilman Tom Behr with the Sorensen family, 1992. Upper right: Bob Dingeman, 1985. Left: Santa and Mrs. Claus visiting with some Girl Scouts, 2010. Below: Steve Steinberg, Marshall Middle School Band Director and Scripps Ranch resident, leading the middle school band, 2005. Source: Bob Dingeman and Cynthia Collins.

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Right: Toys for Tots and visits with Santa are an integral part of the holiday tree lighting celebration, 2002. Below: In 1996, Girl Scout Troop 8129 (Moe Martin, Ricana Pearson, Robin Petering, Christina Rea, Christina Sloyer, Allison Bradrick and Joanna Murray) pitched in and helped serve warm drinks. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: Carolers at the 2002 Tree Lighting Celebration. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Above: The parish of St. Gregory the Great celebrated its first Mass on September 3, 1985 at Miramar Ranch Elementary School. Source: Bob Forrest. Below: Mira Mesa Star News clipping, April 30, 1987. A favorite fishing spot near the reeds in Hendricks Pond. Boys left to right: Omar Hassanein, Matt Miner, Bernie Garland and Andy Pernicano. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar North branch archives.

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Left: Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library walked in the Fourth of July parade as their favorite storybook characters, 1986. Source: Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Right: “Mazie the Loch Miramar Monster,” the Fourth of July parade float entry built by the Slavicek family for the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library, 1989. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Left: After the 1986 Fourth of July parade,the SRFOL held its first post-parade book sale in Hoyt Park as a fundraiser for the upcoming storefront library. The back of the photo read “never again!” Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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On July 7, 1985, the Scripps Ranch Women’s Athletic Club and the Scripps Ranch Old Pros held the first free Symphony in the Park community concert with Harvey and the 52nd Street Jive. Left: Panoramic shot from one of the concerts during the first season of Symphony in the Park. Source: Donna Demko.

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First issue of the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library newsletter. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Scripps Ranch started receiving weekly public library service via bookmobile in 1972. After registering the greatest use of any city bookmobile in 1981, a second weekly stop was added. After almost 15 years of having a San Diego City Public Library bookmobile make periodic stops in the community, Scripps Ranch finally opened its own storefront library branch in October 1986. Right: Bookmobiles used by the City Library in the 1960s. Source: San Diego City Public Library website.

Left: Entrance to storefront library located on Scripps Ranch Blvd at the intersection of Scripps Lake Drive, 1986. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Right: Councilman Ed Struiksma speaking at the library grand opening ceremony, 1986. Nancy Assaf, who had just started as the librarian for the Scripps Ranch library is in the red sweater. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Right: Susan Roberts, first Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library President, holding up a celebratory T-shirt for the library opening, 1986. Below: Brownie Troop conducting flag ceremony at library opening, 1986. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Lower left: A balloon release was the grand finale at the library opening, 1986. Lower right: Children’s program at storefront library, 1989. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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In 1928, Tom and Nackey Meanley Scripps designed and built a large mission revival style home, which they named Miramesa. In 1985, the Meanley property was sold to Currie/Samuelson Development Group for $11 million dollars, with the provision that Tom Meanley would remain in his home until his death. It was also stipulated that the Meanley House would not be used for public use. In 1985, Tom Meanley passed away. In 1986, the Meanley estate was named a historical site in the Scripps Ranch Community Plan. In February 1988, Mira Mesa, the Meanley home, was razed to make room for the library. Above: Artist’s rendering of Miramesa. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Left: Inner courtyard of Miramesa, circa 1985. Below: Road to Meanley house and Evans Pond, circa 1985. Note the edge of the stone wall that remains on the property today in the bottom right hand corner of the picture. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Left: Access road to four car garage and servants’ quarters, circa 1985. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Left: Evans Pond and the pump house that has been removed, circa 1985. Evans Pond was named for the original homesteader who came to the area and ultimately sold the property to E.W. Scripps. The Meanleys used it as a source of water for the surrounding plantings and their horse stable. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

In August 1987, the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library held a fundraiser called Southwest Serenade at the Meanley House prior to its being torn down to make room for the library. Tours of the home were also offered the weekend of the Southwest Serenade. Above is the cover of the invitation for the fundraiser. Right is the cover of the pamphlet that was provided to those who took the home tour. The pamphlet included a floor plan and history of the Meanley House. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Old Pros Fourth of July 10K Fun Run, circa late 1980s. Source: Bob Johnson.

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In April 1978, the first delegation of 5th and 6th graders at Miramar Ranch Elementary went to the Rice School on the San Carlos Reservation in Arizona. The following month, Apache children stayed in Scripps Ranch homes and visited San Diego. This program was the brainchild of Joan Gass, a Scripps Ranch resident, ran for 16 years and earned the prestigious George Washington medal in 1991. Source: Joan Gass.

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Left and below: Source: Joan Gass.

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In June 1978, the Scripps Ranch Community Theatre presented its first production, Our Town, at the little theater at United States International University. Open auditions had been held in the multipurpose room at Miramar Ranch Elementary. Their second production in August 1978 was performed outdoors on a concrete slab near where the old Vons stands today. Lighting was provided by Dr. Steve Tuttle via “the longest extension cord you ever saw” from his dental office. During its first six seasons, the SRCT did not have a steady venue and couldn’t publicize its plays far in advance because they did not know where they would be performed. During its 10th season in 1987, the SRCT performed a reprise of its first production, Our Town. Source: SRCT 1985-1989 binder located in the Scripps Miramar Ranch branch of the City Public Library.

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SCRIPPS RANCH CHRONOLOGY 1990s 1990

Scripps Ranch Girls Softball branched off from Scripps Ranch Little League to become a separate organization. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

1/27/90

Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library sponsored the first annual HodgePodge Arts and Crafts for the Kids where young children create “keep-able” art projects. Victoria Mazelli chaired the program. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/90)

2/13/90

The SRCA voted to amend its bylaws to form a Civic Association Board composed of 11 District Directors (one for each district in Scripps Ranch) plus the Executive Committee in order to better represent the interests of the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/90)

3/90

Paid “open letter” ads placed by Corky McMillin and the resulting reaction from Scripps Ranch residents forced the SRCA Newsletter to examine its ad policy. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/90)

4/90

SRCA newsletter reported that the SANDAG Board of Directors issued a “narrowminded” study in favor of moving commercial traffic to NAS Miramar. The SRCA sought to oppose the commercial use of NAS Miramar, improve Lindbergh and restrict future studies. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/90)

6/90

The City Attorney’s Office concluded that Pomerado Road must be reopened once the realignment work was completed. Originally, residents of Scripps Ranch had been promised pursuant to a City Council resolution and the provisions of the Scripps Ranch Community Plan that Pomerado Road would remain closed until Alternate 8-A could be built between Poway and the Mercy Interchange at I-15. The developers of the County Island projects repeatedly told the community that they would not rush completion of Pomerado Road ahead of construction of 8-A. At the same time these representations were being made, the County Island developers, the City of Poway and the City Manager of San Diego entered into an agreement which stated that the developers could not hook up to Poway’s sewer system until Pomerado Road was totally complete. This had the effect of forcing the developers of the County Island Project to rush completion of Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/90, 7/90, 8/90)

7/9/90

City Council passed a redistricting plan that would severely impact the Ranch and divide Scripps Ranch into two districts. The area north of Pomerado would be in District 6 and the area south of Pomerado would be in District 7. Linda Bernhardt, the councilmember representing the Scripps Ranch community, voted in favor of the plan. If finalized, the Council Redistricting Map would take effect on October 1st. The


 



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SRCA urged residents to get involved and urge city council members to keep Scripps Ranch in one district. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/90)

8/13/90

The City Council adopted a Redistricting Map that kept Scripps Ranch all in one district, but moved it to Council District 6. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/90)

Fall 1990 Petition circulated to recall District 5 City Councilmember Linda Bernhardt. Some residents felt she was not representing the Scripps Ranch community’s best interests in connection with the proposed redistricting of the City Council districts and the resolution of the issues involving the land use plan of the Miramar Ranch North Development Project. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/90) 9/90

After months of discussions and negotiations with McMillin/BCED and many other entities, the SRCA, the Miramar Ranch North Community Planning Committee and the Scripps Ranch Planning Group each approved “Plan C,” as the basis for the community planning process leading to a Community Plan Amendment. Plan C called for a proposed modification to the MRN Community Plan which added additional open space, reduced the number of units visible from Lake Miramar, redesignated certain acreage from industrial to residential and open space, constructed Scripps Ranch Blvd. behind the viewshed ridge line and retained certain facilities and their financing. These same groups notified the City Council that they did not endorse any parts of the “settlement agreement” currently before the City Council that would resolve other issues involving the development of Miramar Ranch North, as they have not been made privy to the terms of the entire agreement. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/90)

10/1/90

Scripps Ranch officially became part of District 6, which was represented by Councilman Bruce Henderson. On November 15, the federal court issued its order approving the City Council redistricting process. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/90)

10/16/90 The City Council voted in closed session to open Pomerado Road in early November unbeknownst to the community. Notice of the vote came first via the city of Poway, who threatened the city of San Diego with a lawsuit if the road remained closed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/90) 10/90


 


Curbside recycling by the City made its debut in Scripps Ranch. Residents were concerned that it would replace “cub-side” recycling. A representative from the City Waste Management Team stated curbside recycling was “not competing” with existing programs and residents should not feel “pressure to recycle with the city.” At the SRCA’s October meeting, the community was urged to protect our scouts and utilize the Cub Scouts’ monthly recycling service as the recycling money was used in the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/90) Curbside recycling impacted income from Cans for Cubs by more than 50% by December 1990. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/91) After an article in the Scripps Ranch Newsletter


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about the lack of support for Cans for Cubs, cub recycling increased by over 200%. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/91)

11/5/90

City Council voted to keep Pomerado Road closed pending completion of an amendment to the community plan and studies designed to determining the best means of protecting Scripps Ranch from the danger and the City of San Diego from the liability opening the road to Poway will create. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/90)

11/11/90 The Los Angeles Times reported that Challenger Junior High, Wangenheim Junior High and Mira Mesa High School were the lowest-ranking schools to receive funding on a per student basis. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/90) 12/10/90 The City approved the initiation of condemnation proceedings in County Island, which will advance the construction of Alternative 8-A. 12/11/90 Brian and Kathy Allman, Neil Berkowitz and Ruth Nelson were selected as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/91, 4/10) 12/90

Scripps Performing Art Centre put on the first annual production of The Nutcracker Suite, which was the only all-children production of this classic Tchaikovsky ballet in all of San Diego. It has served as a fundraiser for the Scripps Ranch Library for 13 years, raising more than $17,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/90 and 9/03)

1/8/91

The City Council held a meeting in the hall of St. Gregory the Great in Scripps Ranch and a standing room only crowd of over 700 people attended the meeting. At the meeting, the City Council voted to appeal Judge Miller’s ruling to prematurely reopen Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/91)

1/91

Councilmember Henderson stated in the Scripps Ranch Newsletter that he was now Scripps Ranch’s “care-taker” Councilman and ready to help. He called himself a “care-taker” because he was taking care to see that Scripps Ranch’s interests were protected and he believed that a citizen’s lawsuit would succeed later in the year in overturning the “Gang of 5” gerrymander of Scripps Ranch and restore the traditional boundaries. He pledged to fight the “Gang of 5’s” attempt to bar Scripps Ranch residents from voting in the recall election. [The reference to the Gang of 5 refers to certain City Council members who were considered to be a group that engaged in block voting on issues.] (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/91)

1/91

A special advisory committee was formed to work with the Planning Department to resolve problems in Phase III of McMillin’s Miramar Ranch North Development Project. Originally, after discussion and agreement amongst the stakeholders, the composition of the committee was set up to include certain representation of the stakeholders. Councilmember Linda Bernhardt attended the first organizational meeting and unilaterally restructured the composition of the committee. After much further discussion, the committee composition was restructured to include two


 



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members each from the Scripps Ranch Planning Group, the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group, the Save Miramar Lake Committee and the SRCA, with the Director of the Planning Committee as the chair of the committee. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/91)

3/1/91

Dues at the SR Swim and Racquet Club increased from $45 to $52 per month. Initiation fees were $750. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/91, 4/91)

3/7/91

Cypress Canyon Neighborhood Park was accepted from the developer by the City Park and Recreation Department. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/91)

4/91

Grading operations proceeded along the right of way through Miramar Road North for Alternative 8-A. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/91)

4/9/91

The voters of San Diego voted to recall Councilmember Linda Bernhardt and elected Tom Behr as City Councilmember for the 5th District. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/91) Linda Bernhardt was the first San Diego City Council member ever recalled. It was by an 83% vote of her constituents for not adhering to the truth and not representing the community’s interests. One of her prime campaign statements was that she was not accepting contributions from any developers and castigating her opponent for being a tool of the developers. Bob Dingeman and others found, in a check of the register of voters, that she had instead received more than a hundred thousand dollars from the wives, sons, daughters, and relatives of developers. She also voted to divide Scripps Ranch by Pomerado Road redistricting, indicating she did not know or care about the community, or its organization or structure, and that south of Pomerado Road was an integral part of Scripps Ranch. Her personal conduct and lack of respect of Scripps Ranch in the first Forum for candidates (held in October 1989) was a clue of her future actions and disdain. Community volunteers raised a modest sum of $17,000 from all of the Council district for the campaign. Linda Bernhardt spent more than $170,000 campaigning against the recall, but lost. The community working together recalled this elected representative and elected a new one. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11.)

4/15/91

City Council approved the plans for the 20,000 square foot library to be built in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/91)

4/16/91

City Council amended the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan to reduce the visibility of Miramar Ranch North Development as seen from the Miramar Reservoir. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/pdf/cp/cpmrntoc.pdf) The new design removed Scripps Ranch Boulevard from the viewshed and greatly reduced the number of homes there. However, some members of the community felt great regret and disappointment that the Settlement Agreement signed by the City Council to end the lawsuit brought by McMillin prevented the community from


 



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preserving all of the hills around Lake Miramar. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/91)

5/91

With the final passage of the Miramar Ranch North community development agreement, McMillin-BCED/Miramar Ranch North Partnership gave an additional $2,000,000, which along with the contributions of other Miramar Ranch North developers, helped to finance construction of the library’s community center. Funding provided by the City was not sufficient to cover the cost of the community center that was attached to the library. In recognition of the Miramar Ranch North contribution to the project, the library will be known as the Scripps Miramar Ranch Library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/91)

5/91

In the Spirit of Scripps Ranch photo contest, Robert Shull’s photo “Boats at Lake Miramar” won the color category and Bob Lampert’s photo of Pomerado Road won the black and white division. Robert Shull is a graphics designer and Bob Lampert, a then nearly 20-year resident of Scripps Ranch was a newsphotopgrapher for KGTV, Channel 10. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/91)

5/3/91

The City Council voted to once again redraw the City Council lines and returned Scripps Ranch and Mira Mesa to City Council District 5. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/91)

5/16/91

Pomerado Road reopened to Poway. After the City of San Diego City Attorney’s Office sought to appeal the ruling by the District Court judge to reopen Pomerado Road and lost on appeal, the City Council in closed session on May 13, 1991 voted to reopen Pomerado Road. As a result, the SRCA and other community members sought to have the City adopt certain mitigation measures to maximize safety along Pomerado and the other roads in Scripps Ranch, which were anticipated to be more heavily traveled as commuters fled the gridlock on Pomerado. (Source Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/91)

5/19/91

First Annual Ride Around the Lake to benefit the new SR Library was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/91)

6/91

Parent-pay busing to Mira Mesa schools (Wangenheim Junior High School and Mira Mesa High School) was discontinued because the State of California Department of Education informed the School District that it prohibited the charging of fees for home to school transportation and violated the state provision of providing a free public education. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/91)

Summer 1991


 


The founding members of the Scripps Ranch Music Club answered a call for “serious music lovers who would enjoy performing for others in the nonjudgmental setting of a Scripps Ranch home” and met in the home of Bob and Marianne Paul. The initial members included Russ Schaefer, Miriam Cole, Dorothea Kramer, Elaine Neuss and


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Bob and Marianne Paul. The club has performed at the Scripps Ranch library, nursing homes and other venues around the county. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/10)

7/17/91

Groundbreaking for Scripps Ranch High School took place with over 100 community members and school district personnel in attendance. Surprising the crowd, the Superintendent of Schools announced that BCED/McMillin had made a $2 million contribution to the facility. The building of the high school came after 17 years of hard work and perseverance by community members. The high school had been a lifelong dream of Karen McElliott, the Miramar Ranch North Community Planning Committee Chairman, whose children were now too old to attend the high school. Theresa Colby, Bob Dingeman, Sarah Fraleigh, Joan Gass, Aileen Heimlich, Joan Le Duca, Lynn Parke, Linda Rogoff and Karen McElliott donated countless hours to bring a high school to Scripps Ranch. (Source Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/91)

7/18/91

Community Facilities District No. 1 (Miramar Ranch North) of the City of San Diego issued Special Tax Bonds, 1991 Series A (Mello-Roos Bonds) in the principal amount of $35,340,000. The funds were used to help develop various public improvements and facilities in the Miramar Ranch North/Scripps Ranch Villages area. (Source: Official Statement prepared by the City of San Diego for the Series B Mello-Roos bonds sold in December 1995)

7/91

The concept of a town center for Miramar Ranch North was explored as part of a provision of the Miramar Ranch North Settlement Agreement of September 1990. The proposed town center or pedestrian mall would be located on Alternative 8-A in the middle of Phase I of Miramar Ranch North. McMillin hired Jerde Associates, the architects who designed Horton Plaza, to develop a concept for consideration by the City. The proposed town center would include retail, business and residential structures, where pedestrian traffic would dominate. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/91)

9/91

Scripps Ranch Maintenance Assessment District appointed a 10-member citizens committee headed by Bob Dingeman to cope with problems arising from Hendrix Pond and to help plan for the pond’s healthy future. Over the year, Hendrix Pond had been beset by many problems, including a significant water level drop, a horrible odor of dead fish, too many ducks and an overgrowth of reeds. The committee evaluated suggestions like putting in water-purifying plants, using appropriate herbicides to control reed growth, reallocate water and seek new water supplies and relocate some of the ducks. (Source: Sentinel 10/3/91 E. Reiss)

9/15/91

Groundbreaking ceremony held for the Scripps Miramar Ranch Library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/91)

11/91

Miramar Ranch Elementary’s Apache Exchange Program earned the prestigious George Washington Medal, which is awarded annually to “Americans who, through word or deed, help maintain the principles of our nation” and fulfill the Freedom


 



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Foundation’s Bill of Responsibilities: “To respect the rights and beliefs of others.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/10 and Sentinel 11/14/91 E. Reiss)

12/15/91 The SRCA Newsletter Editor, Cheryl DeVincentis, was named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/92) 12/91

The Parks and Trails of Scripps Ranch, a three-color brochure describing the ten parks and 25 hiking trains in Scripps Ranch was completed and ready for distribution. Scripps Ranch resident, Andy Bowes, completed the brochure as part of an Eagle Scout project. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/92)

1992

A high school sophomore, Cory Van Noys, won $10,800 on Jeopardy. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

1/31/92

McMillin Communities, Inc. shelved the plans for the proposed pedestrian-oriented town center for Miramar Ranch North by exercising its option to withdraw from the project. McMillin spent over $1 million investigating the concept, but determined that they wished to avoid delays in completing construction of Alternative 8-A and in providing the facilities and infrastructure, such as parks and schools, now included in the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/92)

2/92

USIU emerged from Chapter 11 reorganization and marketed the 57 acres on the east end of its Scripps Ranch campus for sale to help pay off its debts. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/92)

3/92

In light of a recent increase in graffiti on the ranch, volunteers were solicited to help form a team of graffiti removers. Scripps Ranch’s Graffiti Buster’s Team had 5 members: Lou Caspary, John Ingersoll, Bob Camacho, Kevin Haupt and Bob Dingeman. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/92)

5/92

Construction began on the San Diego County Water Authority Scripps Ranch Pipeline, which involved the underground installation of nine miles of eight-foot diameter pipeline within streets and open space areas. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/92)

6/92

Scripps Ranch had over 5,000 residents. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/92)

6/12/92

San Diego City declared that day to be Honorary Bob Dingeman Day. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/92)

1992

Richard Spaulding was commissioned to design and create 11 stained glass works for the new Scripps Ranch library. This body of work was made up of three traditional decorative glass works, Terra Triptych, seven contemporary abstract landscape works, Geomancy Series, and a window for the Children’s library titled Mixtec Menagerie. The decorative works were images derived from the local environment. The omnipresent eucalyptus trees were the first reference with leaves weaving a


 



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lattice border to the medallion of a eucalyptus tree form in positive/negative design. The Water window pictures a dam and reservoir with red ridges and hills - rather like how the terrain was before massive development. The final window of the series is the Rock window. This imagery is drawn from the desert environment near San Diego and is meticulously depicted in various glass working techniques. (Source: www.spauldingstudio.com)

11/92

The City Councils of San Diego and Poway adopted “Scripps Poway Parkway” as the official name of the road formerly known as Alternative 8A. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/92)

12/8/92

The SRCA named Ralph McCort and Lynn Parke as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/93)

1993

Ten-year old Scripps Ranch resident, Paul Murray, was named San Diego County’s official Lego ambassador to Denmark. The Carlsbad City Council consulted with Paul and his father when it was vying for the second Legoland in the world to be built in their city. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

2/93

A “book brigade” tried passing the books hand to hand from the storefront library to the new library building. Light rain didn’t dampen spirits until a deluge descended. Book passers all ran for cover and stayed on for cake and punch under the portico. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06)

3/13/93

Opening of the 22,000 square foot Scripps Miramar Ranch Library Center, designed by Architect Richard Bundy of Bradshaw/Bundy and Associates, as a contemporary interpretation of the Mission Revival style of architecture (echoing the Meanley house’s Mission Revival style). A thousand celebrants were welcomed by the new Friends of the Library president, Susan Howe, and councilman Tom Behr, who cut the ribbon and mandated that “children go first.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06) Artifacts from the original Meanley home have been incorporated into the building. The home’s original front doors are now located between the Children’s Area and the Reference Area. Windows from the original home are used as freestanding dividers throughout the library. Windows from the Meanley home have been used as doors on built-in bookcases throughout the library. The central courtyard of the library echoes the courtyard of the Meanley home. A central feature of the Meanley home was a fountain, whose presence is reflected in the library’s courtyard fountain. (Source: www.srfol.org and Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/93, 9/93) Head Librarian Nancy Assaf and a steering committee took the best of what existing libraries offered and put them together with innovations such as: a library bookstore, directed by Grace Roos; a computer lab, set up and staffed with volunteers headed by Jerry Weil; the centralized organization of children’s materials; the preponderance of book stacks; the presence of individual study carrels, the 5,000 square foot


 



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community room with state-of-the-art kitchen; and the unique art glass windows created by Richard Spaulding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06) “Mixtec Menagerie,” a glass work by Richard Spaulding is displayed in the SR Library and considered a Public Art Feature by the City of San Diego (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/scrippsmiramarranch/pdf/2hcs crippsmiramarranch.pdf) Mixtec Menagerie is a collection of animal designs in the style of the Mixteca people of Central Mexico and were inspired by a publication of the Mixtec Codex. (Source: www.spauldingstudio.com/scripps/scripp8.htm)

3/15/93

Spring 1993

The Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended that NAS Miramar be transferred to the Marine Corps and that the Naval Fighter Weapons School (“Top Gun”) be relocated to NAS Fallon, Nevada. Replacing the aircraft from the Navy would be Marine aircraft coming from the closed MCAS Tustin and El Toro, creating the formation of MCAS Miramar. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/93) The last student exchange between Miramar Ranch Elementary and Rice School on the San Carlos Reservation occurred. The 16-year program came to a close due to several factors, including 6th graders were now in middle school instead of elementary school and 5th graders were generally too young to have as successful an experience and the fact that the exchange experience was not as diverse and different as when the program started due to the increased exposure of the Apache children to white culture due to technology advances. (Source: Interview w/Joan Gass)

7/28/93

Due to the foresight and hard work of the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library (and in particular, Katie Sullivan and Jerry Weil), the library dedicated the Ellen Browning Scripps Computer Room at the Library and became the first library in the City to have a computer room with state-of-the-art computer equipment and access to other terminals. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/93)

8/28/93

The first Scripps Ranch Community Fair and Information Celebration was held in Cypress Canyon Park.

9/7/93

Scripps Ranch High School opened its door to its first year students. Since it was a new school, the administration was able to recruit among the brightest and best teachers from throughout the district. For the seven posted department chair positions, they had almost 100 applicants. For the 30 certificated teacher positions, the school had 274 applicants and interviewed 162 people. Dr. Barbara Brooks was the school’s first principal. All sports were offered the first year, with the exception of varsity football (although the junior varsity football team played 5 varsity teams their first season). QUALCOMM and San Diego Trust and Savings were official partners with the new school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/93, 9/93)

9/15/93

The Scripps Miramar Ranch Library Center inaugurated The Pleasure of Your Company, a monthly series of free chamber music concerts dedicated to the joys of


 



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making and sharing music for small ensembles. The first concert began with vocal duets by sopranos Florence Blumbert and Cheryl Brown, a Scripps Ranch resident, and accompanied by pianist and Scripps Ranch resident, Myron Fink. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/93) The library’s piano, a concert grand Schimmel, was selected after a committee headed by Arnold Gass and Nancy Assaf spent a year searching for the best piano. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06)

10/12/93 Explosions triggered by natural gas leaking into SDG&E’s power conduit facilities caused a series of underground explosions that lifted three manhole covers on Scripps Ranch Blvd opposite the Timberlane condominiums and a small fire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/93) 10/24/93 Scripps Poway Parkway was officially opened with a gala ribbon-cutting ceremony, after a scheduled biathlon event in which participants used the entire roadway without cars. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/93) 10/26/93 The Scripps Miramar Ranch Community Plan was amended to reclassify i) Pomerado Road from a contingency four-lane major street to a two-lane major street and ii) Scripps Poway Parkway from a four-lane major street to a six-lane major street. Deputy Mayor Tom Behr stated, “From the minute I got into office, I have worked to ensure that this beautiful and unique country road is preserved as only two lanes.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/93) 11/5/93

Scripps Ranch High School holds Newcoming (aka homecoming), complete with a Newcoming Parade that proceeded up Treena and Hibert to Scripps Ranch Blvd., down Scripps Lake Dr. and back onto campus. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/93)

12/14/93 Chris Dreifuss named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/94) 12/18/93 Rededication of Scripps Ranch Community “Country Living” sign on Pomerado Road by Councilwoman Barbara Warden. The sign was rebuilt and resealed by Greg Pavlicek, then repainted by Rita Sandor. A group of volunteers, including Ralph McCort, Julian Parrish, Bob Dingeman and Bob Ilko, helped assemble and erect the sign on site. It had been removed because a motorist jumped the curb and hit the sign. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/94) 12/1112/93

1994


 


A large group of volunteers worked to help chip and scrape paint off the Scripps Ranch Blvd. adobe wall in order to help refurbish the wall, which was made from adobe bricks from the old E. W. Scripps mansion. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/94) The second trailer added to Fire Station 37 in 1982 had to be demolished due to its dilapidated condition and replaced with a four-bedroom, two-bathroom trailer. 
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Conditions were crowded, but fairly comfortable for the four-person crew. (Source: The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in Station 37)

1/13/94

The first sale of homes by McMillin, UDC and D.R. Horton in Scripps Ranch Villages were initiated with the opening of the Scripps Ranch Villages Information Pavilion and sales office. The first neighborhoods for sale were: Windchime with homes having 1,236-1,873 square feet and prices ranging from $150,000 - $180,000, Heatherwood with homes having 1,490 – 1,928 square feet and prices ranging from $192,900 – $229,900, Larkspur with homes having 1,635 – 2,253 square feet and prices ranging from $204,900 – $245,900, Prominence with homes having 2190 – 3025 square feet and prices ranging from $249,990 – $299,990 and Lakepoint with homes having 3,500 – 5,000 square feet and prices ranging from $800,000 $950,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/94) Three of the four neighborhoods at Scripps Ranch Villages experienced campout lines of homebuyers. Many were looking to buy their first homes. Over opening weekend, 11 of 12 homes were sold at Heatherwood and 9 of 12 Larkspur homes were snapped up. (Source: Scripps Ranch Villages newsletter, Spring 1994, Volume 1, Number 5)

1/13/94

Official dedication ceremony held for Scripps Ranch High School. Associated Student Body President, Ken Goss, emceed the dedication ceremony. Scripps Ranch High School was the first high school to be dedicated in San Diego County since University City High School 15 years prior. Members of the Scripps and Jessop family whose relatives occupied a small farm on the high school site back in 1890 were present for the ceremony. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/94 and 2/94)

6/2/94

The sales of the first two homes in Scripps Ranch Villages, both in the Larkspur development, closed on this date. Carol and Dave Murray moved into their new home on June 11, 1994, while it is unknown when Cathy Burkett and Jerry Hughs moved into their new home. (Source: www.zillow.com for information on Cohansey Road and Hasbrook Road, Realist reports prepared by Neal Soderberg, and email from Carol Murray to Jake Todd dated 8/2/13)

2/94

ROAR (Residents and Organized Allies for Realignment), led by a Navy wife living in Scripps Ranch, became active in the planning process for the regional airport and the fight against turning NAS Miramar into a commercial airport. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/94 and comments from Elissa Barber 3/11)

2/94

Community survey conducted regarding what to name the new elementary school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/94)

3/94

The Scripps Ranch Community Theater moved back to Scripps Ranch after spending a year in Mira Mesa and 16 years moving from venue to venue. The SRCT entered into a long-term relationship with USIU to use its Legler Benbough Theatre for future productions. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/94)


 



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3/94

First meeting of the Scripps Ranch Village Quilters was held, with 30+ members. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/94)

3/94

Efforts started to establish the Scripps Ranch/Mira Mesa Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP). Marvin Miles, Bruce Brown, and Bob Dingeman met in Mira Mesa and formed the Scripps Ranch RSVP with Eldon Jacobs as the RSVP Administrator and recruited and trained 54 seniors as members for patrol activities. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) Eldon Jacobs, Neighborhood Watch Beat Coordinator, and Ralph McCort acted as coordinators for the RSVP program. This organization helped augment a limited police presence and handled the vacation house checks, the You Are Not Alone program, the shut-in checks and traffic controls. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/94)

3/94

Jack Wadlington was the first Miramar Ranch North resident to be elected to the Miramar Ranch North Planning Committee. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/94)

3/15/94

The Rec Council assisted the MRNPC in reviewing the park plans for Miramar Ranch North in conjunction with the development of the community park and determined that too little acreage was available for children to play active sports. The park problem originated when the Mira Lago park site of 13 acres was not built with active playing fields as first planned. The high school was also designed by the school district with fewer playing fields than anticipated despite receiving $1 million from MRN developers; and Ahren’s Field was lost during the construction of the high school. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/94)

4/2/94

First Annual Scripps Ranch Easter Egg Hunt sponsored by McMillin Realty. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/94)

5/94

The San Diego School Board approved the plans for turning the site of the proposed third Scripps Ranch elementary school into a middle school campus in order to alleviate overcrowding of the Wangenheim Middle School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/96) Around this time period, Jerabek staff and parents also voted to move from a multi-track school calendar to a single year-round track rather than switch back to a traditional school calendar schedule. (Comments from E. Barber 3/11)

5/94

10th anniversary season of Symphony in the Park, celebrated 10 years of free concerts sponsored by SR Old Pros and SR Women’s Athletic Club. Co-chairs of Symphony in the Park were Barbara Hunter and John Petit. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/94)

5/12/94

The MRNPC held a community forum to help design the community park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/94)

Spring 1994 
 


Scripps Ranch Little League celebrated its 20th season, and had 47 teams and 
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approximately 550 players. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

6/7/94

Summer 1994

Proposition A, the ballot measure designed to gauge support of an international airport at NAS Miramar in the event that the federal government decided to make the site available for civilian use, was defeated. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/94) Huntington At Scripps Ranch, offered by Fieldstone at prices from the $190,000s and up. These homes were single family, two-story homes up to 1,914 square feet, located off of Caminito Alto. (Source: Tour d’Elegance Program Guide)

6/14/94

The monthly meeting of the SRCA was the first meeting to be held under the new citywide “no fee” policy for community groups recognized by the city to meet in a library center. This new policy was the culmination of a yearlong effort by Luis Herrera of the Library Department and Bob Dingeman. The SRCA provided $625 to fund a new security system, which preserves the security of the library while eliminating the need for library personnel to be present at overtime costs. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/94)

7/4/94

Over the holiday weekend, a fire ran through the brush along the I-15 and destroyed 200 acres near USIU. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/94)

7/30/94 - 8/28/94 Tour d’Elegance Luxury Home Tour was held, with six homes showcasing interiordesign trends, home-furnishing ideas and landscaping. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/94) 9/1/94

Groundbreaking ceremony held for Scripps Ranch Elementary School #4, to later be known as Dingeman Elementary School.

12/13/94 Rita and Wes Danskin named as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/95) 1995

Scripps Teasers Toastmasters was established to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment for members to develop communications and leadership skills. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/10)

1995

A fifth crew member and an ambulance were added to Fire Station 37 as well as a tent cover to protect the brush rig and ambulance. (The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in the Fire Station)

1/15/95

Noelle Katherine Marra, a Scripps Ranch high school senior, honor student, varsity swimmer and volleyball player, ASB vice president, community volunteer and a lifeguard at the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club, died instantly when her car was broadsided by a drunk driver at the intersection of Pomerado Road and Avenida Magnifica. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05)


 



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4/30/95

Spring Canyon Park dedication celebration held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/95)

6/6/95

City Council amended the Miramar Ranch North Community Plan to 1) change 68 of the 145 acres of industrial acres land in Miramar Ranch North to other uses: 52 acres to residential and 16 acres to commercial and 2) increase the number of dwelling units in the community from 4,402 to 4,589 units, a gain of 187 units. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/pdf/cp/cpmrntoc.pdf)

June 1995

School District and community members worked on the design for the new Scripps Ranch middle school. The schematic design was approved by the Board of Education. In light of the change in design, the overall construction budget for the new school was increased by $1.3 million to $11,630,000. The Board also added another $500,000 to provide two-story portables at the site to aid in fitting a middle school onto an elementary school site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/95, 8/96) Colonel Bob Dingeman’s recommendation to name the middle school after Supreme Court Justice Marshall received 83% of the votes cast. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

5/95

SRCA held community meetings regarding the proposed 20,000-seat amphitheater that the City of Poway was considering building at the eastern end of Scripps Poway Parkway. Sound tests indicated that sounds were audible in several parts of Scripps Ranch. Residents were concerned about traffic, negative behaviors of concertgoers and the potential negative impacts on quality of life in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/95)

7/4/95

25th anniversary of the SR 4th of July Parade. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/95)

7/95

Presales began for homes at Lakepoint, located above Miramar Lake on the former site of the 1994 Tour d’Elegance Luxury Home Tour. Continental Homes offered a semicustom program with six different floor plans ranging in size from 3,100 to 4,000 square feet. Prices began in the high $300,000s. (Source: Scripps Ranch Villages marketing materials provided by Carla Latimer)

8/95

Southwest Cable redid many of its cable lines, which were vandalized in construction. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/95)

9/95

Colonel Robert E. Dingeman Elementary School opened, which reflected the first time that the San Diego Unified School District named a school after an active living person.

10/25/95 Commander Donald McPherson, a Scripps Ranch resident of 22 years, appeared before the Queen of England for his investiture in the Meritorious Order of the British Empire for services in connection with youth and cultural exchanges between San Diego and Edinburgh, Scotland. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/96) 
 



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11/95

Scripps Ranch residents Deborah and Ron Plotkin, arrived home safely after being stranded in the Himalayas for three days after an unexpected snowstorm and avalanche struck the 20,423-foot Island Peak. They both experienced severe injuries due to frostbite, especially Ron who lost part of both feet and fingers, which were later reattached. Their harrowing adventure was retold in a television movie. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

11/95

A new weather radar was installed at the intersection of Pomerado Road and Spring Canyon Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/94 and 11/95)

11/95

SRHS received the prestigious Golden Bell Award from the California School Boards Foundation. SRHS was one of eight high schools among the 32 total schools selected in California to receive the award. The school received its award for “Spotlight on Success: Developing the High School of Tomorrow Today.” This project included an emphasis on preparing students for life-long learning and successful participation in the community and work force. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/95)

12/12/95 Marc Sorensen honored as Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/96) 12/21/95 Community aired concerns at meeting held regarding Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the migration of Marine aviation units to the Miramar Air Base. The comment period was extended. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/95) 1995

21-year old Chris Richard was named the New Jersey Cardinals’ Most Valuable Player of the Year. The New Jersey Cardinals were an American minor league baseball team affiliated with the St. Louis Cardinals. Chris’s baseball career started in T-ball with the Scripps Ranch Little League. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

3/16/96

Cub Scout Pack 616 celebrated its 25th anniversary at the Miramar Officers Club. The City proclaimed that day to be Boy Scout Troop 616 Day in San Diego. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/96)

5/2/96

Dingeman Elementary School was dedicated before an enthusiastic crowd of students, parents and friends. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/96)

5/11/96

Grand opening of Lakeview Neighborhood Park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/96)

5/96

Over Memorial Day weekend, a swastika was burned into the grass next to the Whispering Ridge Community Pool. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/96)

6/11/96

The San Diego City School Board approved a $13.16 million budget for the construction of the new middle school. The new Recreation Center fields will become


 



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joint use fields and available for use by the school during school hours. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/96)

5/96

The California Department of Education selected Scripps Ranch High School as one of the state’s Distinguished Schools. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/96)

8/96

Construction started on the upgrade and expansion of the Water Reclamation facility at Miramar Lake. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/96)

8/96

Final design meeting for the Scripps Ranch Recreation Center, which will have a gym and craft rooms. Planning for this facility has been almost 20 years in the works and construction will commence shortly. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/96)

9/8/96

The new 27-acre Chabad Center and Day School celebrated its grand opening, with Rabbi Yisrael Dinerman speaking about the expansion of the Chabad family to Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/96)

10/96

The SRCA created its own homepage/website on the internet. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/96)

12/11/96 Groundbreaking ceremony for the new Marshall Middle School was held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/96) 12/10/96 Dr. Steven Tuttle and Karen Wood named Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. The Scripps Ranch Recognition Night included the “Energizer Bunny” award for the first time. Officially called the Executive Board Award of Merit, this award goes to those volunteers who keep on going and going and keep on giving their time to the community year after year. The SRCA sought and received permission from Energizer Holdings, Inc. to use their Energizer Bunny logo on the certificates of appreciation for this award. The first two recipients of this award were Lynn Parke and Ralph McCort. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/97) 7/97

The City Fire Department became partners with Rural Metro and jointly won the paramedic contract. New locations for paramedic ambulance were created, and Scripps Ranch Fire Station 37 gained an ambulance. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/98) (Note: This contradicts with The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in the Fire Station that states an ambulance was added in 1995.) In 1997, a sixth person was added to the fire station’s crew. “The ambulance, which had responded everywhere with the pump engine, now became a full time separate operating unit. A third small trailer was brought in to store the station’s exercise equipment. The compound now resembled a gypsy camp. After all the years of use, there was a problem with mice, rats, ants and squirrels. The squirrels had eaten holes in the floor from underneath and the floor sagged where the refrigerators were located. There was no insulation left in the wall, and when it rained, it flooded the lockers and the bathroom floors. The noise of rain or hail hitting the metal roof kept


 



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everyone awake.” (Source: The History of Fire Station 37 Scripps Ranch posted in the Fire Station)

1997

The Scripps Ranch Chapter of National Junior Basketball was formed. (Source: www.scrippsranchnjb.org)

10/1/97

The Marines took over NAS Miramar and Colonel Thomas A. Caughlan became the first Marine commanding officer of MCAS Miramar since World War II. Caughlan was also the last commanding officer of MCAS Tustin. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/97 and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Corps_Air_Station_Miramar)

10/12/97 The parish of St. Gregory the Great broke ground on its permanent church home. (Source: http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml) 11/20/97 More than 500 people overflowed the multipurpose room at Miramar Ranch Elementary to discuss critical school issues, including proposed boundary changes for Scripps Ranch middle and elementary schools. The school district acknowledged the present and continuing overcrowding of Dingeman Elementary School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/97) 12/97

Construction passed the 50% mark at the 23-acre Scripps Ranch Villages Center. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/97) Some stores, such as Cathy’s Hallmark, have already opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/98)

12/9/97

Sharon Hays named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/98)

2/8/98

An early morning electrical fire caused by outdated electrical wiring consumed the Scripps-Davis Ranch, burning down the ranch house built in 1910 and killing both elderly residents, Ellen Browning Scripps Davis and her husband, Everett Davis. Mrs. Davis, the eldest surviving member of the E. W. Scripps family still living in Scripps Ranch, and her husband raised and exhibited American saddle bred horses. The ranch house, the last major property of the E.W. Scripps family located in Scripps Ranch, was located at the entrance to Scripps Ranch at Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/98)

2/24/98

In an effort to reduce overcrowding at SR elementary schools, the School Board ignored recommendations of its own task force and adopted new boundaries for elementary schools, which would require residents who haven’t moved into homes near the new Marshall Middle to attend the relatively distant Jerabek Elementary instead of the closer Dingeman Elementary and future residents west of I-15 would be shifted from Dingeman to Hage Elementary. As a recommendation of the elementary school task force, the school district formed a steering committee to research the possibility of obtaining a 4th elementary school for Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/98)


 



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4/18/98

A festive grand opening of the new Scripps Ranch Villages Center was held, complete with rides, games and entertainment. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/98)

6/98

Plans to build a Wet and Wild water park on Scripps Poway Parkway about 2 miles east of Pomerado Road were canceled due to financing issues. The proposed park had been a topic of much community interest, excitement among the kids and traffic concerns among the adults. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/98)

7/98

Scripps Ranch Blvd. was opened to through traffic. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/98)

Summer 1998

The design phase of the upgrade and expansion project for Miramar Water Treatment Plant began. (Source: http://www.sandiego.gov/engineering-cip/projectsprograms/ miramar.shtml)

8/31/98

Marshall Middle School opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/98)

8/98

The Scripps Ranch Special Park Fund (SRSPF) approved an expenditure of $350,000 to help bridge the gap in financing the swimming pool complex at Miramar College in order to provide nearby aquatic recreational facilities for residents and SRHS students. The SRSPF was a special assessment district that comprised the original Scripps Ranch area and was created in 1977 when ranch residents realized that essential infrastructure facilities would not be provided by the City and that the community and its residents would have to provide them. The community opted for a special fee for parks, to be collected from the sale of all new homes in Scripps Ranch. As of August 1998, the SRSPF had a balance of about $3.7 million. The fund covered the cost of Jerabek, Lakeview and Cypress Canyon parks. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/98, 9/98)

