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A publication of

AUGUST 2013

Integration and integrity Qualtronics supplies wire harnesses for variety of markets


Contents

Also inside College essential economic tool . . . . . . . . . . . 9

On the cover

Owners Dennis Albert, left, and Rob Daly stand next to a rack of completed wiring harnesses in one of the assembly areas at Qualtronics. Photo by Greg Jones. Story page 3.

Chamber Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 On the Move . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Around the Watercooler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Tastemakers and Taskmasters page 6

Morton Marcus column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 County becoming more diverse . . . . . . . . . . 20 Mark McNulty column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Business Leads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Business Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Standing up for workers page 10

2 The Business Connection August 2013

Taylor Bros. Construction page 18

Comments should be sent to Doug Showalter, The Republic, 333 Second St., Columbus, IN 47201 or call 812-379-5625 or dshowalter@therepublic. com. Advertising information: Call 812-379-5652. Š2013 by Home News Enterprises. All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


Qualtronics integrates quality production with motivated workers By Barney Quick n photos by Greg Jones

T

he physical product that Qualtronics LLC makes serves as a metaphor for what it’s about organizationally. That product, the wire harness, serves as an essential communication link between a power-generating device such as an engine, and the thing being powered. In much the same way, Qualtronics partners with its customers to ensure that quality requirements are completely understood. Also, a wire harness is a bundle of wires, each serving a specific function. In the same way, Qualtronics operations are based on a teamwork ethos that’s essential to what it does. A wire harness is a somewhat behind-the-scenes element in an overall vehicular system, and Qualtronics is likewise an understated presence in the manufacturing world. Production manager Janice Daly says the company has three main goals: quality, timely delivery and “making this a place where people would want to come to work.” They are integrated, in that anyone who shows an interest in what Qualtronics does will see that interest returned. “We really do offer careers here,” she says. “We have designers who started in entry-level positions.” Cummins Inc. was the first customer when the company was founded in 1996, and many others came about via what it calls the “Cummins see Qualtronics on page 4

Above: Sitting in front of his build board, Travis Close heat shrinks insulation on the wiring harness he is assembling. At left: With hundreds of pieces of brightly colored, precut wires waiting behind her, Martha Knorr inserts each wire into a die to have a terminal attached to it.

Harnessing

power

August 2013 The Business Connection 3


Qualtronics continued from page 3 trail.” “Connecting with Cummins distributors is how we got introduced to many of them,” says President Rob Daly, Janice’s husband. “We were providing field-test harnesses, so we knew what the engine requirements were before distributors did. We could help them, because we already knew what questions to ask. We’ve targeted lower-volume users of Cummins engines, such as makers of street sweepers, buses and fire trucks.” Along the way, Qualtronics has picked up such other customers as crane manufacturer Tadano Mantis and Alliance Wireless Technologies, maker of the 3rd Eye MobileVision camera system used on waste-industry trucks. An Indianapolis customer drills water wells. Besides Indiana, the company serves customers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Arizona, California, Canada and Scotland. In 2012, the company hired a full-time sales manager, Caleb Townsend, who is seeking new markets, such as concrete mixers and air compressors. The firm’s goal is to double sales within four years. The 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 periods each saw 40 percent growth. “We recently started a group within the company called Q Design, which is going to go after some contract design work,” says Rob. Some of that will consist of redesigning customers’ harnesses. “If a customer would want it, we could embed someone from here with their organization.” Along with the Dalys, the other owner is design and prototype manager Dennis Albert, a Columbus native who worked for much of his pre-Qualtronics years at Cummins, including a stint at the now-defunct Cummins Electronics, where he began his involvement with wire harnesses. He’s keenly aware of their product’s role in the broader scheme: “Harness integration is key. You don’t want an expensive piece of equipment going down because a $200 harness didn’t work.” There are three basic departments on the production floor: wire prep (cutting and marking), assembly and covering (weaving and braiding). “We test at every point along the way,” says Janice. Rob adds that “we’ve implemented systems very similar to those in the medical-device field, which is probably overkill, but it serves us in the long run.” The company, whose facility is at the corner of 14th Street and Grand Avenue, employs nearly 50 people. The canine member of the staff, Daisy, wanders throughout the building, checking on the availability of treats. Daisy was rescued by an employee some time ago and is now a Daly family member. Management is as serious about fostering esprit de corps as it is about quality and delivery. That’s why it’s careful about

At left: Rainbow-colored spools of different gauge wire, with various insulation coverings, sit in the wire room at Qualtronics.

4 The Business Connection August 2013


selecting new hires from among applicants. Those seeking employment take tests to determine dexterity, eyesight, detail orientation and personality type. The company values the balance between work and a person’s overall life. To that end, it has established a flex time arrangement, wherein an employee can add on necessary hours either before or after the core 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. work day to log in an eight-hour shift. Qualtronics frequently proclaims various types of days, such as Super Bowl Day, Doughnut Day and even, on one recent occasion, Duck Dynasty Day, which involved special food and costumes. It holds monthly employee meetings to acknowledge birthdays and introduce new hires to the rest of the crew. A couple of years ago, the company organized an outing to an Indianapolis Indians game.

Melissa Deppe, front, and Amy Blair work to assemble and test a wiring harness. Perhaps the most noteworthy manifestation of the emphasis on team-building and valuing employees is the company’s arrangement with Corporate Chaplains of America to have a chaplain on-site once a week to be available for private counseling. “He talks to people about anything they need to discuss in a non-threatening way,” says Rob. “He’s helped people here through some very big issues in their lives, and it’s in strict confidence. We have no idea what he talks to them about.” Asking the management-level staff members what they find most satisfying about building Qualtronics reveals the array of the company’s priorities. Albert cites the challenge of staying on top of the knowledge required as harness technology keeps changing. Rob says, “It’s fun to watch a person grow. If someone is willing, we’re willing to help them.” August 2013 The Business Connection 5


By Barney Quick n photos by Greg Jones

Together by design Tastemakers and Taskmasters blends decorating skills in two distinct areas 6 The Business Connection August 2013

At top: Maria Grote and her business partner, Steven Joslin, in the showroom of Tastemakers and Taskmasters. Above: The 19th-century carriage house at 431 Sixth St. has retail space downstairs and work space for Grote and Joslin upstairs.


E

vent planning and interior design: They’re the kinds of fields that have such a natural synergy between them that it’s surprising one doesn’t find them combined in one business more often. Locally, Tastemakers and Taskmasters is exactly that combination. The partners who represent each of those skill sets are Steven Joslin (the interior design specialist) and Maria Grote (the event planner). They each live in Madison, and they have a shop there, but they established their presence in Columbus in 2012. They’re located in the carriage house at 431 Sixth St. It’s a building with a rich history, including housing another interior design business in the 1970s. “We want to brand this building,” says Joslin. “A lot of people know about it.” Joslin and Grote are both Midwesterners, Joplin from the Madison area and Grote from Dayton, Ohio, but their passions have taken them to far-flung parts of the globe. Joslin lived in New York City for 10 years and has worked in France and Belgium. Grote has plied her skills in countries such as Italy, Thailand and Australia. Joslin returned to Madison in 2008 “to open a little studio and design shop. Maria, whose husband was from Madison and had returned with her, came in one day. She was rebuilding the kitchen in her historic home.” They immediately sensed a mutual affinity and began collaborating. Joslin is amazed at how their minds work in like fashion. “When we go to trade shows, we instinctively reach for the same piece of fabric,” he says.

