Issuu on Google+

Football 2011

Friday, August 19, 2011


2

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Loving football at all levels While it is difficult to pinpoint the precise moment the power shift occurred, it is indisputable that football is the most popular spectator sport in the United States now. There is no telling what type of withdrawal fans would have felt if the National Football League’s labor strife continued and the season was wiped out. No doubt pleas for psychological help would have increased, a demonstrable

increase in cases of nail biting would have been documented, and perhaps even a desperate resumption of cigarette smoking might have swept the country if pro football had stayed out on an extra long vacation. But not to worry. Pro football is back, and so is college football, and high school ball, too, and the best part of that is that a fan can comfortably cheer for a team at each level with no conflict of interest.

Football practice begins when the thermometer touches 95, and sometimes the season finishes when snow is flying. But if baseball, the deposed National Pastime, is the game of summer and of leisure, football is the game of autumn, when the air grows crisper, and leaves fall from the trees. The sound of baseball is the thwack of a ball soaring off a bat. The sound of football is the sound of shoulder pads banging

What's Inside East's Gunner Kiel Pages 4-6 East player photos Page 7 East roster Page 8 North's Kyle Kamman Pages 9-11 North player photos Page 12 East, North assistants Page 13-14 North roster Page 14 Tough schedules Page 15

Area schools Indianapolis Colts IU's Duwyce Wilson IU schedule, roster Purdue Notre Dame Locals at Ball State East, North favorites

Page 16 Pages 17-19 Pages 20 Page 21 Pages 22-23 Pages 24-26 Pages 27-28 Pages 31

and linemen grunting. In Columbus, the teams fans love to follow are Columbus East and Columbus North, with no game on the schedule bigger than their non-conference collision, this year scheduled for Aug. 26. College allegiances diverge, sometimes based on the alma mater, with devotion to nearby Indiana University, Purdue, Ball State, Notre Dame or a university not even located in

Indiana. The kings of the autumn are the Indianapolis Colts. Even those who root for East against North, or against East and for North, come together to support the Colts. The best any Columbus football fan can wish for is that his high school team will win state, his college team will appear in a major bowl and those Colts will win the Super Bowl. —Lew Freedman

On the Sidelines

On the Cover

Coordinator/designer Joe Gill Writers Lew Freedman, Jess Huffman, Cecil Davis Photographers Alton Strupp, Andrew Laker, Joe Harpring

Columbus North quarterback Kyle Kamman and Columbus East quarterback Gunner Kiel will lead their teams in tonight's season openers. Cover photo by The Republic's Alton Strupp


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

RENNER MOTORS

US 31, Columbus • (812) 372–1561 • (800) 467–8450 www.rennermotors.com

3


4

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

G U N N E R ALTON STRUPP | THE REPUBLIC

Senior quarterback Gunner Kiel will lead Columbus East this season. Kiel, the nation's top-ranked high school QB, will play for Indiana University next season.

K I E L

All about Gunner

Nation’s top high school QB does his best to sidestep hype BY JESS HUFFMAN jhuffman@therepublic.com Hungry, hungry teenagers, as big as buffalo, rumble the walls of Aleta Kiel’s kitchen on Tuesdays throughout the high school football season, searching for the source of the smell of spaghetti and chicken tetrazzini. They chug milkshakes, wipe their chocolate mustaches and let out hearty laughs. “Whatever they want, I’ll fix it for them,” Kiel said. Kiel feeds the Columbus East offensive linemen and keeps them healthy, heavy and happy. It’s important to Kiel. The East linemen protect her son’s back. “It’s fun to see them eat and hear them talk and laugh,” Kiel said. “I think they’ve been very supportive of Gunner, and he has been so back

“It’s fun to see them eat and hear them talk and laugh. I think they’ve been very supportive of Gunner, and he has been so back to them.” – Aleta Kiel, Gunner Kiel’s mother to them.” Gunner Kiel’s rocket arm and level head attracted college coaches to Columbus from the biggest of big-time college football programs, seeking the services of the quarterback most recruiters tabbed as the best in the nation. The last of three boys in the Kiel family, Gunner spent the months after his junior season weighing options, visiting campuses and trying to stay humble, talking team-first and sidestepping the spotlight as he would an

opposing linebacker. When the time felt right, he chose to follow in the footsteps of his older brother Dusty and commit to Indiana University. “It’s not really known as a really big program right now,” Gunner said, “but I feel it will be.” Some gasped when Gunner turned down offers from the likes of Alabama, Oklahoma and Notre Dame to attend Indiana, a basketball school with a football team. Gunner smiled back at them. “It feels really great now,” he

said after East’s first official practice on Aug. 1. “I sleep a lot better knowing that I’m going to be going to Indiana.”

Recruiting madness Before there was calm, there was a storm. Gunner popped up on recruiters’ radar his sophomore season when he took the reins of the East offense from Dusty, who inherited the quarterback role from their oldest brother, Drew. Purdue offered a scholarship first, then Indiana and Iowa. “Whenever that happened, it was kind of surreal for me,” Gunner said. “I didn’t think that could really be happening for me. But

See KIEL on Page 5


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Earn cash with our CashBack Checking. And by “earn,” we mean simply handing your debit card to the cashier.

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTO

Columbus East quarterback Gunner Kiel looks for a passing outlet during the Olympians' game last season against Jennings County .

KIEL

Continued from Page 4 whenever it did, it just kind of exploded and it just kind of got bigger and bigger.” Offers began pouring in after Gunner passed for 2,645 yards and 36 touchdowns vs. six interceptions as a junior, leading the Olympians to a 9-2 record in 2010. Some of the most prestigious programs in all of football wanted Gunner as their gunslinger, including USC, Florida and Tennessee. Recruiting websites such as rivals. com and scout.com rated Gunner the top high school quarterback in the class of 2012. Reporters began calling, asking which direction Gunner was leaning, but he gave few details until choosing his path. “I tried to have fun with it,” he said. “I wasn’t really a big interview guy. I stayed very low key and just stuck to myself. My family and I were very close.” Gunner had good role models. He watched his brothers handle the recruiting game and waited for his turn to play. But neither Drew nor Dusty experienced anything like Gunner Mania. Columbus hadn’t seen a recruit like Gunner since Gunner’s uncle, Blair Kiel, was a top-rated East quarterback in the late 1970s. Blair later started four years

at Notre Dame and went on to play in the NFL. “As far as the recruiting madness goes, I think it’s different now just because you’ve got the Internet,” said Kip Kiel, Gunner’s father and Blair’s brother. “People can find these kids. And, plus, they’re finding these kids at such a young age now.” Gunner whittled his list of potential destinations to four schools: Oklahoma, Alabama, Missouri and Indiana. He liked Missouri’s spread offense and the winning traditions associated with Alabama and Oklahoma. Indiana offered familiarity and a promising new leader, Kevin Wilson, who coached Heisman Trophy-winning quarterbacks Jason White and Sam Bradford at Oklahoma. “As it got down closer and closer to the decision, it started getting pretty stressful,” Gunner said. “It started getting pretty heated … my mind started going crazy.” Even Gunner’s teammates were being recruited — as recruiters. Rob McKee was at a wrestling tournament in Florida when an Alabama wrestling coach asked the junior center to “put in a good word.” Sophomore left tackle Evan Kuhn

See KIEL on Page 6

EARN 5¢ ON ALL DEBIT CARD TRANSACTIONS Stop by a branch or go online to sign up for CashBack Checking today.

Member FDIC. $100 initial deposit required. For each debit card purchase transaction of $1 or more posted to an account during a qualifying period*, you will receive $.05 cash back. To obtain the cash back and avoid a $6 monthly non-qualification fee, you must have one ACH debit or credit and one debit card purchase transaction post to your account during the qualifying period* and receive an electronic statement. *The qualifying period ends the last business day before your statement period ends. Ask for details. ATM transactions not included.