9/29/98

The City Council amended Miramar Ranch North Community Plan to modify the Scripps Gateway portion of Miramar Ranch North, which modifications affected the amount of residential, commercial, industrial and open space acreage. Shea Homes gained the right to construct 444 homes on two sites, an industrial park and a freeway commercial center. It also resulted in the loss of 40 acres of open space for the community. In exchange, Shea agreed to provide a 4-acre parcel located just west of SR Marketplace for use as a private recreational facility for the families in the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/00 and http://www.sandiego.gov/planning/community/profiles/pdf/cp/cpmrntoc.pdf)

Fall 1998


 


Ongoing controversy in the community regarding the proposed US Marine Corps housing on East Miramar and impact on SR community, including the potential overcrowding of schools. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/98, 11/98) 
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10/98

Two new upscale neighborhoods were being constructed just north of Miramar Lake. Crown Collection will have homes ranging from 2,507 – 3,557 square feet with prices starting in the mid-$300,000s. Waterford will have home ranging from 3,200 – 3,900 square feet with prices in the mid to high $400,000s. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/98)

10/22/98 Jerabek Elementary celebrated turning 20 with an evening birthday celebration complete with cake and ice cream for all present and former students, faculty and staff members. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/98) 12/3/98

Gala opening held for Epicentre, the San Diego Regional Teen Center in Mira Mesa, serving Scripps Ranch and Mira Mesa teens. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/99)

12/6/98

Canyon Springs Church holds its first church service at the Scripps Ranch library. 103 people showed up. (Source: http://www.canyonsprings.org/#/about-us/our-story)

12/8/98

The SRCA named K.J. Koljonen and Julian Parrish as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/99)

1999

The 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing returned to Miramar when it officially became Marine Corps Air Station Miramar. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Corps_Air_Station_Miramar)

1/16/99

The official groundbreaking held for the first ever Scripps Ranch Community Recreation Building in the community park. Especially recognized for their efforts in helping to secure this facility were Wes Danskin, Marc Sorensen and Chas Eminhizer. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/99)

1/99

The McMillin Information Pavilion closed at the end of January as McMillin was unsuccessful in finding a buyer for the building on that site. McMillin and Brookfield Homes proposed relocating the building at their expense and details need to be worked out by the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group, the Scripps Ranch Recreation Council and the City. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/99) Ultimately, McMillin donated the Information Pavilion to the City and donated $300,000 to cut the Information Pavilion in three and transport it down Scripps Poway Parkway. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/05)

1/99

The Welcome Wagon Club is reformed as the Welcome Club when its parent organization, Welcome Wagon, Inc., decided to pull out of the San Diego area and stop making home visits to new residents. The organization planned to continue with its purpose to welcome and help new neighbors to become a part of the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/99)

2/99

A concerned group of volunteers from Scripps Ranch formed the Hidden Valley House Auxiliary to support the Hidden Valley Shelter in Escondido, the only 24-hour


 



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emergency shelter in North County dedicated to supporting the needs of battered and/or homeless women and their children. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/99)

2/7/99

The first permanent cross was raised and placed on the first permanent church in Scripps Ranch. St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church. (Source: http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml)

3/29/99

Newly-formed Boy Scout Troop 663 held its first meeting. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/99)

4/99

Construction underway in “The Arbors” development south of Pomerado and with access from Semillon. This parcel of land was originally called the “Doctor’s Parcel” and was the last remaining property earmarked for homes in the original Scripps Ranch development. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

4/24/99

The Scripps Ranch Community Park opened with a gala party, including community booths, free food and the Heroes playing rock ‘n roll tunes, all hosted by the McMillin Companies. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/99)

4/99

25th anniversary of SR Little League, which league contained 62 teams and 815 players. The Little League Board then had over 30 volunteers administering all aspects of SRLL and over 130 managers and coaches. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/99)

5/23/99

The permanent stage at Hoyt Park was dedicated at the first Symphony in the Park concert of the season. The idea of a permanent stage started three years earlier with John Martin and Bob Colbourne of the SR Old Pros. City approval was required as the land is dedicated City open space. Bob Colbourne volunteered his time to and talent as the project architect, and the Old Pros raised the $50,000 needed for the stage. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/99)

5/99

Avalon Bay proposed the rezoning of 5 industrial lots located in the Scripps Ranch Business Park to high density residential. The Scripps Ranch Planning Group opposed the rezoning due to many concerns, including overcrowded schools, increased traffic flows leaving the Ranch in the morning, the regional need for industrial-zoned land and the existing balance of mixed-use zoning within Scripps Ranch. The Planning Commission voted to approve initiation of the proposed amendment, which opened the way for further consideration of the proposed zoning amendment. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/99, 6/99)

6/99

Area code for Scripps Ranch changed from 619 to 858. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/99)

7/13/99

San Diego School Board approved a high school expansion, which will include the construction of additional recreation facilities and parking. In addition, portable


 



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classrooms will be moved on campus. Joint-use facilities and more bleachers are possibilities as well. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/99)

8/99

Scripps Ranch resident, Alexandra Madigan, opened an equestrian center on Creek Road off Pomerado Road at the bottom of the hill near Legacy. The training facility offered hunters, jumpers, dressage and equitation horses. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/99)

8/99

City approved plans for the new Scripps Ranch fire station to be built on Spring Canyon Rd. (Source: SRCA 8/99)

10/2/99

St. Gregory the Great parish held its first Mass in the new church with 1,100 parishioners in attendance. (Source: http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml)

11/6/99

Formal dedication of the St. Gregory the Great church complex by San Diego Bishop Robert Brom occurred. The six-acre complex consisted of the 16,000 square foot Church with a seating capacity of 850; a 3,400 square foot Pastoral Center consisting of offices and meeting rooms and the 5,400 square foot Social and Catechetical Center. Throughout the complex, the design goals of incorporating the basic elements of earth, air, fire (light) and water were evident. The 55 ft. copper dome capping the Baptistry entry became an SR landmark. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/99)

11/13/99 Official groundbreaking for the new Scripps Ranch fire station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/99) 11/99

The McMillin Information Pavilion was cut into 3 sections as part of the process of relocating the building to its new location on Cypress Canyon Road. As a gift to the City the signature building, which for 6 years provided information about new homes for sale in Scripps Ranch Villages, will take on an expanded role of providing information about City services and the SR community, as well as, serve as the SRCA’s headquarters. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/99)

12/14/99 Katie Sullivan and Bob “Hitch” Hitchcox recognized as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/00)


 



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In July 1990, the City Council passed a redistricting plan that would severely impact Scripps Ranch and divide the community within two districts. Linda Bernhardt, the councilmember representing Scripps Ranch voted in favor of the plan. Residents circulated a petition to seek the recall of Councilmember Bernhardt because they did not believe she represented the best interests of the community. The recall was successful and in April 1991Tom Behr was elected to replace Ms. Bernhardt. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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From 1989 through 1991, a huge controversy existed in the community regarding the proposed development north of Miramar Lake, ultimately to be known as Scripps Ranch Villages. Proposed amendments to the Community Plans for both Scripps Miramar Ranch and Miramar Ranch North called for increased housing density. Residents opposed both amendments. A task force was convened to review the development of the hillsides and explore the potential changes to the community. Nine different organizations worked with the task force to negotiate and broker a compromise plan. By working together, gains were made for the community, although compromises had to be made as well. Not all involved were happy with the outcome. Above: Various newspaper clippings regarding the controversy to minimize impacts on the lake view shed. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar North branch archives. Next page: Postcard mailed to Scripps Ranch residents by the Save the Lake Committee after the settlement was reached. The note on the postcard states: “This photo is a gift to remind you why we fought so hard. Later, when you compare this keepsake with the final result at the lake, it will be obvious what all the fuss was about.� Source: Gary/Lois Reed.

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Views of Miramar Lake, August 2013. Source: Jake Todd. Left: View from the dam, looking east. Below: View from west of the boat launch looking northeast, from roughly the same spot as the Save the Lake Committee’s postcard on the prior page.

Left: View from east of the docks. Below: View while standing on the dock, looking northeast.

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Left: View from Lakeview Park, looking west.

Right: View looking east from above the lake on Normanton Way. Below: Views looking south from above the lake on Normanton Way.

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Above: Wall at the intersection of Avenida Magnifica and Pomerado Rd., 1991. Left: Spring Canyon Road looking west, roughly from intersection with Elderwood Ln, 1991. The intersection with Semillon is visible on the left. Source: Dorothy Stout.

Right: Construction of San Diego County Water Authority Scripps Ranch Pipeline on Scripps Ranch Blvd. taken from roughly where Scripps Ranch High School is located, 1993. Construction workers were not planning to replace trees on the median until photos like this were used to prove their existence prior to construction. Note: hillside has fewer homes than it does currently. Source: Dorothy Stout.

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Invitation to the Groundbreaking Celebration for the new Scripps Miramar Library branch. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Upper left: Tom Meanley, Jr. and Susan Roberts, Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library President, during library groundbreaking ceremony. Upper right: Flag ceremony during library groundbreaking ceremony. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Above: Susan Roberts, SRFOL President, and Walter Heiberg, McMillin Communities, during presentation of $2 million donation to the City by McMillin to help finance the construction of the library’s community center. Right: Groundbreaking ceremony. Note: Meanley wall in the background. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Groundbreaking celebration for new Scripps Miramar Ranch library, September 15, 1991. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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While the City and the community were planning the new Scripps Ranch library, the community continued to put the storefront library to good use. Above: percussionist John Szanto of the San Diego Symphony put on a children’s program during Summer 1991. Below: the children’s section of the storefront library. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Construction of the library, 1992. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Right: In May 1992, the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library held a fundraiser downtown called the “Gatsby Gala� to raise money to help construct the library. Over the years, the SRFOL was instrumental in raising funds to build a permanent library in Scripps Ranch. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Right: The night before the library opened to the public, the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library held a slumber party in the library. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Left: Councilman Tom Behr at library opening ceremony on March 13, 1993. Councilman Behr cut the ribbon and mandated that “children go first� into the new library. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Right: Head librarian, Nancy Assaf, being recognized by Marc Sorenson at library opening. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Left: Scripps Miramar Ranch Branch, 2010. Source: Jake Todd.

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In January 1990, the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library sponsored the first annual Hodgepodge Arts & Crafts for Kids event, where young children created “keep-able� art projects. This program was a successful community-wide event that also raised funds for the library. Victoria Mazelli chaired the program for a number of years. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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Below: Richard Spaulding was commissioned to design and create 11 stained glass works for the new Scripps Ranch library. Source: Victoria Mazelli. Left: In 1992, Spaulding volunteered his time at HodgePodge to help kids make Italian stained glass crafts. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

Left: Hodepodge in the library Community Room, circa 2000. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Whether in a formal organized event like the annual community cleanup or just because it needs to get done, Scripps Ranch residents take care of their community. Right: Neighbors on Elderwood Lane working together on brush clearance behind their homes, 1992. Source: Dorothy Stout.

Even young Scripps Ranch residents get involved in cleaning up the community, April 20, 1996. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Above: Cover page of San Diego Unified School District Staff Bulletin, August 15, 1991. Photo shows school district officials and community residents at Scripps Ranch High School groundbreaking. Source: Carla Latimer.

Next page: First page of the Scripps Ranch High School yearbook from its first year of school. Source: Scripps Ranch High School.

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Newsletter produced by McMillin Communities, the primary developer of Scripps Ranch Villages, which discussed a concept for a SR Villages town center that never came to pass. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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The concept of a town center for Miramar Ranch North was explored as part of a provision of the Miramar RanchNorth Settlement Agreement of September 1990. The concept would include retail, business and residential structures, where pedestrian traffic would dominate. However, the town center plan was never adopted and the Scripps Ranch Marketplace was built instead on acreage slightly west of the land originally slotted for the town center. Source: San Diego City Public Library, Scripps Miramar Ranch branch archives.

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In developing Scripps Ranch Villages, McMillin Companies established a Mello-Roos district to help fund the development of community infrastructure. Above is a map of the Scripps Ranch Villages Mello-Roos district, 1993. Source: Jack Waddlington.

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Marketing materials for Scripps Ranch Villages, 1994. Source: Jack Waddlington.

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Above and next page: Cover and second page of McMillin marketing brochure, Spring ‘94, Vol. 1, Issue 5, describes opening of Scripps Ranch Villages and sales of first SRV communities. Source: Jack Waddlington.

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The Tour d’Elegance Luxury Home Tour was held in August 1994, with six custom homes located in what would become the Lakepoint development showcasing interior design trends, home furnishing ideas and landscaping concepts. Above: Cover of Program Guide. Source: Carla Latimer.

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Aerial photo of Scripps Ranch Villages as of September 1995, shows then current state of development in Scripps Ranch Villages. The white line demarcates the borders of the Mello-Roos special district. Source: Official Statement for 1995 Mello-Roos bond issue, provided by Jack Waddlington.

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Groundbreaking and construction of Dingeman Elementary School, September 1994-1995. Source: Dingeman Elementary School Yearbook, 1995-1996.

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Right: Colonel Robert Dingeman welcoming a student to school on the first day of class at the school named in his honor, 1997. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: On October 25, 1985, a formal dedication ceremony was held for the two Scripps Ranch “Country Living� signs located on Carroll Canyon near the IMED building and on the south side of Pomerado Road. The business owners in the SR Business Park wanted to install a special Scripps Ranch sign on Carroll Canyon. The community designed the signed and was carved out of redwood that followed the pattern of the original For Sale signs used by the developer. The sign on Pomerado Road was damaged by a motorist, rebuilt and rededicated in December 1993. This photo is from the re-dedication ceremony in 1993. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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In 1994, after 16 years of moving venue to venue, Scripps Ranch Community Theater moved back to Scripps Ranch with a long-term relationship to use the theatre at USIU. Right: Program announcing first performance back in Scripps Ranch. Below: A still shot from SRCT performance of “The Murder Room” in 1995. Source: SRCT binders in Scripps Miramar Ranch library.

In September 1993, the library inaugurated “The Pleasure of Your Company,” a monthly series of free chamber music concerts. A committee, headed by Nancy Assaf and Arnold Gass, spent a year searching for the best piano to purchase for the library’s Community Room. Right: Classical pianist, Dmitri Kirichenko, performing at the library, circa 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Symphony in the Park celebrated its 10th anniversary in the summer of 1994 and has continued on strong ever since. Source: Donna Demko.

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Above: Crowd shot, 1990. Right: U.S. Marine Corps Band, 1992. Below: Music lovers come in all sizes, 1990.

Below left: Holiday concert lighting, 1996. Below right: Face painting at Symphony in the Park concert, 2002. Source: Donna Demko.

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Above left: Flintstones Air Band, 1994. Above right: Line dance lessons with Jim Kollars, 1996.

Above right: The Heroes, including Scripps Ranch resident Tom Boyd, playing in 2000. Right: Audience spelling out Y while The Heroes play the song “YMCA,” but spell out HOYT instead, 2000. Source: Donna Demko.

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Above: Community members enjoying Symphony in the Park concert in 2000. Below: High schoolers dancing to the Ira Liss Big Band Jazz Machine. Back of photo stated “students danced more swing than the old folks,� 1997. Source: Donna Demko.

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Right: Grand opening of Lakeview Park, May 1996. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: On a rainy December day in 1996, the groundbreaking ceremony for Marshall Middle School (currently the site for Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School) was held. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: Richard Lederer, Scripps Ranch resident and author and speaker known for his books on word play and the English language, launched his KPBS program “A Way with Words� at the library, 1998. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Construction of Saint Gregory the Great Catholic Church started in 1997 and was completed in 1999. Source: Bob Forrest.

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The traditions of the annual Fourth of July parade continue ‌ neighborhood floats, crazy coupe brigade, community group entries and volunteers that make it all happen! Source: Bob Dingeman.

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SCRIPPS RANCH CHRONOLOGY The 2000s

1/00

Scripps Ranch Villages Information Pavilion moved via truck to its new location at the Butterfly Garden on Cypress Canyon Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/00)

2/00

School Board approved the name of Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School for the new elementary school. This will be the first school to be constructed with Proposition MM funding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/00)

3/9/00

At a Schools Committee meeting, school district officials announced that instead of building the new elementary school, EBS, at the intersection of Scripps Poway Parkway and Spring Canyon Road, the school district would apply that money towards building a new larger middle school. The existing Marshall Middle School would then be converted to an elementary school. In the interim 5 years, a modular temporary school will be constructed. The School District is considering two possible sites in the SR Business Park for the new site of the larger middle school. Due to overpopulated elementary schools, an expanded middle school was necessary as Marshall will soon reach maximum capacity. The community wanted to create a new larger middle school and transform Marshall Middle School back into an elementary school. In the meantime, 6th graders would have to be distributed among the elementary schools to relieve overcrowding at Marshall. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/00, 5/00)

3/28/00

School board determined that, in order to relieve overcrowding at Jerabek, all new K5 students without siblings already attending Jerabek will be enrolled at Miramar Ranch Elementary instead. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00) Ultimately, this shuffling of students was not required.

3/00

Brown Colarusso Lebeau (BCL) and Avalon, the owners of record of the business park adjacent to Evans Pond and the library, continued to process their application for a community plan amendment and zoning change to allow multi-family housing in the Scripps Ranch Business Park. Their development plans included developing the lots right up to their property line and installing a fence close to the existing water line of the pond. This proposed development roughly cut through the center of the eucalyptus grove south of Evans Pond. Proposed grading and improvements to the property line would result in the removal of nearly all of the mature eucalyptus trees on the Business Park, as well as the stone wall. Parking spaces in lot 3 of the new proposed development would be just 15 feet from the library. The Scripps Ranch Planning Group was addressing the issue and urged the community to get involved. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/00, Email from Dorothy Mildice to Jake Todd dated 8/12/10)


 



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4/00

Three subcommittees of the Schools Committee were formed to address the issues of: the design of the Scripps Ranch High School build-out to construct additional science and general classrooms, the design of the temporary Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary modular school and the design of the elementary school boundaries once the 4th elementary school came on board. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00)

4/00

The Scripps Ranch Environmental Funds was established with a $235,000 contribution from a nearby development project through the efforts of Michael Baksh, Craig Jones and Deborah Hawkins. The goal of the Fund is to maintain and promote community well-being in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00)

Spring 2000

SRCA’s membership was over 2,200 homes; its annual budget was $33,000 and its newsletter was 88 pages long and distributed to over 10,000 homes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00)

5/6/00

Boy Scout Troop 616 ended their long-standing newspaper collection drive due to the City’s recycling program. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00)

5/7/00

First annual Scripps Ranch Community Fair was held, with over 700 residents in attendance and The Heroes helping to entertain the crowd. Event helped celebrate the SRCA’s 30th anniversary and Wendy Littooy chaired the organizing committee. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00, 7/00)

5/00

Initiation dues at SR Swim and Racquet Club were $599. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/00)

6/00

Save our Scripps Ranch (SOS), a group of concerned SR residents, was formed to protect the SR Community Plan and the quality of life in the community. SOS was formed so that the SRCA didn’t have to get involved. The SRCA and the SRPG were not permitted to do certain types of things and the formation of the SOS gave interested community members more flexibility in the types of actions that they could take to support their cause. (Source: Email from Dorothy Mildice, a SOS board member and Treasurer, to Jake Todd dated 8/12/10) SOS leader Barbara Measelle described the group’s concerns: “We are alarmed that the City’s Environmental Planning Department may allow a proposed high-density residential zoning change to go before the City Planning Commission without full environmental review despite the unanimous objections put forth by our own Scripps Ranch Planning Group.” The owners of the SR Business Park, located east of Scripps Ranch High School, wanted to change the zoning of the business park from industrial to high-density residential. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/00) SOS members set up tables at the library on many weekends and collected dozens of sheets of a petition signed by protestors. Dorothy Mildice attached the petitions on the wall with signs saying SAVE THE WALL and on the trees on the south side of the pond saying SAVE THE TREES. Mrs. Mildice also tied yellow caution tape around all the trees on the south side of the


 



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pond to get people’s attention about what might be lost and additional yellow caution tape on the north side of the pond to call attention to the petitions. (Source: E-mails from Dorothy Mildice to Jake Todd dated 8/12/10 and 8/16/10) Gordon Boerner was also quite instrumental in successfully orchestrating and directing the efforts of SOS. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

6/3/00

Scripps Ranch Recreation Center officially opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/00)

9/00

Marshall Middle School faced its first real taste of overcrowding in its third year of existence. With 1,145 students enrolled, the school was running short of classroom and locker space and four teachers had to share classrooms with ten other teachers. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/00)

9/20/00

Scripps Ranch Information Center opened for business. The center provided residents with an array of City and community services. Scripps Ranch artist-in-residence, Victoria Mazelli, was instrumental in preparing the historical SR photos that hang in the Information Center. As you walk into the Information Center, you were greeted by a six-high foot portrait of E.W. Scripps in his favorite garb of skull cap and trousers tucked into high boots. Ms. Mazelli reproduced this image from a postcard and hung the picture over the Center’s fireplace because E.W. placed the same picture of himself above his fireplace in the Miramar Mansion. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/00, 11/00, 12/00)

10/00

St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church was awarded a Grand Orchid by the San Diego Architectural Foundation for its architecture, landscape architecture and interior design. (Source: http://www.orchidsandonions.org/oo-archives-2000-2001 and http://www.saintgregorythegreat.org/344247.ihtml)

10/7/00

Last Cans for Cubs curbside pick-up due to the success of the City’s recycling program. The Cub Scouts of Pack 614 conducted this recycling effort for many, many years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/00)

10/16/00 BCL and Avalon Bay, the developers of the SR Business Park, withdrew their application to rezone the Business Park to multi-family housing the day before the scheduled City Council hearing. In a few short months, Save Our Scripps Ranch (SOS), with the help of many, was able to collect 3,500 petition signatures opposing the rezone and provide funds to pay for two attorneys to represent the community in saving the Meanley Wall and the proposed middle school site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/00) 11/00


 


A Scripps Ranch Parks and Trails map was published and distributed to SRCA members. The map was developed and researched by a Boy Scout named John Evans under Col. Bob Dingeman’s direction. They walked all of the trails and drew up the map. Al Hofstatter, head of the Trails Committee, verified the trails and Damian 
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Moss in consultation with Wes Danskin prepared the map reproduced by the SRCA for members. The entire effort took over a year to complete. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/00, Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

11/00

The Environmental Impact Report for the proposed Sycamore Estates development of about 1,000 homes just southeast of Pomerado Road was out for public review. The SR and MRN Planning groups had been evaluating the project for over a year, and were concerned about the adverse impacts on traffic and public facilities that were not built with 1,000 more homes in mind. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/00)

11/17/00 The City Historical Board designated the Meanley Wall, all of Evans Pond and the surrounding eucalyptus trees as a historical site. For decades, the City and community had treated the area as a historical site. The wall had been saved at the request of the Meanley family and the community. The library had been sited with the wall in mind. Then the community assumed maintenance of the area, paying for it with annual assessments for the SR Landscape Maintenance District. BCL, the new property owner of the SR Business Park had determined that it needed to develop all of its lots by removing the Meanley Wall and many of the eucalyptus trees on the south side of the pond. Save Our Scripps Ranch, the SRCA and concerned citizens went before the City Historical Board to have the area deemed a historical and cultural landmark. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/00, 12/00) 11/00

Fall 2000

SRCA began its efforts to create bound copies of all SRCA newsletters to be placed at the library and the Information Center. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/00) Wes Danskin single-handedly collected, prepared and bound the SRCA Newsletter files as historical documents, which are now placed in the Scripps Ranch Community Center and the library. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) Tile a New Fire Station began. Fire Company #37 invited community members to design and paint their own ceramic tiles to be installed on the inside wall of the fire station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/00) Victoria Mazelli organized the effort that culminated in a wall decorated with more than 600 family-decorated tiles, a very special Scripps Ranch aspect of Fire Station #37 that is unique in the City. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

11/00

A delegation from SRHS traveled to Washington, D.C. to accept the National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence Award. SRHS was honored as one of 198 schools selected from across the country for their commitment to education. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/00)

12/00

The San Diego Planning Commission denied Shea Homes’ request for approval of its Scripps Gateway freeway center proposal because it did not meet our community plan’s intent for a “gateway” project. The 4-acre commercial recreation parcel near the SR Marketplace had been a source of controversy for a couple years, as Shea Home’s proposed uses for the property did not meet the goals promised the


 



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community. At least two of the commissioners agreed with the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group that there was a link between this project and the disputed 4-acre community recreational parcel and that the project should be denied until that issue was resolved. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/00, 1/01)

12/12/00 Claudia Unhold named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/01) 12/00

20002001

Intel Corporation purchased 31 acres in the Scripps Ranch Business Park, including the site that the community and the School District were focusing on to construct a “right-sized” middle school. “All the community groups, the School District, and the City of San Diego agree that the new schools are our top priority, but a corporation such as Intel is well worth taking time to review the situation and see if we can get both the schools and Intel into Scripps Ranch. … the City and School District are evaluating several alternative sites in Scripps Ranch for the new middle school.” Intel opened escrow while the school district was closed for Winter Break. (Source: SRCA E-letter dated 1/12/01 from Marc Sorensen, President SRCA, as published in Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/01) Victoria Mazelli met with a member of the Scripps family in connection with her efforts to research the history of the Scripps family. During the interview, she looked through a family picture album and ran across a copy of a Christmas card signed by Ellen Browning Scripps in 1907. Ms. Mazelli asked if she could make a copy of the card because she liked to collect signatures. When the new EBS Elementary School was being developed, Ms. Mazelli approached the principal, Rich Cansdale, and suggested using Ellen Browning Scripps’ signature as part of the logo for the new school. Mr. Cansdale loved the idea and from then on T-shirts and other items representing the new elementary school bore the signature of EBS. Ms. Mazelli obtained authorization for use of Ms. Scripps signature from the Ellen Browning Scripps Foundation. (Source: Interview with Victoria Mazelli)

2/01

Official opening celebration held for the new Scripps Ranch Information Center located on Cypress Canyon Rd. The center was a City building operated as a community service center. The building itself and the surrounding land was owned by the City Park and Rec Department which was responsible for their long-term maintenance. The building was designed in the 1820s style of homes near Alexandria, Virginia. The Butterfly Gardens pocket park that surrounds the Center and the hills overlooking the Center are maintained by the Miramar Ranch North Landscape Maintenance District. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/01)

1/19/01

In an unprecedented effort, representatives of the Scripps Ranch Planning Group Miramar Ranch North Planning Committee, SRCA, Scripps Ranch Recreation Council and Save Our Scripps Ranch worked together and conducted a coordinated review of the Environmental Impact Report for the proposed Rancho Encantada project, to be located east of Pomerado Road. This review of the EIR resulted in a 22-


 



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page list of comments and questions on the EIR, which was submitted to the City for consideration. The review team concluded that the EIR failed to adequately analyze impacts for traffic, parks, urban storm water runoff, air quality and schools. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/01)

4/01

A Scripps Ranch welcoming service, the Welcome Club, returned to the Ranch after a two-year hiatus. The group provided a welcoming service for new neighbors. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/01)

4/01

Fire Engine Co. # 37 obtained a new all terrain fire and brush rig. Two years prior, Captain Geiske of Engine Co. #37 had recommended that this particular type of brush rig be purchased and the community initiated a formal request for the purchase of this particular rig. However, the Fire Department elected to purchase a more expensive, but less effective model. Two years later, the fire department assigned our station a new brush rig of the type that the community had originally requested. (Source: SRCA 5/01)

5/01

Construction began for the upgrade and expansion project for the Miramar Water Treatment Plant. The City Water Department formed a special City/Scripps Ranch Planning Group that developed detailed and coordinated plans to reduce the impact of construction noise and dust. The planning group included all community inputs in a far-reaching and cooperative effort and called for significant efforts by the City Water Department to minimize disruptions to the community. This project was considered one of the most cooperative of projects conducted by the City and the Scripps Ranch community. (Source: Bob Dingeman and Dave Nillow 11/11)

7/1/01

United States International University (USIU) and Alliant University/California School of Professional Psychology were joined to create a new university, Alliant International University. (Source: alliant.edu)

8/01

Using $1 million from the Upton Settlement Fund and $200,000 arranged by Councilman Brian Maienschein, the City acquired the Shea parcel (near the new Vons shopping center) for $1.2 million. The community was then tasked with determining the best possible plan for the parcel’s development to meet recreational needs and how best to finance and maintain whatever will be built. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/01) The Shea parcel became known as the “Four Acre Parcel” and ultimately transitioned to a potential site for a new YMCA. Claudia Unhold was significantly involved in ensuring that the parcel was used in a manner that best suited the community. (Source: Bob Dingeman 11/11)

8/01

The City Council and the Planning Commission approved a revised plan for the Shea “Gateway Project, ” to be located on the north side of Scripps Poway Parkway at Mercy Interchange. The project will include two four-story hotels, a fast food area, a gasoline service station and a Park and Ride Facility. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/01)


 



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9/4/01

After only 4 months of construction, the Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School opened with a modular unit layout (pre-fabricated buildings (or bungalows) that can be moved). (Source Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/01)

9/01

Dingeman Elementary School added 6th grade to its class population as a result of overcrowding at Marshall Middle School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/01)

11/3/01

Roughly twenty years after the community asked for a temporary fire station to provide fire coverage for our rapidly growing community, a dedication ceremony for Scripps Ranch’s permanent fire station, San Diego Fire Station #37 on Spring Canyon Road, was held. Mayor Dick Murphy, Councilman Maienschein and Fire Chief Osby officiated, with Steve Fiorina, Ranch resident and TV reporter covering the event for posterity. The Boy Scouts of Troops 616 and 663 raised the same flags that first flew over the temporary station to full staff. Troop 616 provided a replacement flag flown over the US Capital as well as a new California State Flag. The highlight of the event was the unveiling of the plaque dedicating the station to the gallant firemen of New York City who lost their lives on September 11th. It is planned to also dedicate the station to the brave firefighters of New York City who gave their lives in the terrorist attack of Sept. 11th. Fire Station #37 is the product of the combined efforts of the community and the fire fighters assigned to the station. The City had presented a layout for the fire station, which was considered “pedestrian.” The community formed a planning group and asked the local fire fighters to work with the community to develop what they felt would be not only a proper and functional station, but also one that would be a real asset to the City and the Ranch. The community committee consisted of Chairman Steve Goyette, Wes Danskin, Bob Ilko, Pat Bonaguidi, Claudia Unhold, and Bob Dingeman, participated in the planning of the fire station design. Activist Bob Ilko stepped forward as one of the prime architects in the location and layout of the fire station. The community used its accumulated community development funds and other monies to create a better-equipped, well-designed fire station. Laura Wilson, a McMillin Company employee and the Miramar Ranch North Planning Committee secretary for years, was instrumental in the efforts to complete the construction of Fire Station 37 when the original contractor defaulted and the community had to call in the construction bond to continue the building of the fire station. The McMillin Company contracted with Lusardi to take over construction of the fire station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/01, email from Bob Dingeman to Gloria Tran dated 4/6/10)

11/01

Perimeter road over the dam at Lake Miramar fenced off. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/01)

11/24/01 Farmers Market opened at EBS Elementary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/01)


 



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12/1/01


 First Open House held at Fire Station #37. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/02)

12/11/01 Gordon Boerner named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/02) “Gordon Boerner, a tireless worker for this achievement!” added Col. Bob Dingeman. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11) 1/02

Craig Jones reached a settlement in his suit against McMillin Homes regarding its Rancho Encantada development. As a result of the settlement, Rancho Encantada will be built, but the community received the opportunity to reduce community traffic impacts to the same degree as if the project had been scaled back in scope and size. In addition, as a result of the settlement the City made structural changes to the way it considered and analyzed development city-wide. Mr. Jones did not personally profit from his lawsuit. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/01, 1/02)

2/02

SD Police Department cracked down on migrant workers who gathered around the 7/11 store and were littering while trying to secure employment. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/02)

7/4/02

After much effort on the part of the Scripps Ranch Old Pros and Councilman Brian Maienschein, the Miramar Lake dam gates were opened for the 25th annual Scripps Ranch Old Pros' 10K run and bike ride. Security was extra tight, with new measures in effect for the morning of the event. Only runners or riders with an official race bib (and a small fanny pack and clear water bottle only, no bags or backpacks) were allowed across the dam. The gates were only open for this special event. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/02)

7/28/02

The Scripps Ranch Theatre took 23 awards out of a possible 43 awards for creativity and artistic excellence at the 38th annual Associated Community Theatres of San Diego Celebration and Aubrey Awards. (Source: Scripps Ranch Theatre Newsletter for the 2002-2003 Season)

8/02

With the assistance of the Save Our Scripps Ranch (SOS Ranch) committee, the long battle over setting aside the historical wall and trees adjacent to Evans Pond was finally won. This area was formally identified as "Historical Resources Board Site #450-- Scripps Meanley Stables and House Complex Cultural Landscape.” Though the land was designated a City Historical Site in the fall of 2000, an appeal was filed by the property owners at that time. Since then, Intel purchased the property and recently cancelled the appeal. SOS Ranch continued proceeding with the required paperwork for State Historical designation. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/02)

12/10/02 The SRCA named Robert Ilko as Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/03) 2002


 


The headline on the 11/14/03 Union Tribune read: “A 2002 Fire Report predicted Scripps Ranch Devastation.” The lead into the article stated: “The report predicted the possible loss of 200 to 300 homes and potential destruction of ‘biblical 
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proportions.” (Source: Email from Jerry Mitchell, Director of Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council, to Jake Todd dated 8/28/10)

Early 2003

A community-based Design Task Force participated in a four-month series of workshops with SDUSD’s architects and planners and the current Marshall administration to work on the design of the new Marshall Middle School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/84)

4/03

While tunneling for a new water pipeline along the north side of Scripps Lake Drive, paleontologists discovered several 45-million year old fossils. The most significant discovery was a specimen consisting of a left lower jaw, right jaw, and a right upper jaw fragment of an unidentified species within the genus Ourayia, which is a primate group. Based on the jaw specimens that were found, the paleontologists determined that the species is related to the modern tarsiers--also a form of primate. According to the San Diego Natural History Museum, modern tarsiers live today only in southeast Asian rainforests. The discovery of this primate here in San Diego meant that the climate 45 million years ago was tropical. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/03)

4/15/03

Marshall Middle School recognized as a California State Distinguished School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/03)

6/03

Jack Bryant, a long time SR resident who volunteered his vintage car collection for many years for use in the 4th of July parades, passed away and was buried with full honors at Fort Rosecrans. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/03)

7/03

For the first time in 12 years, the Scripps Ranch Girls Softball 12-U team qualified to be in the state championship tournament. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/03)

8/03

Scripps Ranch Recreation Council approved a request from the SR Old Pros to dedicate Jerabek Park’s J-9 field to the memory of Steve Allen, a SR resident for 26 years. The field was to be named the Steve Allen Memorial Field. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/03)

8/03

Western Pacific Housing started to plan for an age-restricted housing project to be constructed east of Alliant International University. Both the Scripps Ranch Planning Group and the City Planning Commission voted to support the project. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/03)

8/03

Charles Preece, a long-time SR community activist, passed away. Chuck and his wife lived in Scripps Ranch since 1978, both taking an active part in the community. Chuck edited the SRCA Newsletter, did publicity for the Scripps Ranch Community Theatre and served on its board, and was a member and chair of the Scripps Ranch Historical Society. He was also on the executive board of the Scripps Ranch Civic Association and served on the Citizens Advisory Council of Miramar College. His biggest legacy to the community was writing E. W. and Ellen Browning Scripps An


 



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Unmatched Pair, a book about the extraordinary siblings. He was also the secretary of the San Diego Pearl Harbor Survivors Association. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/04)

9/03

Miramar Ranch Elementary School added 6th grade to its class population as a result of overcrowding at Marshall Middle School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/03)

9/7/03

SR High School celebrated its 10th anniversary. 38 portables brought on campus when the school opened were still there at the 10th anniversary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/03, 10/03)

9/21/03

Before the Old Pros summer softball championship games were played, more than 250 people, including Councilmember Brian Maienschein, participated in the dedication and renaming of Jerabek Park’s J-9 baseball field to “Steve Allen Field.” Emcee Dennis Downs paid tribute to Steve Allen and extended thanks to several community groups and the city for recognizing such a unique individual. Steve Allen helped create and build Scripps Ranch’s first Little League field, served on the Little League board, coached kids from T-ball to Pony League, supervised maintenance of the Little League fields, and was past president and chairman of the board of directors for the Old Pros. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/03)

10/25/03 At 5:15 p.m. Saturday evening, a fire started near Cedar Creek in the Cleveland National Forest, 24 miles northeast of Scripps Ranch. Pushed by hot, dry winds gusting up to 40 mph, the fire quickly became an out of control inferno – and raced toward San Diego. (Source: Jerry Mitchell, Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council) 10/26/03 The Cedar Fire reached Scripps Ranch at 8:00 a.m. Sunday morning. With virtually no forewarning, the citizens of the community were rousted and directed by the San Diego Police Department to immediately evacuate. Later, the San Diego Fire Department determined that this horrific fire destroyed 312 Scripps Ranch homes and the temporary buildings at Chabad Hebrew Academy, and damaged a large number of other Scripps Ranch homes. Many neighborhoods were devastated by the firestorm. Due to the exceptional efforts of crews from the San Diego Fire Department, the US Forest Service and Calfire, the fire was prevented from moving deep into the neighborhoods north of Pomerado. In addition, many community members stayed behind and helped evacuate homes, saved numerous houses from burning, and assisted with traffic control. Due to these efforts, no lives were lost in Scripps Ranch and the destruction was much less than it could have been. The Cedar Fire was the most devastating firestorm in California history, burning approximately 2,323 homes in the county and killing 14 people. In typical Scripps Ranch style, amid the horror of the firestorm, there were amazing stories of a community that has not lost its spirit. Besides the many heroic people who saved homes, hundreds offered help to those displaced by the fire. Clint Carney, chief of policy and Scripps Ranch representative in Councilman Maienschein’s office, walked each street and made a list of the destroyed homes to post on the SRCA 
 



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website so residents could know the fate of their homes. At a meeting held at St. Gregory’s two days after the devastation, an estimated 1,600 people came together to rebuild the community. After the fire, the Scripps Ranch Recreation Center was turned into the Local Assistance Center, the SRCA put together Project Phoenix and a special Fire Relief Fund to help fire victims and the SRCA’s webmaster, Greg Minter, continually updated the SRCA’s website both during and after the fire to provide crucial information to the community. St. Gregory’s acted as a clearinghouse for donations of clothing and other items, which were made available to fire victims. Project Phoenix, a volunteer grassroots organization led by Bob Ilko, became a multitask effort to not only physically rebuild homes but to assist people throughout the county. The goals of Project Phoenix were to make the SRCA website the place for information and awareness; gather displaced resident information to be able to contact them; take digital photos of damaged and destroyed homes; help with erosion control; help with the demolition and rebuild decision-making processes; be a clearinghouse regarding insurance information; partner with volunteer legal assistance; and use the Geographic Information System mapping to assist the city with protecting storm drains, preventing erosion and locating existing swimming pools. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/03, 12/03) Project Phoenix was a vehicle around which the community could rally. With the help of Councilman Brian Maienshein and the entire Ranch, Project Phoenix was a smashing success and became a national model for all other communities to follow. (Source: Col R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

11/03

Channel 10 News honored three Ranch residents, Old Pros Rich Brown, Tim Forrey and Ray Calhoun, for spearheading efforts to provide food and comfort for those displaced by the fire. Rich Brown served more than 2,000 meals to fire-affected residents at St. Gregory’s. Tim Forrey and Ray Calhoun put together two cookouts for residents along Birch Bluff Avenue. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

11/03

SRHS Foundation postponed the Taste of the Ranch Fundraiser that was to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the opening of the high school. Ultimately, in January 2004, the event was cancelled due to an inability to locate another venue and date combination to hold the event. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

11/10/03 Chabad Hebrew Academy moved into its newly completed permanent buildings, just two weeks after the fire and losing all of the old temporary buildings, files and years of collected supplies in the firestorm. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04) 12/17/03 City Council approved plan to waive permit fees associated with rebuilding homes destroyed in the fire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/03) 12/03


 


The City commenced construction/trenching on Scripps Lake Drive in connection with the undergrounding of the existing overhead electric wires. Once the trenching was completed, the cabling portion of the work would commence and ultimately the


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overhead facilities and poles along the street would be removed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/04)

1/04

Membership in the SRCA was $20 per year. Initiation fee for the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club was $865. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/04)

1/04

The Local Assistance Center moved from the Scripps Ranch Recreation Center to the Information Center. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

1/1/04

A small group of Wine Country residents led by Jerry Mitchell, a retired naval aviator, organized a non-profit organization called the Chimney Canyon Fire Safety Council. This was the first urban chapter of the California Fire Safety Council in San Diego County. The name Chimney Canyon came from a local fireman who, three days after the fire, told residents that had the fire entered their canyon 200 more homes would likely have been destroyed. Firefighters stopped the fire within 70 feet of entering their canyon. The Fire Safety Council’s initial mission was to remove the volatile ground fuel and create a firebreak for their neighborhood. (Source: http://www.srfiresafecouncil.org/WhoWeAre.htm)

1/04

89% of homes destroyed by the fire have cleared their lots, including the slabs. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

1/20/04

City Council approved new building code regulations to ban wood shake and wood shingle roofs, and to require new structures in the city to have Class A roofs, which must be made of materials resistant to severe fire exposure. The new codes applied to roof repairs that encompass more than 25% of a structure’s roof area. The City referred the question of whether non combustible roofs, such as concrete or slate shingles, should be required in High Fire Hazard Areas, for further study. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

2/04

Scripps Ranch Community Theater celebrated its 25th year. (Source: SRCA 2/04)

2/6/04

Volunteers operated Miles of Smiles, a community fire-relief project to help families affected by the wildfires rebuild their photo collections. People brought photos of fire-affected residents to Dingeman Elementary, where they copied the photos for fire victims for free on copiers donated by Hewlett-Packard. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04)

3/04

The proposed revised signage for the Water Plant’s new entrance was presented to both planning groups and the SRCA for approval. The signage was extensively modified and made smaller and more consistent with the entrance from the previous design. The entry signs had been commissioned as “public art” by the Water Department and the original design incorporated large shining metallic letters that have since been removed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/04, 3/04)


 



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2/10/04

SRCA named all San Diego firefighters and law enforcement personnel as the Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/84)

3/04

Maria and Christos Karvounis were the first Scripps Ranch fire-affected family to move into their new home. They re-built their home exactly as it was before. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/04)

4/04

SRCA hosted a successful barbecue and meeting with Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi at Marshall Middle School, attended by around 500 people, where the Commissioner heard the community’s complaints. That meeting led to a group of fire survivors, including Erik Strahm, Don Robinson, Susan Smith, Karen Reimus and Adam Richardson of Scripps Ranch, going to Sacramento to educate legislators as to what happens to homeowners after a catastrophic loss and to lobby for changes in laws that protect homeowners. This group of Scripps Ranch residents became known as part of the “Dynamic Dozen,” twelve unrelenting and tireless volunteers who put in countless hours to ensure that future victims of disasters would not have to face the insurance issues faced by homeowners after the Cedar Fires. The five legislative bills designed to protect homeowners were known as the California Homeowners Bill of Rights. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/04)