Advertise in Pink Purpose in your community. A percentage of ad sales will go to the Mammogram Assistance Fund.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Tastemakers and Taskmasters relishes in the details, as shown by these antique thread bobbins, with brightly colored soft cotton thread, a stark contrast to the gray wire mesh, nested baskets holding them. Their first Columbus client was F.C. Tucker/Scott Lynch Group. “We did a design-and-decorate for Scott’s Washington Street office,” says Joslin. “He insisted we put out a shingle here.” Lynch continues to use Tastemakers and Taskmasters. “We’ve found Steve amazingly talented,” he says. “We count on him a lot. He helps us with the staging of homes. He’s always there when we need him.” Regarding marketing for Columbus, Joslin says, “We’re still determining just what strategy to use.” He notes that “our challenge is that some people feel they can’t use a decorator, but we can work with any budget.” The business has joined the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerce. Of membership there, Joslin says, “It’s a delight to just pop your head in and say hello. They couldn’t be more helpful.” Addressing the way event planning fits with interior design, he says, “It’s all visual. Decorating isn’t just for permanent environments.” His chef brother Clay’s Madison-based catering business serves as another link between design and event planning. “We’ve got it pretty much sewn up,” says Joslin. “We can provide pretty much anything.” Their Columbus shop includes a retail area. Summer hours are from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, as well as by appointment. Most retail sales result from consultations in clients’ homes. Still, the way the merchandise, such as Smathers & Branson key fobs, lacquered trays see Tastemakers and Taskmasters on page 8

To encourage women and men to be diligent in examining themselves and encouraging loved ones to do so, The Republic, the Daily Journal (Franklin), The Tribune (Seymour) and the Brown County Democrat will publish a PINK newspaper with a special section devoted to educating their readers on this disease.

Businesses are encouraged to make Fridays in October PINK FRIDAYS. Go all out and send us a press release and photos, and we’ll let the community know about your participation.

For more information contact us at pinkpurpose@therepublic.com or call 812-379-5655.

> > SAVE THE DATE! SHE'S PAMPER PARTY IS OCT. 25 AT THE COMMONS

August 2013 The Business Connection 7


Tastemakers and Taskmasters continued from page 7 from J. Fleet, candles, placemats, cheese boards, hostess gifts and books on entertaining, decorating and gardening, is displayed invites one to browse. Joslin’s interest in design goes back to childhood. “I was doing floor plans when I was 10 years old,” he recalls. “My father always told me, ‘Think of what you’d do for free and parlay that into a way to make a living.’” He attended Western Kentucky University and the Watkins School of Design in Nashville, Tenn. He says that the main strength his experience has imparted is his ability to forecast trends. His years in the business have also made for valuable connections. “We can get anything someone wants. If a client sees something in a magazine, we can get it.” He still serves clients on a nationwide scale. “We have a long-term project in midtown Manhattan,” he says. “It’s a condo in an old factory building. It has 12-foot ceilings, and the floors are the original wood. The client has the money and taste level to do some really nice things.” He’s currently in the process of getting a real estate license. “It just goes hand in hand.” Grote was a swimmer at Kenyon College, winning three NCAA national championships. Then she amassed 25 years of professional experience in the event planning field, as well as raising four children with her husband, Mike. She had renovated homes in Chicago and St. Louis before undertaking the Madison project that led to her collaboration with Joslin. “I find it interesting that we have such different backgrounds, both in our personal and professional lives, but I also believe that this is our greatest asset,” she says. “Like any team, we each have an area of expertise, but like any good team, we balance each other out. We have such a great partnership and mutual respect for one another’s design aesthetic.” Joslin explains how the team members’ unique strengths fit: “We just try to create a standard of living for people.”

8 The Business Connection August 2013

This antique mule stands watch at the entrance to a small, first-floor room filled with a mix of period pieces and new items.


Ivy Tech president:

College attainment, price hampering economic development By Boris Ladwig n The republic

A

bout 55 percent of jobs in 2018 will require some education after high school; but for about 44 percent of Hoosiers, education stops with a high school diploma. Those dynamics must be addressed so that businesses can continue to thrive, Ivy Tech Community College President Tom Snyder said. He gave the keynote address at the 37th annual meeting of the Columbus Economic Development Board recently. Snyder said that while the link between a college education and good wages is clearer than ever, Indiana ranks 40th out of 50 states in college attainment. While Bartholomew and Johnson counties rank above the Indiana average, many nearby communities fall below the average. According to STATS Indiana, 15.6 percent of Bartholomew County residents 25 and older had a bachelor’s degree in 2011, higher than the state average of 14.6 percent. But in neighboring Decatur, Jackson and Jennings counties, for example, fewer than 9 percent of that same age group held college degrees. Snyder said that the lower educational attainment in nearby communities makes business recruitment more difficult not only there but also in Bartholomew County. Entrepreneurs who are considering establishing a business in the Columbus area also draw potential employees from neighboring counties. One of the challenges that keeps Hoosiers from attending college is the cost, Snyder said. The median family income in Indiana is about $48,000 a year, while a degree at the state’s four biggest universities costs about $76,000 — excluding costs such as books, beer and pizza. Indiana needs to redefine college, Snyder said, and promote more one-year certificates and two- and four-year degrees at community and regional colleges. After attending Ivy Tech for a year or two, students can transfer to a traditional college. Even with one- or two-year degrees, their earnings potential rises significantly, he said. With a one-year certificate in fields such as automotive services, welding or heating, ventilation and air conditioning, workers earn more than students holding an associate degree 40 percent of the time, Snyder said. They even earn more than people with a four-year degree 27 percent of the time. Communities and all their stakeholders must work together to encourage people to get an education beyond high school, Snyder said.

photo by madeline hodek

Tom Snyder, president of Ivy Tech Community College, was the keynote speaker at the annual meeting of the Columbus Economic Development Board at The Commons.

At a glance College attainment People 25 or older with a bachelor’s degree, 2011:

Bartholomew: 15.6%

Jennings: 5.4%

Brown: 14.1%

Johnson: 18%

Decatur: 8%

Shelby: 10.9%

Jackson: 8.7%

Indiana: 14.6% Source: STATS Indiana August 2013 The Business Connection 9


More workers stand up for their health

MCT photos

Mason Reed uses a stand-up desk at his office in Coconut Grove, Fla. He uses a cushioned mat for comfort and keeps his arms at a right angle to prevent wrist strain.