5


6

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

KIEL

Continued from Page 5 heard the same thing when he attended a football camp in Knoxville, Tenn., home of the Volunteers. “One of the conditioning coaches came up to me and said, ‘You go to East?” Kuhn said. “I was like, ‘Yeah.’’ “He goes, ‘We’ve been on (Gunner) … put in a good word about me.’” Though no one is claiming harm or foul, the recruiting process was overwhelming at times. East coach Bob Gaddis said he hasn’t seen anything like it in his 31 years of coaching. “I felt for him at times,” Gaddis said. “He would come in the office and you could tell he wasn’t sleeping.” When Gunner Kiel stepped on campus, he entered locker rooms where coaches made him feel part of the team. There were jerseys with Gunner’s number and lockers with his name above them. Schools made Gunner feel as though he had his own star in Hollywood. “That’s what made my decision so much harder than it was,” Gunner said. “I’d go and try to visit these places and they’d roll out the red carpet for me, and it would just be hard to settle down. … I’d be like, ‘Wow, this is awesome. This is where I want to go.’” Eventually, Gunner stopped visiting campuses. He wanted to make his decision before his senior season to avoid distracting his high school team.

“As far as the recruiting madness goes, I think it’s different now, just because you’ve got the Internet. People can find these kids.” – Kip Kiel, Gunner’s father He narrowed his options to two — Alabama and Indiana — and chose schools to fight for David rather than Goliath. Some called it a recruiting upset. Others were just upset. Gunner was relieved. “I feel great,” he said. “I feel outstanding about my decision, and I’m 100 percent.”

On the Hoosiers Critics can’t understand why Gunner chose Indiana, particularly because they think it sets up an impending quarterback battle between siblings. The Kiel family doesn’t see it that way. “(Gunner’s) not even close to being able to play at that level,” Kip said. “People say he’s going to come in and play as a freshman. No he’s not. When people say that, they’ve got no clue. He’s going to sit and

wait. He is, and that’s fine.” Growing up, the youngest Kiel thrower idolized his brothers, first watching Drew become a high school star. Drew later played for Illinois State and plans to enroll in graduate school to study physical therapy in 2012. Dusty developed into more of a speedy, dual-threat quarterback, dissecting defenses with his accurate arm and fast feet. He’s approaching his red-shirt sophomore season at Indiana, where he’s hoping to be the starting quarterback. “They inspired me to be better,” Gunner said of his brothers. “They definitely raised the bar high for me, and I’m still trying to reach that bar. I mean, some people say I’m over that bar, but I still think I have a lot to work on.” Even so, Gunner won’t rule out the idea of starting as a freshman. He understands his father’s perspective — and agrees with it to a certain extent — but sees another scenario as a possibility. “If I go in, have a strong spring and beat out my brother, and they’re going to ask me to take the spot,” he said, “of course I’m going to take it. “But it would be good to sit for a year or two and watch my brother and learn the offense.”

One to go with O’s Before Gunner takes a snap for the

Hoosiers, he’s got a season to play for the Olympians. When East practices start, talk of Gunner stops. It’s all about the team. “I haven’t heard anyone say anything about it when we’re on the field,” Gaddis said. “I always think if you’re going to hear something like that it would be in the locker room. And they’re going to jab each other in the locker room anyway.” After the first official practice, Gunner pulled his offensive lineman along to do interviews with him. He wanted to share the attention. After Saturday workouts, Gunner gathers a group of teammates and they adjourn to Bob Evans. His mother’s weekly dinners for the offensive line began Tuesday and will continue until the season ends. There seems to be no doubt Kiel is ensuring his blockers will be well fed. “They’re always protecting me,” Gunner said. “They don’t always get the credit they deserve. But I’m always going to have their backs, and they’re always going to have mine.” That’s what good teammates do. They work together. Not just in football. “There’s a lot bigger things in this world than football,” Aleta said. “It’s great and we love it, but them being good people, being good citizens, that’s more important.”

Train with the BEST!

Frasier Chiropractic

$100 OFF

Pain Solutions for the 21st Century

E E F T N E M L L O R EN

. T C O r o . T P E S R FO

AND SPORTS CLINIC

Don’t Wait Until

You’re On The Sideline with pain and suffering from injuries or surgery. Call for a FREE consultation!

We now offer various massages from Leah Sneed.

Maximum Velocity Performance 3490 Commerce Dr • Columbus • 812.373.9880 www.columbusmvp.net

She has over 5 years of working experience in chiropractic clinics. We offer deep tissue, therapeutic, sports and injury-related massages. 3200 Sycamore Ct #1D • Columbus • 812.373.9880 www.frasierchiropractic.com


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Meet the Columbus East Olympians 4

3

2

ERIC OLDS

LUKE HAMPTON

12

15

ZACH DAY

28

ANDREW WILSON

BRIAN WICHMAN

41

CHRISTIAN WICHMAN

TRENT WESTMEYER

56

57

68

CHAD MINOR

JOSEPH FRASER

AARON WALTON

78

79

BAYLEN BURTON

JOHN BUSACK

CAMERON HANNER

JOHN STEPHENS

81

CODY HEMPSTEAD

64

EVAN ELSBURY

83

MATT RUCH

EVAN KUHN

84

AUSTIN GIBSON

ROB MCKEE

87

ERICSON ROSADO

TRACE HACKER

CLAYTON FERGUSON

67

DERRICK JENKINS

KIAN GERAGHTY

77

JARED WHITESIDE

ZACH LAWSON

92

BROCK PATTERSON

DONOVIN WHEELER

55

BEN TURNER

76

LOGAN GALARNO

37

66

SETH FROWNFELTER

75

TEVIN SMITH

54

NICK BOWER

GUNNER KIEL

24

36

65

DAVID TOOLEY

74

JESSE MEEK

JASON KIMMETT

53

MAX FISCHER

KALEB HORN

23

RYAN LEFFLER

52

COLE OLIBO

73

72

PAUL BAKER

CALEB MALEY

DAVID JOHNSON

35

34

11

10

22

KELLEN OTTO

RYAN TAYLOR

63

DALTON BATEMAN

GEORGE MACY

21

51

62

JORDAN PATTERSON

JACOB HAMPTON

33

50

JACOB COOK

AD MCCORMICK

DANIEL TOOLEY

THOMAS SMITH

9

8

20

32

PATRICK O'CONNOR

71

70

EDWARD MEAD

Not pictured: Jordan Miller

JT VOELKER

61

58

ALEX COWAN

18

44

42

CODY EDWARDS

SEAN OWENS

31

CJ WEBER

MARKELL JONES

7

6

17

29

38

JACOB CASH

JEREMY MINOR

16

CHASE BANISTER

26

5

7

BOB GADDIS HEAD COACH


8

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Columbus East roster

NO 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 24 26 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 41 42 44 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

NAME Eric Olds Luke Hampton Jeremy Minor Sean Owens Alex Cowan Jacob Hampton George Macy David Johnson Kaleb Horn Gunner Kiel Zach Day Chase Banister Brian Wichman JT Voelker Thomas Smith Ryan Taylor Kellen Otto Jason Kimmett Tevin Smith Logan Galarno Andrew Wilson Markell Jones C.J. Weber Patrick O’Connor John Busack Caleb Maley Paul Baker Ryan Leffler Trace Hacker Donovin Wheeler Christian Wichman Trent Westmeyer Chad Minor Jacob Cook Cameron Hanner Cole Olibo Max Fischer Nick Bower Ben Turner Clayton Ferguson Jacob Cash

CL 12 12 12 10 10 10 12 11 10 12 10 10 11 10 10 11 12 10 11 10 12 9 11 10 10 12 10 12 11 11 10 10 12 12 12 12 12 10 12 11 12

HT 6-1 6-0 6-0 5-11 5-8 5-11 6-0 5-8 6-0 6-4 5-10 5-10 5-11 6-1 6-2 5-6 6-1 5-10 5-9 5-11 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-9 6-0 6-1 5-10 5-10 5-10 5-7 5-7 5-11 6-0 5-10 5-11 6-2 5-9 5-6 5-7 5-8 5-8

WT 185 165 165 160 160 160 180 175 165 215 250 140 155 165 170 160 185 145 155 160 205 185 155 140 190 195 160 190 155 170 150 140 205 170 180 215 205 170 190 200 185