4/04

The “Builders Working In Cooperation” (pronounced “brick”) program held its first meeting. This program brought together a working group of building professionals, utility providers, local government, political leaders and the community for the purpose of allowing builders to discuss what they need from the city and what they expect in managing their own projects, as well as ways to minimize delays, impacts, conflicts and improve efficiencies. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/04)

4/04

The first fourteen Scripps Ranch residents graduated from the San Diego Fire Department Scripps Ranch Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training Program. These volunteers were trained to provide assistance in the event of a future disaster, such as an earthquake, fire or terrorist attack. Resident Steve Walker worked with Battalion Fire Chief Bowlin to get the SR CERT, the first official CERT within the city of San Diego, organized and functional as a trained augmentation to the fire department. The goal was to have 200 trained volunteers to help the thousands of Scripps Ranch residents. As of March 2005, SR CERT had 32 trained volunteers. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/04, 5/04, 3/05, 12/05)

5/16/04

For the first time ever, the SRCA Community Fair (5th annual) was followed immediately by the opening concert for the summer Symphony in the Park concert series, with Rockola performing. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/04) Mike and Bev Cassity were the chairpersons for the Community Fair. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

5/04

As a result of tough economic conditions, the city manager proposed numerous budget cuts, including cutting the Community Service Center program, which locally was at the Scripps Ranch Information Center. Recent statistics showed that the


 



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Information Center served nearly 1,500 people per month and collected about $75,000. Councilmember Maienschein and the community were in favor of keeping the Community Service Center program alive and urged people to let the city know how important the Information Center was to the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/04)

6/04

Jan Arbuckle and Cary Meyer formed a support group, the Burnout Sisters, for women that had lost their homes in the Cedar Fire. The group provided comfort, fellowship and shared information. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/04, 8/04)

6/04

Project Phoenix Chair, Bob Ilko, was presented with the Channel 10 Leadership Award for his extensive community works in the aftermath of the Cedar Fire. Mr. Ilko helped evacuate his neighborhood, worked feverishly to help fire victims, whether it was regarding demolition, insurance issues or coordinating construction traffic. Bob also took the knowledge that he learned in Scripps Ranch and helped fireaffected residents in other areas. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/04)

6/04

The first reference to “fire folk” was made in the SRCA Newsletter. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/03) Unwilling to be considered fire victims, those Scripps Ranch residents whose homes were damaged or destroyed in the Cedar Fire decided to refer to themselves as fire folk. Wes Danskin coined the phrase because “I hate being called a victim, and I don’t like survivor much better. Despite the pain, it isn’t cancer or war. I am so pleased when I see fire folk used so pervasively in the press. The term honors the new group and the issues, without turning us into pitiful outcasts.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/04)

7/04

Ten months after the Cedar Fire, 60% of fire-affected residents have permits to begin rebuilding, while another 17% have construction plans that are in the process of being approved. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/04)

7/10/04

A large crowd celebrated the reopening of Miramar Lake for fishing of catfish, bluegill and bass. The Lake had been closed in connection with the construction of the water treatment plant. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/04)

7/19/04

State Route 56 opened to vehicular traffic. The project cost $220 million and was designed to facilitate regional movement of traffic and, in part, alleviate traffic on Mira Mesa Blvd. and Pomerado Road. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/04)

8/04

The SRCA Fire Relief Fund distributed checks to displaced Scripps Ranch fire victims ($400 per family). (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/04)

8/04

The Chimney Canyon Fire Safety Council was awarded two U.S. Forest grants totaling $224,000 to provide some 600 homes surrounding Chimney Canyon with a 100-foot firebreak. (Source: http://www.srfiresafecouncil.org) Unfortunately, the Chimney Canyon Fire Safety Council would have had to do the work prior to receiving the funding and as a result had to turn down the award. (Source: Jerry


 



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Mitchell, Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council) The Chimney Canyon Fire Safe Council also submitted a plan to secure financing from a nonfederal agency to reforest both sides of Pomerado Road under the supervision of the Park and Recreation Department. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/04)

8/04

USMC Helicopter Light Attack Squadron 169 based at Camp Pendleton made its second visit to Scripps Ranch Chimney Canyon area to help homeowners clear hazardous brush and deadwood. In each case, a street party followed the work to honor the squadron upon its return from the war zone. Affection between the groups was mutual as this Scripps Ranch neighborhood adopted the squadron. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/04)

8/04

The San Diego Public Library recognized the Scripps Miramar Ranch Branch Library staff as "Team of the Year." In the aftermath of the Cedar fire, the library staff reached out to victims, made meeting rooms available to them on a large scale, and assembled relevant reference books. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/04)

8/04

Land clearing and demolition of trees underway for construction of the new middle school. The planned completion date for occupancy remained September 2006. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/04)

9/16/04

The RSVP celebrated its 10th anniversary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/04)

9/04

UCSD School of Engineering constructed a 25 ft. by 40 ft. shake table on the 800 acres of land owned by UCSD south of Pomerado Road as part of the National Science Foundation’s George E. Brown Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). The $9 million shake table is the largest in the U.S. and the only outdoor shake table in the world, which makes it ideally suited for testing tall, fullscale buildings. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/03 and http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news_events/releases/release.sfe?id=494)

9/04

The Governor signed three of the five Homeowners Bill of Rights into law. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/04)

10/04

The Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council proposed the creation of the 100-Acre Wood Project and solicited assistance. The majority of the mature eucalyptus trees in Carroll Canyon ultimately died following the Cedar Fire. The City was removing the dead trees, creating large open areas. If nothing were to be done, the dense eucalyptus groves would return during the next decade. The SRFSC proposed the 100-Acre Wood project as a concept for a long-range reforestation project intended to address this problem. The goal would be to transition the eastern-most 100 acres of Carroll Canyon into a place with indigenous, drought tolerant, fire resistant, park-like groves maintained with community support, volunteers and city participation. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/04) The SRFSC was unable to garner sufficient support for the 100-Acre Wood Project and the concept was dropped. (Source: Jerry Mitchell, Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council)


 



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10/24/04 SRCA hosted a one year anniversary of the Cedar Fire event entitled the “Community Unity: Scripps Ranch Stronger Than Ever” at Scripps Ranch Community Park. Hundreds of fire survivors and residents came together to spend a day in the park on the Sunday anniversary of the firestorm. There was food, games, and fun, as well as a chance to spend a day with family and friends. The event was a huge success as a result of the help of many community businesses and groups that donated funds, food and services. Afterwards, St. Gregory’s hosted a nondenominational community service. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/04, 11/04, 12/04) 10/04

82% of homeowners had permits to start rebuilding. A total of 87% of homeowners had submitted new home plans to the City. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04)

11/04

The SRCA provided welcome mats to each of the fire-affected families as they moved back in. As of November 2004, they had distributed 10 welcome mats. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04)

10/04

Mail ‘N More, a neighborhood post office annex opened in the Scripps Trails Center. The community was without a full mail service facility since the drugstore in the Vons shopping center closed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04)

10/04

After a year-long campaign to secure funds for the much needed renovation of the high school stadium field, the School District committed to provide a grant of $390,000 to cover a portion of the construction costs and is consistent with the amount provided to other district high schools with similar projects. The funding was contingent, however, on the school being able to raise the remaining funding. The total cost of the project was estimated at $1.3 million. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04)

10/04

The San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) held a community wide informational meeting to discuss the impact of the SDCWA’s Pomerado Pipeline 4 Relining Project on the community. The most significant impacts will be to Miramar Ranch Elementary School, six homeowners on Waldgrove Place and other homes located near the access and portal sites. Pipeline 4 required repairs because of signs of deterioration and relining the pipes with steel was a quicker, more cost effective alternative to replacing the pipeline. One of the access portals was located on Miramar Ranch Elementary and required fencing off a portion of the playground for a large part of the school year. Construction was to continue through May 2005. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04)

10/31/04 Official dedication ceremony for the new Chabad Educational Campus held. Mayor Dick Murphy, Councilmember Brian Maienschein and academy-award winning actor Jon Voight were present. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/04) In 2004, the recently completed Chabad Educational Center Campus was also awarded 
 



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“Outstanding Educational Design” 2004 by the American School and University competition for innovative design. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/05)

11/15/04 Numerous Scripps Ranch fire survivors stayed up until almost midnight to deliver compelling testimony to the State Senate Insurance Committee, which had convened a special local investigatory hearing regarding the insurance problems 2003 wildfire victims experienced. In direct response to the stories of insurance failures, State Senate Insurance Chair Jackie Speier introduced Senate Bill 2, which is a homeowner’s insurance reform package. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05) 12/14/04 SRCA recognized Marvin Miles as the Citizen of the Year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05) 12/04

The City and the YMCA entered into a 10-year lease (renewable for 25 years with $1 annual rent) relating to the 4-acre parcel west of the Vons Center on Scripps Poway Parkway. The community commenced designing and fundraising for a recreational facility that meets the needs of the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05)

12/04

The City reduced the speed limit on Scripps Poway Parkway from Spring Canyon Road to the Poway city limits to 45 mph in both directions as a result of a request from a group of concerned residents to reduce the speed limit. The request prompted the City to perform a speed survey, the results of which justified lowering the speed limit. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/04)

12/04

The postmaster of the Scripps Ranch Post Office agreed to continue forwarding the mail of fire survivors for one more year. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/04)

12/04

Alyssa Huckleberry, a SRHS senior, published her first book, Rescuing Racei, a fantasy novel geared towards 9-12 year olds. The book won the San Diego Book Award for young adult fiction. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/04, 9/06)

2004

The SR Old Pros were 260 members strong. Besides still having a good time, they continue to be dedicated to providing funds to Scripps Ranch kids sports and generated money through their baseball, soccer and basketball leagues, events and tournaments and the 4th of July 10K and Bike Ride. (Source: www.srop.org/history.html)

1/05

A small community ribbon cutting opening ceremony was held to celebrate the completion of the unisex bathroom at Lakeview Neighborhood Park, which after many years of effort replaced the portable bathrooms at this popular and well-used park. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/05)

1/05

The Chimney Canyon Fire Safety Council teamed with the SRCA, changed its name to the Scripps Ranch Fire Safety Council, and extended its mission to the entire 12,000 homes in Scripps Ranch. (Source: http://www.srfiresafecouncil.org)


 



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1/05

The City and the YMCA entered into a lease concerning the 4-acre parcel located west of the Washington Mutual in the Scripps Ranch Marketplace on Scripps Poway Parkway in December 2004. Since the YMCA was required to take possession of and make use of the parcel right away, but did not want to incur significant expenses during the interim phase when planning for the long-term use of the site will be determined, the site was graded and chalked for a free Walking Club. (Source: SRCA 2/05)

1/05

Chuck Adkison, the devoted SRCA Newsletter distribution manager, stepped down after 30 years of distributing the newsletter. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05)

1/05

Heavy rains and high winds did a great deal of damage to Scripps Ranch trees. As many as 100 massive trees--some 80 to 90 years old--fell, blocking roads and, in some instances, damaging cars and fences. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/05) When the City crews were overwhelmed, the Scripps Ranch Maintenance Assessment District crews stepped in and cleared all the Ranch roads of downed trees. Again, another example of Scripps Ranch taking care of itself by well-organized community action. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

1/05

Fifteen months after the Cedar Fire, 90% of fire-affected residents have permits to begin rebuilding, while a dozen fire survivors have moved into their new homes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/05)

1/05

Firefighters at Station #37 chose Scripps Ranch resident Kathy Foley’s design for a logo to be worn on the back of the T-shirts that Fire Station #37 firefighters wear on duty. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/05)

2/5/05

Mayor Dick Murphy and Councilmember Brian Maienschein formally cut the ribbon dedicating Overlook Park on Scripps Ranch Boulevard overlooking Miramar Lake. The old saying that "Rome was not built in a day," applied to this park. It started out as a passive park, but when the Scripps Ranch Boulevard alignment changed to its present configuration, McMillin park planner Jack Nakawatase designed a full park. Many different plans were considered for this park and community residents and MRNPC members Claudia Unhold, Bill Bernard, and Dave Berry put in a considerable amount of efforts to bring this park online. The completion of Overlook Park was the last project that the McMillin Company was obligated to deliver to the community. This project completed nearly 30 years of Corky McMillin's involvement in construction on the Ranch and his assistance in meeting the community goals. Corky McMillin and the representatives of his company had been an integral part of the community. Bob Dingeman stated “Many times Corky has stepped forward and funded receptions for our community. Together, as a community and as developers, we have made the difference. For example, when the Cedar Fire swept Handrich Drive, McMillin provided the old plans without cost to residents to use to rebuild their homes. The names of McMillin representatives have


 



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filled the roster of both our planning groups for years of service, working with and occasionally battling us, but always producing a quality product.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/05 and 3/05)

2/05

The SRCA adopted the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council project entitled "Elimination of Wildfire-Promoting Ground Fuel Throughout Scripps Ranch," as the basis for developing their comprehensive communitywide plan of action. This three-to-fiveyear project provided a critical jumpstart for the initial removal of the large quantities of ground fuel still remaining in Scripps Ranch canyons and hillsides. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/05).

2/21/05

During heavy rains, a 100-foot eucalyptus tree fell on Pomerado Road near Scripps Ranch Boulevard and killed Scott Blevins from Ramona. The tree crushed the cab of his truck. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/05)

2/05

The first of twelve solar powered traffic-calming, speed monitoring device were installed. The signs cost approximately $12,000 each and 6 were placed in each of the Miramar Ranch North and Scripps Ranch planning areas on streets where speeding is prevalent and increased the risk of accidents. (Source: SRCA 2/05, 3/05)

3/05

All of the large power poles and overhead power lines on Scripps Lake Drive have been removed in connection with the undergrounding of the power lines by SDG&E. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/05)

3/5/05

The Navy Seal Leap Frogs “dropped” in on opening day ceremony of SR Little League. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/05)

4/05

Approximately 20% of homeowners affected by the fire have moved back into their rebuilt homes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/05)

4/12/05

Vandals intentionally left broken glass from beer bottles in the play area of the Scripps Ranch Community Park. A small child cut her foot. The entire area was shut down to completely clean the sand at a cost of $15,000 to replace the sand. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/05)

5/05

County Supervisor Pam Slater-Price provided a $10,000 grant to be used to renovate Scripps Ranch hiking trails 12, 23, and 25. The work was performed by the state California Conservation Corps (CCC) under the guidance of the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council. Gordon Boerner put in significant hours to obtain the grant and Jerry Mitchell was instrumental in organizing the restoration of the fire-damaged trails. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/05, 7/05, 8/05)

7/05

Approximately 50% of homeowners have moved back into their rebuilt homes. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/05)


 



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7/4/05

During the SRCA’s 35th anniversary 4th of July celebrations, a flag pole was installed as a Cedar Fire Memorial in Hoyt Park with a marble memorial inscribed to the courageous citizens of Scripps Ranch. Children from families who lost homes in the Cedar Fire raised a flag from the U.S. Capitol on this pole. The Old Pros, including Jerry O’Meara, Dennis Downs, Owen Fabert, were involved in organizing the establishment of the flagpole and memorial. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/05, 8/05) The SRCA and Col. Bob Dingeman arranged for Congressman Duncan Hunter to provide a special flag that had flown over the Capitol for the ceremony. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

7/16/05

Stonefield Development, which is nearing completion of rebuilding 81 homes, hosted a “Homecoming Celebration” on Pinecastle Street. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/05)

7/22/05

To comply with the requirements of the US Healthy Forest Act, the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council formed the Scripps Ranch Community Fire Safe Alliance. Twelve Federal, State, and Civic organizations pledged to collaborate in efforts to protect Scripps Ranch from future wildfires. Formation of this alliance qualified the Fire Safe Council for additional Federal funding to remove wildfire fuel in open spaces adjacent to homes. (Source: http://www.srfiresafecouncil.org)

7/6/05

The opening of the new Marshall Middle School was delayed from September 2006 to September 2007 due to the need to conduct a systematic ordnance detection and removal process and construction delays related to record rainfall. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/05) Despite assurances that historically no artillery had been fired into the area or unexploded ordnance found, the State directive was to screen the area. This resulted in a year delay and a million dollars of effort. No explosives of any type were found on site. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

9/05

The City Council approved revisions to the City’s brush management regulations, which included a citywide requirement for 100 feet of defensible space between structures and native wildlands. One of the goals of the new regulations was to make the standards consistent throughout the City and thus make enforcement more efficient. The new Code also permitted the use of goats for brush abatement within the City. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/05)

9/5/05

Kathie Jones and her family were severely injured when their SUV was struck at the intersection of Pomerado Road and Scripps Poway Parkway by a U.S. Forest Service fire truck traveling to a fire in Rancho Penasquitos on Labor Day. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter: 10/05)

9/30/05

In part, due to the efforts of many SR fire folk, including Karen Reimus, Senate Bill 2 (SB2) was signed into law by Governor Schwarzenegger. SB2 provided an extension of Additional Living Expense benefits to two years in cases of loss due to a declared state of emergency; placed limits on who could estimate the replacement value of a


 



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residence or from recommending coverage limits and made earthquake and fire mediation programs permanent. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/05)

10/23/05 The Burnout Sisters hosted “Home Again … The Tour,” a tour of 11 rebuilt Scripps Ranch homes. More than 350 residents toured the homes and the proceeds of the home tour raised $16,696 for the American Red Cross. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/05) 10/05

Approximately 96% of homeowners have permits to start rebuilding and 64% have moved back home. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/05)

10/05

As the community marked the two-year anniversary of the Cedar Fire, many in the community launched a campaign to “Pay It Forward” and extend to Hurricane Katrina survivors the kindness and generosity they received after the Cedar Fire. St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church set up a relief center, similar to one created after the fire and donations were sent to Katrina victims. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/05)

11/16/05 Groundbreaking for the new Marshall Middle School occurred. The new middle school is expected to cost $42 million. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/05) 12/4/05

Fire broke out and destroyed the Scripps Ranch medical center complex on the corner of Scripps Ranch Blvd. and Mira Mesa Blvd. Investigators believed the fire was intentionally set to cover up a burglary. As a result of the fire, the postal facility located in Medco Drug and the only postal facility in Scripps Ranch, was closed permanently. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/06)

12/13/05 Jany Staley was named Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. At the SRCA Recognition Night, Councilmember Brian Maienschein presented her with a special City Council resolution proclaiming December 14, 2005 as Jany Staley Day. The SRCA also instituted the Volunteer Hall of Fame to recognize past Citizens of the Year who continue their active volunteerism. The first inductees were: Chuck Adkison, Steve Allen, Brian Allman, Gordon Boerner, Wes Danskin, Bob Ilko, Bob Dingeman, Julian Parrish, Marc Sorensen, Claudia Unhold, and Karen Wood. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/05, 1/06) 2005


 


Total Scripps Ranch population: 33,107 (a 22.3% increase since 2000), with 12,060 households and a median household income of $92,228. Population by race: Asian: 12.4%, Black: 2.3%, Hispanic: 6.9%, Native American: 0.2%, Caucasian: 79%, and two or more races: 3.7%. The median age of Scripps Ranch houses was 12.3 years, with a median value of $727,508, 88% owner-occupied. Education: population over 25 with graduate degrees: 27%, population over 25 with four-year college degrees: 37%. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/06)


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1/06

The Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council had seven neighborhood chapters, each with a Fire Safe project underway or in planning. The chapters are: Chimney Canyon, Moselle, Eastglen, Wine Country Corner, Meadowdale, Miramar Ranch and a special chapter addressing the wood shake shingle roof problem. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/06)

2/24/06

City proclaimed “Lake Miramar Day.” Ceremony held at Lake Miramar to mark opening of recent public improvements and to celebrate the partnership between the Water Dept. and the community. Improvements included a redesigned entrance with new signage, a resurfaced parking lot, an additional parking lot at the west end, and new upgraded landscaping (Source: The Miramar Water Treatment Plant Construction News, Winter 2006) SRCA representatives had worked with a SR community group and the San Diego Water Department to determine the types of aesthetic improvements wanted at Miramar Lake, as well as the design of the new sign. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/07)

2/06

The Welcome Club celebrated its 25th anniversary with a big cake at its general meeting. The club raises funds and supports a variety of local SR charities, while also engaging in many fun, social activities. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/06)

3/06

Boy Scout Troop 616, SR’s first Boy Scout troop, celebrated its 35th anniversary. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/06)

3/06

Sign-ups commenced for the first season of Scripps Ranch Pop Warner Football and Cheer. Lisa Gorski spearheaded the effort of creating the league. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/06)

4/06

Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council was awarded two grants from the U.S. Forest Service and will receive over $85,000 to assist neighborhood action groups to initiate fuel reduction projects in Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/06) Ultimately, the SRFSC was unable to obtain all of the numerous permits required from the City, Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Eventually, the City Wastewater Department did most of the work that the SRFSC had planned to do, and the SRFSC returned the funds to the California Fire Safe Council for assignment to another project. (Source: Jerry Mitchell, Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council)

4/06

Two and a half years after the Cedar Fire, 79% of homeowners have moved home, and 96% have permits to start rebuilding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/06)

5/06

San Diego Water officials installed a floating latrine in Miramar Lake with a $50,000 grant from the state. Community members waged an aggressive campaign to get rid of it. A compromise was reached and the latrine was anchored to the primary dock at the lake. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/06, 9/06, http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20060716/news_1m1mpottie.html)


 



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5/13/06

The City Park and Recreation Dept. held re-openings for the reconstructed Forestview Neighborhood Park and Semillon Neighborhood Park Tot Lots. The replacement of the antiquated playground equipment with new equipments was made possible in part as a result from a grant from the State of California. (Source: Invitations to Tot Lot Re-openings)

6/15/06

Groundbreaking occurred for the installation of the $1.3 million artificial surface for the SRHS stadium, which is Phase I of the state-of-the-art stadium improvement project. Phase II of the project, at $400,000, included completion of the turf field and construction of the track. This project required the tireless efforts of the hardworking committee, together with the donations of many community members and several generous major donors, the Cush Family Foundation, the Charger Foundation, the NFL Foundation, and the Grosvenor Familiy Foundation and was still seeking donations. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/06, Col. R.E. Dingeman 11/11)

6/19/06

Captain Warren Geiske retired from the San Diego Fire Department after 29 years in the department, 11 of which were at Fire Station #37. Captain Geiske started his career in Scripps Ranch when the fire station was merely a trailer near Miramar Lake and was one of the guiding forces in getting the new Fire Station #37 built. Most importantly, Captain Geiske made the station a central part of the community, a friendly, inviting place that welcomes all residents. The SRCA hosted a special celebration in honor of Captain Geiske at the fire station. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/06)

7/1/06

The Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council utilized goats provided by Environmental Land Management, Inc. to reduce fire fuel in the community. This effort required two scientific studies: one by a Fire Behavior Analytic Company and the other by the County’s leading environmental biologist. The first study determined that the firebreak in the wildland/urban interface area between our southernmost neighborhoods and the U.S. government property east of MCAS Miramar needed to be 200 feet wide to protect the community. After considerable deliberation, the City granted permits for the added width to the safety zones. The goats treated roughly an acre a day, and worked in the Whispering Ridge-South and Central, Loire Valley and Birch Bluff project areas. The project took 5 months to complete and covered 82 acres. The project was funded entirely by the residents of the neighborhoods listed above. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/06, 9/06, 12/06)

7/06

The San Diego Unified School District approved a Primary Extended Program (PEP) for Scripps Ranch, which will be based at Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School. The pilot program is a half-day junior kindergarten for 5 year olds whose parents preferred waiting until age 6 for full-day kindergarten. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/06)

9/25/06

The Local Fire Survivor Assistance Center located in the Information Center was closed due to the tremendous progress of the Scripps Ranch rebuilding process. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/06)


 



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9/30/06

A gala reception held in the SR Library’s community room to celebrate Nancy Assaf’s 20th anniversary as the Scripps Ranch librarian. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/06)

9/06

The completion of SRHS’ Grosvenor Stadium and Debra Parrish Field was celebrated at the SRHS Homecoming Game. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/06)

10/06

At the third anniversary of the Cedar Fire, 87% of homeowners have moved back home and 97% have permits to start rebuilding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/06)

11/3/06

Miramar Ranch Elementary celebrated its 30th birthday with a big celebration attended by former principals and staff, Councilmember Maienschein, School Superintendent Carl Cohn, Area 2 Assistant Superintendent Chelsea Smith and School Board Trustee Katherine Nakamura. The entire school sang the MRE school song. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/06)

11/7/06

San Diego County Proposition A, which proposed obtaining 3,000 acres at MCAS Miramar to develop a commercial airport was defeated 62 percent opposed to 38 percent in favor. The public decided that they did not want the military to leave and that the proposed joint use arrangement would increase noise levels to an intolerable level and would interfere with the needs of the military. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/06)

11/06

Cub Scout Pack 615 was formed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/06)

11/06

Jerry Mitchell, the chair of the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council, was selected to receive the Channel 10 Leadership Award from KGTV. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/06)

12/13/06 Elissa Barber and Bill Bernard named Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year by SRCA. Lynn Parke, David Prewett and Katie Sullivan were inducted into the Volunteer Hall of Fame. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/07) 2007


 


Sky Danskin’s Eagle Scout Project creates an oral history of the Scripps Ranch community. In his survey of 210 Scripps Ranch residents, only 29% had friends in Scripps Ranch before they moved. When asked their favorite thing about the community, 79% said the overall quality of life, 58% said the safe community, 44% said the schools, 35% said the country living, 30% said the proximity to freeways, and 21% said the predictable appreciation. When asked about their volunteering habits, 40% said they were active before coming to SR but 64% said they are now active. Finally, 57% of those surveyed said they would stay forever. (Source: Creating an Oral History of Scripps Ranch, An Eagle Scout Project from Boy Scout Troop 663 by Andrew Sky Danskin, Spring 2007)


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1/07

Scripps Ranch’s newest Boy Scout unit, Troop 301, was chartered. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/07)

1/1/07

An ambulance returned to the Scripps Ranch fire station. The community had been without one for several years after the ambulance based at Station #37 had been moved to Mira Mesa. Lou Manso spearheaded the effort, collected data documenting the negative impact to the community due to a lack of a local ambulance over the past three years. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/06, 12/06)

1/13/07

Councilmember Brian Maienschein hosted a groundbreaking ceremony at the Rancho Family YMCA’s Scripps Ranch site. Construction and landscaping was expected to be completed in time to start interim use programs as soon as summer 2007. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/07)

2/3/07

The Scripps Ranch High School Foundation hosted the first annual Taste of the Ranch. The event had been originally scheduled for November 2003, but had to be cancelled because of the Cedar Fire and its aftermath. It was held in the community room of the SR Library and sold out. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/07)

2/07

Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council awarded a $65,000 grant by the California Fire Safe Council to promote the establishment of more firebreaks with Scripps Ranch. With the new grant, the SRFSC could augment the funding of neighborhood firebreaks by up to 25% of the cost. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/07)

3/04/07

The Scripps Ranch Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), an all-volunteer organization, held an earthquake disaster drill in the Scripps Legacy neighborhood to hone their skills in the event of a real emergency. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/07)

5/07

The Scripps Ranch Community Emergency Response Team placed emergency lockers filled with equipment and medical supplies at locations in each of the 20 SRCA districts. Funds for the lockers were provided by a grant from the SRCA. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/07)

6/16/07

YMCA grand opening of the first phase of programming held at the Scripps Poway Parkway site, attended by Mayor Jerry Sanders and City Councilmember Brian Maienschein. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/07)

6/12/07

On his 85th birthday, the City Council recognized Bob Dingeman’s efforts with “Bob Dingeman Day.” (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/07)

6/19/07

The City designated the day as “Marc Sorensen Day” in honor of all that Marc has done for the community, including acting as SRCA President for many years and serving on the Recreation Council. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/07)


 



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7/3/07

Councilman Brian Maienschein turned the key and removed the lock that culminated in nearly six years of his efforts to open Miramar Dam to foot traffic. People can once again walk, ride or roller blade all the way around the lake. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/07)

7/21/07

The library’s Book Nook reopened after a complete remodeling and is renamed “Grace’s Book Nook,” in honor of Grace Roos, the first long-term manager of the Book Nook. Grace Roos organized used book sales when the library was just a storefront. The Book Nook raised nearly $175,000 since the library opened, all of which benefited the library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/07)

8/07

Scripps Ranch Cedar Fire survivors paid it forward and volunteered to be part of a unique “Fire Recovery Mentor Program,” in which Tahoe-Angora Ridge fire victims were matched up with a Scripps Ranch Cedar Fire survivor for emotional support and real life insight into recovering from a total and catastrophic loss. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/07)

9/4/07

The new Marshall Middle School, with three main instructional buildings constructed on 24 acres of sloping hillside, opened. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 8/07) The “Great Wall of Scripps Ranch” located at Marshall Middle School was the largest interlocking free-standing wall in the world. The wall, comprised of 58,000 interlocking bricks, was 1,700-foot long and up to 50 feet high. No concrete was used. The huge wall had to be erected because they were limited by the site terrain configuration and needed to make the area for the building pad larger. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/06) The one-of-a-kind in the school district Parent-Paid Bus Program enabled approximately 25% of the student population to ride the bus to school. Denise Hampton, as chair of the Traffic Subcommittee and Bob Ilko, Scripps Ranch Planning Group chair, led the effort to get this unique program up and running. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/07)

10/22/07 Outbreak of the Witch Creek fire a few days shy of the 4th anniversary of the Cedar Fire forced Scripps Ranch residents to participate in a mandatory evacuation. People were able to return to their homes the next day. While the fire didn’t touch Scripps Ranch, neighboring communities of Poway, Rancho Bernardo and other areas of San Diego County were hit by the fire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/07) Later, many Cedar Fire survivors and other Scripps Ranch residents helped provide assistance at the Ranch Bernardo Local Assistance Center after the Witch Creek Fire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/07) 11/19/07 Robert Dingeman awarded the Miramar College Foundation’s 2007 Outstanding Leader Award. (Source: Col. R.E. Dingeman) 11/28/07 Marshall Middle School’s official ribbon cutting ceremony was held. Ceremony originally scheduled for October, but was delayed due to the fires. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/08)


 



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11/07

San Diego Architectural Foundation awarded the San Diego Unified School District an “Onion” award for the design of Thurgood Marshall Middle School. The district also won a people’s choice onion award for the school’s design. (Source: http://legacy.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20071130-2259-bn1orchids2.html)

12/07

Miramar Marine Corps Air Station was awarded top honors as the “World’s Best Military Air Show” by the International Council of Air Shows. The Blue Angels had performed at Miramar Air Show every year since the 1950s, other than in 2007, when the Air Force Thunderbirds took their place. The Blue Angels returned to the Miramar Air Show in 2008. (Source: http://legacy.utsandiego.com/news/metro/20071218-0635-1bo18airshow.html)

12/12/07 City officials, staff and community members gathered to celebrate the completion of the Contract A phase of work for the Miramar Water Treatment Plant upgrade and expansion project. Contract A included 12 new filter basins, a rapid mix facility and a new administration building. (Source: The Miramar Water Treatment Plant Construction News, Winter 2008) 12/16/07 Silver Anniversary of the Scripps Ranch Holiday Tree Lighting. (Source: http://www.scrippsranch.org/documents/Tree%20Lighting%20Flyer%202007.pdf) 2/1/08

Rick Novak, the first and only principal of Marshall Middle School since its opening, retired. Rick was instrumental in the success of the school and the designing of the new Marshall. The central paseo in the middle of the school was dedicated to Mr. Novak and the first street on campus bore his name, Novak Way. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/08)

3/11/08

Rod Bolton and Bob Cavanagh were named Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year by the SRCA. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/08)

4/08

San Diego Project Heart Beat, with the financial contributions of Jennifer Blake, Karen McElliott, the Ron McElliott Memorial Fund and many other local contributors, placed ten Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) in the Scripps Ranch public schools. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/08)

4/25/08

Scripps Ranch Fire Safety Council received a $97,200 federal grant to extend its Neighborhood Brush Abatement Program through 2009. A key factor in the award was the SRCA's pledge to assist with in-kind matching funds. In all, 24 Neighborhood FSC chapters were formed. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/08)

5/13/08

The School Board voted to approve new Scripps Ranch elementary school boundaries in connection with the upcoming move of the Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School to the much larger facility at the old Marshall Middle School site. The School Board decision came after many months of community meetings and work by the Reboundarying Subcommittee of the SRCA Schools Committee analyzing various reboundary options. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/08)


 



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5/08

Scripps Ranch resident, Becky D’Aoust, was murdered in her home by her daughter. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/08)

8/30/08

Community icon, Nancy Corbin Assaf, retired after roughly 22 years as the Head Librarian of the Scripps Ranch Library. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/08)

9/2/08

Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary re-opened at the old Marshall site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/08)

9/08

Scripps Ranch eucalyptus were facing the challenge of a re-infestation of the lerp. Approximately four years prior, the community had to remove at least 600 trees in connection with a lerp infestation. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/08)

9/7/08

Groundbreaking ceremony held on a 9-acre parcel in Stonebridge Estates for St. Gregory the Great Catholic School. (Source: http://www.stggcs.org/)

10/5/08

Jerabek Elementary celebrated its 30th anniversary with a band, food and former and future Jerabekians. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/08)

10/14/08 The SRCA hosted a “Thank You” reception for outgoing Councilmember Brian Maienschein, who consistently took the lead to help the community throughout his tenure as Scripps Ranch’s representative on the City Council. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/08) 10/08

Five years after the Cedar Fire, 306 homes have been rebuilt. Only six lots remained where families opted to relocate. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/08)

10/14/08 The City Council proclaimed this day Karen Reimus Day to honor her for efforts to protect homeowners post-Cedar Fire. Karen had become a nationally recognized advocate for consumers obtaining fair representation and settlements from their home insurance companies based on her experiences from the Cedar Fire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/08) 11/18/08 City Council proclaimed Gloria Tran Day in honor of her many volunteer activities. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/08) 11/08

Marine Corps Air Station Miramar awarded the President’s 2008 Award for Leadership and Federal Energy Management in recognition of it exceptional progress in water and energy conservation and as the most energy efficient installation in the Marine Corps. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/08)

2008

During the year, the SR Fire Safe Council i) completed 100-foot fuel breaks for eight neighborhoods, which impacted 359 homes and 57 acres, ii) assisted with the formation of four new North County Fire Safe Councils in Rancho Bernardo, Rancho


 



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Penasquitos, Lake Hodges and Ramona and iii) launched an interactive computer program to assist homeowners in determining the actions they should take to prepare for the next wildfire. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/09)

1/09

Approximately 32,000 people lived in about 11,500 households in Scripps Ranch, which made the community larger than five of the 18 cities in San Diego County. The median age was 38 and only 37% of residents are 45 or older. Scripps Ranch was one of the highest “online usage” communities in one of the highest “online usage” cities in the entire nation and the cell phone usage in Scripps Ranch leads the city. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/09)

2/09

Miramar Ranch Elementary School’s Safety Patrol won the Best Elementary School Safety Patrol in the Northeastern Division of San Diego for 2008-2009, and was ranked first out of 89 elementary schools in San Diego. Police Chief William Lansdowne presented an award to the Safety Patrol. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/09)

2/09

Kathy Randall organized the non-profit organization Scripps Ranch Elder Care Alliance as a sub-group of the SRCA to provide seniors an alternative to moving from their home to a retirement or assisted living community by providing information, education, recreation and assistance. Scripps Ranch had more than 9,000 residents over the age of 50, which represented 28% of the community. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/09)

2009

In late 2008, the City of San Diego decided to shutter all Community Service Centers, including the one in Scripps Ranch, due to budget issues. The Scripps Ranch Civic Association stepped in and negotiated a Use Permit with the City in February 2009 to keep the center available for community meetings, turned the facility into the new SRCA headquarter locations and renamed the building “Scripps Ranch Community Center.” By February, the SRCA had secured funds to guarantee keeping the facility open for 24 months and began seeking endowment funds to support keeping the Information Center open for perpetuity. An SRCA subcommittee led by Bob Cavanagh and assisted by Wes Danskin, Jany Staley and Brian Allman were instrumental in affecting this transfer of the Information Center to a community-based operation. Councilmember Carl DeMaio also lent his financial support to make this process a reality. The City continued to use office space for the community Park & Recreation Supervisor and the Maintenance Assessment District Supervisor. The Scripps Ranch Elder Care Alliance maintained office space within the center. The Miramar North Planning Committee and a number of Scripps Ranch homeowners associations, non-profits, clubs and community service organizations hold regular meetings in the center. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/09, http://www.scrippsranch.org/community/community-center.html)


 



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4/3/09

Lance Corporal Ray Calhoun, Scripps Ranch resident and co-founder of the Scripps Ranch Old Pros, was awarded the Silver Star for his heroism in the Vietnam War. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 4/09)

4/9/09

Lockheed Martin moved into the Scripps Ranch Business Park on Meanley Drive, bringing 500 employees. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/09)

4/14/09

SRCA named Bill Crooks as Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year. Marvin Miles inducted into the Volunteer Hall of Fame. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/09)

4/09

Lynn Owens spearheaded the effort to create Sustainable Scripps Ranch, a standing committee of the SRCA, with the goal of creating a more sustainable Scripps Ranch for the continued health and well-being of the community and the future generations that will thrive here. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/09, http://www.scrippsranch.org/documents/ article/3149/SSR_STRATEGIC_PLAN%20for%20SRCA.pdf)

4/09

Scripps Ranch High School selected as one of 19 schools in San Diego County as a 2009 California Distinguished School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/09)

6/7/09

Open House held for the new Scripps Ranch Elder Care Alliance (SRECA) at the Scripps Ranch Community Center. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/09)

6/09

Under a FEMA grant awarded to the fire department for brush management, contract personnel removed large amounts of mature green eucalyptus trees in four areas of Scripps Ranch without proper coordination with the SR Maintenance Assessment District and left logs and debris on the ground. Interested residents led by Will Lofft formed Save our Scripps Ranch Trees to factually report on the activity taken and rally support to preserve the community’s signature trees. At the request of the SRCA and the Scripps Ranch Planning Group and many concerned residents, the City of San Diego put a temporary moratorium on the removal of eucalyptus along Scripps Ranch Blvd. A special committee was formed with city officials to share scientific data, and resolve issues relating to the scope of the brush management process. The goal is for the brush management program to focus on removal of ground/ladder fuel and dead/dying eucalyptus trees, while minimizing the elimination of mature live trees. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/09, 9/09)

7/09

The Scripps Ranch Lacrosse Association (SRLAX), which was founded by Joe Brown, celebrated its 5th anniversary of bringing the sport of lacrosse to Scripps Ranch. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/09)

9/8/09

St. Gregory the Great Catholic School opened as a K-3 elementary school. Each year an additional grade will be added until a K-8 school is created. (Source: http://www.stggcs.org/)


 



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8/09

The Sentinel Newspaper, serving Scripps Ranch, Mira Mesa and Rancho Bernardo, closed its doors. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/09)

8/8/09

The Scripps Ranch Farmers Market had its last day at EBS Elementary School due to lack of business. The Farmers Market coordinators, Bev and Mike Cassity, were working to move the weekly event back to its prior location at the former EBS site. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 9/09) The Farmers Market reopened at its prior location at the former EBS Elementary School site on Spring Canyon in October 2009. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/09)

10/09

Peggy Dolby, at age 87, still continued to deliver the SRCA newsletters to her neighborhood. She has been delivering newsletters for 18 years. (Source: SRCA 10/09)

10/09

HG Fenton intended to develop the 3.92 acre site at the intersection of Scripps Ranch Boulevard and Erma Road into a group of 95 dwelling units and 255 parking spaces. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/09)

11/24/09 A loss of a Scripps Ranch icon occurred when Paul Donigan, the very first Scripps Ranch homeowner, passed away. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 3/10) 11/09

The new center island on Scripps Ranch Boulevard is almost completed. Irrigation work and the application of a slurry coat to the road still remain to be done. (Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/09)

12/09

The City Park and Recreation Department and the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council worked together to reopen the Old Grove trail by removing 91 of the dangerous, dead and dying trees that had been fatally damaged by the Cedar Fire. The SRFSC provided $40,000 and the City provided $20,000 to hire FireStop, a professional forest management firm to do the work. Several months later, the Scripps Ranch Maintenance Assessment District paid additional funding to remove additional overhanging branches from remaining trees. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 2/10, Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council notes)

4/10

Cheryl Shaw led the charge to reinvigorate Scripps Ranch’s Neighborhood Watch program. The SRCA, Councilmember DeMaio’s office and the San Diego Police Department coordinated efforts to host a forum to educate neighbors on best practice strategies to form successful Neighborhood Watch groups.

4/10

The National Wildlife Federation awarded the Scripps Ranch Estates (Crown Pointe) homeowners’ association the prestigious Community Wildlife Habitat Award. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 5/10)

5/10

Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary named a 2010 California Distinguished School. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/10)


 



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5/11/10

Jim Paterniti and Mary Drummond honored as Scripps Ranch Citizens of the Year. Jany Staley was inducted into the Volunteer Hall of Fame. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/10)

5/10

The City’s fire chief clarified existing policy within the fire safety brush management regulations relating to areas which are defined as “Eucalyptus Woodlands,” such as parts of Scripps Ranch. The amendment will reduce the overall number of trees indentified for removal and provide more protection for mature eucalyptus trees not judged to be specific safety risks. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 6/10)

8/10

Councilmember DeMaio’s office announced that Spring Canyon Road will remain a four-lane street and that its current striping pattern and speed limits will remain in effect after the street is repaved. The city will install a traffic signal at the Spruce Run intersection and paint 45 mph in the center lanes. This announcement came after many months of community meetings, debate and controversy over the proposal to restripe a portion of Spring Canyon Road from four lanes to two in an effort to curb speeding. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 7/10, 9/10)

10/16/10 The Scripps Ranch Emergency Preparedness Forum was held at Marshall Middle School for the purpose of raising the preparedness level of the community for the next fire, earthquake or other disaster. The event was presented by an alliance of the SRCA, SRFSC, and SRECA, and featured presentations and displays concerning public safety. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/10 and Scripps Ranch Fire Safety Council notes) 10/28/10 Chris Wilson, a Scripps Ranch resident, San Diego police officer, retired U.S. Navy lieutenant and father, was killed in the line of duty during a gun battle with a suspect in an apartment in southeast San Diego. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/10) 10/10

Scripps Ranch resident, Major Chris Collins, flew overhead at the Miramar Air Show as the #4 slot pilot of the Blue Angels in one of his last air shows before returning home to Scripps Ranch after two years as a Blue Angel. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/10)

11/10

The population of Scripps Ranch was approximately 30,000. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 11/10)

11/10

Scripps Ranch resident and Troop 301 Life scout Craig “CJ” Bosworth, Jr. awarded the Medal of Heroism by the Boy Scout National Court of Honor for using his Boy Scout training and performing the Heimlich maneuver to save his little brother from choking on a pea pod in March 2010. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 12/10)

11/14/10 Scripps Ranch Sustainability Forum held. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 10/10) 11/20/10 For the first time in the history of the school, Scripps Ranch High School hit the trifecta on the sports field, with the SRHS Women’s Varsity Field Hockey Team, the 
 



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Men’s Water Polo Team and the Women’s Varsity Volleyball Team each winning the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) championships in their divisions on a single day. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/11)

12/12/10

650 people participated in the 40th Anniversary Run/Walk on Pomerado Road. The road was closed from Scripps Ranch Blvd. to Semillon Blvd. to make a four-mile loop course. On a beautiful, sunny morning, the event started with an energetic warmup by Todd Durkin and his Fitness Quest 10 Boot Camp warriors and remarks from State Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher, City Councilmember Carl DeMaio and San Diego Police Department Assistant Chief Shelly Zimmerman, a Scripps Ranch resident. Will Faber and Cathouse Thursday played great music throughout the event. Birthday cake was provided to all participants. Paul Vaughan, chaired this event, with the able assistance of Bob Ilko, SRCA President, Elizabeth Mayercin, event volunteer coordinator, and the rest of the 40th Anniversary Committee. This event would not have been possible without a huge number of dedicated Scripps Ranch volunteers. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/11) The 28th annual Tree Lighting and toy collection for Toys for Tots was held at Jerabek Park on the same day with the refreshments provided by the Girl Scouts and music from the Scripps Ranch High School band. (Source: Scripps Ranch Newsletter 1/11)


 



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In March 2000, the School District announced that instead of building a new elementary school (Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary), it would apply the construction funding towards building a new larger middle school in Scripps Ranch. The existing Marshall Middle School would be converted to an elementary school. In the interim, while the new middle school was being constructed, a modular temporary school would be built. Above: Architectural rendering of the proposed modular elementary school, 2000. Source: Victoria Mazelli. Below: Principal Rich Cansdale in front of the new Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School on its grand opening day, September 4, 2001. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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In November 2000, the SRCA published a Scripps Ranch Parks and Trails map that was a year in the making. Source: Damian Moos.