By Karen Burkett n McClatchy Newspapers

W

hen Citrix Systems redesigned its Fort Lauderdale, Fla., offices, managers had a mission in mind: Kick-start creativity by getting employees to talk more and sit less. The new layout encourages workers to move around, incorporating open areas and fewer walls. In a common area, there’s a large meeting table that employees have nicknamed the “ideation” table. Employees stand there, chatting and sketching ideas onto its whiteboard surface, much like they would mill around a kitchen island at a party, minus the cocktails. Standing is the preferred posture, part of a workplace movement to reverse the health consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. “We started off trying to design a workplace that would push creativity, but there’s no question, we found ways to make our offices a better place for health,” says Guy Desautels, vice president of facilities and real estate for Citrix, which produces mobile and workplace technologies. A number of studies have linked a sedentary lifestyle with greater health complications, including higher mortality rates. A study conducted by the American Cancer Society, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in 2010, looked at 123,216 individuals who had no risk of cancer, heart attack, stroke or lung disease and monitored their physical activity and time spent sitting over a 14-year period. The findings suggested women who sat more than six hours a day were 37 percent more likely 10 The Business Connection August 2013

to die prematurely than women who sat just three hours a day. For men, the mortality rate was 18 percent higher for those who sat more than six hours a day, compared with sitting just three hours a day. “It used to be that you had to get up to go to a co-worker’s desk, but now you can instantmessage them, you can pick up the phone, you can send them an email. You don’t actually have to be active,” said Dr. Alpa Patel, the study’s author. She added that taking short breaks from sitting time, even as little as two to five minutes, has significant health benefits. Patel now sits on an exercise ball. “Sitting at a desk for long periods of time isn’t good for you,” said Dr. Robert Schwartz, chairman of family medicine and community health at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. While Schwartz says a standing desk wouldn’t work for everyone — some might suffer with hip or knee pain — he says standing does offer an element of physical strengthening to it. “You’re using more muscles, and you’re unconsciously shifting your weight,” said Schwartz. That study and other reports changed the way employees at Facebook conduct their workdays. Of the 3,000 employees at Facebook, there are now more than 350 standing desks available to them. The company also says it receives five to 10 requests for standing desks a week. In addition to the standing “ideation” table at Citrix Systems, the company has ordered four

Dr. Keri Livingstone uses a stand-up desk while entering patient information at her office in Miami.


Citrix Systems executives Paul Martine, from left, Guy Desautels and Michal McKiernan meet at a stand-up desk at their offices in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

standing desks to be spread around its headquarters in Florida. The company’s offices in Silicon Valley are furnished with about 10 standing desks. Standing at a desk was a habit Dr. Keri Livingstone, a Miami Shores, Fla., pediatrician, developed by accident. She inherited a standing desk when she moved into her office. While Livingstone said she was happy to read the new studies, she said so far she can’t personally confirm huge health benefits. She says she moves around the office a lot more because she stands for a larger part of her day. The IKEA store in Sunrise, Fla., sells some standing desks, but managers say sales aren’t anywhere close to what they are in Europe, where customers have embraced adjustable hydraulic desks to improve posture and circulation. “They’ll work for a little while sitting down, then they’ll stand up for a while,” said Charles Wing, Ikea business manager. “Ergonomically, it works.” Mason Reed, an executive vice president and managing director at advertising agency CPB, switched to a standing desk last year. He felt he was spending too much time sitting in front of computers and that his posture wasn’t always the best. But after he learned he’d burn a few extra calories standing, he was sold on the habit. “It just seemed like such a simple change, a small contribution to my health,” said Reed. His office now has a standing desk and a couch, where he takes sitting breaks and holds meetings.

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August 2013 The Business Connection 11


chamberc AUGUST 2013

Business expo aids collaboration In Columbus, we understand that economic development requires a regional approach. Those of us gathered for this year’s Hope Chamber of Commerce annual meeting heard a compelling presentation by Trevor Lane, the southeast Indiana regional director for the Indiana Economic Development Corp. He shared stories of community infighting that soured prospective investors. Lane’s message was clear: Communities must work together if they are going to be successful in recruiting new businesses. The Columbus Area Chamber of Cindy Frey Commerce is doing its part to create a regional approach to doing business. The Tri-County Business Expo is a collaborative effort of this chamber, Seymour Chamber of Commerce and Franklin Chamber of Commerce. The Aug. 27 event will be held at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center in Columbus. It’s a business-to-business sales opportunity that’s been embraced by the members of all three chambers. This year, we’ll build on past success by adding new components. At noon, the boards of directors of all three organizations will network and discuss how to strengthen this region’s business environment. Later, we’ll feature a series of presentations on a topic that is on every business operator’s mind – the impact of the Affordable Care Act. The new health care legislation will have a far-reaching impact on businesses and their employees. We hope to clear up some of the confusion that exists around the law’s implementation. Mark your calendar for the expo. Plan to showcase your business at the event. It’s a great opportunity to expand your network and discover new business opportunities.

12 The Business Connection August 2013

Monthly publication of the Columbus Area Chamber of Commerc

Ribbon Cutting

Engelstad Wealth Advisors 250 Franklin St. Columbus, IN 47201 (812) 799-0345 michael.engelstad@wfafinet.com, jodi.engelstad@wfafinet.com

Will the Marathon Impact My Business?

Join us to find out the answer to this question and mor Wednesday, August 7th 8:00am-9:30am YES Cinema Free to attend, reservations requested.

The September 28th marathon will no doubt have a great our city, which is why we want our members to be informed as possible. The event will include a panel with members o Race Marathon planning committee, the Finish on 4th commi law enforcement, fire and hospital representatives. They will d route, the activities, parking and other important issues. Pleas to bring your employees, as we want everyone to be prepared

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ce • 500 Franklin Street • Columbus, IN 47201 • 812-379-4457

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New Members

Calendar

Design 4-Goode

Office 360

Speedy Laundry Corp.

Lloyd Brooks 4734 Pine Ridge Dr. Columbus,IN 47201 (317) 445-9893 d4goode@comcast.net http://design4goode.net

Ann Keaton 7301 Woodland Drive Indianapolis IN 46278 (317) 632-1360 a.keaton@office3sixty.com www.office3sixty.com

Loren Day 282 N. Gladstone Avenue Columbus,IN 47201 (812) 799-0687 dayloren1984@gmail.com

Franciscan Physician Network

Principal Financial Group

Susie Bixler 123 2nd Street Columbus IN 47201 (317) 528-4393 susie.bixler@franciscanalliance.org www.franciscandocs.org

Rick Bergstrom 2132 N. Edgewater Dr., Apt C Greensburg,IN 47240 (812) 373-9410 bergstrom.rick@princor.com

Sarah Tritz 2085 W Jonathan Moore Pike Columbus,IN 47201 (319) 277-3700 sarah.tritz@edgecore.com www.ecellularconnection.com

garb2Art

S & J Services, Inc.

Yats

Josann Sims 4710 E Mission Court Columbus,IN 47203 (812) 764-4127 jema.borneo@sjservices.us

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Dawn Andrews PO Box 1944 Columbus IN 47202-1944 www.facebook.com/Garb2Art/info

The Cellular Connection

n2Publishing Deena Nystrom 2000 Dockside Drive Greenwood, IN 46143 deena.nystron@n2publishing.com (317) 513-4981 www.n2pub.com

Email Effectively for Less Using the New Constant Contact 25% Discount Friday, August 16th 8:00am-9:30am Chamber Training Room Join us on August 16 for an introduction to this discounted service through the Chamber. Joyce Lucke from Paragon ME, a Constant Contact Solution Provider, will take you through the many elements, advantages, and possibilities of Constant Contact as a means to bring new customers in the door and enhance your relationship with existing customers. Constant Contact brings you a great way to connect and engage with your customers and since we are partnered with them all of our members can get up to 25% off of their accounts!