POS DB WR DB DB R/QB R/DB R/K RB/DE R/DB QB R/DB R/DB DB R QB DB R/P R/DB R/DB LB RB RB/LB LB R/DB LB LB K/P DE/LB DE/LB R/LB RB/LB R/DB DE DB DE DT LB LB OL DE DT

WE REALLY DO SELL FOR LESS! THAT’S WHY WE’RE THE AREA’S #1 VOLUME DEALER! SERVICE MON – FRI 7:30 AM – 6 PM SAT 8 AM – NOON CLOSED SUN

SALES MON, FRI 8:30 AM – 7 PM TUES, WED, THURS 8:30 AM – 6 PM SAT 8:30 AM – 5 PM 3020 North National Road, Columbus 812-372-2575 • 800-571-2575 • www.bobpoynterjeep.com

57 58 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 81 83 84 87 92

Cody Edwards Joe Frazier Jordan Miller Jordan Patterson Dalton Bateman Evan Elsbury Donald Tooley Seth Frownfelter Derrick Jenkins Kian Geraghty Edward Mead Aaron Walton AD McCormick John Stephens Jesse Meek Evan Kuhn Rob McKee Jared Whiteside Zach Lawson Baylen Burton Daniel Tooley Cody Hempstead Matt Ruch Austin Gibson Ericson Rosado Brock Patterson

11 10 10 12 10 12 12 10 10 10 12 10 12 11 11 10 11 10 10 10 10 11 12 11 11 10

5-8 5-9 6-0 6-2 6-0 6-1 5-11 5-10 5-10 6-0 5-8 6-1 6-2 6-2 5-10 6-2 6-4 6-2 6-0 5-11 5-10 6-2 6-0 5-9 6-0 6-1

205 175 195 195 230 230 185 190 175 185 185 175 200 285 175 220 265 215 220 310 310 180 155 155 170 215

OL/LB OL/DL OL/DL OL DT OL OL OL OL/DL OL/DL DT OL/DL OL/DL OL OL/DL OL OL OL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL R R DE DB OL/DE

Still Dreaming of having a Itʼs not too late to make that dream come true!

5780 25th Street (812) 372-7983 Mon-Fri 9-6 Saturday 9 -2

pool?


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

9

K Y L E K A M M A N

ALTON STRUPP | THE REPUBLIC

Columbus North senior quarterback Kyle Kamman is looking forward to the season after transforming himself into a much more salable college prospect.

Really big deal North QB Kamman thinks big, gets big, thinks even bigger BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com When they were just kids playing PAAL football, Kyle Kamman and Gunner Kiel slammed into each other over and over again so hard blocking and tackling in drills that it brought tears to their eyes. Their fathers were their coaches, and their fathers kept asking more out of them. They wouldn’t let them quit, and neither would their pride. “We would literally just ram heads,” Kamman said. “We were just crying hysterically.” By third grade football toughness had entered their souls. But no one, not the dads, not the best friends, could envision the future that they are living today.

On the cusp of the 2011 football season, Kiel is the starting quarterback for Columbus East and Kamman is the starting quarterback for chief rival Columbus North. It wasn’t supposed to work out this way. Everyone knew that Kiel was going to follow his brothers as a signal-caller for the Olympians. But until the end of middle school, it seemed certain that Kamman would be a teammate, the key wide receiver. They were buds, and they were going to play together forever—until Kamman decided his destiny was as a quarterback, too. Kiel’s directional arrow took him to East, where he has evolved into the No. 1 rated high school quarterback in the country and has committed to play college ball for

Indiana University. Kamman’s path led him to North, where he is entering his second season as the starter and nursing the goal of playing major college football that might be harder for him to attain. What Kamman has done after intense self-assessment since the end of North’s 2010 season is transform himself into a much more salable model for colleges than he was a year ago. His insatiable appetite for work, his analysis of his skills and what he needs to do to get noticed, and his determination to play football at the next level leave him poised to demonstrate that he is far more valuable than just “the other” quarterback in Columbus.

“I’m a dreamer,” Kamman said. “Honestly, I see myself playing Division I.”

The need to win The kid always had fire. Kamman was a terror at family Monopoly games. When his dad, Doug, mother, Paula, and older sisters, Jenny and Ashley, gathered around the table he felt winning was his birthright. If things were not going his way he walked away from the table, and was just as likely to throw a hotel built on Boardwalk across the room as he was to smile gracefully in defeat. He was like that in everything, sports for sure, but he was the only kid in his class who thought losing

See KAMMAN on Page 10


10

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

KAMMAN Continued from Page 9

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTO

Columbus North quarterback Kyle Kamman, shown last season, has worked hard in the offseason to gain weight and strength,.

That Special Touch bridal boutique

Prom, Bridal & Special Occasion Dresses | Tuxedos | Accessories

544 Washington Street, Columbus 812.375.2223 | www.specialtouchbride.com

was a four-letter word and that he had it spelled correctly. “It’s one of my faults,” Kamman said, “being so competitive. I don’t know what ticks inside me. I can control that now.” Kamman is 18 and the difference is using the competitiveness as an asset in football, or basketball, where he is the North point guard, and not feeling the need to rip the board in half if he loses a game of no consequence. The youngest of three siblings and the only boy, he hoped for a brother to play with. “I kept telling my mother, ‘I want a brother,’” he said. Instead he and Kiel developed a brother-like bond. When Kamman and Kiel got together for play or for sleepovers, it was usually at Kiel’s house because there was more action. Kiel had two older brothers, Drew and Dusty (who also became college quarterbacks), and with their friends around there were always Wiffle ball games and pickup this and that going on. “We were always super tight,” said Kiel. Doug Kamman and Gunner’s father, Kip Kiel, were hard on the youthful players and they didn’t appreciate it. “It didn’t feel good at the time,” Gunner Kiel said. But now Kamman is grateful for the hard knocks. “I give credit to my dad,” Kamman said. “He was extremely hard on us. And Mr. Kiel.” Kamman is one of those athletes who pretty much came out of the womb with a ball in his hand. His memory refuses to carry back to a time when he wasn’t throwing a football or basketball. He recalls as a toddler using rolled-up socks on a kids’ hoop. Socks? “That was so he wouldn’t break anything in the house,” said Kamman’s father. “He did take to it early. I can remember a few PAAL practices where they went at it pretty hard.” And yes, said Doug Kamman, his boy’s competitive fervor was off the charts.

“It’s one of my faults, being so competitive. I don’t know what ticks inside me. I can control that now.” – Kyle Kamman “He definitely didn’t like to get beat,” Doug Kamman said “But he’s better at accepting it.” More than just friends, Kamman and Kiel were partners for several years, Kamman catching passes that Kiel threw. But Kamman got his share of quarterback time on playgrounds and liked it better than receiving, realizing the position suited him, and he embraced pressure. “There was something about all of those guys looking to you to pull them through,” Kamman said. “I always wanted to be the guy. I thrived on it. I loved it.” For years it was Kyle and Gunner, Gunner and Kyle. Then after eighth grade Kamman decided he wanted to play quarterback badly enough to attend North. “I really thought we were going to be together,” Kiel said. “I really thought he was going to come to East.” When the choice was made under Columbus’ open enrollment system, Kamman and Kiel joked about how four years later wouldn’t it be weird if they were standing on the 50-yard-line shaking hands before an East-North rivalry game. Now that should happen Aug. 26, and the game will be nationally televised on ESPNU. “It’s incredible,” Kamman said.

Hot to improve When Kamman was a sophomore he was as cocky as Chad Ochocinco. He thought he should start at QB. Coach Tim

See KAMMAN on Page 11

Proud Supporters of High School Football!

23rd & Hawcreek • Columbus • 372-0261 • www.FrankAndersonTire.com


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

11

THE

MAN THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTO

EVENT

Columbus North quarterback Kyle Kamman looks downfield to pass last season.