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In 2000, the developers of the Scripps Ranch Business Park sought to rezone the parcel near the library from industrial to high-density residential. In June 2000, a group of concerned Scripps Ranch citizens formed Save our Scripps Ranch (SOS) to protect the quality of life in Scripps Ranch and ensure that the Meanley wall and the trees near Evans

Pond be protected. The group collected dozens of signatures, posted petitions on the wall and the trees and marked the area in danger of being destroyed with caution tape. Ultimately, the developer withdrew its rezoning petition and the community sought to have the area officially designated as a historical site. Source: Dorothy Mildice.

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During the Great Depression, a stonemason came to the Meanley mansion with his 3 children and asked Nackey Meanley if she had any work. In exchange for food for his family, the stone mason built a variety of decorative garden paths and a 6’ by 200’ wall (right). The stone wall ran the length of one side of the house and had stairs leading down to the trail past Evans Pond to Nackey’s horse stables. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

With the assistance of the Save our Scripps Ranch committee, the long battle over setting aside the historical Meanley wall (above) and the trees adjacent to Evans Pond (left) finally ended in August 2002. While the area was formally identified as a Historical Resources Board Site by the City of San Diego in 2000, the appeal brought by the developer challenging that designation by the City was cancelled by Intel Corp. shortly after it bought the property in 2002. Source: Lynn Todd.

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The first annual community fair was held in May 2000 and celebrated the community’s 30th anniversary. The annual event hosts games for kids, free music, community booths, food and fun for all! Upper right: Bev Cassity, fair organizer, Mayor Jerry Sanders and Bob Dingeman, 2008. Right: SRCA booth, 2004. Sources: Bob Dingeman and Elinor Reiss.

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This building has had multiple lives and locations! In 1994, it opened near what would become the Scripps Ranch Marketplace as the Scripps Ranch Villages Information Pavilion and sales office. In January 2000, the building was cut into 3 sections and relocated to its current location on Cypress Canyon Road. McMillin Corp. gifted the building to the City, which opened it as the Scripps Ranch Information Center in September 2000. Victoria Mazelli (in bottom right picture) was instrumental in preparing the historical Scripps Ranch photos that hang throughout the building. In 2008, the city decided to close the center for budgetary reasons. The SRCA negotiated a Use Permit which enabled it to keep the center available for community meetings and renamed the building the Scripps Ranch Community Center. Below left: Grand opening as the Scripps Ranch Information Center. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Left: Lowering the flag for the last time at the old fire station, October 19, 2001. This picture hangs in the current fire station. Source: Fire Station #37.

Below: Firefighters in front of Bob Dingeman’s house with the new brush rig he helped obtain for the station, April 2001. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Below: Ribbon cutting ceremony held November 3, 2001. This picture hangs in the current fire station. Source: Fire Station #37.

Below: Fire Station #37, 2010. Source: Jake Todd.

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The Old Pros have continued to host the highly popular annual 10K Race and Fun Run and Annual Bike Rides for a number of years. These events enable the Old Pros to raise money for community youth and high school sports programs. Sources: Old Pros website, srop.org, and Bob Dingeman.

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Upper left: U.S. Marine Corps Color Guard, 2003. Upper right: Scripps Ranch High School Marching Band, 2000s. Left: The Loire Valley neighborhood is known for its creative floats! Source: Elinor Reiss.

Above left: Gordon Boerner, SRCA VP, and Jany Staley, 4th of July Committee Chair, 2003. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Above right: Station #37’s fire truck typically is the last entry in the parade, 2000s. Left: A perennial crowd-pleaser, the Society for the Preservation of the Middle Class, 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Above left: The Cozy Coupe Brigade, 2004. Above right: Staging of parade float preparade, 2000s. Right: Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) float entry, 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Above: Scripps Ranch High School cheerleaders marching in parade, 2000s. Right: Children on parade float, 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Post run, bike race and parade, Hoyt Park is the place to be on July 4th! Left: Folks enjoying the festivities, 2006. Below: U.S. Marine Corps. Color Guard conducting a flag salute, 2003. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Above: Fun and games for kids, 2000s. Right: Old Pros postrace beer garden, 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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During the SRCA’s 35th anniversary 4th of July celebrations in 2005, a flag pole was installed in Hoyt Park as a Cedar Fire Memorial. Above: Children from families that lost their homes in the Cedar Fire raised the flag that day. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

Right: Bill Crooks, co-chair of the SRCA’s 4th of July Committee, and family at the Cedar Fire Memorial, 2007. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: Crowd watching Old Pros award presentation, 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Early in the morning on Sunday, October 26, 2003, disaster struck Scripps Ranch as the Cedar Fire swept through the community. 312 Scripps Ranch homes and the temporary structures at Chabad Hebrew Academy were destroyed and countless other homes were damaged.

The Cedar Fire was the most devastating firestorm in California history, burning approximately 2,323 homes in the county and killing 14 people. Above: Source: John Gibbons, San Diego Union Tribune. Left: 10:00 am on October 26, 2003 looking Southeast. Source: Mark DiVecchio. Below: St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church at 9:00 a.m. on October 26, 2003. Source: Bob Forrest.

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Above: Source: Bob Forrest. Right: Source: AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi.

Below: Source: Karl Grobl.

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Due to the exceptional efforts of the San Diego Fire Department, the San Diego Police Department, the U.S. Forest Service, Calfire and the community members who helped evacuate homes, direct traffic and stay behind to help save numerous homes, no lives were lost in Scripps Ranch and the destruction was much less than it could have been. Left and below: Source: Karl Grobl.

Below: When the fire jumped I-15, cars scrambled to exit the freeway by driving up the embankment to the on ramp and moving against the flow of traffic in an effort to flee the flames. Source: U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Giles M. Isham.

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The Cedar Fire left devastation and destruction in its wake. Source: Karl Grobl.

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When the smoke lifted and the last flames were extinguished, the extensive damage to various segments of Scripps Ranch could be seen clearly. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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While the effects of the Cedar Fire touched many and caused severe hardships, some homeowners used humor to help alleviate the burdens and stress. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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After the fire, a huge outpouring of community support and assistance came together to help the “fire folk,� those in need who had either lost their homes or had their homes damaged in the fire but refused to be considered victims. Schools throughout the city were closed for a week after the Cedar Fire. Source: Bob Dingeman.

The Scripps Ranch Recreation Center was turned into a Local Assistance Center (LAC), a one stop shopping spot with tables for various governmental agencies and other disaster relief assistance. Right: Councilman Brian Maienschein (left) and his staff members: Clint Carny, Christine Millay and Lance Witmondt, at their table at the LAC. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Project Phoenix, a grassroots organization led by Bob Ilko and the SRCA, became a multi-task effort to not only physically rebuild homes but to assist people throughout the county. The SRCA website provided information. The group also organized sandbagging efforts to help provide erosion control and acted as a clearinghouse for information and assistance. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: Parent organizations at the elementary schools got together and collected school supplies for the kids that lost their supplies in the fire. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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St. Gregory’s acted as a clearinghouse for donations of clothing and other items, which were made available to fire victims. Source: Bob Forrest.

Left: Source: Bob Dingeman.

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In February 2004, the SRCA recognized the men and women of the San Diego Fire Department and the San Diego Police Department as the SRCA Citizens of the Year. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

In March 2004, Maria and Christos Karvounis were the first Scripps Ranch Fire-affected family to move into their new home. They re-built their home exactly as it was before. As each family moved back into their rebuilt homes, the SRCA gave them a welcome mat. Left: The Karvounis family with Marc Sorensen, SRCA president, and Councilman Brian Maienschein. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Right: In April 2004, the SRCA hosted a successful barbecue and meeting with Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi at Marshall Middle School, attended by around 500 people, where the Commissioner heard the community’s complaints. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: SRCA volunteers who helped with the barbecue for fire survivors, from left to right: Bill Bernard, Jany Staley, Marc Sorensen, Elissa Barber and Bill Crooks. Source: Bob Dingeman.

The meeting with Commissioner Garamendi led to a group of Scripps Ranch residents going to Sacramento to educate legislators.

Right: Karen Reimus of Scripps Ranch explaining to legislators what happens to homeowners after a catastrophic loss and lobbying for changes in laws that protect homeowners. These homeowners put in countless hours to ensure that future victims of disasters would not have to face the insurance issues faced by homeowners after the Cedar Fires. Source: Karen Reimus.

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Left: A press conference held on the Reimus family lot in September 2005 to celebrate the passage of the Homeowners Bill of Rights, legislative measures designed to protect homeowners in the event of a natural disaster. Source: Karen Reimus.

Below: In 2007, Cedar Fire survivors (like Karen Reimus below) and other Scripps Ranch residents pay it forward and help provide assistance at the Rancho Bernardo Local Assistance Center after the Witch Creek Fire and act as mentors to Tahoe-Angora Ridge fire victims. Source: Karen Reimus.

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Left: In July 2004, State Route 56 was opened to vehicular traffic. In the center of the photo, Councilman Brian Maienschein and Mayor Dick Murphy help cut the ribbon at the opening ceremony. After the ceremony, bicyclists were allowed to ride on Route 56 before cars were admitted. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: In January 2005, a small community ribbon cutting ceremony was held to celebrate the opening of the unisex bathroom at Lakeview Community Park, which after many years of effort replaced the portable bathrooms at this popular and well-used park. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: In February 2005, Mayor Dick Murphy and Councilman Brian Maienschein formally cut the ribbon dedicating Overlook Park on Scripps Ranch Blvd. overlooking Miramar Lake. The completion of Overlook Park was the last project that the McMillin Company was obligated to deliver to the community. This project completed nearly 30 years of Corky McMillin’s involvement in the construction of Scripps Ranch and his assistance in meeting the community’s goals. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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On September 21, 2003, Jerabek Park’s J-9 baseball field was dedicated and renamed the “Steve Allen Field” in honor of Steve Allen, who had helped create and build Scripps Ranch’s first Little League field, was active in Little League and was an integral part of the Old Pros. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Some people think it is the eucalyptus trees that make Scripps Ranch unique. But, really it is the people and their willingness to pitch in when needed that make the community one-of-a-kind. Below: At the SRCA Volunteer Recognition Night in December 2005, the SRCA inducted its first members to the Volunteer Hall of Fame. These individuals had already been recognized as Citizen of the Year and continued their active volunteerism in the community. Back row, left to right: Wes Danskin, Gordon Boerner, Marc Sorensen, Bob Ilko and Julian Parrish. Front row, left to right: Karen Wood, Bob Dingeman, Nancy Allen (widow of honoree Steve Allen), Chuck Adkison and Claudia Unhold. Not pictured: Honoree Brian Allman. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Below: The first of 12 solarpowered traffic-calming speed monitoring devices was installed on Scripps Ranch Blvd. in February 2005. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Above: In December 2005, the Project Wildlife kiosk at Lake Miramar constructed by Eagle Scout candidate Ryan Mulvey of Troop 663 was unveiled. Left to right: Tedi Jackson of the San Diego Water Dept., Aurie Kryzuda, VP of Project Wildlife, Councilman Brian Maienschein and Ryan Mulvey. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Right: In May 2006, the City Park and Recreation Dept. held reopenings for the reconstructed Forestview Neighborhood Park and the Semillon Neighborhood Park Tot Lots to celebrate the replacement of antiquated play equipment. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Left: Groundbreaking ceremony for the new Marshall Middle School held on November 16, 2005. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

Below: Grading of the site of the future Marshall Middle School, 2006. Source: Bob Dingeman.

Left: Framing of building at Marshall Middle School, April 2006. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

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The new Marshall Middle School opened in September 2007 with three instructional buildings on 24 acres of sloping hillside. Source: Jake Todd.

Left: The “Great Wall of Scripps Ranch� was the largest interlocking freestanding wall in the world. The wall, comprised of 58,000 interlocking bricks, was 1,700 feet long and up to 50 feet high. The wall was necessary because of the sloping terrain of the site and a larger building pad was necessary. Source: Jake Todd.

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The Welcome Club celebrated its 25th anniversary in February 2006. The club was initially formed to welcome new residents into the community. However, its purpose expanded to support a variety of local Scripps Ranch charities. Right: Social outing at Lakeview Park, circa 2000s. Below: Winners of a Welcome Club salad supper hat contest, circa 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Below: In November 2006, Miramar Ranch Elementary celebrated its 30th anniversary with a festive celebration. Source: MRE FFA Archives.

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Above: Cover photo from August 2006 SRCA Newsletter. In July 2006, the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council utilized goats to reduce fire fuel in the community. The goats treated roughly an acre a day in the Whispering Ridge—South and Central, Loire Valley and Birch Bluff project areas. The project took five months to complete and covered approximately 82 acres. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

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In 2005, the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council (SRFSC) formed the Scripps Ranch Community Fire Safe Alliance with 12 federal, state and civic organizations to collaborate efforts to protect Scripps Ranch from future wildfires and qualify for additional federal funding. Right: Signing of alliance documents. Source: www.srfiresafecouncil.org.

Left: In 2008, Jerry Mitchel of the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council was instrumental in obtaining a $97,000 federal grant to continue its Neighborhood Brush Abatement program through 2009. Left to right: Will Metz, Cleveland National Forest Supervisor, Pam Slater-Price, County Supervisor, Jerry Mitchel, Councilman Brian Maienschein and Tracy Jarman, San Diego City Fire Chief. Source: www.srfiresafecouncil.org.

Right: In 2008, the SRFSC continued its efforts to promote fire safety by participating in the Fire Safe San Diego Expo. Source: www.srfiresafecouncil.org.

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Above: Photo from cover of January 2006 SRCA Newsletter. The photo was part of the kick-off of the annual SRCA membership drive and was designed to highlight the concepts that the “SRCA works for all of us” and that the “SRCA wants you” to get involved with the community and join the SRCA. Photo includes many dedicated Scripps Ranch volunteers. First row: Marc Sorensen, Bill Crooks, Bob Dingeman, Jan Kane, Bob Cavanagh. Second row: Dorothy Mildice, Gloria Tran, Jack Little, Bev Cassity, Jany Staley. Third row: Victoria Mazelli, Gordon Boerner, Wendy Littooy, Dave Prewett, Denise Herich. 4th row: Joe Brown, Shannon Alatorre, Bob Ilko, Jay Wurtzler, Dave Settles. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

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The Miramar Air Show, now one of the largest military air shows in the nation, was first held in 1956. The Navy Blue Angels have been performing in the Miramar Air Show every year since the 1950s other than in 2007 (when the Air Force Thunderbirds performed) and 2013.

Above and right: Source: www.blueangels.navy.mil.

In 2007, Miramar Marine Corps Air Station was awarded top honors as the “World’s Best Military Air Show” by the International Council of Air Shows. Above and right: Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Left: In December 2004, the City and the YMCA entered into a lease relating to the 4-acre parcel west of the Vons Center. In January 2007, a groundbreaking ceremony for the Rancho Family YMCA’s Scripps Ranch site was held. Source: Bob Dingeman. Below: In 2008, the Scripps Ranch Theatre celebrated its 30th anniversary season. Source: Scripps Ranch Theatre Archives in Scripps Miramar Ranch branch of public library.

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On July 3, 2007, Councilman Brian Maienschein turned the key and removed the lock on the gates to the Miramar Dam after nearly 6 years of efforts to open Miramar Dam to foot traffic. Above: Cover photo from July 2007 SRCA newsletter. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

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Left: Community icon, Nancy Corbin Assaf (center in photo), retired in August 2008 after roughly 22 years as Head Librarian at the Scripps Ranch public library. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Right: The dedicated library staff help make the library a welcoming place for the entire community, circa 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

Left: Long-time children’s librarian, Miss Anne, in a Cat in the Hat costume to help celebrate Dr. Seuss Day at the library, circa 2000s. Source: Elinor Reiss.

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Jerabek Elementary School celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2008. Above: First page of Anniversary Celebration pamphlet. Source: Cynthia Collins.

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Above: Page 2 of the Jerabek Elementary 30th Anniversary Celebration pamphlet. Source: Cynthia Collins.

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In September 2008, Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School moved into its new campus (the former Marshall Middle School). Above and left: EBS Elementary School, 2013. Source: Jake Todd.

For many years, the SRCA has made a generous donation to each of the public schools in Scripps Ranch. Right: Bob Dingeman (left) and Greg Collamer, Principal of EBS Elementary School, with the “big check” documenting the SRCA donation, 2010. Source: Bob Dingeman.

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Above: The Miramar Ranch Elementary Safety Patrol won the Best Elementary School Safety Patrol in the Northeastern Division of San Diego for 2008-2009 and was ranked first out of 89 elementary schools in San Diego. Police Chief William Lansdowne presented an award to the Safety Patrol. Source: Victoria Mazelli.

Below: The hardworking volunteers of the Mira Mesa/Scripps Ranch Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) were recognized for their efforts as the eyes and ears of the community at the SRCA Volunteer Recognition Night, circa 2000s. The RSVP celebrated their 10th anniversary in 2004. Source: Judy Taylor.

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Left: Steve Fiorina, Scripps Ranch resident and Channel 10 News reporter, emceeing the annual Halloween Costume Contest at the Scripps Ranch Farmers Market, circa 2000s. Bev Cassity, manager of the Farmers Market and Scripps Ranch resident, is helping coordinate the contest in the background. Source: Elinor Reiss.

The Scripps Ranch Farmers Market opened in 2001 in the parking lot of Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School (EBS). A significant percentage of the proceeds from the Farmers Market are given to EBS. When EBS moved campuses, the Farmers Market followed. However, the Farmers Market ultimately returned to its former location at the parking lot of the former EBS site in October 2009. Right: One of the fresh produce vendors at the Scripps Ranch Farmers Market. Below: The crowds enjoying the SR Farmers Market, 2009. Source: www.srfm.org.

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On a beautiful, sunny morning on December 12, 2010, 650 people participated in the Scripps Ranch 40th Anniversary Run/Walk on Pomerado Road. The road was closed from Scripps Ranch Blvd. to Semillon Blvd. to make a 4-mile loop course.

Right: A rarity, seeing Pomerado Road void of cars. Source: Bob Ilko.

Below: Todd Durkin and his Fitness Quest Boot Camp warriors started the event with an energetic warm-up. Source: Scripps Photos.

Right: The start of the Run/Walk. Source: Scripps Photos.

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Left: Will Faber and Cathouse Thursday entertained the crowds throughout the event with great music! Source: Scripps Photos.

Above: Birthday cake was served to all attendees. Left: Post-run/walk activities. Source: Scripps Photos.

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Scripps Ranch Voices: History As Told by Scripps Ranch Residents A significant component of this project was to gather the views, memories and perceptions of various members of the Scripps Ranch community. We interviewed a broad spectrum of people, 57 in total. Some have lived in Scripps Ranch close to 40 years and others grew up here. Other interviewees have not been here as long, but still think of Scripps Ranch as home. Many have volunteered in some way to better the community. And all have a unique story to tell about their time living in Scripps Ranch. Originally, this project was going to tell the story of Scripps Ranch pictorially on five large banners, a history wall if you will. With four of the banners each depicting a decade in the life of Scripps Ranch as a community. As a result, the interview questions were structured in part to figure out what people thought were the most significant events that occurred during each of the four decades in which Scripps Ranch has been existence. As you read the interviews, you will see the emphasis on parsing out information on a decade-by-decade level. In the end, there was simply too much information collected. I came to the conclusion that creating this book would be a much better way to share all the rich and interesting information and perspectives about Scripps Ranch.

 

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List of Interviews Sally Anderson .............................................................................................................. 284 Guy Asaro ...................................................................................................................... 287 Kristin Anderson Banz ................................................................................................ 289 Elissa Barber ................................................................................................................. 291 Lisa Black ...................................................................................................................... 293 Jennifer McElliott Blake .............................................................................................. 296 Gordon and Leigh Boerner ......................................................................................... 300 Rachel Brown ................................................................................................................ 306 Wesley R. Danskin ........................................................................................................ 309 David DeBus and Denyse Baudet ................................................................................ 312 Colonel Bob Dingeman ................................................................................................. 314 Sheila Donigan .............................................................................................................. 318 Karyn Farr ................................................................................................................... 322 Joan Loeb Gass ............................................................................................................ 324 Kyle Glass ...................................................................................................................... 327 Dale Gordon ................................................................................................................. 329 Kristin Hampshire, nee Block ..................................................................................... 333 Bob Ilko ......................................................................................................................... 336 Tracy Jewell, nee Anderson ......................................................................................... 338 Dave Johnson ................................................................................................................ 340 Lauretta Johnson .......................................................................................................... 342 Grace Helen Klein......................................................................................................... 343 Ken Klein ....................................................................................................................... 345 Carla B. Latimer ........................................................................................................... 348 Jill Lawrence ................................................................................................................ 352 Karla Lewellin............................................................................................................... 353 Will Lofft ....................................................................................................................... 356 Victoria Mazelli ............................................................................................................ 358 Becky McDonald .......................................................................................................... 361 Karen McElliott ........................................................................................................... 364

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Dorothy Mildice ............................................................................................................ 367 LaVonne Misner............................................................................................................ 369 Melisa Moriarty ............................................................................................................ 372 Joan Pernicano .............................................................................................................. 375 Laurie Pettit .................................................................................................................. 381 D. Todd Phillips............................................................................................................. 384 Karen Ragusa ............................................................................................................... 386 Gary and Lois Reed ...................................................................................................... 389 Karen Reimus ............................................................................................................... 394 Elinor Reiss ................................................................................................................... 398 Julie Rose, nee Ohrmund ............................................................................................. 402 Molly Sanders-Cannon ................................................................................................ 405 Anne Slavicek ................................................................................................................ 408 Shana Smith................................................................................................................... 410 Steve Steinberg .............................................................................................................. 412 Dorothy Stout ................................................................................................................ 414 Delaney Todd................................................................................................................. 416 Jake Todd ...................................................................................................................... 418 Kendall Todd ................................................................................................................ 420 Lynn Todd ..................................................................................................................... 422 Erin Tomaras ................................................................................................................ 427 Gloria Tran ................................................................................................................... 429 Don Walker.................................................................................................................... 431 Jim and Barbara Wells................................................................................................. 434 Lynette Williams ........................................................................................................... 437

 

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Interview of Sally Anderson September 30, 2010 What is your occupation? Retired teacher. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps Ranch by Hendrix Pond. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Our first house, which we bought in 1976, was on Tribuna. How long have you lived here? 34 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The trees! Convenient location. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Everything! Bob Dingeman’s leadership; people who value education, fun and giving back to make the world a better place; 4th of July, Symphony in the Park and the SR Swim and Racquet Club. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Your neighbors are active and care. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Taught at Jerabek Elementary School, Children’s Hospital, SR Swim and Racquet Club, scouts and youth soccer. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Presently just enjoying it all! What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? The party at the Meanley house before it was torn down for the library. All the floats from the different streets in the 4th of July Parade. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? “Little Bear” was our only grocery; Pernicano’s was the sole restaurant. Wouldn’t dare leave the house without make-up on, as you might run into someone you knew! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The vote on Pomerado Road and the formation of the Old Pros organization.

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How did these events impact you and your family? Two of our children moved back to Scripps Ranch with their families following marriage. That speaks volumes! What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Jerabek Elementary School opened. The kids that attended Miramar Ranch Elementary walked to Jerabek from Miramar Ranch to be present at the dedication ceremony and heard Chauncy Jerabek speak. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? Sixth graders went to Challenger Middle School for one year. A “new club” was created to support people on the other side of the ranch! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Mibs Sommerville – a name everyone knew! If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch got much bigger. There were more places to shop and eat. The new high school opened up. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The recall of Linda Bernhardt, the City Councilwoman who represented Scripps Ranch. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My daughter was ASB President of the first graduating class of Scripps Ranch High School. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? The new middle school opened up. The SR Swim and Racquet Club started offering summer camps so there was no longer any need to drive kids all over San Diego for summer camps! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The firestorm was a life-changing event. Also, the opening of the Farmer’s Market was significant. How did these events impact you and your family? More traffic came with more development. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? More churches (there is property mapped out for them), and a more vibrant library.

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How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? It will be a prominent place for “movers and shakers.” Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? At my first ice cream social in 1977, an old high school friend (we both were raised in La Jolla) walked up to me and we discussed how this is much better and how we both ended up here in Scripps Ranch.

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Interview of Guy Asaro March 29, 2011 What is it like to work at McMillin? It’s unbelievable, but I have worked in the construction industry for 32 years. It’s a luxury to be able to work in one area that you enjoy for so long. I have always liked building things and putting stuff together. It creates a sense of purpose. I started with McMillin in 2004 and so I have been with them for 6 years. It’s a blessing to work for such a great company. Currently, I am the President of McMillin Homes, which is the subsidiary of The Corky McMillin Companies that builds homes, like the ones in Scripps Ranch. Their philosophy is all about building communities, not just houses. Creating something special is the ultimate goal. Money is just a tool and the means for creating communities. The company’s message and the guidance I give in my capacity at McMillin is to do the right thing. Don’t take advantage of a situation; work for what is best for the community. It is easy to go to work each day when you work for people that share your passion and ideals. I love to do what I do. It is a treat! How has this experience affected your perception of Scripps Ranch? I’m a native of San Diego and Scripps Ranch. So, I have a different perspective than others at McMillin might. Working for a company that has helped develop Scripps Ranch has really given added value to my life here in Scripps Ranch. But it’s also been very reciprocal; I can shed some light on the Scripps community as well. What was it like to grow up in SR and come back and live in the same community? It’s very controlled now. Everything is organized. Growing up, it was as close as you could get to Mayberry R.F.D. Back then, it was much more open. There were no parks except for Hoyt Park. Even Hoyt Park didn’t have the playground and still had water flowing through. We used to take a big hike to what is now the shake table area. While I was growing up, I had a motorcycle. I got it when I was 13. It gave me a sense of freedom and adventure. I loved to ride it off road on the dirt trails with my friends. My parents might ask where we were going and tell us to come home when the streetlights turned on. We would go off on our own and never worry about anything. It never crossed my mind to worry about who else might be around. We would go explore different areas. One time we got chased out of the business park area. What makes SR special in your eyes? Scripps Ranch is special because there’s a sense of community. Growing up here, there was a sense of isolation as well, but also a sense of community. Scripps Ranch was like a little island because there were no people coming through. We were on our own in a sense and relied on each other to build the community.

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What personal connections have you developed in the community? I don’t know that many people here in Scripps Ranch today. There was a 7-year gap when I didn’t live in Scripps Ranch. I don’t usually get involved in civics because I do it for a living. However, I once took two months off from work to get very involved with rebuilding the community after the fire. McMillin let me do that. I helped people navigate the City system. I engaged in discussions with insurance companies trying to get insurers to lower prices. Can you share some stories or fond memories of Scripps Ranch? There are so many months and years of stuff to remember. Going to Miramar Ranch, playing in Hoyt Park, roaming around what is now USIU. I see Will Lofft at the store and we have so many shared memories. The community and I grew up together. What do you think were the most important parts of Scripps Ranch history, especially regarding McMillin? When I moved to McMillin, Scripps Ranch was done. McMillin was working on Stonebridge, which really ought to be considered part of Scripps Ranch. McMillin took the community feel from the older more established part of Scripps Ranch, and while working with the community, helped preserve that sense of the place to create SR Villages. Is there anything you would change about SR? No! How do you think SR will change in the future? Look at the original part of Scripps. There was only Hoyt Park and not much else. The community will continue to undergo the same type of transformation that it already has.

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Interview of Kristin Anderson Banz October 19, 2010 What is your occupation? Mother, but formerly I was a teacher and before that I was in sales. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? “Old Scripps.” Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? On and off for 22 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? I grew up here. When my military husband was re-stationed here, it was an obvious choice because it is such a great community. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The great neighbors, the trees. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? I have never lived in another part of San Diego…. But we have lived in many other states and even in Japan. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I grew up here and many members of my family still live here. I went to school in Scripps Ranch and was a sophomore when Scripps Ranch High School opened. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? 4th of July parades used to be awesome with lots of streets getting together and decorating floats. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? I was too young to remember. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? There was lots of growth in SR, with new homes being built all the time. Scripps Ranch High School opened and that was a big deal since prior to that all the Scripps Ranch kids had to go to school in Mira Mesa. Maybe the library was built as well (or late 80s, not really sure) before that we just had a little library in the business park. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The opening of the high school was awesome.

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How did these events impact you and your family? No commute for school. School was top notch and we received lots of awards. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? I visited many times during those years, but did not live here. The continued growth was incredible.

 

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Interview of Elissa Barber October 19, 2010 What is your occupation? Speech-Language Pathologist – school district. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Crown Pointe. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, the “Renaissance” homes on Sunset Ridge Dr. How long have you lived here? Since January 1988, 22 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? It's a suburban location with good reputation. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The maintenance of homes, open space, schools. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? Larger homes, better maintained. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Schools, SRCA. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? When my children were younger, I volunteered in school, scouts and sports. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Kid-related activities. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? There was growth along Sunset Ridge Dr. and overlooking the Lake. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The beginning of development north of the Lake, Scripps Ranch Villages. How did these events impact you and your family? Increased traffic, changes in school boundaries. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I first became involved in the community.

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If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? More growth. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Completion of Scripps Ranch Villages, and the opening of Pomerado Road to Poway. How did these events impact you and your family? There were a lot more new people in the community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My son was born, and I had 2 kids in school. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? It became more settled; it's now an aging community. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? New building ceased, traffic on Pomerado increased and the new Marshall Middle School was built. How did these events impact you and your family? There was increased traffic and time to get to the freeway. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My daughter and son both graduated high school and we became empty nesters. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? People should complain less. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? The community will continue to age; homes will become harder to sell. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? My favorite time was being involved as a “stage mother.” (I also enjoyed cub scouts more than girl scouts!)

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Interview of Lisa Black August 19, 2010 What is your occupation? Legal Writing Professor. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The border of Wine Country. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? Yes, we rented in Old Scripps after we lost our house in the Cedar Fire. How long have you lived here? 14 years. Why did you move to SR? We thought Scripps Ranch was a nice place to live and raise kids. What makes SR special? Scripps Ranch has a sense of community and people care about their children and education. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? SR is more suburban than the city. What personal connections do you have with SR? No connection because I wasn’t born in the area. How are you involved in the SR community? I am a school parent volunteer and I belong to the Fire Folk committee, a group that assists fire survivors with their rebuilding process. What fond memories do you have of SR? These are some of the things I recall fondly: the community helping each other after the Cedar Fire when our home was lost, the annual 4th of July parades and a multitude of soccer games and tournaments. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? Development was booming in the area and the Mira Mesa Mall with Edwards Theater was being built. The new Von's shopping center was also being constructed. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The Marshall Middle School on Cypress Canyon was opened. How did these events impact you and your family? With development comes overcrowding of schools. There were discussions about whether or not kids would be bused out of SR to attend school in other nearby communities. Parents were

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frustrated because they had bought homes here in Scripps Ranch for the quality schools and sense of community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Our daughter, Grace, was born. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? There was further development of apartments and businesses. Scripps Poway Pkwy developed with the strip malls, gas stations, and restaurants. USIU changed to Alliant University and Chabad was built off of Pomerado Road. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? • The murder of Danielle Van Dam in a nearby community changed how people interacted. • The Cedar Fire of 2003 made the community become closer. • Evacuation for the 2007 fire –Our community was much more prepared to respond to this emergency since building codes and lifestyles had already changed as a result of the Cedar Fire. How did these events impact you and your family? Our home burned down in 2003, which has taught us to be more prepared for disasters. In addition, our family values have changed as a result of this event - the focus is not on things, but relationships with people and community. Much of the family's time in the years after the fire was spent rebuilding and replacing our home and lives. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Lisa - diagnosed with breast cancer and endured all the treatment to survive Ken - underwent quadruple bypass heart surgery and all the rehab following Grace - changed schools to attend seminar and Middle school Lisa's mom passed away Lisa's nephew lived with them for a year Lisa and Ken - began new jobs teaching full time at the college level Is there anything you would like to change about SR? I would like to see more diversity in the community as far as backgrounds of jobs among adults and various ethnicities among the people. How do you think SR will change in the future? There will be less new development - growth and change will slow/stop due to the fact there is no land left to expand on and the downturn in the economy. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? 1960 - Lisa Born in Houston, TX 1961-1968 - moved several times to different towns in TX and Louisiana 1968 - moved to the suburbs of San Antonio, TX 1978 - Graduated High School 1982 - Graduated University of TX, Austin

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1985 - Graduated University of TX School of Law, moved to Dallas, started work as a lawyer, married Ken Klein 1987 - moved to San Diego, started teaching law school 1994 - moved to Providence, Rhode Island and worked as a law professor 1996 - moved to SR, Grace was born 2000 - Daughter, Grace, diagnosed with Gaucher's disease 2002 - Lisa diagnosed with breast cancer 2003 - Lost home to Cedar Fire 2008 - Husband, Ken, had quadruple bypass heart surgery 2009 - Grace had her Bat Mitzvah Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? When Lisa and Ken lived in Clairemont and came out here to visit friends, Pomerado was a small 2 lane rural road that wound into Poway Road with no lights and only Old Scripps Ranch was hidden in the trees. Immediately after the Cedar Fire destroyed our house, we were working in the rubble on our lot and a neighbor we had never met pulled up in front of our lot and offered us cold water and homemade sandwiches. That's the first of truly hundreds of acts of generosity we benefitted from during that difficult time.

 

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Interview of Jennifer McElliott Blake November 6, 2009 What is your occupation? Residential realtor. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Conservatory. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Timbers on Vista Lago Place; Nob Hill condos. How long have you lived here? Since 1972. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Parents relocated from Northern California to San Diego due to my father’s job. When they arrived, they were considering La Jolla and Scripps Ranch. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Strong sense of community and pride of community, but most importantly, Scripps Ranch is special because of the people. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? I have not lived in other areas, but my profession has taken me to several other neighborhoods. There are great neighborhoods throughout San Diego, but Scripps Ranch has maintained the same fundamental values through the years. Scripps Ranch is a family-first oriented neighborhood that values family, education, and service by contributing back to community and city. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Involved with Miramar Ranch Elementary, past involvement with Girl Scouts, coached recreational soccer, and our children participate in many community sports programs. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Growing up in Scripps Ranch was amazing. The community was much smaller than it is today. My parents gave my sister and me a lot of freedom to explore the neighborhood. I spent much of my time at the Scripps Ranch Swim & Racquet Club playing tennis, swimming on the swim team, using the high dive years before it was considered too dangerous, or just hanging out with friends. My street always participated in the Fourth of July festivities each year by building a float and competing against other streets. I grew up just a couple blocks from Hoyt Park and I have many memories there with friends. We walked or rode our bikes everywhere; our parents did not drive us from place to place. We also made our own plans; our lives were less orchestrated than they seem to be today. Scripps Ranch didn’t have a library, so my sister and I would walk to the book mobile, which was the library on wheels that came to our neighborhood.

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Little Bear was the convenience store, which is now Fitness Quest. We played hide and seek, coming home when the streetlights came on. My sister published the Snoopy Street News newsletter on our street, we hosted backyard carnivals, and we played outside all the time. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? More people moved here as the new homes were built around our street. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The completion of the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club. How did these events impact you and your family? Our family didn’t have a pool until the 80s; we spent a lot of time at SRSRC, which was called, “The Club.” My sister and I were on the swim team. Our family played a lot of tennis. My sister and our friends would grab our rackets, throw a towel around our necks and walk or ride our bikes to the club and spend the day. We were not entertained by our parents; we created our own fun. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My parents were very involved with Scripps Ranch Little League. At one point, my mom was the SRLL president. Scripps Ranch didn’t have a softball league for girls, so my sister and I played baseball with the boys. We had to travel to Mira Mesa to play soccer. Girl’s soccer in Scripps Ranch wasn’t established until I was in high school. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? I was in junior high and high school during the 80s. There was not a middle school or high school in Scripps Ranch, so we traveled to Mira Mesa for school. We biked to Wangenheim every day, through Hoyt Park and over the Carroll Canyon Bridge. I attended Mira Mesa High School. My class size as a senior was almost 1,000 students. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? My parents were always very active in the community, working toward thoughtful development of the neighborhood. Scripps Ranch was growing, they were dedicated to making sure that the development had infrastructure to support the homeowners. How did these events impact you and your family? This didn’t impact me while growing up, but it changed Scripps Ranch into the community my kids now enjoy. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? One story from this decade is the famous Haunted House on Vista Lago Place. It was legendary to kids that grew up in Scripps Ranch during that time. It took months for the parents of Vista Lago Place to plan and prepare for Halloween Night. We lived in the cul-de-sac at the top of the street and the Haunted House was staged on our driveway and front yard. Over the years, it became bigger and better and TV crews would come and tape it each year for the news segment.

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If kids made it through to the “Witch at the Big Black Cauldron”, they earned a full-size candy. This was a big treat back then. I still talk with friends who remember sitting on the curb across the street to watch and try to get their courage to go in the Haunted House. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? I was in college during the late 80s and early 90s. When I moved back to San Diego I didn’t live in Scripps Ranch until 1995. This is when I got married and I moved in with my husband who owned a condo at Nob Hill. I was back in Scripps Ranch again! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The growth of the community was amazing in this decade, with Scripps Ranch Villages and the shopping center and Scripps Poway Pkwy granting easy access to Poway. When I was growing up, my child’s perspective was that Poway was a very far distance. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My Dad passed away unexpectedly in 1997 from sudden cardiac arrest; he was 56 years old. He was in the original group that started the Scripps Ranch Old Pro’s. He made many contributions to Scripps Ranch and the city. His death shocked the entire San Diego community. The outpouring of love and support we received from our Scripps Ranch neighbors was unparalleled and appreciated. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? The events of 9/11 were felt worldwide. But even in our Scripps Ranch neighborhood, safety measures were taken that interrupted patterns set decades before. For instance, for precautionary measure, the path around Miramar Lake was closed over the dam. For residents and visitors who had been using the lake for years and years, this closure required some adjustment. Glad it was reopened! Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I think that in most communities the invention of the electric garage door has caused neighbors to drive into their garages and walk straight into their homes without a moment to talk with neighbors. I don’t think this is specific to Scripps Ranch, but I think that we don’t have the same relationships with our neighbors that we once enjoyed. I valued that so much while growing up, I wish my kids had the same experience. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I believe Scripps Ranch will continue to be a strong family community. I have not given much thought as to how it may change in the future. I do know that it is a desirable community and people continue to move here for the same reasons it has been special for decades. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I loved growing up on my street. We had the best neighbors with whom we did everything, shared meals, vacationed, etc. Our schedules were not as busy by today’s standards (perhaps I think this way because I was the kid). My dad built stairs from our back kitchen door to our next door neighbor’s back kitchen door. We would frequently eat dinner together or have pancakes

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on the weekend. In today’s over-scheduled lives, I wish we had more down time to nurture relationships with friends and neighbors and enjoy lazy weekend mornings with the family.

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Interview of Gordon and Leigh Boerner August 25, 2010 What is your name? Gordon and Leigh Boerner, daughters Amanda and Amy (both Scripps Ranch natives). What is your occupation? Banker (originally w/ First Interstate Bank, then Home Savings, followed by San Diego National Bank and currently U.S. Bank). Leigh is a Clinical Dietician at Rady’s Children’s’ Hospital. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? We live in a 7-home cul-de-sac in-fill project built in 1987 at the then northwestern corner of the of the original Scripps Miramar Ranch community plan’s residential development land use area (bordered in the back by the concrete wall separating Scripps Ranch Residential from the Scripps Ranch Business Park). NOTE: We’ve also subsequently purchased a rental townhome within the Glenwood Springs development along Scripps Lake Drive to potentially house one of my two daughters when they grow up. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No, Gordon is a native San Diegan and has lived inside the City Limits of the City of San Diego his entire life, but moved to Scripps Ranch for first time in 1989 after marrying Leigh (who is a native Southern Californian, relocated to San Diego for the Masters program at SDSU). How long have you lived here? We purchased in 1989, and are still living in the same initial home. Why did you move to SR? After getting married in 1988, Leigh desired to move to more of a “country” aesthetic, consistent with the home she grew up in up in La Habra, CA, that would also represent a great community to establish a family and raise children within. Gordon had been a long-time Downtown San Diego banker, and desired to stay within a reasonable commute of Downtown San Diego (defined as “preferably within 15 miles, and no longer than 20”). In working with our realtor, they suggested Scripps Ranch, and Leigh fell in love with the eucalyptus-tree “country feel” and the excellent reputation of the schools. Gordon fell in love with the amazing “home feel” of the monthly SRCA community newsletter hand-delivered by resident volunteers; this was beyond anything experienced in his lifetime in San Diego (including City Heights, El Cerrito, Mission Valley, Mira Mesa and Linda Vista, respectively). Gordon’s only Scripps Ranch caveat was to find a place quasi-close to the freeway (to keep him as close as possibly to 15-mile commute, which was accomplished by limiting search to the western portion of the community). What makes SR special? The beautiful tree-lined country atmosphere, the city-commutable location only 15 miles north of the Downtown Hub/City Hall), and the fantastic community feel and infrastructure displayed most visibly by the monthly SRCA newsletter (which we affectionately named “the bible” upon first moving to the SR Community).