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8/7/2013 How Will the Marathon Impact My Business? 8:00am YES Cinema 8/9/2013 August TEN Roundtables 8:00am Visitors Center 8/16/2013 Email Marketing Workshop 8:00am Chamber Office at 500 Franklin Street 8/21/2013 Developing the Leader WithinYou 11:30am Ivy Tech School of Business 726 Washington Street Register for these events at www. columbusareachamber. com/events 8/27/2013 Tri-County Business Expo 10:00am Clarion Hotel Register for the TriCounty Expo at www. columbusareachamber. com/tricountyexpo

August 2013 The Business Connection 13


on the move

Terril I. Pettit

Tom Franke

Kelly Higgs

Terril I. Pettit, general manager for Myers-Reed Chapel, Hathaway-Myers Chapel and Columbus Crematory, recently received the Century Club Award for business excellence, superior achievement and best in class practices for 2012 from Service Corporation International funeral, cemetery and cremation services, parent company of the three local businesses.

student nominations. She was lauded for thoroughly engaging the students, giving excellent explanations of material, always wearing a smile, going the extra mile to help students, connecting lessons to her students’ lives, extending appropriate care to students with disabilities, including everyone in discussion, and giving “esteem boosters.”

DSI has named Tom Franke of Seymour chief financial officer. He will oversee the administration of the accounting department functioning as support for all the agency’s daily operations. He previously served as executive director for Lakeview Ministries in Seymour. He has also held positions as assistant director of the Pioneer Camp and Retreat Center in Angola, N.Y., and executive director of Camp Lutherhaven in Albion. He will oversee and participate in personnel management, effectiveness and training of the accounting staff. He also will develop policies and procedures that ensure compliance with standards and accreditations, quality assurance, program evaluation and consumer satisfaction.

Jerrie Posey is now banking center manager at Old National Bank’s downtown Columbus office at 501 Washington St. The office is the largest Old National banking center in town in terms of client traffic. She was formerly banking center manager at Old National’s Brentwood Drive facility. An Old National employee since 2007, she has spent 13 years honing her skills and building experience in the financial industry. She holds a bachelor of science degree from Indiana University. A Columbus native and an active community volunteer, she is a longtime member of the Columbus-area March of Dimes committee.

Kelly Higgs, executive director of corporate human resources pension and mobility for Cummins Inc., received an honorary associate of science degree during the recent commencement exercises of Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus/Franklin. Higgs was lauded for her leadership, which instituted increased collaboration among Ivy Tech’s community partners, including IUPUC, the Purdue College of Technology and the Community Education Coalition. John Hogan, chancellor of Ivy Tech, said, “Kelly’s vision included serving all of the counties and schools in the region, not only those in Columbus. As a result of that vision, the Columbus/Franklin Region offers classes in each of its six counties.” Sonnie Warnick, an Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus/Franklin adjunct faculty member who teaches the new student seminar course, recently received the Adjunct Faculty Award for Excellence in Instruction. This award is presented annually to an adjunct faculty member from each of the 14 regions of the college and is an effort to recognize adjunct faculty who typify excellence in instruction and in representing the mission of Ivy Tech. The award consists of a commemorative plaque and a professional development grant in the amount of $250. Warnick was selected for this award as a result of

14 The Business Connection August 2013

Jerrie Posey

Alma Gommel, a 26-year veteran of real estate sales and a 23-year associate of Re/Max Real Estate Professionals at 2401 Beam Road, has been chosen to receive the Re/Max Lifetime Achievement Award. Only 3 percent of Re/Max agents around the world receive this prestigious award. Gommel also was honored with the 100 Percent Club Award, based on yearly sales. Alma Gommel

Frances Jordan

Judge Norman Curry and Ronald Lane have been elected to the board of directors of BHI Senior Living, a nonprofit organization of continuing care retirement communities, including Four Seasons Retirement Center of Columbus. Frances Jordan, deputy director of the Columbus Human Rights Commission, is a graduate of the 2012-13 Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series. As a participant in this national leadership program, she received specialized training in preparation to serve in key governmental and political positions. During the graduation ceremony in Washington, D.C., Lugar restated his commitment to the program’s goals of identifying and encouraging outstanding Hoosier women to enter public life. A native of Lexington, Ky., Jordan attended Tuskegee University and the University of Kentucky, College of Law.


Jim Trueblood

Jim Trueblood, vice president for high horsepower engineering at Cummins Inc., will join the board of trustees of Ivy Tech Community College – Columbus/ Franklin. Since joining Cummins in 1978 as a senior engineer for fuel systems, he progressed through the technical organization in roles as technical project leader for heavy duty engines, executive engineer for advanced midrange engines and chief technical executive for the filtration business unit. He holds a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

service efforts the past year. She was one of just 662 of the firm’s more than 12,000 advisers to be honored. The award derives its name from firm legends, who in the 1950s traveled the Midwest from Tuesday through Thursday each week, becoming known as TNT brokers. — Staff Reports

Brad Wethington of SIHO Insurance Services has been elected president of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors-Indy South for 2013-14. He has served on the local or state board continuously since 1998 and was elected president of the local chapter twice. Sherry Aaholm has joined Cummins Inc. as chief information officer. She worked more than 15 years at FedEx Services, most recently serving as executive vice president of information technology. She also previously held positions at GeoLogistics in Atlanta and Schneider National/Schneider Logistics in Green Bay, Wis. Lisa Duke of Columbus, a financial adviser at Edward Jones, has received the TNT Client Development Award in recognition of outstanding

From left, Josh Littrell, Scott Fields, Will Horn and Aaron Hatton shot a 15-underpar 57 to place first in DSI’s 28th annual Golf Classic at Otter Creek. About 140 golfers took part in the benefit tournament that raised nearly $9,000 for children with disabilities. DSI is a not-for-profit organization that provides early intervention, job placement, residential living options, family support, habilitation and respite for children and adults in 40 counties in Indiana.

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August 2013 The Business Connection 15


Around the WATERCOOLER JGI now authorized Canon dealer

Jim Gordon Inc., an office equipment dealer and document solutions specialist in Columbus and Bloomington, has been selected by Canon U.S.A. as an authorized dealer of hardware and workflow solutions. Founded in 1973, Jim Gordon Inc. offers a line of products including office furniture, a wide variety of office machinery and Internet and desktop computers and services.

OCI buys Kentucky company

Owens Communications Inc. of Columbus recently purchased Commonwealth Communications, a Motorola Solutions business based in Lexington, Ky. In 2012, OCI opened a new facility in Louisville, Ky., to help support the sales and service of Motorola Solutions’ wireless communication products. OCI’s Columbus and Bloomington locations have provided wireless communication products and services in south-central Indiana for more than 18 years. Over the past five years, the company has expanded across southern Indiana and northern Kentucky and will continue to operate from the original Commonwealth location in Lexington.