KAMMAN

Continued from Page 10 Bless did not. Now Kamman recognizes the boss made the right call. “I was such a small kid,” he said. “I probably weighed 135 pounds. I could have gotten hurt.” By his junior year, the 6-foot-2 Kamman weighed 165, a bit more respectable, if not in Refrigerator Perry’s class. Last year, on a team with 27 seniors, Kamman was the voice in the huddle and the thrower in the pocket behind an offensive line that wouldn’t let a drop of water through a hole in a dam. In a 7-4 season limited by an epidemic of injuries, Kamman completed 124 of 213 attempts for 19 touchdowns with only five interceptions while running rarely for 51 yards. “Last year I was a pocket passer. I think I’ll have to make more plays with my feet this year,” Kamman said. “I want to be more of a dual threat.” This summer the quarterback was proactive, rounding up receivers to run routes. Senior Christian Williams, a veteran pass-catcher, said Kamman was on his frequent caller list. “He’d call and say, ‘Hey, you want to come throw?’” said Williams. They have been pals since PAAL, too, and have almost mental telepathy on the field. “He just makes eye contact,” Williams said, “and I know what he’s going to do. He knows what he’s doing.” Just ask Bless. “He just has such a rare combination of leadership, competitiveness and talent,” Bless said of Kamman. “He’s a floor general in the winter and he’s a field general in the fall. The ‘it’ factor, he’s got it. The thing about Kyle as a passer is his intelligence. He knows when to throw the football and where.” One thing Kamman did more often than throw recently was eat. From the end of the basketball season when he dropped to 155 pounds, until Aug. 1 practice began, he was on a 7,000-caloriea-day diet. “I was eating every second I was awake,” Kamman said. Downing chicken, tuna and eggs, and drinking four protein shakes a day — banana and chocolate are his favorite flavors — Kamman combined nutrition

and weightlifting to reach 180 pounds. He looks bigger and in a sleeveless jersey appears tan and fit. “Size is important,” said Doug Kamman. “He knew he was teetering between being too small (for major college play). I looked at it that he was going about it the right way.” Kamman makes time for bass fishing and reading books about quarterbacks such as Tim Tebow and Drew Brees, and he has a passion for movies. He is an A-plus student, with a 4.1 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale. A disciple of the Indianapolis Colts’ future Hall of Famer Peyton Manning, Kamman said he admires Manning’s brains more than his arm. “I knew I wasn’t going to be the biggest or the fastest,” Kamman said. “I knew if I could be more intelligent than everybody else on the field it would give me an edge.” Smarts can be a recruiting plus, as well. Kamman believes he can play for NCAA D-I schools like Northwestern, Vanderbilt or Boston College, top academic schools where he would major in business. Kamman said he is happy for Kiel, who was pursued by national powers and snowed by national attention and who gives him recruiting tips. “That kid deserves it,” Kamman said. But he still harbors some “Hey, what about me?” feelings. “I didn’t prove all I wanted to prove last year. I hope I can prove that’s me this year.” North has a high-profile opener against Carmel and that ESPN game vs. East and later plays in the Horseshoe Classic at Lucas Oil Stadium. If the spotlight equals opportunity, Kamman knows he has chances to shine in front of college coaches. Many have written him letters, but he knows they covet bigger guys with fancier resumes, and they will only offer a scholarship if he can glitter on the biggest stages. Kamman believes with all of the heart that he has put into the game that he will get the chance to play at the right bigtime school. “I pray every night that I can,” he said.

Sponsored by:

Events plann ed for HIM !

Noon

Jimmie Johns Gargantuan Eating Challe Watch him stu nge ff his face with the best Who can eat 3 sandwiches th subs in town! e fastest?

1-3 pm

Indianapolis Co lts Cheerleaders Photo/Autogra ph Session

Bring your ca mera! He’ll REAL Indianap love his picture taken with olis Colts Chee a rleader

4 pm BufEafatinglo WCildon Wings test

See if he can ea t Blazin Wings

without cryin

g like a girl!

Myers Funeral Service

B Skinny Coffee Bradbury’s Pools & Spas Buffalo Wild Wings Columbus Clinic of Chiropractic Cummings Lighting & Design Cutting Edge Sporting Goods Dave’s Farm Service Family Chiropractic & Wellness Fields Outdoor Adventures, LLP Frasier Chiropractic & MVP Sports Greemann’s Furniture Jimmy John’s Max Henry M.D MK Skin Care Peddler Firearms Tipton Lakes Athletic Club

Terril Pettit, GM Funeral Director

Ron Shadley Funeral Director

Rich Rudder Funeral Director

“COMMITTED TO OUR COMMUNITY” We support the Youth of Columbus!

Good Luck to Columbus East and Columbus North’s Football Winning Teams!

Hathaway-Myers Chapel 1022 Pearl Street Columbus, IN 47201 379-4419

The Columbus Crematory The Only Crematory in Columbus 372-2828

www.hathaway-myers.com

Myers-Reed Chapel 3729 25th Street Columbus, IN 47203 376-3341

www.myers-reed.com


12

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Meet the Columbus North Bull Dogs 3

2

1

ROBERT BOOTH

11

JONATHAN BYERS

ZEKE GOMEZ

12

NICK OLIVER

23

MICHAEL VOGEL

25

24

JOSH HOLT

35

41

38

DARIAN VEDADI

JARED NEWKIRK

DARRION HOLLOWAY

55

28

JACOB LASHLEY

LUIS CAMBRON

63

ELI TEAGUE

76

THOMAS SHOAF

66

MCKINLEY ROYALTY

79

ANDREW JONES

57

80

ETHAN BROWN

ZACH HOLT

82

LUKE MINNIEAR

87

21

ALEC FRIEND

ALEX CORNN

33

JUSTIN SKIRVIN

52

MATTHEW MAHONEY

72

70

CALEB HAWES

JERMAINE JONES

59

TAYLOR SUMMA

MIKE NIELSEN

32

51

MASON ROBERTS

MICHAEL DEDOMENIC

ZAK RUEHMAN

JASET WELLS

SOLOMON KNIGHT

61

ANDREW MILLSPAUGH

73

CHASE CHAPMAN

53

ROARKE MOODY

60

RANDALL ROTHROCK

75

TYLER COMBS

93

Not pictured: Neal Shaw (19), Kenny King (62) EZRA FOLLOWELL

LOGAN LUNSFORD

JADEN WILSON

CHRISTIAN WILLIAMS

DEONTA DISMUKE

TREVOR SHUTTERS

10

9

20

31

ANDREW EASTON

58

TYSON CLARK

67

TRACE FETTERER

44

CONNER MARSHALL

KYLE KAMMAN

18

29

43

JOEY GERTH

56

17

SKYLER FARMER

8

7

LUKE TEAGUE

16

42

MASON NEWKIRK

C.J. DENNIS

JOSEPH GEDEON

26

SHANNON MCDONALD

6

5

15

13

JAMAAL HALLIBURTON

COREY BLAND

4

TIM BLESS HEAD COACH

SHAQUILLE ASH

22

JESSE TOMPKINS

34

AUSTIN SIZEMORE

54

JACOB BARNETT


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

E D D I E

A A R O Valuable commodities N ALTON STRUPP | THE REPUBLIC

Columbus East defensive coach Eddie Vogel instructs some of his players during practice.

East’s Vogel, North’s Karrer among assistant coaches whose contributions to their teams can’t be measured BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com

V O G E L

The football equivalent of Tammy Wynette’s song “Stand By Your Man” is being an assistant coach. Above all, loyalty to the front man of the program is what counts. He will take the glory and the heat being in the spotlight, but everyone who knows anything about the game knows that the boss couldn’t make his team function as well as it does without backup. Sometimes it seems as if there are as many men in street clothes on the sidelines as there are players wearing numbers, but every assistant coach has a

specialty and if everything is meshing as smoothly as a fine-tuned engine then each one has a well-defined role and has the delegated authority to carry it out. “I don’t think they (fans) understand how valuable they are,” said Columbus East coach Bob Gaddis of assistant coaches. The Olympians’ defensive coordinator is Eddie Vogel, who has been coaching at East with Gaddis since 2002, but also worked for him in Evansville 17 years ago. “He’s got a lot of responsibilities for our staff,” Gaddis said. “I’m going to do some defensive preparation, but I trust

him to do that so I don’t have to get too involved in that.” In that way, Vogel is Gaddis’ righthand man. Similarly, Columbus North coach Tim Bless has come to rely on the expertise of Aaron Karrer, who has been on his staff since Bless arrived in Columbus in 2000. Bless boasts about Karrer’s know-how in developing tough offensive lines. “He is as fine an offensive line coach as you will find in Indiana,” Bless said. Vogel? Karrer? Not the best-known names in Columbus football, but key components in how East and North fare

See ASSISTANTS on Page 14

ALTON STRUPP | THE REPUBLIC

North assistant coach Aaron Karrer oversees a drill during the Bull Dogs’ first official practice.