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What personal connections do you have with SR? Both daughters are now native SR’s, and we’ve had so many “Scripps Ranch-ish experiences” (including walking with homemade cardboard Indian Princess canoes in the July 4th parade, dancing to the Heroes at Hoyt Park during Symphony in the Park, dance performances at the Community Fair and in the SRHS Auditorium, etc…), that we decided to purchase the aforementioned townhome to enable the possibility that at least one of our daughters can have an entry-level living experience within the Scripps Ranch community if desired. How are you involved in the SR community? Currently, Gordon is on the SRCA Board as the Past President and is the co-Vice Chair of the SR Planning Group, as well as serving on a number of ad hoc committees of the above two entities. Leigh currently serves on the Foundation Board of SRHS, where she is the E-Scrip Chair for the school. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? We didn’t move in until the late 80s, however, my subsequent community involvement has given me a great appreciation for what the residents who followed Paul/Sheila Donigan in early 1970 had to endure as far as lack of infrastructure while setting the tone for what would become an almost self-sufficient 12,000 household, 30,000+ person community. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The opening of the original temporary Miramar Ranch Elementary school site (where the Pink Palaces east of the Old Vons Center now exist), the opening of the Country Store (which became an icon for many years in the community) in the Vons Center were two big ones to make sure get documented. There are community involved residents who were here then as children and experienced both of these (Anita Gomes, Mike Asaro, Julie Rose, etc….) If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? We moved in right as this decade was sunsetting. The Country Store was “the place” to congregate at the old Von’s Center, along with the Baskin Robbins ice cream store (which was owned by recently deceased {and then previous-All-Pro Charger DT Gary “Big Hands” Johnson}) and the Little Ceasars Pizza shop, and of course Pernicano’s. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Again, we came at the sunset of that decade. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? N/A, other than Leigh & Gordon getting married, which acted as the catalyst for our 1989 relocation to Scripps Ranch. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? The development groundbreaking north of the lake by McMillin and Brookfield that led to the entire Miramar Ranch North community (which was long-anticipated and long-debated), the opening of Pomerado Rd. to traffic from the east (Marc Sorensen can tell you this one in detail),

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the closure of the PSA Test Flight facility at the Carroll Canyon Bridge (that would sit empty for many years to come). What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? In addition to the development of the Miramar Ranch North (MRN) community and the Community Park with Rec Center, our first full-service Car Wash facility, added health care facilities, and the SR Marketplace (adding wonderful infrastructure including a 2nd grocery store, restaurants, banks, fast food + Sammy’s and a return of Baskin Robbins), the most important event was the maturation of the much-needed SR School Cluster with the addition of needed Elementary Schools and the long-awaited Middle and High School facility openings, allowing all SR students into same “community footprint” schools for the first time in community’s history. This was a huge “family” necessity for a “family” community. How did these events impact you and your family? The MRN development and associated MRN Marketplace Shopping Center added community infrastructure synergy, including a number of additional food choices, a Hallmark franchise to replace the sale and subsequent demise of the aforementioned Country Store, thereby enabling the ultimate re-use of that space for one of SR’s long-time needs, a top tier classy restaurant (La Bastide), as well as a quantum leap for the community provided by the Community Park (where the annual Community Fair is now held along with hundreds of birthday parties, and sporting events). The MRN development also enabled a fantastic Community win when Wes Danskin, Claudia Unhold (now Tedford) and several others negotiated with developer McMillin to save the original MRN Sales Office, and agree to slice it in thirds so that it could be moved (probono) to the Butterfly Park area and become one of the City of San Diego’s first-generation Community Service Centers, providing Community joint use opportunities, as well as passport and water bill service. See next decade for the “next stage” outcome. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? The birth of both of our daughters as Scripps Ranch natives was by far the most important event of that decade in our household. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? The traffic circulation pattern changed significantly when SDUSD chose the site south of Pomerado for the “new” right-sized Marshall Middle School campus, enabling the relocation of EBS Elementary to the old Marshall site contiguous to the Community Park. Also, we were finally successful in bringing a long-time community desire to our footprint, a top-tier health food store (with the opening of Trader Joe’s at the end of the decade), and a large single-tenant corporate presence in Lockheed Martin to the SR Business Park (employing a number of SR residents). Finally, when the City ran into insurmountable budget woes and decided to shutter all of their Community Service Centers, the SRCA was able to step up and leverage off the prior negotiations that allowed the building to be provided pro-bono by the developer, and offer to maintain the facility, resulting in being one of only a couple of CSC’s left open to operate after the entire Division was dismantled by the City. The facility has become an invaluable resource, housing local community HOA and community-benefit group meetings over 300 days per year, including the regular monthly meeting place for the MRN Planning Committee, as well as the SRCA’s recent launching of the SR Elder Care Alliance, etc…

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Getting the right-sized middle school (even if the location caused traffic circulation detriment) was critical; the joint use opportunities from those fields added needed infrastructure to the Community as did the negotiated add-on of the 300-seat theater in addition to the multi-purpose room (which has housed a number of community meetings and enabled worship service usage on the weekends to the benefit of the community). The decade’s crowning achievement was weathering the City’s budget storm and turning what would’ve otherwise become a shuttered building into the SR Community Center, a thriving community benefit facility. How did these events impact you and your family? Added self-sufficiency and convenience for the Scripps Ranch community added to family satisfaction and timesaving efficiency with the now mature community. Involvement in children’s sports was significantly benefitted by the addition of the park space. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Children grew up in the SR public schools cluster. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? Yes, I would like to see: a) us get a Hallmark Gift Shop back into the community after losing our long-time franchise in MRN Marketplace; b) us get the potential theater additions to the MRN I-15/SPP business park area to help alleviate what has become a chronic overcrowding in the Mira Mesa Mall where the Edwards Theaters currently exist; c) us get a great community Church (existing or new) of some sort (with minimal weekday use) to take over the old PSA site now owned by Horizon Church right at the mouth of the Carroll Canyon Bridge; d) in a perfect world, see us get a Diamond Lane connection to the I-15 Express Lanes for at least the AM southbound commute, which could unclog some outbound AM traffic; e) see the outdoor food court concept develop in the new Trader Joe’s redevelopment of the Chucky Cheese shopping center; and f) see the lane-widening plan under the I-15 bridge at Mira Mesa Blvd come to fruition in tandem with re-direction of the U-turns to un-clog traffic in that area. How do you think SR will change in the future? The development of the Renzulli site atop the hill west of Cypress Canyon and the Fentonowned Erma Road site will have the most residential impact, however, the community’s development will potentially be greatly enhanced by retail/commercial adds in the I-15/Scripps Poway Parkway business park area. Also, eventually the Stonebridge community (east of SR) will likely get re-districted into the same council district as Scripps Ranch and the 2 communities will become more symbiotic, which will likely include adding the SRCA Newsletter distribution to the Stonebridge community.

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Is there any additional information you would like to provide for this Capturing SR History Project? It’s great to have energetic future Eagle Scouts willing to participate in a worthwhile endeavor such as this. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Gordon: a) Native San Diegan, adopted from the County Adoption Center b) Grad of University of San Diego High School (now known as Cathedral High) c) Grad of SDSU: Finance & U of Washington’s Pacific Coast Graduate Banking School d) Married to Leigh (SDSU MPH grad & long-time Rady Children’s Hospital Dietitian e) 2 children: (Amanda {SRHS to-be Senior} and Amy {SRHS to-be Sophomore). f) SR resident since 1989: -> Member of Scripps Ranch Planning Group since 1991 (19 yrs) * Vice-Chair for 11 years * Public Facilities Finance Plan liaison for 15 yrs -> Member of SRCA Board since 1999 (12 yrs) * Executive VP for 8 yrs * President for 3 yrs * Currently Past-President -> Scripps Ranch Y-Indian Guide/Princess * Pomerado Nation Secretary/Scribe for 2 yrs -> Scripps Ranch Girls Softball Association * Coach/Asst Coach for 3 yrs -> Scripps Ranch Soccer Club * Coach/Asst Coach for 5 yrs -> Scripps Ranch Girl Scouts Basketball * Coach/Asst Coach for 4 yrs -> Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year: 2001 -> Scripps Ranch Hall of Fame Charter inductee: 2005 Leigh: a) b) c) d) e) f)

Native SoCal, lived in SD for ~ 25 yrs after graduating SDSU w/ an MPH. Room Mom, Miramar Ranch Elementary E-Scrip Chair, Miramar Ranch Elementary E-Scrip Chair, Marshall Middle School E-Scrip Chair, SR High School SRHS Grad Night Committee

Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? The community power of Scripps Ranch was never more evident than during the “Save our Scripps Ranch” efforts in the 1999-2000 vintage. The then-2nd largest REIT in the country tried to change SR Business Park Prime Industrial zoning to residential in order to create over 1,100 rental dwellings at a time when virtually all of the SR Schools were at full capacity (and the lone Middle School well beyond capacity) and the streets leading into the proposed facility illprepared to deal with the traffic circulation implications of the project. When rebuffed by the

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SR Planning Group as being inconsistent with the Community Plan, the REIT purchased the property and attempted to move forward. The SR Planning Group sought assistance from the SRCA to defend the integrity of the SR Community Plan and ultimately prevailed. Led by SR residents Anita & Gary Prior (since relocated out of state), Barbara Maeselle and Chuck Norris (who both still live in SR), a growing group of concerned citizens rallied to become a community force as necessary to defeat the proposal at City Hall. While this resulted in the REIT selling the land to Intel for a potential 37-acre R&D campus that became a victim of the 2000 dot-bomb explosion, less than a decade later several of those lots now house the largest commercial employer in Scripps Ranch’s history (Lockheed Martin) in a state-of-the-art facility employing a number of Scripps Ranch residents and partnering with the Scripps Ranch Civic Association on activities such as community blood drives as well as becoming the first Platinum Corporate Sponsor of the Scripps Ranch Civic Association.

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Interview of Rachel Brown August 24, 2010 What is your occupation? Student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Near the Old Vons (sorry-don’t know the official name) Negley Avenue. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 20 years, (whole life!). Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Born there. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Great community feel, very safe, good schooling systems, homogeneous population, great community activities and youth sports leagues, very family-oriented. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I went to school at Miramar Ranch Elementary, Marshall Middle and Scripps Ranch High School. I played in the soccer, basketball and softball leagues. I was in a Girl Scout troop based out of Scripps. All of the groups that I was a part of growing up originated in Scripps Ranch and all of my friends growing up were from Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I was very involved in the Scripps Ranch Softball Association (SRSA). I was in charge of hiring and training the youth umpires for the league. My high school senior project involved teaching science lessons to kindergarten classes. I was involved in the public schooling system and I played on sports teams. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? All of my memories of Scripps Ranch are very pleasurable. Especially now that I am in college, I appreciate growing up in Scripps Ranch and am very nostalgic in reflecting back on growing up there. It was a great community to be a part of, all of my friends are from there, and it just has a great suburban feel with community pools, shopping centers, things to do and good schooling systems. I remember hanging out at the Swim and Racquet Club through high school with friends, playing softball at Cypress Canyon for around 10 years, playing softball for SRHS, driving around Scripps to my friends’ houses, days at MMS and SRHS, and just the daily rhythm of life in the Ranch.

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If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? I was born in 1990, so I don’t know that I remember most of the details, but I definitely remember construction and building being done. I think Scripps Ranch definitely was upgraded during the 90s. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? No specific memories. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Like in the 90s, I definitely think that Scripps Ranch got upgraded. The Swim and Racquet Club on Aviary is the best example as it has gotten renovated and a lot has been added like the gym, the work out rooms and better locker rooms. The Starbucks was added to the Vons Shopping Center, and the rest of the community has just been further developed. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? In 2003 and 2007 there were the wildfires. The first one especially severely impacted Scripps Ranch with around 300 homes burning down. That was definitely a backward step in the development of the town, but Scripps Ranch dealt with it quickly. How did these events impact you and your family? Luckily the fire did not affect my family directly, but it did affect a lot of my friends. It was a very hard time for many people and the community really had to rebound to help the people affected. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Graduated from high school, headed to college. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? No, I love it there! How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I think it will only continue to become nicer as people try to upgrade everything. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? 1995 - 2001 Miramar Ranch Elementary 2001 - 2004 Marshall Middle School 2004 - 2008 SRHS 2008 - Present Harvard University Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? For some odd reason, I remember the transition of the stores in the Old Vons Shopping Center. The dry cleaners on the corner used to be a Little Caesars Pizza Place, then a candy store, (that one lasted a very short time), and my favorite was the country store with a great environment. The store also had the best cookies! My sister and I used to walk up to the store all the time to

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get two cookies for a dollar, there were chocolate chip and frosted ones. We would also buy Christmas ornaments there as presents for our parents. We were really sad when that store closed. Z Pizza and La Bastide are relatively new, or at least I still think of them as new. The Fitness Quest on the far corner used to be 7-11, and I used to walk there during the summer for slurpees. I remember several years when the Vons had a grand reopening and I won an iPod Shuffle. The Starbucks also used to be a video rental store, and I can still remember it very vividly. That is a great area with the Swim and Racquet Club and Hoyt Park where I used to go for Concerts in the Park. I remember going to those concerts and laying out a picnic blanket and then going to dance at the front where the band was playing. I also have lots of memories at Cypress Canyon playing softball.

 

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Interview of Wesley R. Danskin November 28, 2010 What is your occupation? I am a research hydrologist, who is someone who studies water; I focus on water management. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? My home is in Loire Valley. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, I have also lived in the Jerabek area. How long have you lived here? I moved to Scripps Ranch in 1984, so I have lived in the community for 26 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? I was able to purchase a home utilizing Veterans Administration financing. What makes Scripps Ranch special? To me, Scripps Ranch is special because it is a place filled with community activists who solve problems and improve many aspects of the community. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It is a wonderful place to raise a family. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? My connections with Scripps Ranch include many of my friends living here, as well as the fact that I raised my family here. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I was on the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group for eight years, and served as the SRCA president. Also, my family edited and produced the SRCA Newsletter for 15 years. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I look back fondly on participating in the Fourth of July parade, the Miramar Ranch carnival, the annual Jerabek Tree lighting ceremony, Symphony in the Park, and other community events that I participated in with my children while they were young. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 70s? In the 70s, the most important event in early Scripps Ranch history was the homeowners going up against the developer, Leadership Homes; to ensure that development promises were fulfilled. This action was important because it created a “can-do” attitude among the Scripps Ranch homeowners.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I was drafted and sent off to Vietnam during the 1970s. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? In the 80s, the most significant change to Scripps Ranch was the development of the land north of Miramar Lake (in the Scripps Poway Parkway area). What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The most important events during the 80s were the “Save the Lake” controversy (opponents of increased development of land north of Miramar Lake), together with the founding of the Retired Senior Volunteer Patrol program (RSVP). How did these events impact you and your family? I was affected by the “Save the Lake” incident and it motivated me to get involved and join the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group. In my efforts with the MRNPG, I learned how to work out compromises between different factions. These skills have been useful in my career. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? During the early 80s, my wife and I moved from the San Francisco Bay area to Scripps Ranch and had two children. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch changed during the 90s with the building of the Recreation Center, along with the development of the land north of Miramar Lake. This expansion of the community made Scripps Ranch become more of an impersonal suburban area. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The most significant events of this decade were the incorporation of people living north on the lake into the SRCA, the opening of the Information Center and the opening of Scripps Ranch High School. How did these events impact you and your family? My family was impacted by all these events because I ended up working about 20 hours a week fighting on various issues relating to the development of Scripps Ranch over that time period. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I became the chair of the Miramar Ranch North Planning Group, along with the president of the SRCA. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? I think Scripps Ranch became a more mature community as it became more and more built out.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The opening of the new Marshall Middle School and the fact that the SRCA remains a vibrant and involved organization are the most important historical events for the decade. How did these events impact you and your family? Within my family, these events gave us a feeling that all of the work over the many years of planning had paid off and had a positive result in the community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My personal life during the 2000s included a few events to remember, including my divorce and the loss of my home during the Cedar Fire. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I strongly believe that a community pool at SR High School would be a nice addition to the community, along with having senior housing next to Alliant University. I would also have moved Marshall Middle School to the Intel lot in the business park where the community and the district originally considered building the school. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? The future is unknown at this point in time, but as long as Scripps Ranch remains filled with great community activists, the community will not change much and remain the great place it is now. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? One example of how the SRCA is and has always tried to fund and save good community projects was their involvement with the creation of Boy Scout Troop 663. In an effort to jumpstart Troop 663 and bring it up to the level of Troop 616, the SRCA provided the new troop with the necessary equipment and gear to make the start-up process easier. I have learned a great deal about how to get along with people and how to build a consensus and resolve issues effectively from Bob Dingeman. The life lessons I have learned while being involved with the MRNPG and the SRCA have helped me in my business dealings as well. Often, when I am in meetings or work groups, I try to approach issues from the perspective of “What would Bob Dingeman do in this situation?” Also, in all the many meetings I went to with Bob, he would always tell me where to sit. I learned that it is better for two people with the same perspective or agenda to sit separately from each other. I also learned that being secretary of an organization or committee can be more important than being the president, because the secretary keeps the meeting record and creates the history of activities taken at the meetings.

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Interview of David DeBus and Denyse Baudet 2010 What are your occupations? David: psychologist. Denyse: author, math tutor. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The Grove. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No How long have you lived here? Since March 1988. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Because of the trees. We also had a friend who lived in the Smoketree section of Scripps Ranch and loved it. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The sense of community, community involvement. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? Denyse: the trees, the people. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Library, church. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Denyse and David: volunteered in school, library. David: recognized for setting up library computer room. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? David: Walking with Denyse and our daughter, Micaela, around Miramar Lake. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 80s? Community resistance to having houses built north of Miramar Lake. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Got a high school in Scripps Ranch, new library, Dingeman Elementary School, Marshall Middle School, military housing. How did these events impact you and your family? Daughter benefited from the schools and library.

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What other important events happened in your life during the 90s? Less noise, Miramar changed from Navy to Marine base. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Wildfires, cut down more trees, more traffic. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Fires in 2003, the meeting at Marshall with the Insurance Commissioner. How did these events impact you and your family? Scripps lost its charm, had a different style. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? Try to protect what’s left of the trees. Ecological concerns. Is there any additional information you would like to provide? We are really grateful to Scripps Ranch, can’t imagine living somewhere else. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? We met as students at USIU (United States International University). Micaela was co-captain of the Flag Team at the first Marshall Middle School.

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Interview of Colonel Bob Dingeman July 21, 2010 What is your occupation? 34 years in the military. One of the most decorated men, decorated for heroism, valor and honor. I am a professional citizen soldier, community activist, and leader. Been retired 5 times, the last time at age 85. I am now 88. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I live in what is known as the older section of Scripps Ranch. My house was built in 1969. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? We are the second owners of our house and we have lived here for 34 years. There were about 950 people in Scripps Ranch when we moved in. And everybody was nice and knew each other. Why did you move to SR? We lived in La Jolla for a while, but didn’t like it. We moved here because it was called Country Living. People were so nice, it reminded me of the old days when I was a young man. Everyone gets together to have a barbecue. And everybody knows each other. Nowadays, nobody knows even the people next door. What makes SR special? The people make Scripps Ranch special—the people and their spirit of family living. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? The people take care of themselves, they care about others, and they are willing to devote time for good works. What personal connections do you have with SR? How are you involved in the SR community? I have done everything. There have been 9 “Bob Dingeman Days” awarded by the City Council and 5 by the County. No one else has more than 2. What fond memories do you have of SR? My fondest memory is having the people of Scripps Ranch vote to name a school in my honor. This has given me more personal pleasure than all my military decorations. The people voted and they said thank you. Golly, are people nice to me. Every year they have a Bob Dingeman day at the school and I get hugged by 800 kids. I always get a cold, though. As you may have detected, I have a good attitude towards life.

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If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? In the 70s, we were coming out of the Vietnam War and still had lots of things going on. People were settling down. Scripps Ranch was a sanctuary. People were darn nice, worked hard, took care of each other. It was a throwback to the old days like in the Midwest. Everyone knows everyone, country living. Things changed in the 70s because they got better. The community worked very hard. We did not have a library, parks or schools. We worked for those things and we now have them all. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The most important event was getting the City to admit what we needed in terms of a library, schools, and parks and to get it done. For example, we had a bookmobile that came to the parking lot in the shopping center one and then two times a week. The circulation at the bookmobile was greater than at most branch libraries. We were able to get some money and had a storefront library in the industrial park area for several years. The current library is a triumph of what can be done. $2.3 million in land was donated. Corky McMillin gave $1 million and Allstate Insurance donated $750,000. The library committee worked for 7 years from that point to get the library built. Our Scripps Ranch library set the standard for what you could do for the rest of the City. It was the first big library with a reading room and a large auditorium/community room with a kitchen, and a seminar meeting room. They called it Bob Dingeman’s Taj Mahal. I was on the library committee for 19 years. Another example is we worked hard to get a fire station for Scripps Ranch. We started with a trailer that was put next to the Water Authority on Scripps Lake Drive. Originally, it was only funded for 3 people. Well there was one that drove the fire truck, one captain and that left only one person to fight the fires. We went to the City Council to get them to staff the station with four people, so there would be at least two people to fight the fires. The first women firefighters were assigned to this station, so we bought another trailer for them to stay in. Our firefighters helped design our current station. The people that had been contracted to build our current fire station ran out of money. But there was a performance bond on their contract. I noticed that nothing had happened for about 6 weeks and called the insurance company that held the performance bond. A company named Lusardi came and finished the station. One amazing thing is that the tiles that are inside the station that were done by all the Scripps Ranch families. Victoria Mazelli organized this effort. How did these events impact you and your family? My family is very proud of my efforts. My oldest grandson and granddaughter participated in the first Scripps Ranch 4th of July parade in 1976. My wife and I were the narrators for the parade. My granddaughter has even brought my great grandkids to be in a 4th of July parade. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I received an outstanding citizen leadership award. I was selected as Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year for 6 years. I told them not to give me anything anymore, just to say thank you. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? We continued to do good works.

 

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? I think getting our schools as good as they are was our greatest accomplishment. How did these events impact you and your family? Mrs. Dingeman has been very nice and put up with a lot. Every night was booked up with meetings for different committees except Wednesday nights. I have worked on 76 projects and enjoyed it. I have a notebook for each of the projects. I am retired army and a teacher. I am not wealthy and not poor, but fiercely independent and absolutely devoted to Scripps Ranch. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? We continued on with what we were doing to improve the community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I have been the same force through the 70s, 80s and 90s. Until I was 85, I was an officer of the SRCA. Now I am the President Emeritus of the SRCA. What other important events happened in your life during the 2000s? During the last decade, I was selected as teacher of the year by Miramar College. I was nominated for Distinguished Graduate by West Point. I have four wonderful great grandchildren, who are smart, healthy and a blessing. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? Sometimes people forget and drive too fast. There is a four-way stop outside our house and people blow through the stop sign. When we leave the house, we have a mantra, OK left, OK right and we don’t back out until we check. I would like people to drive with more care. How do you think SR will change in the future? The Senior Care Alliance will help change the future. It will help people stay in their houses. I have been working on it since it started and it is very much a change. At 88, I’m very old. I have lived through 3 wars, malaria, a broken back and neck. I am the luckiest man in the world. Other people are not as lucky. They are in their 60s and not in as good a condition as I am, but they want to stay in their own homes. The Senior Care Alliance works very hard to help them do it. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? I was in the military and have lived all over. I was born in the Philippines, on Corregidor Island. I have lived in Hawaii, France, Panama, Germany, Italy, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, New York, Wisconsin and Illinois. I have been married to my childhood sweetheart for 65 years. We got married after I graduated from West Point in 1945. She has helped me with the 4th of July parade every year. Gaye is the light of my life. Rarely do you find two people like us. We started going together in 1939. She has sustained me and supported me. The only thing I can wish for you is the same. For years, I

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would disappear for four weeks doing “interesting work,” and then come back as if nothing happened. She has put up with me. One of the questions I have been asked is how do you have time for all of this and my answer is I make the time. I also worked as a teacher at community college, where I taught American History and Political Science to all the new immigrants who wanted to become American citizens. I ran into someone yesterday who took this class long ago and remembered me. You can’t buy that. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I could tell you 100 stories. But one time I remember is the very first 4th of July celebration in 1976. We decided to have a buffalo barbecue. We arranged for a caterer to get real buffalo meat and barbecue it. We had a tent set up and outside we had kegs of beer and it was all you can drink for $1. That was back in the days you could do that and not have to worry about the insurance. We had old-fashioned games like toss eggs and water-filled balloons and sack races. I was the head of the 4th of July parade for 27 years. Now we sit at a table and have all the electronic gadgets, like radio headphones. But when we started out I just had a bullhorn. One of my favorite pictures is from the parade is of me with my bullhorn. Basically, I have loved what I have done. I have appeared before the City Council 189 times to represent Scripps Ranch interests and I have only been turned down two times. One time, we had a controversial issue and I stood up in front of the City Council with a brand new baby in my arms. The Mayor said that I was going all out and I replied that yes I am because this is your constituent and I am speaking on behalf of this baby. The mayor asked if I would give the baby back to his mother and when I tried to give the baby back, the baby started to cry, so I kept the baby in my arms. I told the Council that obviously the baby enjoyed our presentation and everybody got a big laugh. Another time, we had a large group of people supporting our position, over 200 people. The people were making lots of noise. The mayor told me to instruct my group to be quiet. I told the mayor that this was democracy in action and they have a political right to express their views. The mayor stated that he would clear the chamber if the group did not quiet down. I said, Your Honor, I would not recommend that you do that. I will request that the group be quiet, as we have made our point. But if you threaten to throw us out, we will come back. After that episode, I was able to go down to the City Council chambers alone and make the pitch by myself, but they knew I was supported by a large number of people. I always got a favorable vote.

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Interview of Sheila Donigan 2010 What is your occupation? Retired, Pacific Bell. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since Dec. 30, 1969. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Married a second time, had children. What makes Scripps Ranch special? It’s a wonderful place to live! What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? The community spirit. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I'm the first resident of Scripps Ranch. Helped found the Scripps Ranch Civic Assn. with 19 other families. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? There were no schools, fire department, no police, and no stores when we moved here. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Establishing the above. How did these events impact you and your family? They enriched our lives forever. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? Son in college, another moved out of Scripps Ranch. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 80s? Watching Scripps Ranch being built.

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How did these events impact you and your family? My son moved, and my sister bought a house on Brookview, and then got a job with PSA on Carroll Canyon Rd. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 90s? Got a fire station on the Ranch. How do you think SR will change in the future? Limited area now, it can’t grow much. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? When my husband, Paul Donigan, died, all the neighbors came to Ft. Rosecrans for the memorial service. The following article about the Donigans ran in the SRCA Newsletter. SRCA Newsletter

September 2010 Scripps Ranch Still a Hit with First Family

In 1969, after seeing only pen and ink drawings, Paul and Sheila Donigan put down a deposit of $100 for a 2,737 square foot house in Scripps Ranch. Their friends couldn’t believe they’d done that. “What do you want to go way out there for? There’s nothing there!” True, there was nothing there yet, but it looked beautiful and seemed like a good place to raise Sheila’s three children from a previous marriage. The developer, Macco Corp., had not built anything in San Diego before, so the Donigans checked out the homes they had built in Laguna Hills and were satisfied. They didn’t have a neighbor for months. There were no schools, no fire department (Miramar NAS filled in for a while), no shopping, no police protection, and no phone service. “And I worked for the phone company!” laughed Sheila. “The power was off more than it was on!” Jay explained that it would be shut down when a new house was being completed. In 1970 the children, Cathy - 11, Jeff – 9, and Jay -8, went to school in Ocean Beach. Eventually, they went to elementary school in houses in Mira Mesa, then to “Site 1” on Red Rock Rd. Cathy went to Einstein Jr. High, and graduated from Madison High School. The boys graduated from Mira Mesa High School. Having no neighbors, the Donigans were happy to have the construction foreman to talk to. He told them their 4 bedroom/bonus room house that cost $38,000 in Scripps Ranch would be $70,000 in Del Cerro.

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The Donigans finished the bonus room so the children would have a place to be with their friends, Paul saying he didn’t want to be confined to the bedroom when they entertained. The room, with bar, wet bar, and vinyl flooring cost $800. The draperies and hardware for the whole house came in at $800 too, both projects still holding up well. Sheila had come from a 900 square foot house in Allied Gardens, Paul from a 1200 square foot home in Ocean Beach. They felt like they were living in a palace! They became Scripps Ranch’s first residents, moving in Dec. 31, 1969. Macco hosted the new buyers, including those who hadn’t yet moved in, with a catered dinner on the lawn of the Scripps Ranch mansion. Tables were set up near the mansion’s “humongous pool,” near Aviary. “It was a beautiful dinner!” Sheila remembered. The kids took to Scripps Ranch living, fishing at Hendrix Pond. They sold snakes they encountered to the Biology Department at United States International University. The family had a boat, and spent a lot of time on the water. Cathy became a stunt water skier and appeared in the original Freaky Friday movie starring Jodie Foster. “She bought her first car with the money and still gets residuals,” said her proud mother. Wild Grape Rd. ended where Rookwood started, and Rookwood Rd. ended at the end of the current block. Jay said he and his brother used to go to the unfinished areas and shoot their BB guns and play in the houses under construction. “We made sure never to damage any property or take anything.” Sheila is proud of being among the 20 families that mounted a class action lawsuit in 1970 when the builder reneged on promised amenities. Each family put up $800 and hired a lawyer who worked on a contingency basis. Each month the lawyer would meet with residents in someone’s house to keep them updated on the status of the case. A few families wanted a monetary award, but the group agreed that they wanted amenities for the community, like schools and parks. Hoyt Park, up till then a dumping ground, became the first Scripps Ranch park. It was the first class action suit against a builder in California and effected a change in the law for future developers. Despite the lack of neighbors, the Donigans had many recreational activities. They belonged to the Swim and Racquet Club and participated in activities there. They had a motor home for 17 years and took family trips until the kids begged off so they could stay home with friends and go to work. They also had motorcycles, which they rode in Jamul on a friend’s 40-acre property. The Donigans lived in their motor home for four days while the builder put in 21 eucalyptus trees behind the house. The trees eventually died, some from the Australian beetle invasion. The last one removed was 120 feet tall. Jay and his mother laughed remembering when “the sheep got loose.” The Scripps property was still a working ranch and kept sheep. Workers chased the sheep all over the streets and Jay saw two bewildered sheep looking at him through second story windows in a house under construction on Wild Grape. Another time the dogs on the ranch got loose and killed birds that had been released from the aviary.

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“We saw beautiful birds flying around the neighborhood for a long time. They were exotic birds, beautiful birds,” said Sheila. Jay remembered the wild parrots that perched on trees in the yards. Jay enjoyed growing up in Scripps Ranch and bought a house across the street from where he once lived. His sister, Cathy, also lives in Scripps Ranch and has raised her daughters, Kelly, who has been teaching in a Baltimore high school and is coming back to get her Master’s at SDSU and will teach in an inner city school, and Amber, a student at Creighton University in Nebraska. When Sheila and Paul got married, he had a shell camper on his pickup truck. It had two beds for the adults. Cathy slept on the floor under the table, Jay on the table, and Jeff in the “bat cave.” As the kids grew, the campers grew, first to a cabover camper, still on the pickup truck, and in 1971, a 24-foot motor home. In 1981 Sheila became national secretary of the Family Motor Coach Association and, eventually, senior vice-president. The Donigans appreciated their Scripps Ranch “quality of life” so much, they arranged for a $5,000 bequest to be used for Scripps Ranch projects. Not long ago, they revised that, increasing the amount to $10,000. Paul passed away earlier this year and received full military honors at a Celebration of Life ceremony at Ft. Rosecrans cemetery. “The winds were blowing so hard that day, it broke a steel sign post. Friends and neighbors huddled together for protection,” Jay related. “But after a bugler played “Taps,” the winds stopped and two rays of sunshine beamed down on the gathering. ”Tear time!” said Sheila. They are still glad they chose “Scripps Ranch country living” for their home. “The community spirit is amazing, the outpouring of love. Lots of young people who grew up here want to live here, usually in Old Scripps Ranch. You can get anywhere from here,” said Jay who works all over the county. Paul Donigan, interviewed eight years ago about his days in Scripps Ranch, remarked, “I’m so glad we made the decision to move here.” Elinor Reiss

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Interview of Karyn Farr August 19, 2010 What is your occupation? Travel Consultant. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Waterford. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, Timberlane. How long have you lived here? Currently since October 2002; originally from 1975 to 1985. Why did you originally move to Scripps Ranch? The quality of the community and people, the affordable home for me as a newly divorced woman, and, having never lived alone in my entire life – it was a safe community. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The ‘community’ spirit of the people. Support is there when you need it. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? People have pride of ownership, participate more in community activities, and know their neighbors. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Since I’m a travel professional, I have quite a few clients in Scripps Ranch. How have you been involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I was active in the Scripps Ranch North Planning Committee and the Timberlane HOA; and currently I am involved with the Scripps Ranch Women’s Club (I’ve chaired Membership and the Newsletter). We are season subscribers to the Scripps Ranch Theatre; and I drum and do Tai Chi with the Scripps Ranch Eldercare program. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I have always liked the beauty of our ponds with the wildlife; the many eucalyptus trees; and the horses that lived at the old ranch house (I used to pet them between the fence rails). If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? Traffic got better as I-15 was widened!

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Sadly, we lost our historic buildings from the old ranch house. But many new neighborhoods were created and our theater, shopping centers and schools. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? New-builds slowed and stopped. Schools changed. We have an Eldercare Program to serve our senior population. The theater is growing! We got a Trader Joe’s! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The devastating fires and rebuilding of homes and families. We faced an election to see if we wanted Miramar as the San Diego Airport – and luckily we did not! Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? It’s too bad we ever widened Pomerado Road over to Poway! How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Hopefully, people will maintain and improve their older homes – maybe use more solar. Hopefully, people of all age groups will continue to move into the ranch and keep the community spirit active. Hopefully, we will continue to have the buffer of Miramar versus other uses for that space. We will continue to need to watch our water use. Is there any additional information you would like to provide? I’m just proud to live in this most lovely neighborhood of “America’s finest city”, San Diego. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? November 1945 - Karyn Farr born in Clinton, Iowa 1957 - Moved with mother Nell to join brothers Ken and Don in California 1963 - Graduated Clairemont HS in San Diego 1985 - Graduated La Jolla Univ. with BA in Human Resources 1989 - Married Don Berkebile, Captain, USN, Retired 2001 - Retired from State of California with 38+ yrs. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I tell stories about the 3 foot rattlesnake that I killed around 11 PM, cut off its head and placed the two ends in our large lidded trash can on top of the newly-mowed grass. When I went out the next day to review my ‘kill’, there was no snake! Both ends had departed! I realize that the head probably had the ability to burrow into the grass, but how did the 3-foot body disappear with the lid tightly on?

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Interview of Joan Loeb Gass December 22, 2010 What is your occupation? I am a retired English teacher and was the GATE program coordinator at Scripps Ranch High School. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The Woods series. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 38 years, we purchased our home in February 1973. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? My husband was completing his medical residency at UCSD. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The environment, the commitment many residents have made to developing, improving and maintaining the community. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I have been involved in a number of ways in the Scripps Ranch community. • Served on the planning committee that developed the Scripps Ranch Master Plan. • Developed and implemented the Apache Exchange Program at Miramar Ranch Elementary from 1978-1993 • Original board member of the Scripps Ranch Little League • Active in the development of the SR Community Theatre • Represented Scripps Ranch on the GATE Advisory Committee of SDUSD • Employed at SRHS from 1993-2008 • Served on the committee that planned the permanent library • I was selected Scripps Ranch Citizen of the Year I and the other members of the Scripps Ranch Master Plan Committee were given helicopter tours of undeveloped Scripps Ranch in the late 1970s. In addition, my son, Corey, and his family also live in Scripps Ranch. What fond memories do you have of SR? I look back fondly on the bookmobile, the day I got to interview Chauncy Jerabek and the groundbreaking ceremony for Scripps Ranch High School.

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If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? • The rapid expansion of the community • The loss of the original Scripps estate • The building of the two permanent elementary schools and a temporary library • Concerts in the Park • The shopping area How did these events impact you and your family? They enriched the lives of the people in the community and moved Scripps Ranch closer to selfsufficiency. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My youngest son was born in 1979. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? • The planning for a middle school and a high school • The community’s concern regarding development north of the lake • The development of houses on the south side of Pomerado Road What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The expansion of Scripps Ranch to the south and plans for expansion to the north. The completion of the permanent St. Gregory’s church. How did these events impact you and your family? The expansion in Scripps Ranch led to a loss of the uniqueness of the small community that we moved to. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My two sons graduated from high school and one completed college. I was actively involved in a variety of community groups. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? The further expansion of Scripps Ranch. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The opening of Scripps Ranch High School in 1993 and the opening of Marshall Middle School. How did these events impact you and your family? I began my teaching career at Scripps Ranch High School the first semester the school opened and continued on there part-time and then full-time until 2008.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? One son got a law degree, married and had twin daughters. One son got a BA and a MA and got married. One son graduated in the first four-year class at Scripps Ranch High School. My mother and sister moved to Scripps Ranch. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during that decade? The unfortunate placement of the new Marshall Middle School created a traffic problem for the community. The high school rose to #1 in the San Diego Unified School District. The northern part of the community completed most of its development. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The Cedar Fire and the rebuilding of Scripps Ranch. How did these events impact you and your family? Many of my students lost their homes. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? The birth of my four grandchildren and my retirement from Scripps Ranch High School. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I wish we had better public transportation. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? The institutions will continue to mature. Everything is in place to see that happen. Chabad will build out its site. Perhaps there could be a senior living project. Is there any additional information you would like to provide for this project? My husband has much to add regarding his involvement in Scripps Ranch, including developing the first adult sports league, serving on the library committee that purchased the piano and chairing the Scripps Ranch Community Theatre. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? • Born in NY City in 1943 • Graduated Brown University in 1964 • Received a MA from the University of Rochester in 1966 • Lived on the San Carlos Apache Reservation from 1970 – 1973 • Moved to Scripps Ranch in 1973 Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I interviewed Chauncy Jerabek shortly before the opening of Jerabek Elementary School. The tape of that interview was lost but I still have a lovely letter from him. When I served on the Little League Board in 1975-76, we had a parent who killed himself and his family. The Miramar Ranch Apache Exchange Program won a Freedom Foundation Award.

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Interview of Kyle Glass October 17, 2010 What is your occupation? Student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I would assume old Scripps. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 20 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? My family did when I was 2. They liked the neighborhood. What makes Scripps Ranch special? I never really thought it was. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? I live in Wisconsin now and we have seasons there. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? My family still lives there and it’s where I see my friends from high school. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Not involved. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I liked playing sports there. What other important events happened in your life during the 70s? We got out of Vietnam. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? More people moved here, I was really young. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? I was born. How did these events impact you and your family? My parents now had a child.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I went to school. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? New Scripps began to become more developed. How did these events impact you and your family? I don’t think they had much, if any, affect. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I went to middle school and high school. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? No. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? More people will live there. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? Once I got lost when I was 8 and it took me 3 hours to get home.

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Interview of Dale Gordon August 29, 2010 What occupations have you held? I worked as a property manager for the Scripps family. I managed their property here in Scripps Ranch and later I managed a 78-acre property that they owned in Lake Tahoe. Who did you work for (E.W. or other Scripps family members)? E.W. Scripps had passed away before I went to work for the Scripps family. I worked for Mrs. Hawkins, who was originally married to R.P. Scripps and then later got remarried to Mr. Hawkins. Mrs. Hawkins lived in the mansion while I worked for the family. E.W. set up the EW Trust for the benefit of the six grandchildren. While I worked for the family, the EW Trust was managed by Margaret Scripps Hawkins, who was the widow of Robert P. Scripps, one of the sons of E.W. Scripps. How did you get the job working for the Scripps family? I was farming west of the Naval Air Station and the Navy condemned the property that I was farming because it was under the flight path. I knew some people that worked at Miramar Ranch because our kids went to school together. These people told me about Miramar Ranch and the fact that they needed a property manager. I set up an interview with Mrs. Hawkins, had discussions with her about the job and got hired. What did you do for the Scripps family while you worked as property manager? Pretty much everything. Whatever it took to run the place, I did it. I had to provide maintenance and upkeep for the buildings, hire personnel, maintain the trucks and cars, grade the roads, and maintain the water and sewer systems. How did you learn to do all those things? I learned all these skills from the jobs I had already worked. I learned a lot of from farming. I worked at Lockheed up in LA and learned how to manage things. I have had rental properties all my life and needed to maintain those properties. What was it like working for the Scripps family? Absolutely heaven. You could never find a family better or equal to them. They treated me as part of the family, invited me and my family to parties and other family events like weddings. I really never had a boss; I just did what needed to get done to do the job. For example, at one time I asked one of the grandchildren what they wanted me to do on the Lake Tahoe property and they just told me to do whatever I thought needed to get done and that I knew better than he did what needed to be done. How long did you work for the Scripps family? I started in 1956 and worked at Miramar Ranch until they sold it in 1968.

 

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Did you live at Miramar Ranch? If so, where on the property (based on locations and buildings present currently)? My family and I lived on the property while I was the property manager. We lived about a block from the mansion. Our house was on top of a hill where it flattens out near where the old Vons is now. There were nine dwellings that the help lived in. We lived in a 75 year-old house. When they were going to tear down the house to build a road, we were offered the opportunity to take the house and move it somewhere else and live in it. However, the house wasn’t really in a condition to be moved and it would have been very expensive to move it. From our house, we could see the temporary school site and the store being built, but we didn’t see anything after that being built. What did the area look like back then? Eucalyptus trees and rattlesnakes. Had you been to Miramar Ranch before you started working for the Scripps family? Yes, we had gotten to know the chauffeur’s family because our kids went to school together. I understand the Scripps family named an area on the ranch after you. How did that come to pass? Actually, it was the City that named a part of the area after me. There is a Gordon’s Grove off of Pomerado Road. I worked with the City to help determine how the parks and green areas were to be laid out in Scripps Ranch. A lot of the parks were left natural as open space. The City named certain parts of the area after various people that worked for the Scripps family, such as Hendrix Pond and Meanley Drive. There is a picture of me near the sign showing where Gordon’s Grove was located, but that picture was taken well after I had moved to Lake Tahoe to manage their property up there. What personal connections do you have with the Scripps family and Scripps Ranch? I don’t visit the Scripps Ranch area any more, but I still keep in contact with the family, mostly the grandkids and great grandchildren of E.W. Scripps. There is only one grandson left, who lives in Texas. He is about my age, which is 93. I just had lunch with two of the great grandkids the other day. Over the years, I also met lots of the family’s friends. I understand that you also worked for, Macco Corp., the developer that built the first homes in Scripps Ranch. What did you do for them and what was that like? I was a Field Superintendent for Macco. I helped with the grading of the lots, paving of the streets, building of the curbs and sidewalks, drainage, and hydroseeding. I helped get everything all ready for the city to pass inspection. Essentially, everything up to the point where they actually built the houses on the lots. My two sons also worked for Macco as well. It was a family operation. Macco was an up and coming company. Unfortunately, the officers of the company were more interested in the welfare of the directors, rather than the company and the development they were building and the company went bankrupt.