Sunright plans to expand

Sunright America Inc., a Japanese manufacturer of automotive nuts, bolts and specialty fasteners, announced plans to expand its Columbus operations, creating up to 103 new jobs by 2016. This is the third major expansion for Sunright in Indiana since 2005. 16 The Business Connection August 2013

The company, a subsidiary of Japan-based Sugiura Seisakusho Co., will invest $34.7 million to construct and equip two additional facilities on its 33-acre campus at the Northwest Industrial Park. The new 176,000-square-foot and 160,000-square-foot facilities, which will stand next to its existing 322,000-square-foot facility, will house additional lines for automotive nuts and bolts. The first production line is expected to be operational in April. Sunright primarily manufactures weld nuts and flange nuts and is a tier 1 supplier to Toyota. It has more than 130 full-time employees in Indiana and plans to begin hiring additional manufacturing associates, engineers, supervisors and manufacturing managers this fall. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. offered Sunright up to $700,000 in performance-based tax credits based on the company’s job creation plans. The city of Columbus will consider additional property tax abatement at the request of the Columbus Economic Development Board.

Cummins looking at Indy expansion

INDIANAPOLIS — Property brokers say engine maker Cummins Inc. is considering several locations in downtown Indianapolis to build an office building that would expand its presence in the city. The Columbus-based company now leases space in two downtown buildings for about 70 employees. The Indianapolis Business Journal reports Cummins is looking to construct its own building of about 70,000 square feet, or more than double its current

leased space. Cummins spokesman Jon Mills says the company is evaluating its Indianapolis office presence and that it’s too early to discuss details of its plans. Property broker John Robinson says Cummins would prefer a new building rather than leasing existing space. Cummins has expanded its Columbus headquarters operations in recent years. It has some 7,500 headquarters and factory workers in southern Indiana.

Heavy equipment company expanding

LEBANON — An agricultural and construction equipment company plans to boost its central Indiana operations with a $13 million expansion project. CNH Parts & Service says it expects to add up to 100 workers at its Lebanon facility in the next year. The company has about 500 full-time and 200 contract employees at the Lebanon parts distribution center. The Racine, Wis.-based company says it will lease and equip a 153,000-square-foot facility in a business park in the city about 15 miles northwest of Indianapolis, giving it about 1.2 million square feet in three buildings. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. says it offered the company up to $650,000 in conditional tax credits and $100,000 in training grants based on the hiring plans.

Suit questions cold beer law

SOUTH BEND — Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller says he’ll

defend the state’s position on limiting who can sell cold beer against a lawsuit by a trade group representing convenience stores and gas station owners that contend it’s unfair. The Indiana Petroleum Marketers and Convenience Store Association has filed a lawsuit in federal court in Indianapolis that calls Indiana’s law allowing only liquor stores and bars to sell cold beer arbitrary. The lawsuit contends Indiana is the only state that regulates the temperature beer may be sold at and that there’s no legitimate purpose for the restriction. The lawsuit names the state, the Indiana Alcohol and Tobacco Commission and its chairman as defendants. Spokesman Brandon Thomas said the commission would not comment on pending litigation.

Aerospace firm plans expansion

GREENWOOD — An aerospace company is planning to expand its factory in suburban Indianapolis and add about 40 employees. L&E Engineering Co. officials say the company will spend $3.7 million to expand its Greenwood factory and buy new equipment for the plant where it makes tubes and brackets for use in airplane, gas turbine and industrial engines. Plant manager Jeff Derrer says that its tube manufacturing is increasing to keep up with rising demand from the aerospace industry. The factory now has about 50 workers. Construction on the expansion is expected to start this summer and finish in mid-2014, with all the new equipment being installed over the next few years.


RV plant closing

WAKARUSA — The new owner of Monaco RV plans to shut down a 520-worker northern Indiana factory and shift its production work to another Indiana plant. Allied Specialty Vehicles announced it was buying Monaco and several of its brands from Navistar Inc. Allied executive Jim Meyer says the company owned by a New York-based private equity firm will work on turning around the RV company’s financial troubles. Meyer says the Wakarusa factory won’t get new production orders and that its work will wind down in August. Allied will try to sell the Wakarusa facilities. Production will move to a factory in Decatur near Fort Wayne. Meyer says an undetermined number of jobs will be added in Decatur.

Bearings maker adds jobs

FRANKLIN — NSK Corp. and NSK Precision America Inc. plan to expand operations here, creating up to 46 new jobs by 2016. The companies, subsidiaries of Japan-based NSK Ltd., will invest $30.2 million to equip and renovate two facilities on their 63-acre campus in Franklin. The 160,000- and 75,000-square-foot facilities will house additional taper rolling bearing lines, linear motion production equipment and building improvements for production, which are expected to be complete by 2016. NSK, which currently has 400 fulltime employees in Franklin and more than 2,400 employees nationally, plans to begin hiring machine operators, manufacturing associates, engineers and quality control associates in October. NSK manufactures and supplies roller bearings, ball bearings, precision ground ball screws and other automotive components for the industrial and automotive industries. With additional facilities in Iowa, Michigan, Vermont and Tennessee, NSK’s U.S. presence serves more than 3,500 customers in 100 different industries and 30 countries. The Indiana Economic Development Corp. offered NSK Corp. and NSK Precision America Inc. up to $225,000 in conditional tax credits and up to $100,000 in training grants based on the company’s job creation plans. These tax credits are performance-based, meaning until

employees are hired, the company is not eligible to claim incentives.

Startup helps with pest-tracking

WEST LAFAYETTE — A company based at the Purdue Research Park has won $250,000 in federal grants to improve an electronic trap it created that monitors insect pests nibbling away at farmers’ crops. Spensa Technologies developed the Z-Trap, a device that detects the number of target insects it has captured and sends that data wirelessly to a farmer’s mobile phone or computer. Company President Johnny Parks says close tracking of insect pest levels in fields allows farmers to reduce how much pesticide they apply to fields, helping them manage pests in a more ecological way. His startup company recently won a $150,000 grant from the National Science Foundation and a $100,000 grant from U.S. Department of Agriculture to refine the Z-Trap device, including reducing its energy consumption.

Former GM plant to be razed

INDIANAPOLIS — A shuttered General Motors Corp. stamping plant that once employed more than 6,000 workers near downtown Indianapolis will be demolished this fall after failing to attract a buyer. Property redevelopment manager Bruce Rasher says that after consulting with commercial real estate experts, it was clear the 102-acre site’s numerous buildings were hampering efforts to sell the complex or redevelop it. GM closed the site’s stamping plant in 2011. The site’s owner is Revitalizing Auto Communities Environmental Response Trust, which was created to clean up and market properties owned by GM before its 2009 bankruptcy filing. Demolition work is expected to begin by this fall. The 2.1 millionsquare-foot factory and several smaller support buildings will likely take six months to raze.