K A R R E R

13


14

NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 28 29 31 32 33 34

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Columbus North roster

NAME Robert Booth Zeke Gomez Jonathan Byers Joseph Gedeon C.J. Dennis Luke Teague Kyle Kamman Mike Nielsen Taylor Summa Shaquille Ash Nick Oliver Jamaal Halliburton Michael Vogel Darrion Holloway Skyler Farmer Trace Fetterer Zak Ruehman Neal Shaw Alex Cornn Alec Friend Jesse Tompkins Corey Bland Josh Holt Shannon McDonald Jacob Lashley Andrew Jones Andrew Easton Jermaine Jones Justin Skirvin Chase Chapman Austin Sizemore

CL 10 11 9 11 12 10 12 10 11 11 12 11 10 11 11 12 11 10 11 12 11 12 9 11 10 10 11 11 11 10 12

HT 5-9 5-4 5-10 5-11 6-0 6-0 6-1 5-9 6-0 5-10 5-10 5-8 5-11 5-8 6-1 5-9 6-0 5-4 5-8 6-1 5-8 N/A 5-10 5-8 5-11 5-7 5-7 5-9 6-1 5-8 5-11

WT 155 140 180 140 200 190 180 165 185 185 170 185 190 145 195 180 215 135 150 180 175 N/A 175 185 145 155 185 160 175 145 195

POS WR/DB DB RB/LB K/P HB/LB HB/LB QB DB WR/DB WR/DB DB RB/DB QB DB TE WR/DB FB/LB WR WR/DB DB RB/DB HB/LB RB/LB HB WR RB/DB LB DB DE RB/LB HB/LB

35 38 41 42 43 44 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 66 67 70 72 73 75 76 79 80 82 87 93

Darian Vedadi Jared Newkirk Mason Newkirk Joey Gerth Conner Marshall Mason Roberts Matthew Mahoney Roarke Moody Solomon Knight Jacob Barnett Luis Cambron Thomas Shoaf Tyson Clark Michael DeDomenic Ethan Brown Andrew Millspaugh Randall Rothrock Kenny King Eli Teague McKinley Royalty Caleb Hawes Zach Holt Luke Minniear Jaset Wells Tyler Combs Ezra Followell Logan Lunsford Jaden Wilson Christian Williams Deonta Dismuke Trevor Shutters

10 10 10 10 11 12 12 10 11 10 11 11 10 12 11 12 10 10 12 10 9 12 12 10 10 9 10 11 12 12 10

5-10 6-1 6-1 5-10 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-9 6-0 5-11 6-0 6-5 6-1 5-10 6-4 6-1 5-10 5-9 5-8 5-9 6-2 5-11 5-10 6-0 6-5 6-1 6-0 6-1 6-1 6-4 6-5

200 165 155 170 195 190 240 190 260 225 230 235 260 225 255 200 180 260 195 205 235 205 215 255 295 230 295 160 190 260 255

DL TE WR DE LB TE DL LB DL DL OL OL/DL OL/DL OL/DL OL OL DL OL OL OL OL/DL DL OL OL OL OL/DL OL WR WR DL DL

ASSISTANTS Continued from Page 13

on the scoreboard, how the head coaches are perceived, and how the players perform. Before he came to Columbus, Gaddis, who has been coaching high school football for 31 years in Indiana, was the head coach at Evansville Rice. Vogel, 39, is from Evansville and after high school played ball at the University of Evansville. When he graduated he wanted to stay in the game and Gaddis offered him a low-on-the-coaching chart assistant’s job handling the junior varsity and defensive backs, his own position as a collegian. “I just wanted to get a taste of it,” Vogel said. “Football had been such a big part of me. I had been playing since I was eight years old. I wouldn’t know what it would be like for me not to have football. I was not ready to give up football.” Later, by the time Gaddis was filling out his staff at East, Vogel had been a head coach in Evansville, but was seeking a change.

“Tim lets me coach the offensive line. He is good at instilling the common goal, but he lets us (assistants) do the things we need to do to carry out that goal.” – North assistant coach Aaron Karrer “Bob and I stayed in touch,” Vogel said. “I said to him, ‘Hey, if you get any openings…’” In 2002 that opening appeared and Vogel has been in Columbus ever since. “It’s nice to have his confidence,” Vogel said. “One of the things I can say about Bob is he lets his coaches coach. He doesn’t micromanage.” Vogel, the father of two small children, is head of the math department at East, so he is plenty busy without football. But he still loves the sport. He said he enjoys game preparation the most, more than he did being the face of a program. “I’m just kind of happy doing what I’m

doing,” Vogel said compared to being a head coach. “It was nice coming back to just coach.” Unlike the Gaddis-Vogel connection, Bless did not know Karrer before he applied to become an assistant coach. “I put out feelers,” Bless said of Karrer’s hiring at the start of the decade. Karrer is a Columbus North graduate—currently he is one of the school’s deans of students—and had coached middle school football in town. What began as a blind partnership has evolved into long-term cooperation. “Aaron loves being able to coach and not worry about administration,” Bless

said. “He embraces that role. He takes great pride in his craft. His passion is working with young players.” Agreeing with Vogel, Karrer said he feels his head coach trusts his instincts and background to make the right decisions with the players directly under his influence. “Tim lets me coach the offensive line,” Karrer said. “He is good at instilling the common goal, but he lets us (assistants) do the things we need to do to carry out that goal.” Karrer, 37, a one-time offensive tackle for North and Indiana State, said football provided life lessons for him in terms of building character and made him a better individual and he likes to impart such information to new generations of high school players. “In high school, you’re coached by teachers,” Karrer said. “Our job is to deal with the whole person. In-between the lines we’re still educators. I love it.”


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

“Without a doubt this is the most exciting season I’ve been part of. Carmel, our rival on national TV, then Lucas Oil Stadium. It’s phenomenal.”

15

“What I’ve always liked about 4A is the chance of playing someone unfamiliar is a lot better. We like that because you’re preparing for someone new ...”

– Columbus North coach Tim Bless

– Columbus East coach Bob Gaddis

It’s all about the schedule North’s ‘phenomenal,’ ‘awesome’; East ‘pumped’ for TV game vs. Bull Dogs BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com If there is a high school football team in the nation that has a juicier schedule this season than Columbus North, let it issue a challenge. Not only do the Bull Dogs open against perennial Indiana power Carmel, a new entry on their schedule, but North meets rival Columbus East on ESPNU next week and is one of the fortunate teams to be invited to play in the Horseshoe Classic at Lucas Oil Stadium this fall. “Without a doubt this is the most exciting season I’ve been part of,” said North coach Tim Bless. “Carmel, our rival on national TV, then Lucas Oil Stadium. It’s phenomenal.” Bless won’t find any disagreement among his players. “It’s awesome,” said senior lineman Deonta Dismuke and he would like to hear about it if any other high school can claim to have a more entertaining schedule. “I don’t think so.” Columbus East has its own special things to look forward to this year, with the traditional Aug. 26 match-up with North topping the list in the national TV showing. Also, the Olympians have been reclassified by the IHSAA from 5A to 4A, the division they used to play in, so the squad will see different teams in the postseason playoffs than they have recently. Bless said that the Bull Dogs, who remain in 5A, have been working toward adding Carmel to the non-conference portion of the schedule for two years. “It was something we were always interested in,” said Bless of the game that will be played in Columbus to open the season at 7 p.m. today. Carmel has won three state crowns and been runner-up three times since 5A was introduced in 1985. The Horseshoe Classic will pit North against Conference Indiana opponent Lawrence Central, Sept. 17, giving local high school players a chance to compete where the Indianapolis Colts play. That was supposed to be a North home game, but the chance to play at the Dome was irresistible. “What a great opportunity for high school kids to play in that environment,”