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What fond memories do you have of Miramar Ranch? It was an ideal place to raise a family. Our family was able to use everything on the property. It was like living the lifestyle of rich people without being rich. We had access to a basketball-size court gymnasium, a pool, tennis courts, treehouses, off-road vehicles and trails all over the 1,200-acre property to ride them. We could use the garages to work on cars. My kids even had an ornery donkey that we kept on the property that their grandfather gave them. My kids could bring their friends over to play and use the off-road vehicles and everything else. Is there anything you would have liked to change about Miramar Ranch? I would have liked for the family to have not sold the property. I was in the camp with some of the grandchildren that did not want to sell the property. Is there any additional information you would like to provide about your time at Miramar Ranch? Working for the Scripps family was a rare opportunity that I was lucky enough to get. I never will forget it. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? I don’t think I could have lived a happier life. I worked at Lockheed up in LA during the war as a supervisor. I decided life was too stressful and I switched to farming up in the LA area. I then wanted to live an even simpler life and moved to San Diego to continue farming. Ultimately, I ended up farming the property near the Naval Air Station. After working for the Scripps family at Miramar Ranch, I retired. Then at a later point, the manager of their Lake Tahoe property was killed in an auto accident. They called me back out of retirement to manage the Tahoe property. I helped maintain the house and other dwellings on the property. It was a 78-acre parcel with about a mile of lakefront. Originally, the house had been built as a summer retreat only. Various family members would come from San Diego and Ohio to summer there. I was hired to help revamp the property and winterize it and get it ready to sell. It took 9 years to revamp and winterize the property and then I retired again. Here is the story about how E.W. came to own the Lake Tahoe property. E.W. liked to go camping with his rich buddies. One summer, he was camping on the property and someone came up and said, “Do you know you are on my land?” E.W. asked if he could buy the land and the gentleman said yes. Can you tell me one story about your time at Miramar Ranch? The Scripps family was very generous and treated me very well. One of my responsibilities was to take care of the house. If there was something wrong in the mansion, Mrs. Hawkins would call me over to come fix it. While I was there, she would say while you’re here, have a drink and let’s visit. We used to have a little dog with very long hair that suffered from the heat. The dog dug a hole under the fence that surrounded the pool and unbeknownst to me would go swimming in the pool when it got too hot. Mrs. Hawkins saw the dog in the pool and told me about it. I told her that I

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would fix the hole under the fence. But she told me to leave it and that my dog was welcome to go swimming, just like her dogs went swimming. We tried to give the family their privacy and I told my boys not to go swimming while the family was using the pool. Mrs. Hawkins asked me why the boys weren’t swimming and I explained we were trying to give them their privacy. She told me the boys were welcome any time to use the pool and she loved the company. Mrs. Hawkins invited us to all the family weddings, parties and social events.

 

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Interview of Kristin Hampshire, nee Block August 5, 2013 What is your occupation? Family physician. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Americana, near Dingeman Elementary School. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? Yes, I grew up in old Scripps Ranch by the Aviary club and we lived in condos off Scripps Ranch Blvd. for one year while looking for a house to buy. How long have you lived here? Lived here from age 4 - 18 (1974-1988), moved away for school and medical training, and returned to Scripps Ranch in 2000. Why did you move to SR? Great place to raise a family, close to my parents who still live in the house I grew up in. What makes SR special? Strong sense of community, great schools, great people, lots of children, not pretentious. Feels like a small town. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived ? Main factor is the community; it feels like a small town in a big city. What personal connections do you have with SR? My parents still live here. Most of their community that they raised their kids with still live here and I see them all of the time. Many of the kids I grew up with in SR moved back to raise their kids here and our kids are now friends. It’s very interwoven. How are you involved in the SR community? Volunteer in the schools, I am a family physician at Sharp Rees-Stealy in SR so I also work in the community and see many patients from the community. What fond memories do you have of SR? Countless. Walking to “the club” where I practically grew up, playing on Hendrix pond where my childhood house is located, going to “Little Bear” and “lavichios” where the old Vons now is. Sneaking into various Jacuzzis at night around town, going to Miramar Ranch before it was at its current location. It was located across from the old Vons back then. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? Vons was built at some point, more houses popped up such as those on the south side of Pomerado.

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? I can’t recall, I was 4-10. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? More growth in population and houses. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I graduated high school 1988 from Mira Mesa High School (no Scripps Ranch high until the 90s). If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? They built the high school and at some point the middle school. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Scripps Ranch High School, building out into “new scripps”, which was previously non-existent. How did these events impact you and your family? My brother was in the second class to graduate from Scripps Ranch High School. He went to Mira Mesa High School his first 2 years of high school and then we finally had a school in Scripps Ranch. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I wasn’t living in SR during most of 90s. I was completing my education, returning home to visit, and had two kids in the 90s. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? Moved back to SR in 2000. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The new middle school. How did these events impact you and your family? My kids went to the new Marshall Middle School. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? New son, we bought our first house, in SR in 2001. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? No, I love it. How do you think SR will change in the future? It’s hard to say. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch?

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It was an idyllic childhood growing up in SR, spending time on the cul-de-sac with neighborhood friends, building structures on Hendrix pond, walking to the club to spend time swimming and playing tennis and then heading to Little Bear for a snack. Much freedom, ‘be home at dark’. Many fond memories, hard to nail it down to one.

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Interview of Bob Ilko August 2010 What is your occupation? Attorney. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Loire Valley. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since January 1994. I had looked around and found Scripps Ranch had something for kids morning, afternoons, and weekends. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? People had set up the SRCA: Marc Sorensen, Wes Danskin, Brian Allman set up opportunities. You come into Scripps Ranch, go to the SRCA, from there to Planning Groups. You knock on doors, ask for help, such as for Neighborhood Watch. My daughter, Alicia, was in the 4th of July Parade and has worked on it ever since. Whoever she dates has to be able to get through Float Week. The second generation in Loire Valley helps, the third generation probably will not. What personal connections do you have with SR and how are you involved in the SR community? Joined the SRCA in 1995, District Representative, vice-president of Planning Commission, SRCA president in 2010, chaired Project Phoenix, a model for Rancho Bernardo when wildfires struck that community. What fond memories do you have of SR? The 2003 meetings after the fires. In what ways did SR change during the 90s? Pomerado Rd. was closed, and then reopened. Miramar Ranch North was not being planned. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Master planning for Miramar Ranch North. How did these events impact you and your family? We got a new fire station and a community park. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Our children were born.

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In what ways did SR change during the 00s? The Stonebridge development was built. Got Marshall Middle School, SOS campaign against new apartment complex building was successful. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The 2003 wildfires, the establishment of the Eldercare Alliance, the wall bordering the Meanley property was preserved as a Historical Landmark, and the beginning of a Scripps Ranch History Wall and Historical Society. How did these events impact you and your family? I’m never home! What other important events happened in your life during that decade? The children grew up. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? I wish Scripps Ranch was more open, as it was in Project Phoenix. We need more willingness to help others. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? The response for a friend who was in a bad car accident was amazing; it saved his life! The first blood drive was 4 hours long, the second, 9 hours long, and was the longest one in the city.

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Interview of Tracy Jewell, nee Anderson November 14, 2010 What is your occupation? Mom/CPA. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps – close to Hendrix Pond (Rookwood Drive). Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? I lived on Tribuna from 1976-1981, Rookwood from 1981-1988 (when I went to college) and then Brian and I moved into our current house in August 1997. How long have you lived here? 34 years – this includes a 4-year break for college and two years when we were first married. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Because my Dad was in the Navy and this is where they moved. As an adult, because its a great community and has good schools. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The eucalyptus trees, the schools and the people! What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? My parents live here as well as one of my sisters. I went to school at Miramar Ranch and Jerabek. I went to Wangenheim and Mira Mesa High School – because SRHS and Marshall weren’t around back then! How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I’m involved in Girl Scouts and on the Boards of SRHS, Marshall and Miramar Ranch. I’ve also volunteered with some of the different sporting teams. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Walking up to Little Bear to get candy, the bookmobile that came weekly to Scripps Ranch Blvd before we had a library, and decorating bikes and wagons to ride in the 4th of July parade. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? I’m not sure what year Jerabek opened. I was in third grade (it was either late 70s or early 80s) and Mrs. Latimer was my teacher. We walked from Miramar Ranch to Jerabek the first day of school as a class. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch High School opened. Previously we went to Mira Mesa High.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I graduated from college, got married, bought our first house in Scripps Ranch and had two children. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? 7-Eleven was replaced by Fitness Quest. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The fires‌ How did these events impact you and your family? We were evacuated. I remember watching TV and having Brian Maienschein read off addresses of families that lost their homes and knowing so many of them. Knowing people that lost their homes and all their personal possessions yet they were still so positive. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I had two more children!

 

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Interview of Dave Johnson July 9, 2010 What is your occupation? Retired, SDPD Police Captain, Northeast Division; 1984 – now, Security Relations. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Galleria. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Brighton Manor. How long have you lived here? Since 1987. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Raised and lived in San Diego, knew about Scripps Ranch. What makes Scripps Ranch special? There’s no other community like it in San Diego! What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? The clubs, 4th of July celebration, friends. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Support the clubs, have friends. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? “My son got married on our patio. It was beautiful!” If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? It grew larger. Now had shopping conveniences. How did these events impact you and your family? Could avoid freeways. Never have to leave Scripps Ranch! If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? More growth. We got the new library, St. Gregory Church, the Recreation Center, bathrooms at Scripps Ranch Community Park. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Growth in the community, have good values.

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How did these events impact you and your family? More friends, bike rides. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? More growth. Now that we have Trader Joe’s, there’s no need to leave Scripps Ranch.

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Interview of Lauretta Johnson July 9, 2010 What is your occupation? Retired . Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Galleria. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Brighton Manor. How long have you lived here? Since 1987. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Community feeling. What makes SR special? A lot of community involvement, Newsletter great, now an online website. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Sense of community. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Newsletter distributor (“Dave helped!”), worked with Community Theatre, Welcome Club, Scripps Ranch Women’s Club, attend Symphony in the Park, 4th of July festivities, Hidden Valley House Auxiliary. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Do things with friends. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 80s? Growth, new park, new Vons, new restaurants. How did these events impact you and your family? Fun for the family. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? More shopping, more friends. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Pretty much built out, don’t anticipate more growth.

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Interview of Grace Helen Klein August 19, 2010 What is your occupation? I am a new student at Scripps Ranch High School (entering 9th grade). Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? My home is off Handrich Drive near Jerabek Elementary. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Another home I lived in, as a rental after my house was lost in the 2004 Cedar Fire, is located in the Red Cedar area, on Courtyard. How long have you lived here? I was born here and have lived in Scripps Ranch all fourteen years of my life. What makes Scripps Ranch special? To me, Scripps Ranch is special because even though it is large (stretching across highway I-15), there is still a strong sense of community. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I have many personal connections to the community through attending local public schools; through my neighbors, who are all family friends; and through playing competitive soccer for Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I am involved in the community through, again, playing soccer for a local club; and visiting the local library regularly. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I have many fond memories of Scripps Ranch, but my favorite is our cul-de-sac’s annual 4th of July BBQ. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? I don’t remember much because I was born in 1996. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 90s? For me, a couple of important events in my life during the 1990s include turning four at the turn of the century; along with being diagnosed with Gauchers disease, a genetic blood disease. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the decade? During and after the 2003 Cedar fires, the community grew closer as a whole due to the tragedy it survived together.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? I think that the most important events in Scripps Ranch history out of the last decade were the 2003 Cedar Fire; the 2007 opening of the new Marshall Middle School; and the fact that the 2006 5th grade class of Miramar Ranch Elementary school got to attend the new Marshall Middle School since the elementary school was no longer keeping its 6th graders. How did these events impact you and your family? Within my family, the previous events had a huge impact because our house burned down in 2003, and because my graduating class from Miramar Ranch was the first 6th grade class to start at the new Marshall Middle School without being retained at Miramar Ranch for 6th grade. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My personal life included a few events to remember during the 2000s as well: my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006; and, in 2007, my dad had to get a quadruple bypass surgery due to heart problems. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? On the bright side, there isn’t really anything big I would change about Scripps Ranch. It is a pretty good community to live in, but if there was one thing I could change it is the jail-like appearance of Marshall Middle School. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? The future for Scripps Ranch seems solid while looking at the past, but I believe the community may grow farther apart as it expands and the older, more knowledgeable citizens move on. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? Behind my house, there’s a canyon with a rather large cliffside made of silt and sand. My friend, Matthew Ryan, and I got it into our heads to make a rope and rappel down the hill. So, because we were determined child geniuses and lacked a much-needed rope, we managed to make a surprisingly strong rappelling “rope” out of my unused belts. Of course, the only reason we really needed a rope is because we’d attempted before to climb without one and managed to get stuck on a small ledge made of loose sand. It was a requirement of my mother that we use a rope—not for fear of our safety, but because she wholeheartedly believed we would start a landslide into the neighbor’s yard. As far as I know, that rope is still up there, tied to a tree, caked in mud, and stiff as a steel rod. In 2005, Mrs. Latimer’s third grade seminar class at Miramar Ranch Elementary School started an annual tradition of appearing on Ken Kramer’s All About San Diego history show on a local news network in connection with its own San Diego history research projects.

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Interview with Ken Klein August 19, 2010 What is your occupation? Attorney, Law School Professor at California Western School of Law. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Wine Country. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? I have lived in Scripps Ranch for 14 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? We wanted to raise a family and Scripps Ranch offered the best opportunity to do so. What makes Scripps Ranch special? It is a highly competent and self-supporting neighborhood. They had a systematic response to the Cedar Fire in order to assist and take care of residents that were victims of the fire that was great. It was very competently organized. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? My answer to the last question says it all. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I have been involved in youth sports (coached and managed my daughter’s soccer team) and also played in a soccer league. We watch the annual Fourth of July parade. We helped other neighborhoods after the fires. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? My involvement in Scripps Ranch stems from the activities described above in my answer to the last question. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? The response by the community after the fires in 2003 and 2007. Also, playing in a Sunday soccer league, where the oldest player is 77 years old. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch became bigger and more crowded, which meant more traffic and everything became harder to do.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The election of Brian Maienschein as our City Councilman, the building of the new school and the opening of a major shopping center. How did these events impact you and your family? Due to the help of City Councilman Brian Maienschein, we were able to get our lives back to normal more quickly after the fires. Without his election to the City Council in the 90s and his ensuing representation of Scripps Ranch and support of the Fire Folk after the fires, life would have been harder. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? During that decade, I moved back to the East Coast and then back again to California. My daughter, Grace was born. I went into private law practice and then to academia. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Scripps Ranch continued to grow and grow. Housing prices soared. New schools opened. The fires had an enormous impact on the community. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The three fires, in both good and bad ways. And the growth south of Pomerado. How did these events impact you and your family? These events had a significant impact in two important ways on our family. First, we learned you could lose everything and still come back. Second, we came away from all this with a completely different perspective on what is important in life. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My wife, Lisa, and I both returned to teaching. Grace was diagnosed with Gaucher’s disease. Lisa was diagnosed with 1st stage breast cancer. I was diagnosed with coronary disease. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? Scripps Ranch has a sameness about it that I would like to change. Everybody wants kids and their family to be successful early on. There is too much pressure on the family to succeed and be perfect. Scripps Ranch is somewhat like the communities of Stepford and Lake Wobegone. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Housing prices will continue to go up, resulting in younger families being priced out of the community. Neighborhoods will age as the people who live here remain and their children grow up. There will continue to be no mass transit available in the community. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? 1959 – Born in Dallas, Texas 1963 - President Kennedy assassinated in Dallas 1977 - Graduated from Skyline High School in Dallas

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1981 - Graduated from Rice University in Houston, Texas 1984 - Graduated from law school at the University of Texas, in Austin 1985 - Got married, bought first house and started first job 1987 - Moved to San Diego 1994 - Moved to New England, became a law professor 1996 - Returned to San Diego and private practice, daughter, Grace, was born 2000 - Grace diagnosed with Gaucher’s disease 2002 – Lisa diagnosed with breast cancer 2003 - Cedar Fire destroyed our home 2008 – My quadruple bypass surgery and return to academia 2009 - Grace’s Bat Mitzvah Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? The role that the St. Gregory the Great Catholic church played during the aftermath of the fires was critical to the fire relief effort. The homes in Scripps Ranch were either totaled or spared (no in between). After the fire, Brian Maienschein drove the burned streets, created a list of the addresses of the destroyed homes and compiled a list of the names of homeowners that had lost their homes. By email, he organized a meeting of these homeowners and invited others to attend the meeting as well. The library was too small and the Church agreed to house the meeting. Three thousand people attended the meeting and the Church was jammed to capacity. The Priest offered the Church as a place for people to bring extra clothing, etc. for distribution to those in need. For the next two months, the Church as a place for burned out residents to get much of what they needed to get their lives back together. It was like shopping at a Costco store. Everything you needed was there.

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Interview of Carla B. Latimer December 2, 2010 What is your occupation? Retired Teacher---taught school for 33 years in Scripps Ranch. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I live in the only neighborhood that has been in Scripps Ranch for the entire 40 years… among the first to be built… by the park…down from the “Old Vons.” What important events happened in a major decade living in Scripps Ranch? In the beginning of the decade of the 1970s----A job transfer from Orange County brought our family to San Diego---in early 1971…and we ended up among the eucalyptus trees brought here by the Scripps family where the old Scripps mansion was located…..and where many acres were sold and it became a housing development. There were lots of dirt roads….houses being built…..and no schools…. a grocery store in Mira Mesa…..and in the community, a favorite small store called, “Little Bear”!!! (Now “10” Fitness) We loved it out in the country! We bought a house and realized that it would require long rides to everywhere!!!!! The result of this humble beginning would become one of the BEST, familyoriented, community-oriented, educationally successful, communities in San Diego……where families were dedicated in uniting together to share sports, S.R. Newsletter, July 4th, etc.--opportunities for people of ALL ages!!! The loss of over 350 homes in the 2003 fire disaster was indeed the ultimate in the community coming together to help in multiple ways over a period of a few years to reestablish the neighborhoods in everyway! Our own family was evacuated three times due to fires over the years…the last time the fire burned toward us, burning the soil across the street to the olive tree in our front yard….we left knowing it would be a loss…..the fire was diverted fortunately by the firemen and a breeze diverting the direction of the fire! Amazing! Can you tell a story about your time in Scripps Ranch? “My story..………..my dream….…..!” I will always be humbled and grateful to a chain of events that affected my life with my family and my opportunity to become an Elementary School Teacher………… ……..IN SCRIPPS RANCH……..for over 30 years! This is how those events took place. Our family had purchased a home on Canyon Lake Drive in the EARLY days when friends who lived in more settled areas of San Diego pleaded with us, “WHY would you buy a house WAY OUT THERE?” Our answer was simple……! “Why not……we have 5 children and we can buy a house that is 2,800 square feet for $40,000??” It would have been $38,000---however, the open space and view at the end of the cul-de-sac INCREASED the price!!! ( I am still here!!!) We settled down…searching for answers to “where do the kids go to school”!!! Our oldest son, Chad, a middle school child rode a bus to Taft Jr. High…(later to attend Madison High School)--there were no schools in Scripps Ranch and schools in Mira Mesa were in “houses”---

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temporarily---that the builders arranged for in order to entice families to locate there! Across the street from the now “10 Fitness Club,” there was a church building that had been taken over by the district to turn into a “temporary school” and Miramar Ranch Elementary was to be constructed! Miramar Ranch was constructed-----Rex, Marc, Dee Dee, and then the youngest, Troy, started school! I did indeed continue ‘the dream”…. and became the Elementary Substitute School Teacher! My first few assignments were IN THOSE HOUSES IN MIRA MESA. I wish you all could see how that all worked out!!! My younger children were at Miramar Ranch---and I was loving having my family in the “country style” area of Scripps Ranch in San Diego. Living in the cul-de-sac of Canyon Lake Drive, we had visiting deer from the wooded trees and MANY cows showing up in the cul-desac from the Meanley Family----it was indeed, a shock each time we would go out the door……..to a cow or two or more! Of course, there were MANY coyotes, snakes, and rabbits! Our kids loved it and wondered what animal would show up next! Members of the Meanley family would ride their horses around to find the missing cows and guide them back to their stables! The kids loved it! I did enjoy caring for my family in Scripps Ranch. The Scripps Mansion was still aligned to the “then” new Scripps Ranch Swim Club ($15.00 per month). We actually attended two adult Halloween parties in the “Mansion”! It was a blast---and we had the opportunity to “tour” the mansion and it was amazing to see the many beautiful plants and antique décor…etc….it was sad for many new residents when the decision to tear down the historical mansion took place. The Meanley Home eventually was torn down and it became the location for the new Library that was designed similar to a “mission”….building surrounding a courtyard…and rooms for community events, beautiful windows, fireplace, and lots of comfortable chairs. The community worked hard to raise the money for the beautiful library. To continue MY dream……..I had learned to manage my family and substitute in “early interesting” classrooms in Mira Mesa and Miramar Ranch. Then, property was located and purchased for another elementary school to be constructed in Scripps Ranch….I drove over to Avenida Magnifica and parked the car, got out of the car and walked around on the grounds that would be prepared for the next elementary school. As I looked around….I continued the dream in my mind…..I said to myself, “When this school is built, I would like to teach full time……AND have a THIRD GRADE classroom!” I left, driving home with a warm feeling on one hand and a slightly less optimistic feeling on the other hand…….OH RIGHT!!!” Jerabek Elementary (Scripps gardener--Chauncey Jerabek was alive, at the opening of the school—he was thrilled to be there---he passed away a short time later.) was constructed, opened, and in the first month, much to my surprise, I was fortunate to sub in a 3rd grade AND be invited to go down to the district office and sign a contract…….for a third grade permanent assignment! MY SCRIPPS RANCH DREAM CAME TRUE! I hesitated to tell my family that I was going down to the district to sign a contract………I was a bit nervous and wanted to make sure that it was actually going to happen! IT DID! I was thrilled…..it was very special to go

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home and make the big announcement! To have my children attend Miramar Ranch, I could be permanent at Jerabek…..close to home which would make assisting my family sooo much easier…..and be the “parent” for my kids at Miramar Ranch….and to “Teach at the neighboring new school.” Wow!!! As it turned out, my dream continued……..I taught at Jerabek for 21 years, teaching mostly 3rd and 4th grades! AMAZING!!!!!! Then…I was invited to consider going to Miramar Ranch to replace the 3rd grade Seminar teacher who was moving from the state! I did get the position… and enjoyed that new challenge! I taught at Miramar Ranch (my children were older then) for10 years in the 3rd Grade Seminar Program! I have been very blessed to live (yes, in the same old original house) and teach in the WONDERFUL FAMILY COMMUNITY OF SCRIPPS RANCH!!! The Seminar Program involved students from Miramar Ranch, Jerabek, Dingeman, EBS and even some students from other schools in the district! I loved the challenge! I could have kids from all four Scripps Ranch Schools. All the families were supportive!! My DREAM came true in spades!!! I am grateful for the many families I have had the privilege of working with in the area of Elementary Education! I see and talk to many past students and families-----now, my grown 5 children, Chad, Marc, Rex (passed away 13 years ago), DeeDee, & Troy have given me 17 grandchildren…..and 2 great-grandchildren! Guess what----I also consider myself a “grandma teacher” because former students have grown up--gone to college, married, started a young family of their own……and so, indeed, I feel that I have also become a “grandma teacher” !!! It is delightful to see many of them at the 4th of July fun & other places! The last word----Guess what else----I am back on the “substitute teacher” list in our area and continuing to work with students….staying in touch with young students and enjoy the art of teaching and hopefully add to their educational experience and encourage THE LOVE OF LEARNING……and especially about history-------! Sooo…Jake Todd’s Eagle Scout Project will help all of us learn more about “the people” in THE HISTORY OF SCRIPPS RANCH at the 40th celebration! “To learn to LOVE History…one must learn to know and love the PEOPLE in HISTORY!” (ROBERT REMINI—Library of Congress and History Professor at George Washington University in Washington D.C.!) Another example, from our classroom, had students explore the HISTORY of San Diego County with the help from Ken Kramer from Channel 7 and KPBS----The annual HISTORY Fair…..displaying projects that Ken Kramer visited and listened to every student explain and tell Ken about the HISTORY of the selected location -----We were delighted to have Bob Dingeman come to check out HOW the HISTORY of SCRIPPS RANCH was displayed and explained! Ken and Bob indeed appreciated young students and their interest and pride in their History Fair displays! It was a great experience for Bob Dingeman to know that young students were indeed taking time to learn about the history of Scripps Ranch. I would like to THANK the many children and parents that I have had the pleasure of meeting and working with over all these past years! Hmmmmm….estimating the math numbers over the years…..what do you think??? THANK YOU!!!

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SCRIPPS RANCH….A COMMUNITY WHERE DREAMS CAN COME TRUE!!! “HAPPY 40TH BIRTHDAY TO THE ONE AND ONLY SCRIPPS RANCH!” THANK YOU, JAKE TODD (A FORMER STUDENT IN MY CLASS) FOR THIS GREAT PROJECT FOR YOUR EAGLE SCOUT PROJECT!!!

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Interview of Jill Lawrence October 9, 2010 Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Near Jerabek Elementary School and Park. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, we used to live in old Scripps on Mesa Madera. How long have you lived here? We moved to Scripps in June 1974. Then, we bought a home on Mesa Madera Dr. in 1977. What fond memories do you have of SR? When we bought a home on Mesa Madera Dr. in 1977, the street ended at Red Cedar Dr. My husband, Jim, used to walk with our children, Jennette and John, to the top of the street and then they would climb to the top of the hill and eat apples together and enjoy the beautiful view. They began calling it “Apple Hill” and we were all sad to see the hill scraped off and developed some years down the road, even though that stretch of Mesa Madera Drive has extremely beautiful homes on it…it will be always be our Apple Hill. I also remember standing in front of our home on Mesa Madera and watching as the caravan of cars streamed by loaded with teachers, parents and children on their way to officially “open” the school. Our daughter, Jennette, in her stroller, and I, had watched as the ground for the new school across from Avenida Magnifica had been graded and the building had begun. It was great to have the opportunity to observe the “fruit” of the project.

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Interview of Karla Lewellin January 11, 2012 What is your occupation? Teacher. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The old “original” SR. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since 1970. Why did you move to SR? It was my new home as a child. What makes SR special? The community feel. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? The community is very close. What personal connections do you have with SR? I grew up with the people who are now homeowners. How are you involved in the SR community? I’m involved in school, the Scouts, sports, and the Old Pros. What fond memories do you have of SR? I remember the 4th of July parades and the Memorial Day picnic at the Club. If you lived here during the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? It grew to the other side of Pomerado Road. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? 4th of July Parade and Memorial Day picnic. How did these events impact you and your family? They were family fun time with friends in the community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? The 200th year celebration of America’s birthday.

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If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? The VONS Shopping Center was created. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Community activities. How did these events impact you and your family? It was family time for us. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Graduated high school and went off to college. If you lived here during the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? It grew to the other side of the lake. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Community activities. How did these events impact you and your family? Family time. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I married and had kids. If you lived here during the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? More growth. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Community activities. How did these events impact you and your family? Family time together. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I raised kids. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? No – I love it! How do you think SR will change in the future? It will have continued success as a community.

 

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Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I went to kindergarten across from the “Old VONS” at Site One. One time, a cow came to school and we were able to milk it. I was also Betsy Ross in the 4th of July Parade.

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Interview of Will Lofft 2010 What is your occupation? CEO of Zuncraft Co. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, La Colina 1974-78 How long have you lived here? 36 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The trees. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The close community. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It’s unique. It’s tight. No one ever moves! What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? The Old Pros, the Scripps Ranch Civic Association, friends. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Many things over the years. Now, I’m involved in an effort to keep the city from cutting down the trees. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Being involved in the 4th of July celebration since 1975. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? It’s a lot bigger now because of the growth. The severity of traffic congestion makes it difficult to get out of Scripps Ranch to Sorrento Valley Rd. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The formation of the Civic Association, institutions started, Schools Site 1 and Jerabek School. How did these events impact you and your family? Allowed us to live and grow. Suzie was now able to shop at Vons instead of going to Clairemont.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Old Pros started, Little Bear, back of the stables, was a little store for groceries. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? In some areas of Scripps Ranch, it was like no one was there. The roads were not paved. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The effort to preserve Miramar Lake. I chaired the committee that got the Save the Lake people and the builders together. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Kids went off to college, got a swim team at the club. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Miramar Ranch Library Center opened in 1993. Scripps Ranch High School opened. Scripps Ranch became more like a town than a small village. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Mapped trails through Scripps Ranch, 30 miles of open space. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The fires of 2003. They pulled the community together. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? No. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Hope the pioneering instinct will not diminish.

 

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Interview of Victoria Mazelli November 28, 2010 and August 6, 2011 What is your occupation? I own my own business, Mazelli Graphics, a graphics company that has built really long-term relationships with clients. I wanted a business at home because I’m a widow. My business was involved in producing the Farmer’s Market logo, logos for the opening of EBS and Marshall Middle Schools, the Jerabek koala, the designs on the gym floor of the rec center, the Project Phoenix logo, the burn maps after the Cedar Fire, the St. Gregory the Great 35th Anniversary book, and I worked on decorating the SR Community Center. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I currently live in Scripps Ranch. For a long time, I was on the Community Pride committee. I don’t like to divide up the community. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? I have also lived in Cypress Canyon, and in the Timbers and Mesa Madera. How long have you lived here? I have lived in Scripps since August 9th, 1991. Why did you move to SR? I moved to Scripps from Orange County after my husband died. What makes SR special? Scripps Ranch is special because it’s a great place for kids, is community-oriented, beautiful, and very self-contained. We have schools, theater, shopping, and a civic association. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? Scripps Ranch is different because it has good schools, cultural events, community parties, and a small town “Country Living” feel. What personal connections do you have with SR? I have been involved with the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library since 1991, the SRCA and St. Gregory’s since 1992. I was the SRCA Community Pride Chair for 10 years and I am the photo and graphics editor for the SRCA newsletter. How are you involved in the SR community? I decorated the library every month or so back in 1991, chaired the Community Pride Committee for 10 years starting 1992, I became the Special Events Coordinator for the Community Pride Committee in 2000, I became an SRHS Foundation Member in 1993, was the Boy Scouts Charter Representative from 1999-2005, organized Hodgepodge Arts & Crafts For Kids since 1999, worked with Project Phoenix from 2003-2004, and was on the Boy Scouts Membership Committee from 2006 to date. I am a regular Grace’s Book Nook volunteer and have helped out at the Pleasure of Your Company music concerts on occasion. I designed the logo for Scripps

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Ranch’s National Junior Basketball team. I also did design work when my son won the Tournament of Champions. I helped work on the SR Rec Center and coordinated the construction of the tiles on the wall as well as a commemorative plaque. What fond memories do you have of SR? I love working with a dedicated group that enhances the community’s vitality and camaraderie. Working with kids is really fun. I also remember the time I got a poem published in the newsletter. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? Scripps got a new library, a new high school, and a new fire station. How did these events impact you and your family? These events brought my son and I closer to the community and a greater sense of pride. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? During this decade, I had two major surgeries, my son Ryan’s father died, I moved to Scripps in 1991, and in 1999, I moved houses. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 00s? The 2003 and 2007 fires How did these events impact you and your family? I had to evacuate during the 2003 fire. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Also in that decade, my son became an Eagle Scout. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? I wish more people would read the newsletter and I want the newer parts and older parts of Scripps to come together in community unity. How do you think SR will change in the future? I think Scripps will have to change to meet the needs of its elderly residents in the future, as they are 33% of the population now. A new subcommittee, the SR Elder Care Alliance (SRECA), is working to meet those needs. Is there any additional information you would like to provide? E.W. Scripps had a daughter, Nackie, who married Tom Meanley. E.W. Scripps disowned her on the spot. The SR library is where the Meanley family (with their new addition of Nackie) used to live. The land was later donated to the community for the library. The Meanley wall, however, was not donated, and the landowner was preparing to tear it down. In response, a group of concerned citizens, including myself, decided to save the wall’s heritage. We formed the Save Our Scripps committee to stop the landowner and get the site certified as a historical monument. We were successful in saving the wall, and now it is a historical site under the city of San Diego. After getting together, they realized how significant it would be to have a family member at the

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dedication. Thus, I began to trace the Meanley descendents through history, starting with a picture in the public library. I traced the people in the picture using the Internet. After finding the “Meanley Hardware” store owned by Tom Meanley’s family in La Jolla, I went to pay the Meanleys a visit, taking the picture with me. There, I found the great-grandson of Nackie Scripps, who gave me the contact information of his great-aunt. She knew about the history of the wall. I learned that Nackie was a caring, loving woman. The aunt was living in Nackie’s house during the Great Depression in 1938 when a stonemason and his children arrived offering to work for food. Nackie Scripps-Meanley gave him work and asked him to build a stone wall that would later be known as the Meanley wall. The Meanley house is rectangular with an inner courtyard above the hill next to the library. The stones for the wall were chipped out of the hillside on the other side of Scripps Lake Drive from the library. The aunt also owns a family photo album that includes Ellen Browning Scripps’ signature on a Christmas card from 1905 I framed. There was also a caricature of EW Scripps with his signature on it. I borrowed the card and then contacted the EBS foundation to get permission to use the signature for the first EBS Elementary School logo. Also, the penguin was chosen as the mascot because it was Ellen Browning Scripps’ favorite animal. The community center, which contains 19th century Alexander Virginia architecture, used to be a real-estate office, but the SRCA paid to move it to Butterfly Park. The park was made to protect the butterflies. Scripps Mansion has an adobe foundation, so it fell into disrepair. That’s why it’s no longer open for tourism. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? My son was born in 1987, his father died and we moved to Scripps Ranch in 1991, I was a banker for 25 years, after which I got my graphics certification in 1995. I opened Mazelli Graphics in 1996.

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Interview of Becky McDonald November 29, 2010 What is your occupation? Retired Welcome Wagon hostess. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Original. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No How long have you lived here? 31 years Why did you move to SR? My husband was working here and looked all over for an area that looked like back east. What makes SR special? The people. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? It has a community feeling. What personal connections do you have with SR? Was a Welcome Wagon hostess and founded the Welcome Wagon Club (now Welcome Club). How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Welcome Club founder and current adviser. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? There were no houses across the street. We joined the Swim and Racquet Club right away. How did these events impact you and your family? I saw a need for a Women’s Club and founded the Welcome Wagon Club. I belonged to the Children’s Hospital Auxiliary the first year I was here. That’s when I saw the need for a Women’s Club. I interviewed for the job as Welcome Wagon hostess and got it. I did that so I could start the Welcome Wagon Club. I had started other clubs, so I knew how to do it. My job didn’t pay much. My expenses might have exceeded my income! What other important events happened in your life during that decade? We had friends over every 4th of July. The parade goes right by our house! If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? The Welcome Wagon Club was formed.

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? We had to go to Mira Mesa for my daughter’s high school. We had only Big Bear (up where KMart used to be) for grocery shopping. How did these events impact you and your family? We were here at the time of the Navy Housing and the schools being built. There was a Bookmobile which I remember seeing, but we didn’t use it. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? The growth in the housing. That affected my job. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Scripps Ranch High School and the new library opened. And I think the Civic Association has come a long way since I moved here. How did these events impact you and your family? The growth increased the number of calls I made for the Welcome Wagon, and the Welcome Wagon Club got more members. I was able to bring more people into the club. How did these events impact you and your family? The Welcome Wagon Club was flourishing. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My husband retired. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? We should have a community map. How do you think SR will change in the future? I hope it stays the same. We want to keep the country living feeling. It feels so good to come back here when we’ve been away. Is there any additional information you would like to provide? The first thing my husband did here was join the Swim and Racquet Club. That was the best thing he could have done. We were members there for a long time. I remember the lighting of the community tree. Councilman Struiksma almost got electrocuted! Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? In 1960 we were married. 50 years. Amazing! We moved here in 1979 and we are being interviewed in 2010. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? One year on the 4th of July we forgot to turn off our sprinklers. And we had all that company to watch the parade!

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My husband was sitting next to a meteorologist on the plane coming out here, and he said the Scripps Ranch was the best place to live in San Diego. It was close to the mountains and close to the ocean. We can’t imagine living anywhere else!

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Interview of Karen McElliott September 14, 2010 What is your occupation? I am retired. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I no longer live in Scripps Ranch. I lived in Scripps Ranch from April 15, 1972 until I left on December 12, 2005. My daughter, Jennifer Blake, and her family live in my home on Lake Rim Road. We, my late husband and I, originally lived on Vista Lago Pl. and built our dream home on Lake Rim Road. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, Vista Lago Place. How long have you lived here? I lived in Scripps Ranch for 33 years. Why did you move to SR? I loved the “country” feeling it had. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The people and the love of the community that residents had and still have today. It is special. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It has grown considerably since we arrive in 1972. Then, it was a small, close-knit community. Everyone knew everyone. We previously had been in the military and moved almost every year. It was nice to settle down. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Many of my friends still live in Scripps Ranch. And, my family lives in Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the SR community? I was involved in the PTA at the “new” Miramar Ranch School, active on the board of directors of the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club, Chair of the Scripps Ranch Children’s Hospital Auxiliary, served for 13 years, some of that time as chair, of the Miramar Ranch North Community Planning Group. Served as the first woman Scripps Ranch Little League President. Our street, Vista Lago Place, hosted a Halloween Haunted House, and we were competitive every year for 1st place for the best 4th of July parade float. What fond memories do you have of SR? I have so many fond memories; I don’t know where to begin. The numerous parties and the Swim and Racquet Club, the beginning of the 10K race, and the community 4th of July parade— all events that are now hosted by the Scripps Ranch Old Pros. The community spirit. The long lasting friendships my family has made and maintained over the years.

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If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? The building and expansion of the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club, the 10K race hosted by the bank, the building of a real grocery store, now the “old Vons”, and the building of our first elementary school, Miramar Ranch. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Our own grocery store and elementary school. How did these events impact you and your family? We didn’t have to drive miles from our home to shop or take our kids to other communities to go to school. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I realized that the community was “growing”, but the infrastructure was not keeping up. Lack of schools, roads, fire station, churches, playing fields for young and old alike. Most, if not all, of our amenities were in Mira Mesa and our children played sports on Mira Mesa teams. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? In the 80s, I personally spent a lot of my time and energy trying to get needed schools from elementary to a new high school in our community. I served on a number of local and city-wide committees to plead our case. After seventeen years, while my girls were both in college, the building of Scripps Ranch High School began. Building on the east side of Pomerado Road began as well during this decade. Traffic impacts were a major issue and once again schools were back on the radar screen. MRN (Miramar Ranch North) was in its development stages. Controversy over the impact of housing on and around the Lake was a major issue. It would take YEARS to resolve this issue. Homes in the original development plan were eliminated. Parks and overlooks prevailed. The Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club expanded and built a new club/pool/tennis courts on the north side of the Ranch. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? I am not totally sure of my timeline. It has been awhile. But the building of Jerabek School and our first real playing fields I think happened in the 80s. Up to that point, the only playing field we had was the lower field at Miramar Ranch. Hoyt Park was always there, but was never used as playing fields. It was just a great neighborhood park. The Scripps Ranch Old Pros became a dynamic contributor to sports for young and old. They took over the 10K and turned it into the great 4th of July event everyone in Scripps Ranch enjoys. How did these events impact you and your family? At long last my girls could participate in Scripps Ranch sports… If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? In the 90s, Scripps Ranch was no longer a small, quiet community amongst the eucalyptus trees. Development was everywhere. With the development of Miramar Ranch North, Scripps Ranch

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had its first real church, we had our own fire station and new schools were popping up as needed. Roads and infrastructure were also added. A new town center was built on Scripps Ranch Parkway, new parks. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The opening of Scripps Ranch High School in September of 1993. How did these events impact you and your family? Many families had waited many years for the high school. Even though, I was not personally impacted I was very proud of that day… What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 00s? The wild fires that ripped through our community in 2003 and 2007. Devastating. How did these events impact you and your family? Family and friends lost their homes and all they had. It was a tough time for everyone. I was fortunate; I did not have any personal loss. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I love the memories I have of Scripps Ranch when it was a quiet, little community, but we cannot stop growth. I feel Scripps Ranch has had good strong leadership. Community leaders have maintained, as best they could, the integrity and spirit of Scripps Ranch. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Good question. Guess we will just have to wait and see. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Our family of four moved to Scripps Ranch in April of 1972. Husband, Ron, two daughters, Kimberly and Jennifer, and me, Karen McElliott. We lived in our home on Vista Lago for 17 years. We built our custom dream home on Lake Rim Road in 1989. I lost my husband in October 1999. Moved downtown in December 2005. Ken and Jenn attended Miramar Ranch School, Wagenheim Jr. High and graduated from Mira Mesa High School. Both girls attended UCLA. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? One of the legacies I felt I have left the community was the wild and crazy Haunted House we hosted for over 13 years on Vista Lago Pl. It was a street activity. A number of the neighbors participated. We spent months putting it together. And, if you know anyone who was around during those years it was truly the place to go on Halloween.

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Interview of Dorothy Mildice 2010 What is your occupation? Retired travel agent. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Northridge (Birch Bluff Ct.). Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since December 1985. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Liked the idea of open space. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Community involvement, country living, space What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? Volunteerism, organizations like the SRCA don’t exist in other parts of city. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Was district representative for 9 years, Recognition Night chair for 11 years, SOS group treasurer, liaison SR-Miramar, Community Forum, Welcome Club Program Chair. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? People’s generosity, working with SOS, getting Meanley Wall saved as historic landmark, working together after the 2003 wildfires. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? More houses, more traffic congestion, more community involvement. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Recall of City Council representative, more coaching for sports, more money for schools, Newsletter helped community glow. How did these events impact you and your family? They got us more involved. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Children married. Historic wall saved, SOS campaign, new library, and growth.

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If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Impact of building Stonebridge Estates. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Volunteer Hall of Fame, Cedar Fire, expansion. How did these events impact you and your family? I personally did ¾ of the landscaping. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Lost my son. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? Street names. Too many sound the same. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? For the better.

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Interview of LaVonne Misner 2010 What is your occupation? Retired professor, U. of Minnesota, author of No More Mondays: A Nautical Odyssey. Presently working part time as an assistant to a tax consultant in Scripps Ranch. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps Ranch. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, when we first moved here we rented a small three-bedroom house just four blocks from the home we presently own. How long have you lived here? Since 1994. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? We looked for a rental while waiting for our application to be processed for New Zealand residency and our friend who lived in Tierrasanta recommended Scripps Ranch. I think he knew that we would be attracted to the trees on the Ranch. What makes Scripps Ranch special? We immediately noticed that Scripps Ranch was open and friendly. I joined the Welcome Club (then, Welcome Wagon Club) and instantly had friends. Our kids were all grown and lived in several other states so there was no way of meeting or making friends through them or their activities. We also did not have a church affiliation or jobs to meet people, so we decided to get involved in volunteer activities in Scripps Ranch activities right away. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? - I lived a few years in Alabama where I was considered a “damned Yankee” but for most of my life I lived in Minnesota, which was very friendly – just as friendly as Scripps Ranch. We brought a lot of Minnesota friendliness with us. Tom (my husband) and I have always felt like we’ve never met a stranger. - Another rich aspect of SR is our canyons. I can step out my back door and immediately be surrounded by nature. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Only the friends we’ve made since moving here. We had no previous connection to Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I both work and play in Scripps Ranch. I belong to the Welcome Club, the North County Society of Fine Arts, and I am the historian for the SR Theatre. I regularly walk with my dog around Miramar Lake and my part time job is also in Scripps Ranch.