Plant begins operations

EDWARDSPORT — A new coalgasification power plant in southern Indiana that’s been hounded by cost

overruns and ethical scandals has started commercial operation. Duke Energy said that its $3.5 billion, high-tech 618-megawatt plant near Vincennes will produce 10 times as much power as a former plant but emit about 70 percent less pollution. While Duke boasts the plant is one of the largest, cleanest coal-fired power generating facilities in the world, the project has drawn strong criticism as its price tag ballooned from its original 2007 cost estimate of $1.9 billion. It has also been the focus of an ethical flap after company officials and regulators were found to be discussing the cost overruns in secret meetings, prompting several firings and resignations. Then-Gov. Mitch Daniels fired the state utility commission’s chairman amid the fallout. The plant is expected to build up to its long-term level of production over the next 15 months. It is expected to employ about 140 full-time workers. About 3,500 workers took part in the plant’s construction. Duke’s 790,000 Indiana electricity consumers are expected to see an increase in their

monthly bills of 14 percent to 16 percent by early next year, 9 percent of which has already occurred. Duke is Indiana’s largest electric utility, operating in 69 of the state’s 92 counties. Duke has 4 million electric customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, along with 500,000 natural gas customers in Ohio and Kentucky.

State’s casino revenue down

INDIANAPOLIS — The state’s portion of gambling revenue is slumping as Indiana’s 13 casinos take advantage of a new law that allows them to reduce their tax burden. A report shows total tax receipts from casinos in May fell nearly 18 percent compared to May of last year. Gaming commission deputy director Jenny Reske says much of that drop resulted from casinos deducting freeplay coupons used to attract gamblers, as allowed under a law passed by this year’s General Assembly. Horseshoe Casino manager Daniel see watercooler on page 19

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August 2013 The Business Connection 17


Submitted photo

From left are Taylor Bros. Construction executives James Euler, secretary/treasurer; David Doup, president; Jeff Chandler, vice president; and Tom Harmon, CEO/chairman of the board.

Taylor Bros. named contractor of the year

T

aylor Bros. Construction Co. has been named Contractor of the Year for 2013 by Top Notch Indiana. Each year, the award goes to the company that has earned the highest level of distinction over the past year in Indiana’s union construction industry. Taylor Bros. has been part of the construction industry for 80 years, providing general construction and construction management services. The committee that chose Taylor Bros. was impressed by the company’s strong reputation for excellence in safety, continuing education, commitment to diversity and extensive philanthropic efforts. “It is an honor to receive this award,” said Jeff Chandler, vice president. “Taylor Bros. has built a knowledgeable and dedicated team, focused on commitment to quality and integrity. We will continue to strive for improvement each year, with the goal of becoming an even better company for our customers, subcontractors and suppliers.” Safety has always been a top priority for Taylor

18 The Business Connection August 2013

Bros., which has implemented a safety software program that tracks trends and analyzes safetyrelated data and incidents to minimize workplace injuries. Taylor Bros. also has a safety committee that includes upper management, supervisors and tradesmen. This committee meets regularly to evaluate current policies and develop and implement new safety policies and procedures. Taylor Bros. also exhibits a value for continuing education within all levels of the company. It provides extensive training for employees to ensure compliance in all aspects of the construction process. Also, all employees take part in project planning sessions focusing on a wide range of topics, including scope of work, insurance requirements, safety requirements and scheduling. The committee also noted Taylor Bros.’ dedication to diversity. For instance, the company has structured bid packages to help provide additional opportunities for minority firms. Outreach and mentoring of these companies are other ways Taylor Bros. exceeds its minority participation goals.

Taylor Bros.’ philosophy is to encourage and foster minority participation on every project. Its overall current spending on minority participation is 16 percent. One member of the award committee commented that “the firm’s commitment to diversity is impressive and worth recognition.” The award committee was impressed by Taylor Bros.’ commitment to serving the community through philanthropic efforts. In 2010, Taylor Bros. worked with its sister companies, Harmon Construction of North Vernon and Harmon Steel of Indianapolis, to begin a not-for-profit organization called the Joy of Giving, which has raised nearly $200,000 to give back to families in both local and distant communities. The Top Notch Indiana committee also recognized Taylor Bros. for its continued commitment to providing high quality construction services while focusing on customer satisfaction. One committee member stated that Taylor Bros. is “clearly a local contractor with a national reputation of representing all of us well.”


Eye on the pie

Morton Marcus

Growing diversity of population opens opportunities Sometimes what everyone knows is not actually known by everyone. Often those who know something don’t pay any attention to what they know. At times that avoidance of the known can be costly. Everyone knows that the Hispanic population of Indiana and the United States has been increasing. While the total population of Indiana advanced by 7.3 percent between 2000 and 2012, our Hispanic/ Latino neighbors increased by 90 percent. Of the 446,000 additional Hoosiers, 196,000, or 44 percent, were Hispanic/Latino. Whereas in 2000, this ethnic group represented 3.6 percent of the Indiana population, today it accounts for 6.3 percent. We have seen some governments, institutions and businesses make adjustments to the growth of the Hispanic/Latino population as if it were a homogeneous entity. In smaller towns that might be true, but in our larger cities our new residents come from many lands other than Mexico --- including Central and South America plus the Caribbean. Therefore we find signs, forms and booklets in

English and Spanish to accommodate populations that today require them. Will that need persist? To ask the question is not to deny the utility of what has been done. Rather, the question becomes: Will the next generation of immigrants to the U.S. from Spanish-speaking areas be better prepared to function in this country in English than their predecessors? To date we have drawn often from the poorest, least educated, least skilled portions of the sending nations. A new immigration policy could lead to a new set of Hispanic/Latino applicants for admission to the U.S. who have basic English skills. In Indiana we have not seen a similar response to the near 90 percent increase in the Asian and Pacific Islander population. Why? There are three reasons: First, although increasing almost as fast as the Hispanic/Latino population, this group is still small in numbers (116,000), just 1.8 percent of the state’s total population. Second, the Asian and Pacific Islander population is made up of many more language groups than the Spanish-speaking population. It would be far more

costly to accommodate numerous languages. Third, many of the Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants are already well-versed in basic English when they arrive. Growing more slowly (19 percent) is the black-only population in our state. Even though this largely native group is still the second most numerous race (616,000), it represents less than 10 percent of the total. But that might be misleading. The fastest-growing minority (106 percent increase) are those who identify themselves as being of two or more races. In earlier times, multiracial people might have been classified as black. This increased racial and cultural diversity of our state’s population could easily help reduce Indiana’s image as a white-only state where others are unwelcome. In the next generation, we may find that breaking the old mold will enhance our desirability as a good place for everyone to live and prosper. Morton Marcus is an economist, writer and speaker. He can be reached at mortonjmarcus@yahoo.com.

watercooler continued from page 17 Nita says the move should help Indiana casinos be more competitive with those in neighboring states. Reske says some companies own casinos in Indiana and competing states. Despite the relief, casino revenues dropped 5.8 percent from May 2012.

100-turbine wind farm planned

WINCHESTER — A renewable energy company is planning to build a wind farm with up to 100 turbines in an eastern Indiana county. The project is planned by EDP Renewables North America for a rural area south of the Randolph County city of Winchester. Company spokesman Adam Renz says major construction work is expected to begin

next spring on the project estimated to cost $350 million to $400 million. The subsidiary of a Spanish company has an agreement with Indiana Michigan Power to buy electricity from the proposed Headwaters Wind Farm in the area about 25 miles east of Muncie. Two other companies have gained the approval of Randolph County officials for wind farm projects there, while opponents in neighboring Delaware County are fighting proposed turbine construction.