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTO

Columbus North linebacker Austin Sizemore (34) chases a Lawrence Central ball carrier during their 2010 Conference Indiana game. Bless said. East opens the regular season tonight at 7 p.m. at Greenwood, a regular opponent in recent years, but not in the future. Olympians coach Bob Gaddis said Greenwood wanted a change, and in 2012 East will open against Bloomington North instead. Gaddis said being back in 4A means there is a good chance the Olympians will not meet one of the teams it faces during the regular season once sectionals begin. “What I’ve always liked about 4A is the chance of playing someone unfamiliar is a lot better,” he said. “We like that

because you’re preparing for someone new. We’re competitive.” Possible teams that East could see in sectionals that aren’t on the regular-season schedule are Franklin County, South Dearborn, Shelbyville, New Castle or Connersville, he said. Not much can top the annual rivalry game with North, however, and having it televised nationally will be an unforgettable bonus. “I don’t think they (fans elsewhere) know how good Indiana football is,” Gaddis said. “It’s exciting that we got chosen. They will see that Indiana has

good football and that Columbus has good football.” East players and North players had the same kind of reactions when they learned they were going to be playing in a TV game. “I was just really pumped up,” said East running back Andrew Wilson. “It’s an extra boost. I feel very lucky.” Olympian receiver Luke Hampton said being one of only a small number of high schools playing football on TV will be something special. “It will definitely be a cool experience,” Hampton said.


16

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Jennings hooked on Bass

A R E A T E A M S

Running back, already holder of all school records, back for finale BY CECIL DAVIS cdavis@therepublic.com Outside of the city of Columbus, perhaps no other area high school football player is talked about more than Jennings County’s Iyan Bass. And for good reason. “Iyan owns every single season and career rushing record in school history,” said Panthers coach Scott Buening. “And we’ve got him one more year.” The 6-foot-1, 220-pound Bass ripped opposing defenses last season for more than 2,100 rushing yards and scored 27 touchdowns. He has the strength to punish defenders, yet remains quick enough to pull away for long runs. So Jennings County fans can expect a lot more of Bass this season. “We’d be pretty stupid if we didn’t utilize the skills and talents of Bass,” Buening said. “We just want to feature a more efficient Bass.” According to Buening, the Panthers plan to be more diversified on offense, especially since junior quarterback Ryan Cowan has a full year of experience and four of five starting linemen return. “We’re excited with everyone coming back,” Buening added. “The guys are determined and focused this year on what they need to do to get the wins.” Other key players like junior Tommy Taylor should make an impact at the fullback position, as well as defensive end. Conner Montgomery returns for his third season at safety and receiver, while Austin Wilson and Brock Wathen bring stability at linebacker. “We’re working hard at improving our defense and special teams,” said Buening. “But having confidence is the key for us.”

Seymour Owls football coach Jeff Richey welcomes a mixed group of athletes this year. “We’re young in some places and have good experience in other places,” said Richey. “Our defense has a lot of two-year and three-year starters.” Leading that group will be linebacker Bryce Werskey, who was named to the All-Hoosier Hills Conference team last year. Josh Joray and Logan Hill also bring plenty of clout, while Seymour will look to a pair of seniors to provide its offensive punch. At 6-5, 230 pounds, Grant Hubbard

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTO

Jennings County’s Iyan Bass encounters a Columbus East defender during last season’s Hoosier Hills Conference clash. will play tight end this season, while Wade Fox (6-2, 210) will stretch opposing defenses as a wideout. “Those two guys are exciting and we’ve also got good size on the offensive line,” Richey said. “Sophomore Austin Sutton is our quarterback and how quickly he develops will be the real key.”

Brown County After taking their lumps the last couple of years, the Eagles are ready to dish some out. “This season the players are showing great attitudes and a strong work ethic,” said Brown County coach Ken Wendling. “We expect to finally have a winning season.” One reason to be excited for the Eagles is the return of all-purpose back Konnor Graber, whose senior leadership will be counted on to help guide sophomore Dillon Boatknecht at quarterback. Seniors Nick Oliver and Justin Lawson will anchor the line, while classmate Caleb Wedan will do double duty as receiver and defensive end. Wendling said the experience is

valuable, but the key will be how well the offensive line holds up. “If we can give Dillon time to set up and pass we’ll be able to compete with anyone,” Wendling added.

Edinburgh More players and a better competitive schedule have Lancers coach Bill Unsworth optimistic about this year’s squad. “If we can get our new guys up to speed and stay healthy, then I’ll be happy,” said Unsworth. “We’re also playing schools our size now, like Monroe Central and Turkey Run.” Outside linebacker Trent Tatlock returns for Edinburgh, looking to lead the team in tackles for another season. Dakota Sneed and Josh Swallows will be counted on to provide size and leadership in the trenches, while junior Sammy Wilkerson will guide the Lancers at quarterback. “He’s coming along really well,” Unsworth said. Wilkerson will have 6-2 Nate King to throw to and the tandem of Steve Schuter and Jake Emerson as running backs.

The trio will also be a force on defense, along with Zack Burton and Brandon Morefield.

South Decatur All-state receiver Tyler Ewing returns for coach Rod Martin’s Cougars, who will be quarterbacked this season by sophomore Chris Johanigman. “Chris has worked his tail off this summer,” Martin said. “And Tyler will give him a steady target.” Martin said youth is the theme of this year’s team, although he welcomes back six starters on defense, including top tackler Byron Balser.

Greensburg Senior Blake Abplanalp returns another year to lead the Pirates from the quarterback position. Coach Scott Moore has a stable of running backs to call on, including Abplanalp, as well as senior fullback Zack Balusik and senior halfback Jordan Cunnington. Balusik will also lead the defense at linebacker, and will be joined by fellow linebacker Peter Myers and senior defensive back Tucker Hime.


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

I N D I A N A P O L I S

17

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indianapolis Colts wide receiver Austin Collie catches a pass during training camp in Anderson.

Waiting to receive WRs Collie, Clark ready to catch but Manning not set to throw yet

C O L T S

BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com ANDERSON — The road leading to the Indianapolis Colts’ practice facility has blue horseshoes painted on the asphalt. The sign on the Wendy’s reads, “This is Colts country.” At McDonald’s they offered a special on the Colts burger, which for Mickey D’s during the National Football League team’s training camp at Anderson University, Aug. 1-18, was two Big Macs for the price of one. Apparently you are not an eatery worthy of the name in Anderson if you do not express your allegiance to the Colts, as the Lemon Drop Inn did as well. The sign on the local drive-in establishment reads, “Welcome Home Colts.”

“It’s been a long time since I’ve been out there with the guys. It feels good to be back with the team and be part of it again.” – Austin Collie That was the most telling sign of all because up until the last minute as the calendar spilled from July to August it looked as if there might not be any Colts camp this year, or any NFL play at all. An owners lockout kept the players on the sidelines in a labor dispute and it took a last-minute settlement for Anderson to enjoy its annual summer brush with big-time football—the school plays at the NCAA Division III level.