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What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? One of my funniest memories was from a few years ago when we hosted a pre-theater party for the Welcome Wagon Club and the entire Ranch experienced a power outage! Another fond memory is of our first meeting of the Welcome Club Literary Group (book discussion group), which Diane Rider and I co-founded. It was a very hot summer evening and we decided to hold the meeting in my hot tub. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? - Scripps Ranch Theatre (then Scripps Ranch Community Theatre) productions have greatly improved since the 90s. Over the years I’ve become more involved with them. - Then there are the old traditions like the 4th of July parade and concerts in the park, which contribute to making this a marvelous community. I also should mention the fantastic opportunity for residents to take community college classes at Scripps Ranch High School. I, and several of my friends, took computer classes with the high school students. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The Davis Ranch burned down. What a terrible loss for our community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My daughter and granddaughter moved here. Our Minnesota children gave us five more grandchildren. When my husband and I moved to Scripps Ranch after living on a sailboat and traveling the world for six years, we found things like gas pumps and mechanical voices on telephones strange. Those things didn’t exist in that format prior to our leaving the US. Coming back after six years was in many ways not unlike going to a foreign country! If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Due to the bomb scares, a fence was erected at Miramar Lake, which I detest. We all became more water conscious in keeping up our yards. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? I was impressed with the orderly evacuation of Scripps Ranch during the wildfires of 2003 and 2007. Neighbors were helping other people. For instance, one of our neighbors asked my husband to rescue a computer he had forgotten to take with him during the evacuation. Both evacuations were team efforts! Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I would like to see the fence at Miramar Lake come down. I would also like to see more community spirit in the new section of Scripps Ranch. I am not impressed with the new middle school building. It is far too secluded and there are not optional emergency evacuation routes. The entire area should have more exits.

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Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Born 1941, moved to Scripps Ranch in 1994, interviewed 2010. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? After our cruise of 6 years, we hoped to live in New Zealand. While waiting for the outcome of our application, we fell in love with Scripps Ranch. We moved out of our rental home, bought a home, and I wrote a book about living on the boat. The book is called No More Mondays – A Nautical Odyssey.

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Interview of Melisa Moriarty 2010 What is your occupation? Retired Public Health Nurse, author of Nursing Illuminations: A Book of Days. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since June 1970. Why did you move to SR? It was the only place near the water that had trees. Children could play outdoors and you didn’t have to worry. What makes SR special? The trees, closeness to nature, Miramar Lake. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? It has an ideal climate, with sun every day. It’s close to the water. Every day you can see birds in the garden and neighborhood. What personal connections do you have with SR? My daughter and grandson live in Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the SR community? I’m not a joiner, but I belong to the Scripps Ranch Welcome Club and have good friends here. I participate in the July 4th parade, go to Concerts in the Park, in the Walks/Runs on July 4th. Walk around the lake three days a week, two days a week walk with grandson who lives in Scripps Ranch. What fond memories do you have of SR? In the 70s, the house was full of fleas, and there was a fox in the birdfeeder. I was a volunteer for McGovern in 1971 and ran the caucus in our Congressional district. I was nominated to be a San Diego delegate, my husband was an alternate. We had a caucus meeting in the old Scripps Mansion. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? There was no Vons; as you know, it was Little Bear. We shopped in Clairemont. We always went south because John’s (husband) office was at Balboa and Genessee. Johnny’s (son)

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kindergarten was across the street in a temporary building known as Site One. His teacher drove a Jaguar and that was the best thing about school for him in those days. He went to and from school through the canyon with friends. Marchelle (daughter) was at “Site Two” on the hill on Red Cedar Dr. They both went to Taft Jr. High, and Mira Mesa High. Marchelle was in the first graduating class at Mira Mesa High. I walked at Miramar Lake with lots of neighbor kids looking for trap door spiders, birds to identify, and any plants of interest. We called the top of the hill Rattlesnake Hill. You started to see fences in the neighborhood, kids had those Big Wheels rolling on the pavement, there was testing of planes at Miramar, and there was more dog poop, but there’s more now. You can hardly walk around. How did these events impact you and your family? The testing of engines at Miramar was noisy and bothersome. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Site 1 (school) was built, a result of the class action suit brought by the Civic Association against the developer. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? Husband John retired. People became aware of values in the community. It was a part of the city but with a country atmosphere. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Organizations developed, and Scripps Ranch came together as a community. How did these events impact you and your family? We participated in political gatherings. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Jimmy Carter’s inauguration as president, son went to high school, daughter to college, daughter got married, grandson born. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? We moved next door and sublet our house for a year. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? We got new neighbors, people who had moved away moved back. How did these events impact you and your family? We traveled, went on a lot of cruises, and exchanged houses with people in other countries. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? We traveled, my husband, John, became disabled, and we made a master bedroom downstairs. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? The fires of 2003.

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How did these events impact you and your family? We have a fear of fire. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? We need dog leash signs. I think it’s important. We need alternative energy, “going green.” How do you think SR will change in the future? More public transportation. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Born 1937, moved to Scripps in 1970, interviewed 2010. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? We’ve lived here longer than any other place. It’s like paradise. When my children were 6 and 9, I found them bouncing with other children on the newly planted eucalyptus sapling trees and consequently breaking them off as they weakened from the children’s weight. I felt a painful tear at my heart for the little trees. I admonished the children and spoke of the life of a tree and what a financial loss it would be to the builder, and, possibly, to us. My children and I went to the builder on site office and my children were invited to tell the man of authority what they had done. It was most difficult for them to speak about their actions. They were shaking and near tears. The man was kind and sympathetic and said that he was grateful that they had come forward to explain what had happened and to acknowledge their mistake and to make amends. He made them promise that they would think about the consequences of their action and not ever treat a living thing with such disrespect in the future. They, and I, were extremely relieved to learn that we would not be held financially responsible for replacing the trees. Many lessons were learned that day.

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Interview of Joan Pernicano November 23, 2010 What is your occupation? Restaurant owner. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The Timbers. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since 1971, for 39 years. Why did you move to SR? We were looking for a larger place. We lived in Bay Park and couldn’t afford a larger home there. We saw a full-page ad in the newspaper for Scripps Ranch and the price seemed right. I told my husband, Larry, to check it out on his way up to Riverside. Larry visited the development and the sales guy told him to go look around and see if there were any lots that he liked. He said if there were any lots that he liked, Larry could leave a $200 deposit and come back 15 minutes early the following week when the developer had the grand opening. The sales guy was able to tell Larry that the lot he liked would have a 4 bedroom house on it, but not if it was going to be a one story or a two story house. After Larry found the lot, he wrote the check and came home and told me what he had done. I freaked out. $200 was a lot of money back then and we didn’t know whether we would lose it or not. There were no models or anything. Well, we ended up with a one-story house and we are still living there today. Larry had promised me that we would move some day and sometimes I remind him that we haven’t ever moved. But we did remodel the house four years ago. What makes SR special? It is a unique community, unlike any other. I tell people that you can go a mile from your house and you will find someone you know either walking their dog, or mowing their lawn. You know not just your immediate neighbors, but those that live further away. Because of all the sports, scouts, churches and other organizations, you can go around and you always see somebody you know. There is a closeness to the community; Scripps Ranch exemplifies the word community. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? There are no neighborhood boundaries and a great sense of community. What personal connections do you have with SR? We have our restaurant, Pernicano's, in the old Vons shopping center.

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How are you involved in the SR community? I was involved in fighting the re-alignment of Pomerado Road. The City engineers said there would be fewer accidents on Pomerado if the road were straightened out and that there was too much liability for the City if they kept the road the way it was. I think there have been more accidents than there would otherwise have been. The engineers also said that the plans called for making Pomerado up to six lanes wide, but that to be honest, it was likely to only get widened to four lanes. Our argument was wait until there is enough traffic on the road to warrant the expansion to four lanes. When my kids were young, I helped with Blue Birds and Cub Scouts. Mostly, our children went to private school. However, my youngest son went to Miramar Ranch for kindergarten and first grade and I was involved with the school at that point. My husband has been very involved in soccer in Scripps Ranch. While my older two kids did not play soccer, my younger two did. When I enrolled my kids in soccer, they told me they needed coaches and I signed Larry up to be a coach. They said they would pair him up with Ramon, a semi-professional soccer player, and it would be fine. Larry was really mad that I volunteered him. He had never played soccer before, but he is very athletic and had played football. He went to the coaches’ clinics and got involved and has never looked back. First, he coached my 8-year old son’s team. Then he was assistant coach for my daughter’s high school team. After a year, he was made head coach at the high school for 6 years. When Scripps Ranch High School opened 17 years ago, he was hired to be the head coach of the girls’ soccer team. He has held that position since the school started. He has also played with the Old Pros and Huff n Puff. Larry and Ramon started a men’s soccer team called Scripps Ranch International; the team had players from many countries. They went 80 plus games without losing. He went from never having played soccer to playing three times a week. What fond memories do you have of SR? Way back when we first moved to Scripps Ranch, Ironwood Road ended at Dichondra Court. When they started to develop beyond that, they found seashells and fossils of sea life when they were digging. It was evidence that this area was at some point in the distant past below the oceans. I found that fascinating. Before there was the old Vons shopping center, there was the Little Bear Country Store. It was really just a big trailer, but it looked larger and more substantial because the trailer had wood siding and a big wooden porch and steps. There was just a big oak tree where Vons is now. It was truly country living. We would see deer grazing on Scripps Ranch Boulevard. There were lots of deer around. Unfortunately, sometimes you would find a dead deer that had been killed by poachers. We also had a peacock on our roof one time that had come from the ranch. Moms would sit on the curbs in the cul-de-sacs and watch their kids play on big wheels and skates. Since there weren’t any stores nearby, vendors would come selling things in trucks. One guy in a truck came by and was selling wooden Adirondack chairs really cheap, for only $5. You could

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buy fresh produce from the produce truck and the milkman delivered milk. Life was much simpler. Summers were long and fun. All summer was spent at the club. We brought food and the kids played all day long. Once the kids were around the age of 8, they were allowed to go to the club by themselves. The kids could ride their bikes to K-mart, which was the closest big store and was located at the bottom of Scripps Ranch Blvd. and Mira Mesa Blvd. The kids built forts in the canyons. You didn’t worry about the kids roaming around back then. We felt safe. Most of the kids were very well behaved and acted appropriately. I remember one kid though who tried to shake down my son and I went after him and told him never to do that to my son again. My son was so embarrassed, but the kid never bothered him again either. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? During the 70s, there was an explosion of buildings. The Timberlane condos were built. The building of the club was great; it gave everyone a place to go. They had activities like arts and crafts and summer camps for the kids. The pool was definitely a plus. Everyday lots of families would go to the club. Back then, there was no initiation fee. If you lived in Scripps Ranch, you were able to use the club as long as you paid the monthly dues. They capped the fees for homeowners that were original members. I think when we stopped paying dues about 10 years ago, the fees were $52 per month. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The developers said it would cost too much to restore the Scripps mansion, which was in a very bad state of disrepair, and so they tore it down. In today’s world, it wouldn’t have been torn down. The mansion would have been seen as a historic landmark that needed to be preserved and they would have found some way to preserve it. How did these events impact you and your family? Originally, when we told our family we were moving to Scripps Ranch, they all thought we were moving to the boondocks. However, during this decade, it was a busy time for our family. We had three family members join us in buying homes on the Ranch and move into the neighborhood. My sister and brother-in-law came from the East Coast and picked out a place in the Parks development. My other sister bought a Corky McMillin home. We also got my mom to come out and relocate to a condo here. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? We opened the restaurant, Pernicano’s, in 1977. We signed the papers in 1976 and we were the last tenant to move in. The Tuttles came in 1976; we are the last two of the remaining tenants in the shopping center. When we moved in, the entire shopping center had not yet been built. In fact, there was a big slab of concrete near the stores and they used it for the first Scripps Ranch Community Theatre performances. They would bring in bleachers and give outdoor performances.

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My dad passed away in 1973 at the age of 73. youngest child was also born in 1973.

The older I get, the younger that seems. My

If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? The Meanley house was torn down. That was a loss to the community because it had so much history to it. I understand that Mr. Meanley did not want his house to remain as a public building after his death, but if it had been me, I would have wanted to share that history with others. What other important events happened in your life during the 80s? My kids were in high school during the 80s. They graduated in ‘84, ‘86, ‘89 and ‘91. We were involved in high school activities, like girls soccer. I went back to Miramar College to get my degree. I kept telling the kids it was important to go to college and I figured that I needed to also show them through my actions as well. I had been taking classes off and on over the years, and I eventually became a speech communications major. I started working for the public schools in the late 80s and have worked as a teacher’s aide, guidance assistant and a career tech. I worked in advertising for years and eventually came back to help with the restaurant. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? They built the high school. And St. Gregory’s built the church. Prior to the church site they have now, they originally met at Jerabek and then leased a building in the Business Park. The new shopping center on Scripps Poway Parkway was also built. We watched all this growth take place. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My daughter graduated high school; my first granddaughter was born. We opened a second more upscale restaurant in 1990, but we had to close it four years later on Memorial Day 1994 due to the economy and the Gulf War. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 00s? The Cedar Fires were the most significant event of the decade for the community. It was only a matter of time before a fire of that magnitude hit Scripps Ranch. The risk of fire had been talked about for years. Fortunately, many people had changed out their original roofs over time and there were less wood shake roofs than there could have been. How did these events impact you and your family? My son is a fire captain and he was supposed to be off the first day of the Cedar Fire. But he stayed on duty and stayed at the station, while the other crew went to fight the fire. He kept calling us to give us updates and told us we could stay. Finally, around 11 a.m., he called and told us that the winds had shifted and we should get out. We had spent all morning packing up pictures and papers, so we were ready to go. My daughter had suggested that I should put all my clothes in the pool so that the water would protect them. I started taking all my clothes out of closet and stacking them on my bed. But then

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I realized that they were all old and not that valuable, so I wasn’t going to save them in the pool. If they burned, I would just buy new clothes. You learn a lot from having to pack for an evacuation. We were much more prepared the second time around. One funny thing was the way in which I was trying to protect my mother’s silver during the Cedar Fire. I wanted to keep it safe, so I put it out under the waterfall above our pool. So in the end, though, in my efforts to keep the things from melting I left my valuable silver out in the open where looters could have found it. But the water turned on in the waterfall and the silver got really tarnished, but it was safe. We went to our daughter’s house and camped out on the floor. We were able to come back in the next day because we had a business. We made food, pizzas and sandwiches, for the firefighters and policemen that were working. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? Scripps Ranch is still a quaint, nice community. But if I could, I would go back to when the community was smaller and more encapsulated. I would put Pomerado Road back the way it was or make it four lanes. I would also move the air show back to August. How do you think SR will change in the future? I don’t see that it will change much. It is pretty much built out. I am sad about the Davis Ranch. Some day it will get sold to a developer and we will eventually lose the open space. Can you tell me some stories about your time in Scripps Ranch? Years and years ago, there was a huge push to realign Pomerado Road. It was still a two-lane road, but more curvy that it is now. Many of the old-timers did not want them to realign the road. We formed an ad hoc committee to fight the realignment and I was one of four members. It turned out that I knew the other three members of the ad hoc committee due to various connections, although the other members did not know each other. They held lots of meetings at the Swim and Racquet Club. At one point, we were trying to schedule our next weekly meeting and I offered to host the next meeting at our house on a Saturday night. One female member of the committee said she couldn’t go to the meeting that night since it was her date night. Another member of the committee said they could go out after the meeting. I explained to my friend that the man wasn’t married and she agreed to go. They have now been married for over 25 years, and on good days I get thanked for getting them together. At times I have thought that the community should come up with a new license plate holder. Rather than “Scripps Ranch Country Living,” we should have one that says “Scripps Ranch: Bump’em and Dump’em.” Unfortunately, over the years a number of people have been killed in Scripps Ranch or murdered elsewhere and their bodies dumped in the community. It’s always been interesting to me how people from back east have a different perspective or concept of the west coast and its geography. For example, I was visiting my brother and sisterin-law during the late 60s and I was watching a weather station and there were no weather

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forecasts for anything west of the Rockies. My sister told me that was how it always was on that station. Our weather was just not relevant. Nowadays, there are national weather channels. Also, in the late 80s and early 90s, I worked at Wangenheim Middle School during a time when there were fires near Escondido. For some unknown reason, I fielded a call from someone back East while I was working asking me if the San Diego airport was closed due to the fire. I always remember thinking how silly and unusual it was to have received that phone call. Our favorite parts of Scripps Ranch were the community tightness, the opening of the Swim and Racquet Club, the concerts in the park, and the Fourth of July parade that came down our street. Back in the earlier days, the Fourth of July parade was better, with lots more unique entries and more floats. Also, there was an incredible Halloween event put on by the families that lived on Pinetree. Everyone went there. It was incredibly elaborate and had people jumping out of caskets and things like that. You had to go through the haunted house in order to get candy. Unfortunately, the family that primarily ran the event moved away and turned the event and all the props over to families on Mountain View. They held the event for a while and then it stopped and never got re-started again. As Scripps grows and people age, the community changes. But what is great is how many second generation residents are moving back to raise their families here.

 

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Interview of Laurie Pettit December 2010 What is your occupation? Stay at home mom. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? “Classic Scripps” Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? About 10 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The country feel, quaint parks, beautiful lake, thriving schools, friendly essence and, of course, the trees. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Well of course the trees! We have an amazing community. One of my most favorite things about Scripps Ranch is how this community was developed with hiking trails that interconnect the neighborhoods. Our concerts in the park are also very special. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Scripps Ranch definitely has a cohesive feel to it. Most places I go, there are familiar faces relating to school, sports and social networks. Our old neighborhood had no cohesion or sense of community. It was very spread out and not a lot of community gatherings. We never knew our neighbors. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? This will always be the place where we “raised our children.” How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I have volunteered countless hours with all three children at our public school. I volunteered briefly on the SRCA. (Will have to wait until my kids get older to jump back into that). Have played tennis competitively for SRSRC for 8 years. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I have loved watching my kids march in the Fourth of July Parade through the years. They have marched with different organizations. Most memorable would be the Indian Princess Tribes. Some day they will grow up and I will hold those memories dear.

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If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? The Cedar Fire was a major event that reshaped our community. The Cedar Fire ultimately brought people together and inspired many to form support groups that still remain today. In addition, affected neighborhoods look nothing like they did before the fire. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Although there were many events that occurred in that decade, the Cedar Fire will always be a monumental event in Scripps because it affected our community in its entirety. Every resident was affected by that fire in some way. Many lost homes, pets, and personal property. The rest of us rallied to support them. How did these events impact you and your family? Although we did not lose our home, many friends did, especially friends of our children. I have never seen a community pull together so many resources so quickly. Within hours of returning to our home, calls and emails were circulating to donate cribs, beds, clothes, etc. to those that lost everything. Within a week, a massive donation center was set up to aid the families that lost everything. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Well, 9/11 happened during that decade. I will always remember the fighter jets that circled above our airspace that day. I felt very safe know MCRD was right next door. Our lake was also shut down for some time for security purposes. It was then partially reopened. After some time, it was fully reopened to the public. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I would stop vehicles from driving around our lake. I’m afraid a jogger or child will someday get run over. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I think like all communities, Scripps Ranch will struggle with limiting development, especially south of Pomerado. If there was something I could “wish for,” I would wish for preservation of that land. We have one of the prettiest stretches of road through our community, which is enticing for developers. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Born 1972 in San Diego, CA. Graduated Santana High 1990. Mesa College/San Diego State 1990-1995. Del Cerro, CA 1995-2000. SR, CA 2000-present. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? Yes, my husband and his Indian Princess Tribe are the reason no water guns are allowed in the Scripps Ranch Parade. His unruly Indian Princess Tribe took it too far with the water war one

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year, and they were kicked out of future parades. They were eventually let back in but with restrictions. So funny!

 

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Interview of D. Todd Philips What is your occupation? Director of Government Affairs for the San Diego Workforce Partnership. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Nob Hill. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? Yes, La Merida. How long have you lived here? Since December 2006. Why did you move to SR? The schools. What makes SR special? Quality of life and engagement by community members in local issues. What personal connections do you have with SR? My sons attend school/day care in SR; my older son plays soccer and baseball in SR leagues. 8) How are you involved in the SR community? Chair of Scripps Ranch Planning Group. What fond memories do you have of SR? Concerts in the Park In what ways did SR change during the 00s? The fires in 2003 and 2007 have changed the community in drastic ways. There is more concern and alertness to fire season and preparedness; I also thing residents became closer as a community through those issues. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The fires…no doubt. How did these events impact you and your family? We weren’t here for the first, but were evacuated during the second one. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Both sons were born and we moved to SR.

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Is there anything you would like to change about SR? Although in comparison to other areas of SD, Scripps Ranch has a very high level of civic engagement, I would still like to see it higher. How do you think SR will change in the future? We will gentrify and kids will begin to leave the area…it will be a challenge to find ways to get young families to continue to locate here and stay here to raise their children. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? At this year’s SR anniversary run I saw State Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher running ahead of me. I know quite a few elected officials through my work and I know many of them simply don’t have the time to devote to working out or running, so I was sure I could catch him and pass him in the run. I am by no means a fast runner…but I can consistently run between an 8:30 or 9 minute mile…well, little did I know that I was chasing a 6 minute mile runner! Almost killed myself trying to catch someone I had no hope of catching. That was quite humorous!

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Interview of Karen Ragusa August 15, 2010 What is your occupation? Stay-at-home mother. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I don’t live in Scripps Ranch any longer. However, I used to live in “Whispering Ridge.” Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? I used to live in Village Woods (town house complex). How long have you lived here? Village Woods: 1991-1997 Whispering Ridge: 1997-2003 Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The first home we purchased was affordable and Scripps Ranch seemed like a nice place to live. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Scripps Ranch has a “small town” feel within a large city. We made many lifelong friends there and the community seems to be very supportive of one another. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Compared to where I live now (Chicago), Scripps Ranch is very laid back. However, the homes are closer together but the weather is much nicer. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I still own property there. Some of my friends still live there and I plan to retire there. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? When I had Jacob, I stopped working. My fondest memories of Scripps Ranch is joining a playgroup and making new friends. I have fond memories of Concert in the Park/Ice Cream Socials at Hoyt Park, rollerblading at Miramar Lake, watching the 4th of July parade/watching the fireworks from the Todd’s backyard, hanging out with my neighbors and friends at the Whispering Ridge swimming pool, and getting together for dinner with friends. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch grew and developed immensely in the 90s. I recall new homes, shopping centers, and schools being built. I believe the new library opened, as did the Fire Station. Jacob loved playing in the library’s children’s pit. I thought the library was a beautiful addition to the community. The fireplace was a nice touch. I remember Miss Ann, the children’s librarian, too. She always gave me the impression she did not care for children very much –always seemed a bit crabby.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The community became a lot bigger with new development. I think Scripps Ranch High School and EBS were schools built in the mid-late 90s. Scripps Ranch High School was the first public high school for students living in Scripps Ranch. High school students did not have to go to Mira Mesa High School any longer. How did these events impact you and your family? More shopping and eating options became available. “New Vons”, Fins, El Pollo Loco, and the Toy Station were nice and convenient places to go to. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? In 1997, we bought a home on Pinecastle Street. I loved the neighbors and cul-de-sac there. In 1998, Katherine was born. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Scripps Ranch continued to grow into this decade. However, the wildfires of October 2003 changed my life in many ways. My home was destroyed. 46 out of 47 homes on Pinecastle Street were devastated by the fires. It was a very sad time for a lot of us. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? I think the wildfires and the rebuilding of homes are the most significant events that occurred during this time. Also the community was a tremendous support to us after the fires. People came together to help out those in need. It was an amazing experience. How did these events impact you and your family? Even though our home was destroyed, no one got hurt. My family was intact. Friends and family got us through a difficult time and made it so much easier for us to pick up the pieces. Without this support, the road to recovery would have been much more difficult for us. I received such kindness and generosity from so many people in Scripps Ranch. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I rebuilt a new home that I never lived in. My husband was transferred to Chicago in 2005. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? I wish it was a bit smaller. In the early 90s, I used to like driving down Pomerado Road (towards Poway) and see “uncluttered”/undeveloped hills. I thought it was like driving in the “country.” How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I don’t know. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? 1967: Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA. 1985-1989: Attended and graduated from UCSD. 1991: Bought first home in Scripps Ranch.

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1995: Son, Jacob, was born. 1997: Bought home on Pinecastle Street. 1998: Daughter, Katherine, was born. 2003: Home on Pinecastle Street was destroyed in October wildfires. 2003-2005: Moved to La Jolla during the rebuilding process. 2005: In June, we moved to Chicago and put the house on the market. 2006: New house sold in the spring. 2007: In May, we visited Scripps Ranch and were amazed to see how Pinecastle Street changed after the fires. The houses seemed huge and crowded to me. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I remember a funny story that happened after the fire. I was at St. Gregory’s (fire victim resource center) getting toothbrushes and Advil. As I was leaving, an elderly lady approached me with a plate of spaghetti. She asked me if I had lost my home and I said I did. She said she wanted to help the fire victims by making food but the church would not allow her to donate her food. So she asked me if I would take it. I said I would and thanked her. As she gave me the platter, she said, “Don’t worry, I did not poison it or anything.” She was so serious but I just laughed and laughed. I thought it was so funny but she did not want me to throw it out. I ate it and thought it was really good.

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Interview of Gary and Lois Reed August 17 and 19, 2010 What are your occupations? We are both currently retired. - Gary worked 50 years in the computer field – hardware and software. Started as a Field Service Engineer for Control Data Corporation supporting a 1960’s computer system that filled an entire large room at UCSD/Scripps Institution of Oceanography. - Lois worked 17 years for IVAC Corp in their regulatory affairs/product labeling division. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? In one of the original developments in Scripps Ranch called the Woods series, built in 1969-70. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No How long have you lived here? For 40 years. Why did you move to SR? As we would often do, we came out to look at the model homes for landscaping and decorating ideas for our Clairemont home - had absolutely no plans to move. As we got out of our car, two young boys, Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, were there to greet our two children and took them for a raft ride on Hendrix Pond to catch fish and frogs while mom and dad toured the model homes. Everything about the model home presentation was first class, including the young girls in the homes dressed as they were in the 1890s (with hoop skirts and bonnets), furnishings including the use of antiques from the mansion, all beautifully landscaped and surrounded by huge trees. We remember the model homes had orange and other unusual color ceilings in some of the rooms. There were also plans to utilize the mansion as the community clubhouse and rec center. We were very impressed with the entire operation, went out and discussed it over lunch, and came back and signed papers to purchase a home. Before we moved in, the developer made us feel very welcome. They held several events for new owners, including a welcome party in the courtyard of the mansion for couples, and a gettogether for the ladies to learn about various SDG&E appliances and other options. What makes SR special? All the trees and the feel of country living – many community open space parks – plans for preservation of the trees. In the mid 60s, we would often drive on Pomerado Road from the old 395 highway out to Poway. As we would travel through all the trees, we would comment about how wonderful it would be to someday have a home out there. We had heard about the Ranch and the Scripps

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family, but didn’t know much about it. Little did we ever realize that it would someday be possible. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? Being able to look out our windows or sit in our back yard and see nothing but trees. Our house is situated with an open space park behind us and another open space park across the street, so we only have neighbors on the two sides. How are you involved in the SR community? We've been members of the SRCA since the beginning. We have been season ticket holders for the SR Theatre for many years. In the early years performances were held at a temporary outdoor theater situated near where the old Vons is currently located. What fond memories do you have of SR? We would often go for walks up to the mansion, passing the huge bird aviary they had built, and the horse stable building on the way. Our children took full advantage of the open spaces for hiking and playing. Back then, we didn’t worry about the things that we do today. For example, our kids used to play in the Camp Elliott area and sometimes came home with pieces of tanks, spent ammunition, and other military paraphernalia. We were lucky nothing bad ever happened in connection with these exploring adventures. We also attended Cub Scout meetings in the mammoth living room of the mansion. This room had a huge fireplace, in which eight-foot logs could fit. It also had a huge elaborate candle chandelier hanging in the center of the room, because there was no electricity in the room until later years when lamps were added. Because the lamps had been removed from the room, we needed to bring in our own lights to conduct the meeting. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 1970s? The developer, Macco, was owned by Penn Central Railroad, which filed for bankruptcy in 1970, just prior to our house being completed and our scheduled move-in. A new company took over and there was a lot of confusion and concern about finishing the homes and the long-term changes. They were still finishing some of the details when moving trucks began unloading our furniture. They later decided to change the community plans to discontinue the Woods/Parks series homes and build less expensive homes, stop using the “gas-lantern” style streetlights, demolish the Scripps mansion (which was supposed to be the community rec-center/clubhouse), and many other cutbacks, including schools. Our son and daughter attended the temporary Site 1 Elementary School, located across from the original shopping center in the block surrounded by Scripps Ranch Blvd, Ironwood Road, Walgrove Place and Red Rock Drive. How did these events impact you and your family? The delay in the building of the homes was stressful. We had waited to put our existing home on the market until the construction was fairly far along, but eventually we listed our home for sale,

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sold it quickly, but fortunately with a 90-day escrow. Then, with about a month or so of the 90 days left, Macco filed for bankruptcy and everything stopped. The homes were all finished except the interior details (cabinets, floors, appliances, lights, etc). The developer offered to rescind the sale, but tried to assure us that they would have it finished in time for us to move in. We looked around the city at other developments, saw other very nice homes, but nothing with the trees and the environment of Scripps Ranch. We decided we would take the chance and wait, as we really wanted to make the move to Scripps Ranch. Ultimately, they finished right around the time we were moving in. Other families were not as fortunate. They had sold their homes earlier and ended up having to live in hotels for a period of time until their new Scripps Ranch homes were completed. In addition, because the secondary schools weren’t built out yet as a result of the cutbacks, our children had to be bussed into Kearney Mesa and Mira Mesa for Junior and Senior High school. In what ways did SR change during the 80s? For a period of three-four months, Pomerado Road was closed at the far end for construction and didn’t go all the way into Poway. Our house backs onto Pomerado but it is higher up off the road. During the construction period and while the road was closed, all was so quiet, and we actually missed the white noise sounds of the traffic. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 90s? During the 90s, NAS Miramar became MCAS Miramar and the Top Gun school was transferred to Nevada. During the transition period, there were no jets flying at Miramar and we missed hearing the noise of the jets. We have always enjoyed watching the Air Shows and the Blue Angels. It always seems like they are flying only a couple hundred feet overhead. What other important events happened in your life during the 90s? In 1996, the company Gary worked for merged with a company based in Chicago. Gary didn’t want to relocate to Chicago, given his age and future retirement plans. He was a manager of technical training on computer–based energy management systems at the time of the merger, and the new company offered him a position as an independent contractor to continue providing technical training. The job entailed traveling to different locations around the country, conducting about 26 weeklong training classes in various cities each year. After some negotiations, including agreement for them to pay for Lois’ airfare, Gary accepted the opportunity. We got to see many beautiful parts of the country, but never found a place that was better than home in Scripps Ranch. We travelled in this manner for about 5-6 years and then just before 9/11, another large European company bought out the company Gary was working for, and his training job tapered off over the next few years. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 2000s? The wildfires that we had in 2003 & 2007. It was nice to see how the community pulled together, got behind the needy families and helped to restore their homes. For example, in 2003 they were all on different radio frequencies and were unable to communicate with each other, and agencies willing to help were rejected. In 2007, it was good that the various governmental

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agencies were much more coordinated and willing to work together. The communication was much better. The Marines were ready to pitch in and help and weren’t turned away like they were during the first fire. How did these events impact you and your family? In October 2003, we had been on vacation and were driving through Minnesota visiting relatives. We heard on radio that there was a wild fire in San Diego, but didn’t know it was Scripps Ranch. Our son called and told us he was hosing down the house and asked what we wanted him to take out of the house. Our son got 2½ carloads of items from the house, before he finally left the house. The firefighters told him he had to leave now. When he left, there were nine fire trucks lined up on our street. We called the airport and tried to get a flight, but were unable to do so. Which in the end was probably a good thing since the San Diego airport was closed and we would have had our flight diverted far away. We started driving home the next day. It was wonderful to see our house still standing when we finally were able to get to it. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Lat year, we celebrated our 50th wedding anniversary. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? No, it really turned out pretty nice. We have many friends here and we like to get together. For example, one of our friends lives on the parade route for the annual Fourth of July parade and we always go to their house for brunch and to watch the parade. Where else can you do that? How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? It will just keep getting better and better. Can you tell me one or more stories about your time in Scripps Ranch? We remember the Navy Firefighting School that was just across Pomerado Road from our house. We couldn’t see it through the trees, but every morning at 7 a.m., we would hear them play Revile and the Star Spangled Banner. We could also hear them on the loudspeakers saying “Alright, men, remember to keep both hands on the hose at all times.” Contractors and developers were much the same then as they are today. While our home was being built, Gary would often go to inspect the work that was being done. At times, he would find things that needed to be fixed and he would notify the superintendent of the problems so that they could get taken care of more easily during the construction process. However, one time we noticed that the framing for a certain wall in our kitchen was not straight. Once again, he notified the superintendent of the problem, but the superintendent asked Gary what his occupation was. Gary told him he was a Computer Field Service Engineer responsible for repairing computers when they failed. The superintendent then told him that he wouldn’t tell Gary how to fix computers if Gary won’t tell him how to build houses. However, once the drywall was in and the house was all completed and we were going on the walk-thru with the superintendent prior to move in, we again pointed the problem out to him. He then acknowledged that the wall wasn’t straight and they had to go to the time and effort to tear it out and rebuild it. That same morning, we learned that the City’s inspector hadn’t signed off on the permit and the house sale couldn’t close until the permit was signed off. We were sweating

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bullets and afraid that we would have to delay our move-in date. However, it turned out that the inspector had merely forgotten to sign the paperwork, and once he signed the necessary forms, everything was good and we were able to move in on time. What a relief!

 

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Interview of Karen Reimus October 15, 2010 What is your occupation? Attorney. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I live in Whispering Ridge. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? I also lived on Handrich Drive for 5 years (I think that area is known as The Timbers?). How long have you lived here? I have lived in Scripps Ranch for 12 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The primary factors that led to us choosing to purchase a home in Scripps Ranch were: (1) the good schools for our children; (2) centralized location in San Diego County; and (3) felt the community seemed very family-friendly. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Amongst the things that I feel make Scripps Ranch special is the extremely strong sense of community. Neighbors help neighbors. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Scripps Ranch is different from other places I’ve lived in that the community ties seem much stronger here. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I feel that much of my personal connection to Scripps Ranch stems from having lost my home in the 2003 Cedar Fire and going through the process of recovering and coming back to Scripps Ranch afterward. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I was a member of the Scripps Ranch Fire Safe Council from 2005-2008; I was a volunteer at Jerabek Elementary when my children went to school there; I am a current Neighborhood Watch captain; I am a member of the Scripps Ranch “Burnout Sisters” (2003 Cedar Fire Survivor Recovery Group); I was very involved in the post-2003 Cedar Fire fight for homeowner’s insurance reform which many Scripps Ranch “firefolk” supported. (NOTE: People who lost their home in the 2003 Cedar Fire in Scripps Ranch often unofficially refer to ourselves as “Firefolk”). What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? My fondest memories of Scripps Ranch revolve around my children playing in our neighborhood…probably because I often describe to others how our Scripps Ranch

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neighborhood is very “old school”, (kind of how things were when I grew up…kids playing outside together, riding their bikes, playing street games, etc.) If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? The biggest change I’ve noticed in the 00s is the growth of Scripps Ranch (building of Stonebridge; more traffic on Pomerado, etc.). What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Without a doubt, from my perspective, the biggest event in SR history in the 00s was the 2003 Cedar Fire. How did these events impact you and your family? It would probably take an entire book for me to describe how that single event changed my life. In the first year after the fire, I would have described it as one of the most excruciatingly difficult times of my life. My husband and I were not home when the fire hit, so we did not get anything out of our home…no pictures, no videos, no family mementos. Strictly speaking, what we lost was “stuff.” But, what I learned was that it was painful to not have any tangible remembrances of my family history…particularly my two young children’s early years. A particular memory from that time stays with me to this day…less than 3 weeks after our home burned down, I looked in my dayplanner one morning and noted that I had previously written (before the fire), “Kelly (my daughter’s name) – bring family history item to school.” Her teacher had told us when school began that the kids were going to be doing a project about their family roots. And, I had written that notation in my dayplanner as a reminder to get some family mementos out for her. With the fire, I had completely forgotten about the project, (along with many other things!) When I looked at my dayplanner that morning, I started crying and couldn’t stop crying for quite awhile as I felt that our (and Kelly’s) family history had been wiped out by the fire. As time went on, I more often felt that the true loss that the fire imposed on us was actually the loss of time. Navigating a total loss insurance claim while simultaneously trying to rebuild was INCREDIBLY TIME CONSUMING AND STRESSFUL. Before the fire, I had absolutely no idea of what was required to navigate a large-loss insurance claim, as well as a home rebuild. Both of those processes were unbelievably time-consuming. The countless hours my husband and I spent navigating those processes took so much time away from our family during the 21 months of our recovery. But, in time, we did recover. Our home burned down on October 26, 2003 and we moved home to our rebuilt house on July 17, 2005. But, time does heal. And, in the end, I now feel that I truly gained more than I lost. While the fire took much…it also gave much to me in terms of adding to my understanding about what is most important in life. The manner in which our family, friends and community supported us after the fire, (everything from emotional support to helping us sift through our lot to helping us outfit our rental home) is truly the “take-home” message for me of the fire. We were incredibly humbled by the outpouring of love and to this day…that is what I remember most…not the pain of the loss…but the love and support of those who surrounded and supported us in the days, months and years after our home was lost.

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And, other unexpected blessings also emerged after the fire. Like the majority of other Scripps Ranch Cedar Fire Survivors, we had a variety of problems with our insurance company during the recovery process. In April of 2004, I attended a town hall meeting at Marshall Middle School, convened by then Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi to discuss insurance obstacles. I was the 3rd fire survivor to come to the microphone in the “open-mic” meeting. I ended up having a 15-minute exchange with the Commissioner about the numerous problems Scripps Ranch (and other CA) fire survivors were having with their insurance companies in the wake of the fires the previous fall. As a result of that dialogue, Insurance Commissioner Garamendi invited me and 11 other 2003 Fire Survivors to come to Sacramento to lobby for legislative change that would help future catastrophic property loss victims. The set of bills was known as “The Homeowner’s Bill of Rights.” Again, I could write another book about the citizen lobbying we did, as a group, in Sacramento during the spring and summer of 2004. While we didn’t get everything we wanted in terms of legislative change, our group did help to pass some significant homeowner’s insurance reform and “The Homeowner’s Bill of Rights” was passed and signed into law in September 2004. The next year, I continued citizen lobbying for further homeowner’s insurance reform legislation and was thrilled to see another piece of reformative legislation (Senate Bill 2) codified in 2005. It was an amazing experience to see how our group turned its tragedy into practical action and did, in fact, change the law in California to make it better for future fire survivors. Shortly after the return to my rebuilt home in 2005, I also became involved with the nonprofit organization United Policyholders. United Policyholders helps educate consumers about their insurance rights. The group does a lot of work in areas hit by natural disaster where many homeowners must do battle with their insurance companies to get the insurance benefits they need to rebuild and recover. In my work with United Policyholders, I have traveled to disasterstruck areas in various parts of California, as well as Louisiana and Mississippi, helping other disaster survivors navigate their loss. In mid-2007, under the umbrella of United Policyholders, I created the United Policyholders Disaster Recovery Mentor Program, a volunteer group of previous catastrophic property loss survivors who were ready to offer support to current loss survivors. The program is now called the Disaster Survivor Support Network (DSSN). This program, which originally had 13 Scripps Ranch Cedar Fire Survivor volunteers, has now grown to a roster of over 160 previous loss survivors from Scripps Ranch, as well as other communities affected by natural disaster. DSSN volunteers have helped catastrophic property loss survivors from all over California and even, other states. I was also extremely involved in long-term recovery efforts for those who lost their homes during the 2007 San Diego Firestorm (Witch Creek Fire, Guajito Fire, Rice Fire, Harris Fire) and helped coordinate a more than 2-year long educational lecture series for those who lost their homes in that disaster. Myself and numerous other Scripps Ranch 2003 Cedar Fire Survivors personally mentored many of those survivors through the recovery process. Having this opportunity to “pay forward” the tremendous amount of help that was given to my family after our own loss has been one of the greatest blessings of my life. I like to think that our efforts in this regard embody the Scripps Ranch philosophy of “neighbors helping neighbors.” I never would have done any of the things described in the preceding paragraphs if my home had not been lost in the Cedar Fire. So, again, I reiterate…in the end, I gained more than I lost. I gained the opportunity to take my experience and use it to try and help others. And, while it still hurts

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that I will never again see things such as the videotapes of my children’s births as those tapes/photos all were destroyed…I know that the fire propelled me onto a path I was supposed to take.

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Interview of Elinor Reiss August 19, 2010 What is your occupation? I am a retired reporter formerly with the Mira Mesa Scripps Ranch Sentinel, a local weekly paper that published community news and events. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? I live in a neighborhood south of Pomerado called Chantemar. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? I have lived in Scripps Ranch for 25 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Scripps Ranch is a good neighborhood with many trees and friendly people. It seemed like a good place to live. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The people make Scripps Ranch unique. People look after each other. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It is very much like a small town, where you know many people. What personal connections do you have with SR? My strong ties with the community come from the many friends I have made through the years. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I keep involved in a variety of ways for the community. I write articles for the SRCA newsletter, mostly focusing on various aspects of Scripps Ranch history, which is one of my great interests. I also volunteer in other ways for the SRCA, including conducting interviews with Scripps Ranch residents for this Scripps Ranch history project. I am also involved with the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library. For example, I helped with publicity and worked on various committees. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I look back and think fondly of watching Scripps Ranch grow over time into almost a fully developed city on its own. We went from an area lacking much in the way of infrastructure to a community that has a number of high quality schools, a fine community library, recreational facilities, markets, and nice restaurants.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during the 70s? I did not live here in the 70s but I have read about the time. The first homeowners created a homeowners association that ultimately became the Scripps Ranch Civic Association. A class action suit was filed against the homebuilder, Leadership, alleging that the developer failed to deliver on its promises to build certain facilities for the community. The neighborhood won the suit and as a result, the first permanent school, Miramar Ranch School, and the first park, Hoyt Park, were built during this decade. How did these events impact you and your family? The diligence of the community in looking after the best interests of the entire community made me feel protected by the community, as if shielded from bad things. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? A great deal of growth occurred during the eighties, which led to numerous street detours. In fact, my son came to visit from Los Angeles and, because of the many detours, we had to meet him at Vons rather than at our home. He could never make it directly to our house as a result of the detours. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? One of the things that had a long-lasting impact on the Ranch were the various disputes and battles over land-use and managed growth issues involving the development of Scripps Ranch real property. The community was diligent, organized and united in its efforts to prevent developers from changing the look and feel of the community. This was a time when developers were trying to push through a number of development deals. They were very connected with local politicians. For example, Councilman Struiksma ended up working for a developer after his term as our city councilman was over. Another of our city representatives, Councilwoman, Linda Bernhardt, ultimately was recalled from her position as a result of an improper landswapping deal. A group of over 40 Scripps Ranch residents were always on call to prevent an improper groundbreaking. How did these events impact you and your family? These events made us very vigilant about the community and the benefits and protection of building right. People were very passionate about protecting the community. I witnessed a rally of the Save the Lake Committee. There were strong emotions on these issues. What other important events happened in your life during the 80s? My five children graduated from college. Concert in the Park (since 1985). If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? Much construction occurred during the 90s. Scripps Ranch Villages was built out. More parks, like Spring Canyon and Scripps Ranch Community Park, were created. Our library was built. Three new schools were brought on line, Dingeman Elementary, Marshall Middle and Scripps Ranch High.