Fertilizer plant survives

MOUNT VERNON — A southwestern Indiana county is issuing $1.3 billion in bonds for a fertilizer

plant being developed by a Pakistanbased group after Gov. Mike Pence pulled state support. The Posey County Council voted unanimously in favor of the financing plan for the project planned. Pence withdrew the state’s incentives offer for the plant because fertilizer made by Pakistan-based parent company Fatima Group was used in bombs in Afghanistan that have killed American troops. Company attorney Tom Campbell said the facility will produce urea ammonium nitrate, which is a fertilizer not used in explosives. County officials say the plant developers are responsible for repaying the bonds. The plant is expected to have about 300 workers.

Lilly giving $10M to bioscience effort

INDIANAPOLIS — The Lilly Endowment is giving $10 million toward the new Indiana Biosciences Research Institute that aims to attract more research scientists to the state. The grant adds to the $25 million in startup funding the institute received from the state Legislature. It was launched with the goal of increasing collaboration between businesses and universities in the state. Lilly Endowment President Clay Robbins says the institute shows an unprecedented degree of commitment toward growing the research capacity for Indiana’s life sciences industry. — Staff and Wire Reports August 2013 The Business Connection 19


Influx of Asians, Hispanics making county more diverse By Boris Ladwig n The republic

B

artholomew County is getting more diverse, gaining residents especially from Asia; and while it remains overwhelmingly white, it was among only 19 Indiana counties that last year gained nonHispanic whites. According to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the county gained 1,312 residents between summer 2011 and summer 2012, and about two-thirds of that growth came from minorities, primarily Asians. The county’s Asian population grew at 16.2 percent, faster than all but four Indiana counties. People who identified as being biracial or multiracial grew at the second-fastest clip in Bartholomew County, at 7.5 percent. That pace ranked 20th among Indiana counties. The number of local blacks or African-Americans grew by 6.5 percent, and the number of Hispanics grew by 4.1 percent. While minority populations posted much faster growth rates than whites, which grew at less than 1 percent, the white population posted

the second-largest numerical gain, at 467. Only the Asian population added more: 494. Minorities combined gained 845. The Hispanic population grew by 200, followed by blacks or African-Americans, up 103; and people with two or more races, up 84. Bartholomew County’s growth among Asians and Hispanics reflected state and national trends, although the county’s growth rate among Asians was more than five times as high as the national rate of 2.9 percent. The county’s share of minorities grew by 0.8 percentage point, the biggest jump in the state, to 14.4 percent. Thirteen counties had a higher share of minorities, with Lake County the highest at 45 percent. Bartholomew County remains overwhelmingly white: More than 85 percent of the county’s population is non-Hispanic whites. Bartholomew also was among only 19 Indiana counties that saw an increase in the population of non-Hispanic whites, which saw a net decline across the state.

Changing demographics

Bartholomew County is getting more diverse, and from 2011 to 2012 it was among only 19 Indiana counties that gained non-Hispanic whites. Here’s a look at the county’s demographic data: Bartholomew County

State rank July (by growth rate) 2011

July 2012

Change

Asian

5

3,056

3,550

494 (16.16%)

Two or more races

20

1,117

1,201

84 (7.52%)

Black or African-American 43

1,592

1,695

103 (6.47%)

Total Hispanic*

31

4,932

5,132

200 (4.06%)

White Hispanic

15

4,352

4,506

154 (3.54%)

American Indian and Alaska Native

44

386

399

13 (3.37%)

White non-Hispanic

7

67,252

67,719

467 (0.69%)

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

86

62

59

-3 (-4.84%)

77,817

79,129

1,312 (1.69%)

TOTAL

What it means The data underscore that Indiana is recovering from the recession, but very slowly and not quickly enough to be drawing a lot of new residents, state demographer Matt Kinghorn said. A few pockets in the state — the Indianapolis and Louisville regions and some outliers such as Bartholomew County — are gaining residents. But in most other areas, people are moving away. In fact, Kinghorn said, without the growth among minorities, the state’s population would have declined from summer 2011 to summer 2012. The state gained nearly 21,000 people during that period, but the number of nonHispanic whites fell by more than 2,000. “Indiana is definitely becoming more diverse,” he said. The latest data show the continuation of a trend that began many years ago. Kinghorn see diversity on page 21

Here’s a look at the numbers as a percent of Bartholomew County’s total population: Asian: 4.1% Two or more races: 1.5% African-American or black: 2.1% Total Hispanic*: 6.5% White Hispanic: 5.6% American Indian and Alaska Native: 0.5% White non-Hispanic: 85.6% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.6% *Includes all races

*Includes all races Here’s how Bartholomew County compares to other Indiana counties, by state rank and percentage of minority residents: 1. Lake 45% 14. Bartholomew 14.4%

29. Jackson 30. Johnson

9% 8.4%

39. Shelby 59. Jennings

6.7% 4.5%

65. Decatur 72. Brown

4.1% 3.7%

92. Franklin Statewide

2.3% 19%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

20 The Business Connection August 2013


coach’s corner

Mark McNulty

Time management vs. self-management When I recently asked a room full of business owners what their biggest challenges were, one of the themes that rose to the top was the problem of not having enough time — most of them labeled it a time management problem. Well, the good news for everyone out there who thinks they have a time management problem is that I can solve that one easily. There is no such thing as time management, so therefore no problem. However, there is still this problem of not having enough time to get everything done, and that can also be solved, but only if you recognize the source of the problem. The source is not time, the real source of the problem is you, and the problem is more appropriately named self-management. There are two key steps to becoming better at self-management. The first is the most important, and it is simply accepting a basic truth: You will never have enough time to get everything done, and that is a good thing. I firmly believe that running out of things to do in a business is a very bad thing. If you believe in the concept that you are either growing or dying, then when you run out of things to do, you are clearly going to fall immediately into the dying category. This is true of both businesses and people. What this means to you is that for the most part, you should stop worrying about not getting to everything, because you simply

will not ever get to everything, and it is OK to accept that. Once you accept this fundamental truth, you can let go of some of the stress that comes with believing that somehow you should be getting it all done. Let it go. The second step of self-management is where you need to develop your personal skills and teach them to your teams. This step involves the process of making decisions on how to allocate your time. Since we now believe we can’t get to everything and that it is OK not to get to everything, we have to be absolutely sure we are getting to the right things. The key to doing this well is to make decisions regarding the allocation of your time based on your priorities. There are many ways to determine your priorities, but let me start with one of my chief cautions. One of the biggest mistakes we can make in our business and in our lives is also one of the most common. This mistake is letting others set our priorities for us. Whether it is our biggest customer, our loudest employee, our family or just the friends we hang out with, the biggest mistake I see is letting someone else, or “the world,” set our priorities and make our decisions. The biggest problem with this method of prioritization and decision making is that the world very rarely prioritizes or decides in our favor. So how do we set priorities? There are a number of components to setting the priorities for ourselves and our businesses. It starts

with values and beliefs, which define what is important to us about life, business, people, etc. We build on our values and beliefs with our vision and goals, which define where we want to end up, and our basic plan for how we intend to get there. The last ingredient is a small dose of reality, the situation at hand. The world throws interruptions at us on a regular basis, and we need to account for them in the daily execution of our plan. The key to self-mastery is to learn how to respond to these interruptions instead of reacting to them. When we react, the world wins; when we respond, we can all win. The difference is simply allocating the time to consider the interruption at the right moment (which is not always immediately), assess the interruption against the priorities for the day/ week/month that you have already established, and make an intentional decision on how to allocate time to the interruption. The alternative option is to let the world decide, and as I stated before, the world rarely decides in our favor. So to master yourself, simply define your priorities, make decisions based on those priorities and accept the fact that it is OK to not get it all done. There will always be a tomorrow for growing businesses and people.