The citizens and fans did not get cheated out of their training camp adventure, but it has been up in the air how much of the Colts’ greatest attraction they will see. Hall of Fame-bound quarterback Peyton Manning, who recently signed a five-year, $90 contract, has been slow to recover from neck surgery. Manning’s pain in the neck follows what seemed like a million team injuries during the 2010 season. The problem then was who Man-

ning had to throw to, not who was doing the throwing. In the early days of training camp the Colts relied on Curtis Painter and Dan Orlovsky to share quarterbacking duties. But unlike certain times last fall when Manning was making friends with a new receiver the same week as he was introduced to the play book, the backups have had the old, familiar targets to aim their passes at, including Dallas Clark and Austin Collie. Collie is returning from a season that ended early because of two concussions. He was taking hits again in early August and not flinching. “You can’t think about that or you are going to be having some issues,” said Collie, who added that it was

See COLTS on Page 18


18

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

COLTS

Continued from Page 17 good to be back on the practice field. “It feels good.” In his first two seasons Collie showed that he has the potential to be one of the league’s great receivers. He learned what others who came before him in the Colts lineup discovered quickly: if he can get open, a Manning pass will find him. Collie recorded games of 11 catches for 163 yards at Houston and 12 catches for 171 yards and two touchdowns at Denver. In a year when the Colts had 17 players go out with season-ending injuries, his loss might have been one of the most worrisome. At one point the Colts were 6-6, and even though Manning, a four-time league MVP who has thrown for 399 touchdowns in his career, rallied Indianapolis into the playoffs with a four-game winning streak, the Colts were hurting and showed some slippage. Collie was pleased he was healthy enough to report to camp and be ready for action from the start. “It’s been a long time since I’ve been out there with the guys,” he said. “It feels good to be back with the team and be part of it again.” Tight end Clark is one of Manning’s long-time reliable receivers and he missed even more time with injury than Collie did last season. He too was healed enough to make his 2011 debut at the start of training camp. “I am probably the happiest guy to be back here,” Clark said. “It feels great, and obviously, putting pads on and hitting and getting that, that will be the ultimate test. Everything has been great and I am looking forward to getting back.” The Colts have been kings of the AFC South for years, but they are retooling. Free agents left and free agents signed. There was a need to buttress the offensive line, the running game and the defense, but the Colts go as Manning goes. Getting the most reliable pass grabbers back on the field is a huge plus, but Manning’s health is the paramount issue. Coach Jim Caldwell, who never says anything controversial or inflammatory, is one of the most even-keeled men in sport and he copes with the hand he is dealt. He was placid when he lost player after player to injury last season, and he was keeping his cool about Manning’s early absence. “Whenever he is ready, he is ready,” Caldwell said of the franchise’s pillar. “He works harder than anyone else on the planet and will get himself ready faster than most people. He will work at it.”

Colts’ schedule 9/11 9/18 9/25 10/3 10/9 10/16 10/23 10/30 11/6 11/13 11/27 12/4 12/11 12/18 12/22 1/1

at Houston CLEVELAND PITTSBURGH at Tampa Bay KANSAS CITY at Cincinnati at New Orleans at Tennessee ATLANTA JACKSONVILLE CAROLINA at New England at Baltimore TENNESSEE HOUSTON at Jacksonville

1 p.m. 1 p.m. 8:20 p.m. 8:30 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 8:20 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 8:20 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 8:20 p.m. 1 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Indianapolis Colts tight end Dallas Clark runs a drill during training camp in Anderson.


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Indianapolis Colts roster NO 29 23 90 51 5 62 62 41 58 83 39 31 33 30 34 74 97 44 59 17 53 8 66 80 71 81 32 68 93 85 60 12 52 11 96 9

92 79 42 99 46 37 64

NAME Addai, Joseph Afalava, Al Anderson, Jamaal Angerer, Pat Baltz, Travis Bedford, David Beekman, Josh Bender, Casey Bethea, Antoine Brackett, Gary Brooks, Chris Brown, Cornelius Brown, Donald Bullitt, Melvin Caldwell, David Carter, Delone Castonzo, Anthony Chick, John Clark, Dallas Colasanti, Chris Collie, Austin Conner, Kavell Davis, Nate DeVan, Kyle DeVree, Tyson Diem, Ryan Eldridge, Brody Evans, Darren Foster, Eric Freeney, Dwight Garcon, Pierre Gill, John Gilreath, David Glenn, Cody Gonzalez, Anthony Harris, Tommie Hartline, Mike Heckendorf, Kole Horn, Joe Hughes, Jerry Ijalana, Ben James, Javarris Johnson, Antonio Johnson, Terrence King, Brandon Kirkpatrick, Jake

POS RB DB DE LB P DE OG T DB LB WR DB RB DB DB RB T DE TE LB WR LB QB OG TE T TE RB DT DE WR DT WR LB WR DT QB WR WR DE G RB DT DB DB C

HEIGHT WEIGHT 5-11 214 5-11 212 6-6 289 6-0 235 6-3 210 6-4 247 6-2 310 6-5 295 5-11 203 5-11 235 6-2 210 5-11 198 5-10 210 6-1 201 5-11 212 5-9 225 6-7 305 6-4 250 6-3 252 6-2 241 6-0 200 6-0 242 6-1 226 6-2 306 6-6 245 6-6 320 6-5 265 6-0 220 6-2 265 6-1 268 6-0 210 6-3 302 5-11 169 6-0 240 6-0 193 6-3 295 6-6 210 6-2 191 5-11 191 6-2 255 6-4 317 6-0 215 6-3 310 5-9 190 5-10 194 6-3 305

EXP 6 3 5 2 R R 4 1 6 9 1 2 3 5 1 R R 1 9 R 3 2 1 3 1 11 2 R 4 10 4 1 R 3 5 8 R 1 R 2 R 2 5 1 2 R

27 35 72 18 91 98 86 1 65 47 95 45 3 57 56 94 38 64 6 7 78 25 69 76 61 36 63 55 10 48 28 84 67 73 21 75 54 20 40 49 4 87 50 15

Lacey, Jacob Lefeged, Joe Linkenbach, Jeffrey Manning, Peyton Mathews, Ricardo Mathis, Robert Matthews, Michael McAfee, Pat McClendon, Jacques McNeill, Mike Moala, Fili Moore, Devin Moore, Larrone Moten, Adrian Myers, Rob Neal, Kerry Nevis, Drake Newton, Mike Ogbu, Ollie Orlovsky, Dan Painter, Curtis Pollak, Mike Powers, Jerraud Pressley, DeMario Reitz, Joe Richard, Jamey Rucker, Chris Saturday, Jeff Sims, Ernie Smith, Taj Snow, Justin Spann, Chad Tamme, Jacob Tepper, Mike Thomas, Jaimie Thomas, Kevin Toudouze, Michael Triplett, Nate Tryon, Justin Tuihalamaka, Vuna Vaughn, Chip Vinatieri, Adam Wayne, Reggie Wheeler, Philip White, Blair Williams, James Williams, Marshall

DB DB OT QB DT DE TE P OG TE DT RB WR LB TE LB DT DB DT QB QB OG DB DT OT C DB C LB WR LS RB TE OT OG CB OT LB DB LB DB K WR LB WR T WR

5-10 6-0 6-6 6-5 6-3 6-2 6-4 6-1 6-3 6-4 6-4 5-9 6-1 6-2 6-4 6-2 6-1 5-10 6-1 6-5 6-4 6-3 5-10 6-3 6-7 6-5 6-1 6-2 6-0 6-0 6-3 5-9 6-3 6-6 6-4 6-0 6-6 6-3 5-9 6-0 6-2 6-0 6-0 6-2 6-2 6-5 6-1

177 205 311 230 294 245 270 220 324 235 303 190 185 230 239 245 294 197 283 230 230 301 192 301 320 295 195 295 230 192 240 198 236 323 330 192 303 247 183 230 221 202 198 240 205 295 188