 

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The development of the entire Scripps Ranch Villages area, including the new schools and community center, was the most significant event. The Community Center was originally the McMillin information center while they were selling homes. The SRCA was able to get it donated to the City and moved to its current location, and it began being used by the City as a satellite of City Hall. For a while, although no longer, people could pay their utility bills or file passport applications in the community center. The Community Center is still used as a meeting place for many groups and clubs, such as homeowners associations, and Girl Scout troops. How did these events impact you and your family? Even though my children were older, we made good use of the parks and the shopping centers. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My children settled in CA. My husband, Oscar Reiss, wrote and published four books about the Revolutionary War. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? There was a group called SOS, or Save Our Scripps Ranch, that was very active in preserving the quality of life in Scripps Ranch. They successfully opposed the development of a massive multifamily complex (with 600 apartments) that a developer proposed building near Hoyt Park. And, of course, the 2003 Cedar Fire had a huge impact on the community. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The Cedar Fires. How did these events impact you and your family? Seeing what happened during the fires made me much more safety conscious and aware of how to be prepared for emergencies. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My children got married, and my granddaughter was born. My husband, Oscar, passed away. My neighbors and friends are very supportive. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I think Scripps Ranch could use a large meeting hall. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Scripps Ranch is likely to continue growing given the community’s good reputation. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? One of the great benefits of Scripps Ranch is that the community looks after its own. People help others, even those they don’t know. For example, in 1989, the president of the SR Friends of the Library was expecting a baby and was confined to bed. Neighbors immediately helped

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out, taking the children to school and shopping, even coming in and playing games with her. Of course, they provided meals too. In November 1995, two Scripps Ranch residents, Ron and Deborah Plotkin, escaped a treacherous avalanche in the Himalayas. However, they were seriously injured during their escape to safety. When they returned home from Nepal, all of Scripps Ranch pitched in to help them. The aftermath of the 2003 Cedar Fires was the finest hour for Scripps Ranch. A generosity of spirit was seen in the activism and assistance given by the community, both by people who were fire victims and those who were fortunate enough not to have lost their homes. For example, a group called the Burned Out Sisters, an organization consisting of women who lost their homes in the Cedar Fires, was formed. They helped organize events to relieve stress, such as Halloween and Christmas parties, but also created a network that shared information on ways to rebuild their lives. They also collected information on pricing in connection with rebuilding homes and were able to benefit from shared pricing information and discounted pricing.

 

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Interview of Julie Rose, nee Ohrmund September 29, 2010 What is your occupation? Homemaker. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? We live along the parade route for the 4th of July; a cul-de-sac named Bourbon Court. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? I grew up on Red Cedar Drive, in old Scripps, and after a few years of marriage we moved back to Scripps Ranch and bought a condo in Smoke Tree, which is next to the original Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club. We bought this home in old Scripps on Bourbon Court about 8 years ago. How long have you lived here? Total…. 30 years (1974 – 1986; 1988 – 1990; 1994 – present). Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Originally we moved here because my mom got a listing to sell a home on Red Cedar Drive, and she convinced my dad to buy it and move to the “country.” I moved back as a married adult because of the convenient location in San Diego, neighborhood feel and good schools. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Back in the 1970s and 1980s it felt a little bit country, with all the trees, friendly neighbors and isolation from other communities because of the military property, freeway and hills. The Swim and Racquet Club was a social hub, along with the baseball season and the Old Pros softball league. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Probably the terrain and trees are the biggest difference. I haven’t lived in a place as hilly as Scripps Ranch and the trees have quite a presence. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I volunteer at Miramar Ranch Elementary School, since 2001. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I LOVED being able to ride bikes with friends to the country store (called Little Bear). We would ride down Ironwood Rd. (without helmets or much traffic) to buy candy. We would also ride our bikes to the dam, overlooking the city. The lake was not paved all the way around and Scripps Lake Drive was just a dirt road for a while. I also had a great time at the Halloween carnival at Miramar Ranch Elementary. Star Wars had just come out in the late 1970s and so I have vivid memories of lots of costumes that were of Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker and those little characters that had brown robes and you couldn’t

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see their faces. We would win gold fish and put our hands in the treasure chest, etc. Back then we could grab our pillowcases on Halloween night and run all over the ranch trick-or-treating with our friends with not a care in the world. A cul-de-sac near Vista Valle would put on a gory Halloween display in their front yard and there was always a buzz about where who had a haunted house that year. The 4th of July Parade was always fun to participate in. We would decorate our bikes with red, white and blue streamers, or dress in our dance troupe costumes and walk down the road in the parade. It was not as commercial back then. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 70s? Scripps Ranch was just simpler! I was in elementary school back then, so it could be the fact that I didn’t pay attention or know any better. The community was always growing though! New houses were being built, and so Jerabek Elementary was built to keep up with the growth. Roads were being paved and improved too. Driving on Pomerado Road to Poway was not for the faint of heart. It was very narrow and curvy, with no lights, so you didn’t travel that way at night. New ball fields were being put in too, to keep up with the demand of all the kids. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? Mira Mesa was growing, just like Scripps Ranch, so students went to Wagenheim and Mira Mesa High for their secondary education. They had buses you could take to the schools back then. Before that, high schoolers attended Madison High in Clairemont. So now, all the conveniences were getting closer to home. Shopping was being developed too. There was a Kmart and Big Bear grocery store where the Monarch apartments are now, along Scripps Ranch Blvd. Chuck E. Cheese was built in the 80s too, along with a surf and skate shop, fitness place, Vons, etc. The main eatery was Pernicano’s pizza and a Mexican place called Carmelitas. Little Bear became 7-11 and a new country store with cookies and gifts, was built next to the old Vons. Business Parks were being built as well. So basically the difference was in development, bringing more conveniences to Scripps Ranch, as well as more houses. But we still depended on Mira Mesa a lot for shopping, secondary education, restaurants and entertainment (their recreation center and library, etc.). I believe USIU (United States International University, aka Alliant University now) was built then too. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? I never imagined they would build houses north of the Lake. That seemed like uncharted territory. So the fact that the growth went north, instead of east and south (to the military property) was pretty impressive. More famous people were starting to move in to the wealthier homes too (athletes, news casters). That gave Scripps Ranch a more upscale image, though Mira Mesa already thought everyone in Scripps Ranch was rich (the rumor still exists, and still is not true today that everyone is rich that lives in Scripps Ranch). Do you have any additional information to share? I find it interesting that there are so many people like myself that grew up in Scripps Ranch and have returned to raise their families. There are also a lot of people who have lived here for many years. I live on a street where there is another couple and their two kids who I went to school with. And four older couples whose kids went to school with me. It’s quite fun to live on a

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street where you’ve known people practically your whole life, and have all these fond memories with.

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Interview of Molly Sanders-Cannon September 22, 2010 What is your occupation? Student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Loire Valley (I’m living in Boston at College currently). Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? It will be 16 years in January 2011. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? My mom was having a baby and our other house didn’t have a room for him! We were also looking for a more community feel and to leave the city and live in the suburbs. It’s a nice place to be a kid, there are very safe schools, and you can ride you bike in the street, all good things. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Loire Valley! It’s the greatest neighborhood, everyone is friends and constantly involved in everyone else’s lives (in a good way). We have lots of dinners and parties. Every holiday we all celebrate together and everyone that lives there is invited. We have Easter egg hunts, pumpkin carving night, Halloween pizza party and parade, Christmas parties, but Fourth of July is the best. We make a float on top of a jeep every year and everyone walks in the parade, we have pool games, croquet, tennis tournaments, and several block parties and potlucks. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It’s much more suburban. In San Diego I have only lived near downtown and now I live in the city of Boston so you can’t really get more urban then that. The neighbors are what I miss most while I’m at school, not even the dorms can top the kinds of friends we have made in Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I was in Girl Scouts in Scripps Ranch through high school. I played water polo for the high school and swam there since I was 8. In high school, I ran the Peer Education program (a state mandated program for the education of all freshmen high school students about drug abuse, disease prevention and suicide prevention). I am also involved through all of Loire Valley’s various activities. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? We got to play outside everyday after school with all our neighborhood friends. We didn’t have to go to a park or anything we could just go outside and play with a built-in set of friends.

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If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Huge housing developments started coming. When we moved to Scripps Ranch, new Scripps didn’t exist yet it was just starting. I remember when the new Vons opened (I don’t know if people still call it “New Vons”) and everyone was amazed that now there were two Vons! What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? It grew! Tons of new houses were built and lots of new families, new stores and new schools moved in. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 2000s? The fires changed Scripps Ranch for the people affected. How did these events impact you and your family? We were right in the midst of the fire and our house was severely damaged to the point we couldn’t live there for almost two years. It was a real tragedy not just to lose our home and belongings but we missed those neighborhood friends very much. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I moved across the country for college, which gave me a very different perspective about home. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I think it is a wonderful place to grow up. It really gives you a chance to be a kid. It is not a good representation of the rest of the world though. Other communities are not like that, and as you meet a more diverse group of people you start to realize how unbelievably privileged Scripps Ranch, as a whole, is. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I think it is becoming a more wealthy community. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life? Jan 1995 - Moved to Scripps Ranch Sept 1995 - Started half-day kindergarten at Jerabek 1996 - Joined the Scripps Ranch branch of Girl Scouts Troop 8027 2001 - Graduated from Jerabek and moved on to MMS (the first year that Dingeman (or Miramar Ranch, I can’t remember) had to wait until 7th grade because the school was too crowded) May 2004 - 8th Grade East Coast Trip (during the series finale of Friends, which we missed because we were at the Hard Rock Cafe) June 2004 - Graduated 8th grade Sept 2004 - Started at the high school, playing water polo and swim team Oct 2004 - First Homecoming dance and game March 2006 - I got my drivers license, and would drive EVERYWHERE May 2006 - The “Scripps Ranch mom if-I-see-your-child-doing-something-they-shouldn’t-beI’ll-call-you-if-you’ll-call-me pact” got me in trouble for driving other people before my year was up December 2007 - received my college acceptance letter

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May 2008 - Senior Prom at the Sheraton Harbor Island June 2008 - Graduation! August 2008 - Left Scripps Ranch and moved to Boston

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Interview of Anne Slavicek 2010 What is your occupation? Retired, writing tutor, Alliant International University; USIU (United States International University Public Relations Director. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Original. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since 1982. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? The trees. What makes Scripps Ranch special? It’s a close-knit community. No big streets, kids could ride bikes here. A sense of community. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It’s suburban. I lived in Chicago before. It’s warmer than Minnesota where I’m from. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Lived here, worked here, my kids were raised here, and I have friends here. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Member of the Scripps Ranch Welcome Club, past president of AAUW (American Association of University Women) that includes Scripps Ranch, edited their Newsletter, also for the Library and the Welcome Club. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Watching my children grow up here. Also, the 4th of July parade goes by my house and the floats used to line up in front of my house. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 80s? There were areas that had no houses. There was a bookmobile. The community was growing. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? A storefront library opened, the Scripps Ranch Friends of the Library was formed, and planning started for a new permanent library.

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How did these events impact you and your family? I volunteered for the Friends of the Library (FOL), made a lot of friends. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? My children grew up. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? New areas were established. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? My husband went to USIU. How did these events impact you and your family? My son went to Scripps Ranch High School, my daughter and husband graduated from USIU. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? It became more like the rest of the U.S. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? USIU became Alliant International University. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I would like SR to have less traffic. Is there any additional information you would like to provide? The Welcome Wagon club (now Welcome Club) used to have a luncheon to welcome new students at USIU. Scripps Ranch Community Theatre (now Scripps Ranch Theatre) found a permanent home in the Legler Benbough Theatre at USIU. USIU had campuses in San Diego, London, Mexico City, Japan, and Nairobi and had programs in Hawaii, France, Canada, and Palau. The university was founded in 1952 as California Western University at Point Loma. In 1965, it received a Federal land grant for a new campus in the Scripps Ranch area of San Diego. In 1967, the name was changed to United States International University to reflect its expanded commitment to a global perspective. In 1968, construction began on the Scripps Ranch property, previously the site of Camp Elliott, a Marine Corps training facility. It is now the home of Alliant’s largest campus. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? There is a lot of interest in sustainable gardens now. A lot of people are working toward those. The Friends of the Library worked hard getting ready for Scripps Miramar Ranch Library Center. People involved in the planning of the new library slept on the floor in sleeping bags the night before the official opening.

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Interview of Shana Smith October 5, 2010 What is your occupation? Full-time stay-home mom. Side job as the event coordinator of the Scripps Ranch Swim & Racquet Club. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Wine Country. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. 4) How long have you lived here? 11 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Because of the strong family-oriented reputation of the community and the high quality of public schools. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The small-town feel. The way so many community members volunteer for the benefit of the entire community. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Currently, I am serving my second year as SRHS Foundation President and 5th year (probably more) as Scripps Ranch Schools Committee member. I am also serving my second year on the SRHS SSC/Site Governance Board. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? When we first moved to Scripps Ranch, it was summer and our home came with a membership to the Swim & Racquet Club. My daughters were four years/two years and we would spend most days playing at the toddler pool. Some of the people I first met around the pool I am still friends with today. (And our kids are still friends.) It is hard to believe that those first friendships have grown to be so important. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? My focus has been on the public school education. I have been involved in planning two new schools in Scripps Ranch (EBS & MMS) and I have worked on the school boundaries issues as well as the MMS parent paid bus program. It is impressive how so many parents will come together to work hard on behalf of other families. Young families have a strong loyalty to the public elementary school their student attends and they stand-up to stay in that school regardless of the boundary (even if the school they are being asked to move to is considered a “better” school.) Scores and reputation alone are not the only indicators of a “good” school.

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I experienced the total community support for the Cedar fire families. That year, I was FFO President at Jerabek and 100 of our families lost their homes in the fire. (I remember five out of 20 students in my daughters 2nd grade class lost their homes.) There was such an amazing amount of support and love that I had to set up an empty bungalow as a “store” for those families to come in and take what they wanted/needed. The school became a gathering place for mothers to come and talk and share and cry. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Cedar Fire, opening of Ellen Browning Scripps Elementary School, opening of Thurgood Marshall Middle School. How did these events impact you and your family? We did not lose our home, but our neighborhood came together and created a bond that today is just as strong. We have lived through cancers, deaths, weddings, graduations, teen parties etc…knowing that this neighborhood watches out for each other. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Happily, nothing tragic. And nothing totally “lottery-winning” either. Life has just happened along with all its normal highlights. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I wish it was closer to the beach  How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? Actually, I hope that at its core it does not change. Communities can go through big changes as the children age and move and a community turns older. I am very happy that the Elder Care Alliance has been created because it gives me hope that the community will stay strong and connected even after softball fields and schools are no longer the social center of people’s lives.

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Interview of Steve Steinberg September 30, 2010 What is your occupation? Music teacher/musician. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Near Wine Country. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 10 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? When my wife got a job with San Diego Unified School District, she asked other people in the district for their recommendation on a good area for kids and schools. What makes Scripps Ranch special? We think it is a great place to raise kids. The schools are wonderful and the community is close. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? We lived in Sunnyvale, Redwood City and South San Francisco, and Sunnyvale was very much like Scripps Ranch---close neighbors, very good schools. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I have taught music at Marshall Middle School for the past 10 years. Both of my boys went to Marshall and both boys played in the music program (band, orchestra, jazz band, lab band). Also, many of my neighbors have had kids in my program. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I am a scout leader with Boy Scout Troop 616, and I am a teacher at Marshall Middle School, so I am very involved with this community on many levels. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? I have many fond teaching memories (too many to chronicle). If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? I was just starting my first year at Marshall in September of 2001. Experiencing the events of 9/11 with students was life-changing for all of us. More recently, the fires and evacuations were also life-changing for many of my students who lost homes, and for all of us here in Scripps Ranch.

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? See above! How did these events impact you and your family? 9/11 made our family aware of our fragile existence in this world---we are never immune to possible world violence. Likewise, the fires have reminded us to re-assess what we value as a family. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Raising our kids through their teenage years was a major event! Also, my father passed away last year.

 

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Interview of Dorothy Stout July 28, 2011 What is your occupation? I’m retired. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? The Heights. Have you also lived in other SR neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? Since October 1988. Why did you move to SR? Found a house and neighborhood we liked that was close to Miramar, where my husband worked. What makes SR special? Location – it’s centrally located to all of the county and people that were interested in what is happening in their community. What personal connections do you have with SR? Neighbors that have become good friends. How are you involved in the SR community? In the past, I have served on the Open Space Committee, Planning Group, and the Scripps Ranch Civic Association. We are now currently members of the SR Elder Care Alliance. I am block captain for the Neighborhood Watch. In what ways did SR change during the 90s? Spring Canyon opened, Pomerado reopened to Poway, Scripps Legacy was built in what was called County Island, a new Fire Station was built, and houses started to be built in Miramar North. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The new fire station and the opening of Spring Canyon and Pomerado allowing us a quick way to Poway, and the completion of Scripps Poway Parkway. How did these events impact you and your family? It let us get around the area and County easier and faster saving us time and gas. We were able to use the facilities in Poway; before, the travel time was too long.

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 00s? The Cedar Fire of 2003 How did these events impact you and your family? We learned how vulnerable we are to fires since we had to evacuate twice and had friends that lost their homes. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I survived cancer, my husband and I retired, and we started to travel. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? I would like to see residents become more fire conscientious and keep their property safe from fires. I would like to see the residents read their CC&Rs and live by them.

 

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Interview of Delaney Todd October 15, 2010 What is your occupation? Middle school student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Prominence – Miramar Ranch North Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 13 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? I was born here. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The sports teams. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Girl Scouts, sports and school. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? The 4th of July parade, concerts in the park. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Our house was built. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? Dingeman Elementary school was built. How did these events impact you and your family? I went to school there. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? None. What other important events happened in your life during the 00s? I started scouts, sports and school. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? No, it’s perfect.

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How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? It won’t change.

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Interview of Jake Todd October 2010 What is your occupation? Student of Scripps Ranch High School. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Waterford at the Lake. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? We lived on Rue Chantemar until I was 3 or 4. How long have you lived here? Since birth, 15 years, 1 month, and 4 days ago. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? I was born here. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The way that everyone comes together and appreciates one another. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I am involved in the Scripps Ranch High School Marching Band and have been in Scouts since I was in 1st grade. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I am doing this Eagle Scout Project to capture Scripps Ranch history. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Most of my fond memories are from Scripps Ranch, as I’ve lived here my whole life. Specifically, having a nice house and plenty of things to do, going to the Country Store for cookies, and going to zpizza, Submarina and Pernicano’s. Playing and swimming at the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club. Marching in the 4th of July parades with my Cub Scout pack. Attending Marshall and Scripps Ranch High. Playing at the community park and the parks above the lake and having one right below my house. Going to Miramar Lake to ride bikes or walk around the lake. What other important events happened in your life during the 90s? I was born and went to preschool. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? Hard to tell; I changed so much too. However, the Cedar Fire transformed Scripps Ranch, as did the building of Marshall Middle School.

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How did these events impact you and your family? We had to evacuate for the fires and I was one of the first 6th graders at the new Marshall site. What other important events happened in your life during the 00s? I went through elementary, middle, and high school. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I think we will continue to grow as a community as new people with new ideas add their lives to Scripps Ranch. Would you mind providing a timeline of your life ? 1995 - Born 2001 - Became a kindergartener at Miramar Ranch 2004 - Entered seminar classes at Miramar Ranch 2007 - Started middle school 2010 - Started high school

 

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Interview of Kendall Todd October 15, 2010 What is your occupation? High school student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Prominence – Miramar Ranch North. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 15 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? I was a baby – We needed a bigger house. What makes Scripps Ranch special? There are so many community activities. Also, soccer moms come to games in high heels and designer sunglasses! How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? I’m a Girl Scout and participate in school activities. What fond memories do you have of Scripps Ranch? Walking with my school (Dingeman) in the 4th of July parade. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? A lot of houses were built and businesses were put in. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The schools (Dingeman, Marshall and Scripps Ranch High School) were built. How did these events impact you and your family? I have attended all 3 of these schools. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I was born and began kindergarten; I also played soccer. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? A lot of families with children moved here.

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What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I stopped playing soccer and turned to music instead. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? Living in a cul-de-sac close to Dingeman, we would keep a ladder over our backyard wall, over which my sister and I used to climb on our way to and from school.

 

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Interview of Lynn Todd October 16, 2010 What is your occupation? Mostly, I am a stay-at-home mom. I work part-time from home doing administrative work for a medical partnership and I spend a lot of time volunteering. I am a lawyer by training, but gave up working as a lawyer when my oldest son started kindergarten. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Waterford at the Lake. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, we used to live in Fairbrook on Rue Chantemar. How long have you lived here? We moved to Scripps Ranch in 1992, and we have lived in our current home for 11 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? We had been living in Glendale and wanted to move to San Diego. My husband worked in an emergency room in Murrieta, CA and I had a new job in downtown San Diego. We had to find a home off the I-15 and Scripps Ranch was a nice, pretty, family-oriented community. I liked it better than Escondido and Rancho Bernardo where we also looked at homes. (And it made my commute downtown less, even if it made Doug’s drive longer.) When we were looking at homes in Scripps Ranch, I fell in love with the Fairbrook/Loire Valley area and told our realtor I wanted to live on a “Rue” street. And, what do you know, that is where we ended up. What makes Scripps Ranch special? The people in the community make Scripps Ranch unique. Without that pride of ownership, the willingness to get involved, take charge and fix what’s wrong while still willing to be reasonable and compromise, and the commitment to the entire community and not just to what is best for one, we would be just like a lot of other neighborhoods. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? It has more of a small hometown kind of feel. I don’t know if it is because I see lots of faces because of my kids being in school and participating in extracurricular activities, but I know many more people here in Scripps Ranch than I ever knew in the other areas where I lived as an adult. Also, the many eucalyptus trees and the various trails in old Scripps Ranch give it a more rural feel. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? I feel pride in being able to say I have lived in Scripps Ranch for almost 20 years, knowing it is an awesome community to raise a family. I feel I have connected with many, many folks who live here. If your child is on a sports team or involved in scouts like our two boys are, you invariably know some other family that is involved. There is a great network of involved community activists and if you ever have an issue or concern, there is always someone (like Bob

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Dingeman, Gordon Boerner, Gloria Tran or Bob Ilko) that you can go to for help or advice. Even helping Jake with this Scripps Ranch history project has led me to meet more of the many fascinating and committed community members. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Most of my Scripps Ranch activities involve my kids and education. I have done the following: Member of the SR Schools Committee for 5 years (including 3 years as co-chair) Member of the Miramar Ranch School Site Council and Site-Based Management Team for 5 years (including 2 years as chair) Room mom at Miramar Ranch Elementary for 6 years Grant Writer for Miramar Ranch FFA Member of the Executive Board of the Marshall Middle PTSA for 4 years (2 years as auditor, 2 years as corresponding secretary) Member of the MMS Parent-Paid Bus Program Committee for 5 years (1 year as chair) Cub Scout den leader for 8 years Active Member of Pack 1216 Executive Committee for 8 years Adult Training Chair and Committee Member for Boy Scout Troop 301 for 4 years Write a monthly newsletter for the Waterford development for over 10 years What fond memories do you have of SR? There are so many. Before kids when life was less complicated, my husband and I used to walk our two dachshunds along the ridge behind the homes on Rue Chantemar or on the trails up above and around the lake (starting in the area where Lakeview Park is now, but it wasn’t there then) when we would both get home from work and could catch up on things. Sometimes we could hear the coyotes howling and yipping nearby, which was a little nerve-wracking with little wiener dogs. I loved the cookies at the Country Store. My favorite was the Orange Oatmeal, but my kids loved the decorated sugar cookies, and we would stop there to get cookies as bribes and special treats depending on the occasion. I always loved browsing in the store and seeing all the neat things for sale. I was so sad to see the Country Store close. Before I had my first child, Jake, I pretty much worked all the time for a law firm. Once Jake was born, I needed to find things to do on the days I wasn’t working and I joined the ‘95 playgroup. When I went to my first playgroup meeting (a walk around Miramar Lake), I felt totally out of place and not connected to anyone. I wasn’t used to just doing the mom thing. However, I kept at it and gained many really good friends, like Karen Ragusa and Lori Erlenbach, from my playgroup experience. Eventually, the playgroup got so big we had to split it in two and Jake and I became part of the Late ’95 playgroup. We spent hours and hours with the playgroup over the years meeting at parks, holding holiday parties and visiting places like the Wild Animal Park. I remember we even once went to a worn-down skating rink in the La Mesa area and skated with our strollers. That was a challenge and I later heard that the skating rink was condemned. Yikes! We even had a second offshoot playgroup for second siblings of similar ages to Justin, my younger son. Although we don’t meet anymore, I still run into people from playgroup at Vons or school events, like school music concerts or back to school nights, and get caught up on what is going on with their families.

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I remember sitting on the curb with my family and my dogs watching the 4th of July parade go by when they were little. And then when my kids became cub scouts, we walked with Pack 1216 and handed out candy and airplanes and waved at the crowds. Watching and participating in this parade always makes me feel like we live in Mayberry R.F.D. I loved taking my kids to the Miramar Ranch Halloween Carnival (even before they went to Miramar Ranch). The carnival games remind me of the carnivals at my own elementary school eons ago (except MRE never did the booth where you bonk a goldfish on the head with a ping pong ball and get to bring it home in a plastic bag). Then, as the kids got older, we would work at our kids’ classroom booths and clean up afterwards with Cub Scouts and make an entire day of it. Exhausting, but fun. One of the reasons we picked Scripps Ranch as a place to live was because of Miramar Lake. At the time we bought our first home, Doug was a runner and I wasn’t. He loved having someplace where he could run dirt trails that was so close to home. Now, I have been running for 6 years and I run 5 miles pretty much every other day on the dirt trail at the lake. It is a great place to run and talk with a friend at the same time. You see the same people there day in and day out. Some you know, and others you just give the wave to, but they still seem like friends because you have seen them for years. We are fortunate enough to have a house with a fantastic 270° view overlooking Miramar Lake and the city from our backyard. This makes for perfect viewing of the Blue Angels on Air Show weekend and about 12 sets of fireworks on a clear 4th of July night sky. We love to have family and friends over to watch these two signature events. I remember the first air show after we moved into our house and we weren’t sure what view we would have. Everybody was lined up at the fence standing on a chair watching the planes zoom overhead and over the tarmac. One of the most rewarding things I have ever done (and something I never in a million years would have guessed that I would do if you asked me when I was in my 20’s) was be a Cub Scout den leader for both my boys. I knew I wanted my boys to become scouts because I was a Girl Scout from Brownies up through Seniors and I think scouting gives kids opportunities that they would never otherwise have. So when Jake was in first grade, I went to the scout round-up and signed him up and I volunteered to be the den leader for ten first graders. What was I thinking? I am not really the maternal, touchy-feely, teacher type, but I really enjoyed getting to know all of the boys in my two dens as they grew and matured, figuring out how to do the advancement activities in interesting ways at the last minute and doing something out of my norm and comfort zone. Through Cub Scouts, my boys and I have done lots of things in Scripps Ranch, like tour the fire station, pick up trash at Miramar Lake, clean up after the MRE Halloween carnival, hike some of the trails, walk in the 4th of July parade, sell overpriced popcorn in front of the old Vons, and get to make our own pizzas at Zpizza. Overall, it was great fun. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? I know there was tremendous growth during this decade, with new homes being built and the schools coming online. But it didn’t really seem to impact me or my family, so I didn’t focus on it. I read the newsletter religiously every month and had a vague sense of what was going on in

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the community, but since I didn’t have kids until 1995 and worked crazy hours, I didn’t get involved or really understand the huge changes that were going on in the community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Both my boys were born. And that changed life for us forever, but obviously in a spectacular way. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? I think, as it got bigger, it got a little more impersonal. What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The Cedar Fire, the construction of the new middle school, and the reopening of the perimeter road around Lake Miramar. How did these events impact you and your family? The fire just made it hit home that life can change in an instant when you least expect it and your priority and focus should be on people and not things. Our son started middle school the first year the new Marshall opened, so both my kids have the benefit of that amazing campus, filled with excellent teachers and state of the art facilities. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? A huge number of people reap the benefits of this community and its dedicated and caring volunteers, but it would be great if more people would make the time and volunteer in some way to help the community. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I think it will sort of lapse into a lull of complacency because we have it so good. People will think Scripps Ranch will always have the attributes and far-reaching vision to keep it a great place to live, but unless new families and individuals get involved in maintaining the benefits that make our community unique I think we won’t be as strong of a community. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? I vividly remember the day of the Cedar Fire. From our backyard in the early morning, we watched the huge flames quickly travel across the ridge south of the lake. It was an amazing sight, one that I never want to see again. And we knew it had to be really bad, but we had no idea how severe the damage and destruction would be. My good friend, Karen, called to tell me that they were evacuating and going out to breakfast. She thought she would be back home later that day. I told her to come to our house after breakfast. That day was surreal. Various friends who knew they could see what was going on just kept arriving throughout the day. Some who had been evacuated and others that just came. We ended up with about 6 families hanging out all day. The kids would play inside and watch TV, and then get bored and want to run around outside. Given all the smoke in the air, we tried to keep them in as much as possible, but sometimes we let them run all over the backyard for brief periods of time just to burn some energy. It was almost like a party, but for a very bad reason. We baked cookies, and had dinner

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and hung out. At the end of the day, everyone had found a place to go for the night and the Ragusas stayed with us for 3 days.

 

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Interview of Erin Tomaras September 20, 2010 What is your occupation? Student. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? In New Scripps Ranch, in the Fieldstone Summit Development. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? No. How long have you lived here? 14 years. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? My parents wanted to move to a bigger house in a nicer neighborhood. What makes Scripps Ranch special? Scripps Ranch is special because everyone is so close knit and ready to help others as was witnessed during and after the fires. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? I don’t remember. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? My parents and my friends’ families live in Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? Not much anymore since I am gone at school for the majority of the year. What fond memories do you have of SR? Playing softball at Cypress Canyon, hanging out at the Scripps Swim and Racquet Club, going to Scripps Ranch High School. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 90s? Scripps Ranch became more developed and a lot more people started to live here. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? I started to play softball. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? There were more people and a new school.

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What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The Cedar Fires. How did these events impact you and your family? Some of my friends’ houses burned and it was sad to see them go through that. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Started high school and college. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I would like it to become more environmentally friendly. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I’m not sure.

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Interview of Gloria Tran 2010 What is your occupation? Editor of the SRCA Newsletter, former TV journalist. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Cypress Valley. Have you also lived in other Scripps Ranch neighborhoods? Yes, Ivy Hill, for one year. How long have you lived here? 12 years, moved here in 1997. Why did you move to Scripps Ranch? Liked the environment, it was convenient, and it was a newer neighborhood. 6) What makes Scripps Ranch special? Feeling of community here. What makes Scripps Ranch different from other places you’ve lived? Here people know their neighbors, become like a family. What personal connections do you have with Scripps Ranch? Serve as editor of the SRCA Newsletter, have many friends here. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 90s? Vons opened. The grand opening of the shopping center was cool! Before there was no shopping in the area, had to get groceries in Penasquitos. How did these events impact you and your family? Interesting to see the community develop. There had been no “new Vons” or St. Gregory in the neighborhood. Watching it all develop kind of bonded us to this new community. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Got married, moved to Scripps Ranch, had first child. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did Scripps Ranch change during the 00s? The empty land was built up, schools settled down, no more schools will be opened. I think Scripps Ranch is in its finality, not growing anymore.

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What do you think were the most important events in Scripps Ranch history during that decade? The fire of 2003, and the state insurance commissioner coming to Scripps Ranch to talk with the residents. It effected changes in other areas. Commissioner Garamendi was always receptive to me when I wanted to talk to him. The community came together, and even then survivors were not bitter and were the epitome of grace. How did these events impact you and your family? My kids still remember being up at the Rec Center after the fires. My older son is now part of the ASB at Marshall School. That’s what we do. Whenever we go to events, we’re usually working them. Not as much now. Everyone in the SRCA was so nice to them. The kids knew them as “Bob, Brian, Marc, Brian Maienschein, Clint Carney, oh he was great!” What other important events happened in your life during that decade? The SRCA embraced the residents and their needs. My first editorial for the Newsletter was May 2002, earlier than I’d hoped. Rita Danskin, the editor, had to leave to complete her Master’s Degree. Is there anything you would like to change about Scripps Ranch? I hope people will still work with the SRCA to keep Scripps Ranch feeling like a small town. How do you think Scripps Ranch will change in the future? I hope it will stay cohesive and united. Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? When my husband and I moved here, we used to walk through the Ranch. We walked through the dirt before the area was integrated into the Scripps Ranch. Now we live in that area. St Gregory’s was built there, and my sons both were baptized and took communion there.

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Interview of Don Walker 2011 What is your occupation? Real Estate Consulting and Investment. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Crown Collection. How long have you lived here? 11 years. Why did you move to SR? Location, schools and the great reputation of community. What makes SR special? It's a great place to raise kids with good schools, supportive parents, and low crime. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? The sense of being part of a cohesive community. Master planned communities such as Scripps Ranch provide more than just rows and rows of houses in a typical subdivision. The abundant landscaping with consistent themes, community parks, schools, shopping, places to work, and a variety of housing product create a great environment. What personal connections do you have with SR? I worked for the Corky McMillin Companies and was directly involved with designing and building many of the neighborhoods within Scripps Ranch. How are you involved in the SR community? Mainly through kids sports and we regularly participate in events such as the Scripps Ranch 4th of July 10K. What fond memories do you have of SR? Memories are continuing to be created, but having great neighbors, coaching or helping with kids’ sports, running around or fishing at Lake Miramar will be remembered. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during the 70s? Setting the stage for comprehensive community planning. How did these events impact you and your family? Gave us a great place to live. In what ways did SR change during the 90s? Most of the housing in Scripps Ranch North was completed and new retail and commercial developments were created along Scripps Poway Parkway.

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There was a time when the school district was thinking of having many of the homes built in the areas of Terraza, Willows, Crown Collection and Waterford attend schools in Mira Mesa. Although these schools would have been fine from an educational standpoint, it would have changed the feeling of being part of the Scripps Ranch community. The school district ultimately decided to have the kids in these neighborhoods attend schools located in Scripps Ranch. How did these events impact you and your family? Our kids were able to attend schools located in Scripps Ranch, which was an important reason why we moved to Scripps in the first place. What other important events happened in your life during that decade? We had three kids that changed our lives. In what ways did SR change during the 00s? I think the new Marshall Middle School was a very important addition to the area and reflects how important a great school system and education is to the Scripps Ranch community. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? Completion of Marshall Middle School was an important addition to Scripps Ranch by helping to easy crowded schools. Another interesting thing that happened as a result the terrorist attacks of 9/11/2001 was that the dam at Lake Miramar was fenced-off for security reasons – which in my mind made no sense at all. If a terrorist wanted to cause damage to the dam, a fence with barbed wire would not stop them - it only disrupted people’s enjoyment of walking or biking around the lake. Thankfully, local politicians worked to have logic prevail and successfully re-opened the entire path around the lake. The unfortunate events of two huge wildfires had a very negative impact on a large number of families in the Scripps Ranch Community. However, the community rallied to support those in need individually as well as through community groups, churches and business. This support is an example of what makes Scripps Ranch special. Lastly, the construction of St. Gregory the Great School in Stonebridge will benefit Scripps Ranch families wanting an alternative and religious-based education. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? The following is not specific to Scripps Ranch and I think local parents do a much better job than most, but I think that all parents need to maintain their outstanding involvement with their kids as they grow through high school. My sense is that many of our petty crimes and vandalism (like the recent break-in at the Scripps Ranch Swim and Racquet Club near the Jerabek school) are caused by a small group of kids that are bored and not properly supervised by parents. How do you think SR will change in the future? It will only get better and become a more desired place to live and raise a family.

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Can you tell me one story about your time in Scripps Ranch? One small story was how our kids, when very young, became very excited when they found turtles living in the pond by the library.

 

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Interview of Jim and Barbara Wells 2010 What is your occupation? Jim: Retired, 30 years computer engineering. I now own BJ Wells Tutoring. I tutor middle school, high school and university lower division algebra, calculus, geometry and statistics, and also physics. Barbara: My wife, a retired San Diego unified School district teacher of 15 years, tutors students within the elementary grades. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? We live in the original Woods Unit 0, specifically at the corner of Scripps Ranch Blvd and Red Rock Drive. How long have you lived here? In October, it was 40 years. Why did you move to SR? To get away from the congested neighborhoods of Claremont and University City. What makes SR special? For the first 25 to 35 years we truly were living in the country. Highway 395 (now I-15) was the only way to come north to our neighborhood. Coming east on Miramar Road from Genesee Avenue was not an everyday trip. We had both Hendrix Pond and Miramar Lake for our enjoyment, and Hoyt Park West for park play and Hoyt Park East for canyon and creek exploring. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? We were truly a community unto ourselves. To a point we were self-sufficient. Except for medical attention, it was not a requirement to leave the neighborhood to find what was needed. You had to want to live in Scripps Ranch to move out here. Our only grocery store was 'the Little Bear' grocery store, a trailer made into a small store. It was owned by the Big Bear chain, thus the name 'Little Bear’. Major shopping was done in University City or Rancho Bernardo. We stood up to the Navy and their noisy nighttime jet engine testing - and they responded by quieting down. What personal connections do you have with SR? We are original owners of this house - over the decades we have watched Scripps Ranch grow into what it is today.

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How are you involved in the SR community? For many years I was a part of the Scripps Ranch Community Theatre group, doing set construction and set design. I was awarded Best Set Design in their 1984-84 season for the production of Oliver. What fond memories do you have of SR? The feeling of independence from the nonsense going on in and about downtown San Diego. During those first years, the Mobile Library bus stopped on Scripps Ranch Blvd at Red Rock Drive each week or so. We always made a visit. Our daughter worked for weeks to be able to print her name (Lara). Then one evening when the bus came, at 4 years old, she could print her name and sign for a library card. Even now, at 30+ years of age, she still remembers that evening. If you lived here in the 70s, in what ways did SR change during the 70s? As best I remember, there was minimal growth in Scripps Ranch, and very little, if any, growth on our street, Red Rock Drive. There was an explosion of growth in Mira Mesa, but that was on the other side of the highway, and that was just fine. It was inconceivable to me that downtown San Diego would ever grow north of Kearny Mesa. I was sure the Naval Air Station and the east-west flight path would stop the northward growth. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? I believe that was when we had a fire move in from the west, across highway 395 (now I-15), through where the high school is now, and into the field east of (what is now) the high school football field. It was stopped just short (west) of the homes south of where the library is now. What I vividly remember is coming home after the fire and seeing all the firemen sitting at the park benches in Hoyt Park having cold water and snacks. How did these events impact you and your family? This was only a hint of the fire problems we were to have in the future What other important events happened in your life during that decade? Our one and only child, a daughter, Lara Anne, was born. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? I am not sure if it was the 70s or the 80s that things began to change. First was the addition of all the condos along Pomerado Road and south of the Vons shopping center. No longer was there the buffer of country driving between 395 (now I-15) and Scripps Ranch Blvd. Country living was disappearing. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? It was during this time frame that the Rec Center grew from a swimming pool on top of a hill to an activity center with pool, tennis courts and clubhouse. I realize many people enjoy this facility, but such a club is not country living as was the original foundation of the Scripps Ranch development.

 

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If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? In the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s there was explosive growth all around the original Scripps Ranch community. Lost was the 'Country Living’ atmosphere. No longer were people purchasing and moving to Scripps Ranch for the life style offered here. Scripps Ranch became an investment. People moved in with no intention of becoming a part of the community. On occasion the building was purchased and the owners never moved in - the building was rented out for a few years, then sold for a profit. If you lived here in the 00s, in what ways did SR change during the 00s? The 4th of July parade has come down our street every year since it started. For many years, during the hours of the parade, we decorated our front yard with our teddy bear collection. This included a half dozen bears having a teddy bear picnic; and each branch of the armed forces was represented by a bear dressed in full dress uniform of each branch; there were families of bears, including grandma and grandpa, dad, mom and their children, all on a blanket watching the parade. And when the parade fell on the weekend I would setup in my driveway a train layout with my three Lionel trains running before and after the parade. A few years back, while I was putting things away and carrying boxes into the house, someone stole two train cars, my Erector set and the bunting around the base of the layout. I have not displayed the trains or bears since. Because of the nature of home sales in the 1980s and 1990s, we now see foreclosures throughout the Scripps Ranch neighborhoods. Houses need painting, front yard are in major disrepair. The beauty and charm of Scripps Ranch is gone. What do you think were the most important events in SR history during that decade? The two fires, especially the Cedar fire. How did these events impact you and your family? We are currently making plans to leave the neighborhood that we have loved and lived for over 40 years. Is there anything you would like to change about SR? You cannot set the calendar back. What is done is done, what has changed has changed.

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Interview of Lynette Williams 2010 What is your occupation? Retired teacher. Which neighborhood of Scripps Ranch do you currently live in? Old Scripps. How long have you lived here? 23 years. Why did you move to SR? Lived in Mira Mesa and didn’t want to change schools. What makes SR special? The people, they care about each other. SR is family-oriented. What makes SR different from other places you’ve lived? In other areas they don’t know the other people. What personal connections do you have with SR? I’ve worked on the SRCA Newsletter 21 years, kids, the club (Swim and Racquet). How are you involved in the Scripps Ranch community? My grandson is at Jerabek and Scripps Ranch High School. What fond memories do you have of SR? Fishing, roaming around with my son. It’s like a small safe town. If you lived here in the 80s, in what ways did SR change during the 80s? There was a Save the Lake campaign. If you lived here in the 90s, in what ways did SR change during the 90s? I ran for the school board and won in the primary. I met people and made new friends. Made Republican connections and started meeting with a conservative women’s group. Thirty women would meet at Pernicano’s. If you lived here in the 00s, in what way did SR change? The Internet. How do you think SR will change in the future? It may become less family-oriented.

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Scripps Ranch History Book  

Scripps Ranch Through The Years: 1890 – 2010 By Jake Todd

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