wish they could. In other cases, business costs would go up as employers would have to compete — and pay — more for the few available workers.

at 116 million in July 2012, accounting for 37 percent of Americans. “More than 11 percent (353) of the nation’s 3,143 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2012,” the Census Bureau said in a news release. The bureau expects that the minority share among the very youngest Americans will become larger than non-Hispanic whites in the next couple of years. “The population of children younger than 5 is close to becoming majority-minority nationally, standing at 49.9 percent minority in 2012,” the bureau said.

Mark McNulty is a business coach with ActionCoach Business Coaching. He can be reached at 372-7377 or mark@coachmark.biz.

Diversity continued from page 20 said the demographics of young Hoosiers make that very clear: Between 2000 and 2010, the number of non-Hispanic whites declined by nearly 100,000, but growth among the minority population under 18 more than made up for that decline. The data magnify the importance of the minority population to the state, Kinghorn said. Without the minority growth, Indiana’s population would be in decline, which would mean a smaller number of consumers, fewer taxpayers and a shrinking labor force, he said. Those trends would leave some employers without enough workers, which means they might not be able to expand as much as they

National trends

Asians also were the fastest-growing demographic in the nation, according to the Census Bureau. Kinghorn said that the growth of the Asian population across the nation was fueled primarily by international migration, while the Hispanic population grew primarily because of high birth rates. Nationally, the minority population stood

August 2013 The Business Connection 21


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Business Indicators for Bartholomew County Percent changes MAY 13/ MAY 13/ Description MAY 13 ApR 13 MAY 12 ApR 13 MAY 12 Labor Force

41,679

41,431

41,251

0.6

1.0

Household Employment

39,056

38,912

38,666

0.4

1.0

Unemployment Rate (pct)

6.3

6.1

6.3

— Center for Business and Economic Research, Ball State University 22 The Business Connection August 2013


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1400 25TH ST NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDING $100,000 BARTH CONS SCHOOL CORP/C NORTH, OWNER SOUTHERN BLEACHER COMPANY, CONTRACTOR BLEACHERS/PRESS BOX 3838 WILLIAMSBURG WAY NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDING $60,000 DOLAN, B.J./WILLIAMSBURG APTS, OWNER SKAGGS BUILDERS INC., CONTRACTOR STORAGE BLDG 2280 SF 1622 SOUTHPARK CT COMMERCIAL ADDITION $125,000 T&K RENTALS INC., OWNER MOHR,LARRY CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR UNIT C COM ADDN 3250 SF 3780 W JONATHAN MOORE PIKE COMMERCIAL TENANT UP FIT DUTRO, GEORGE, OWNER LAND CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR 4000 SF TENT/UPFIT

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS

14960 E HAWKS CT $410,000 RES/NEW KIKENDALL, RYAN, OWNER SPOON, JOEL, CONTRACTOR 1930 LAKECREST DR $173,500 NEW 3541 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 1970 LAKECREST DR $158,400 NEW 3526 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 1980 LAKECREST DR $156,800 NEW 3527 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

2358 SHADOW BEND DR $103,000 NEW RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 2116 SHADOW FOX DR $129,500 NEW 2107 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 6915 W 550 S $180,000 RES/NEW PURDUE, ERIC, OWNER EMP CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR 2444 W APPLEBLOSSOM LN $250,000 NEW RES DREES HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR 388 WESTBROOK CT $440,000 5183 SF 2-ST/GAR/BAS SPOON, JOEL, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

2636 DAFFODIL CT WEST $200,000 NEW 3634 SF RES/BMT/GAR PHILLIPS DEVELOPMENT INC.,OWNER/CONTRACTOR

2025 LAKECREST DR $165,000 NEW 3462 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

2716 DAFFODIL CT WEST $200,000 NEW 3569 SF RES/BMT/GAR PHILLIPS DEVELOPMENT INC., OWNER/CONTRACTOR

2060 LAKECREST DR $147,400 NEW 2807 SF RES/GAR BEAZER HOMES, OWNER/ CONTRACTOR

1008 WESTCREEK DR $350,000 NEW 6104 SF RES/BMT/GAR BALASUUBRAM, SRIKANTH, OWNER SMITHERMAN CONSTRUCTION, CONTRACTOR

1954 DEER CREEK CIRCLE $300,000 5180SF 2ST/GAR/BAS

2075 LAKECREST DR $164,500 NEW 3527 SF RES/GAR

4352 WESTMINSTER PL $100,000 NEW RES

SETH CHELF, DBA THRIVE SKATESHOP (RETAIL SKATEBOARD SHOP), 2525 E. ROAD 950S, COLUMBUS RYAN BROWN, DBA GO TO GUY CONSTRUCTION, 1327 SYCAMORE, COLUMBUS RICHARD DANA, DBA WT SERVICE (MACHINE SERVICE), COLUMBUS JOHN HAYDEN, DBA GODFIT (PUBLICATION), 2616 BEECH DRIVE, COLUMBUS WILLIE E. SHILLINGS JR., DBA SHILLINGS CONSTRUCTION, 14080 N. ROAD 300E, HOPE PAUL AND LISA WENDEL, DBA QUICKSIGNS (SIGN COMPANY), 1101 16TH ST., COLUMBUS DARREN W. AND PAMELA J. MOORE, DBA TANGLED WAVES (BEAUTY SALON), 1801 CENTRAL AVE., COLUMBUS KIPPER L. DORAN, DBA BIG DADDY’S DONUTS & BBQ (FOOD SERVICE), COLUMBUS TIMOTHY A. JOHNS, DBA TJ HAMMER (HANDYMAN), COLUMBUS JOHN HENRY, DBA BEE-LINE SERVICE (PLUMBING SERVICE), GREENSBURG HAROLD MASON, DBA K&B TRUCKING (HAULING), 145 S. ROAD 900W, SEYMOUR GLEN ALDEN, DBA ALDEN TRITT DESIGNS (CARBON FIBER RACING BIKE COMPONENTS), 6111 SLOAN VALLEY DRIVE, COLUMBUS JENNIFER AND LUIS GIRON, DBA GLITZ SPRAY TANNING, 726 FAIRVIEW DRIVE, COLUMBUS August 2013 The Business Connection 23


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24 The Business Connection August 2013


Business Connection August 2013