19

3 R 2 14 2 9 4 3 2 R 3 2 R R 1 R R 2 R 7 3 4 3 4 1 4 R 13 6 2 12 R 4 1 2 2 4 2 4 1 3 16 11 4 2 1 R


20

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

D U W Y C E W I L S O N

Breakout year for IU East grad Wilson says it’s time to show new coach he’s a starter BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com BLOOMINGTON — It was a one-funnel-cake summer for Duwyce Wilson. That was all he had time for during his singleday visit to the Bartholomew County 4-H Fair with his nephew Gino and that was all he dared eat when taking his health-food diet off-grid. Wilson, 21, a former Columbus East standout, spent his days sweating during voluntary workouts and even though Indiana University is only about 35 miles from Columbus he barely went home. After two years of apprenticeship with the Hoosiers, the first as a red-shirt watching, and his second breaking into the lineup, the softspoken Wilson figures it is his time to shine and show a new coaching staff under boss Kevin Wilson that he belongs in its starting lineup. “I feel a lot more knowledgeable about the game,” Wilson said. “I’m still learning. I feel a lot better every day.” Wilson is 6-foot-3 and is listed at 197 pounds. He is quick and rangy, with good leaping ability when it comes to getting his hands on the ball. After sitting out his first season on campus, the 2010 campaign counted as his freshman year. On a throwing team with signal-caller Ben Chappell at the helm, Wilson caught 32 passes for 488 yards and three touchdowns. He showed bigplay capability by averaging 15.2 yards per catch. Wilson had several multi-catch games and his longest TD reception was 62 yards against Wisconsin. He also played on special teams, running back eight kickoffs for 180 yards. Although moving up a level in competition, Wilson showed the same type of form he did for the Olympians in 2008 when he was one of the top-ranked players in Indiana and grabbed 49 passes for 1,258 yards and 14 touchdowns. With the arrival of Kevin Wilson as the new head coach after several years as offensive coordinator at Oklahoma, Indiana figures to be a high-scoring team. However, the transition from ousted coach Bill Lynch just a day after wresting the Old Oaken Bucket from rival Purdue to complete a 5-7 season, shook up many Hoosiers. “I remember hearing about the talk (that Lynch might be fired), but nobody expected it to be so soon,” Wilson said. “At first everyone was uncertain, but the seniors told us it was part of the game.” Coach Wilson was hired to lift IU to Big Ten and national prominence and player Wilson said there have been differences in his approach from the Lynch regime. “It’s a lot more intense,” Wilson the receiver said. “He’s the real deal. He’s an intense coach.” As often occurs following a coaching change and the graduation of a long-serving starting quarterback, the Hoosiers are temporarily rudderless on the field. Or they have so many captains they don’t know what to do with them. When fall camp opened, the coaches offered reps to five different quarterbacks, including Dusty Kiel of Columbus, Duwyce Wilson’s high school teammate. “All the quarterbacks are great,” said Wilson

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Columbus East grad and now Indiana University receiver Duwyce Wilson, second from left, responds to a question during media day in Bloomington.

Reed, Kiel seek spots for IU STAFF REPORTS There will be three Columbus players on the Indiana University football roster for the 2011 season. Sophomore red-shirt Dusty Kiel is battling for the starting quarterback position, hoping to make the same type of impact that his old Columbus East teammate Duwyce Wilson did at wide receiver.

the player. “They’re all good.” Coach Wilson said he was far from choosing a starter, but would narrow down the choice to three players soon, and might use two or three guys with some regularity when the season starts Sept. 3 vs. Ball State. “Sometimes you have two good ones, or you have guys that bring different strengths to the table,” the coach said. While the coach steered clear of naming a quarterback favorite—and wouldn’t let any of the candidates speak to reporters—he did say he was impressed by the receiver corps, and mentioned Wilson by name. “That’s going to be a good group,” coach Wilson said. Under NCAA rules, coaches cannot monitor

Kiel saw limited action last year, appearing in five games and completing four passes for 71 yards. The first game of his college career came against Towson State. Jake Reed, a 6-foot-4, 240-pound 2011 graduate of Columbus North, is working at defensive end as a freshman after being a two-way guy for the Bull Dogs. Coach Kevin Wilson said he may well play several freshmen this season.

off-season workouts, but determined Indiana players gathered on their own almost every day during the summer break to run, lift weights, and in the case of receivers, run pass patterns. Kevin Johns, IU’s co-offensive coordinator and receivers coach said Wilson physically appears as if he has worked hard in the off-season. “Just on how he looks, it’s obvious he put the time to use,” Johns said. “I think he showed flashes (last year). He had a good spring. He knows he has a lot to learn. He’s like a sponge. I think he has a huge upside. We’re counting on him.” Wilson was happy he showed well in 2010, but he is not complacent because of it. “It gave me confidence,” he said. “But I just know I’ve got to get better every day.”


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Indiana University schedule, roster 9/3 9/10 9/17 9/24 NO. 29 57 27 23 21 48 88 97 25 83 34 45 55 74 84 94 19 49 54 65 41 61 91 30 59 62 76 16 50 14 99 24 77 3 4 52 9 87 47 12 13 17 71 29 35 44 10 93 68 51 8 2

Ball State at Lucas Oil, VIRGINIA SOUTH CAROLINA ST. at North Texas

NAME Adkins, Chris Bachman, Pete Banks, Antonio Barnett, Lawrence Beckett, Levi Beckum, Leon Belcher, Damario Black, Larry Jr. Blackwell, David Bolser, Ted Bush, Kevin Carr-Watson, Dimitrius Carter, Mike Chapman, Charlie Chester, Jamonne Cornley, Javon Creevey, Connor Dahlstrom, Griffen Damisch, Joe Damisch, Marc Dedmond, Max Deitchman, Eric Dooley, Matt Drane, Jarrell Eckert, Peyton Evans, Ralston Evers, Cody Ewald, Mitch Fiacable, Steve Follett, Adam Freeland, Nick Guzek, Teddy Hager, Josh Hardin, Drew Hardin Forisse Harris, Marlandez Heban, Greg Himes, Leneil Hoobler, Chase Houston, Stephen Hughes, Kofi Hunter, Michael Ivan, Bill Jackson, Jordan Jefferson, Shaquille Johnson, Darius Jones, Donnell Jones, Fred Kaminski, David Kennedy, Kyle Kiel, Dusty Kiles, Lenyatta

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 7 p.m. POS. S OL RB CB WR LB WR DT RB TE DE LB DL OT WR DE WR LB LB OL TE OL LS S OL OL OL K OL QB K S OT S S DL DB FB LB RB WR CB OL WR S DE S DE OL LB QB CB

10/1 10/8 I 10/15 10/22 HT. 6-1 6-5 5-10 5-10 5-11 5-11 6-5 6-2 6-1 6-6 6-4 6-1 6-1 6-6 6-2 6-5 6-2 6-3 6-2 6-7 6-5 6-1 6-4 6-2 6-6 6-4 6-4 5-10 6-1 6-5 6-0 6-2 6-9 6-0 6-1 6-3 6-1 6-1 6-2 6-0 6-2 6-1 6-4 6-3 6-0 6-0 5-10 6-4 6-4 6-3 6-2 5-11

PENN STATE ILLINOIS at Wisconsin at Iowa WT. 190 262 213 191 193 213 213 305 206 245 257 230 215 292 199 235 200 218 233 285 250 250 251 197 295 280 310 175 266 213 200 179 300 200 198 274 186 265 232 228 205 170 282 234 197 243 209 265 272 224 216 194

CL SR FR FR SO FR SR SR JR SO SO JR SO SO SO SO SO JR SO FR JR SR FR FR SR FR FR FR SO SO JR JR FR SR FR FR FR SO FR FR SO SO FR FR FR FR SR SR SR FR FR SO SR

TBA TBA Noon Noon 63 96 3 79 85 60 15 72 39 58 69 41 82 22 37 89 70 24 86 25 10 64 99 90 98 46 95 5 20 31 17 33 75 36 92 14 73 43 53 26 19 9 27 18 6 28 81 7 1 80 67 40 21

10/29 11/5 a 11/19 11/26

Kirlew, Jerrell Laihinen, John Latimer, Cody Lewis, Gregory Love, Charles III Matte, Will McCants, Jay McDonald, Andrew McGhee, Brandon McGuigan, Tyler Mentzer, Mick Michalek, Jake Muhammad, Dre Mullen, Kenny Murphy, Mark O’Conner, Tim Pagan, Justin Perez, Matt Phillips, Paul Phillis, Ryan Pines, Adam Rahrig, Colin Rayner, Adarius Reed, Jake Replogle, Adam Replogle, Mike Richardson, Bobby Roberson, Tre Roberts, D’Angelo Rose, Lee Schell, Teddy Shaw, Zack Sliger, Nicholas St. Fort, Peter Steinacker, Blake Stoner, Nick Taylor, Bernard Thomas, Ishmael Thomas, Jeff Turner, Nick Veatch, Dylan Voss, Mitchell Webb, Alexander Whitaker, Xavier Williams, Brian Willis, Darius Wilson, Duwyce Wright-Baker, Edward Wynn, Shane Young, Logan Young, Zackary Zakrzewski, Matt Zupancic, Jake

NORTHWESTERN at Ohio State at Michigan State PURDUE DL DE WR OL TE C WR OT LB OL DT LB WR CB S WR OL RB TE DE P OL DL DL DL LB DL QB RB LB QB/H LB DT CB DL CB DL LB LB RB S K CB RB CB RB WR QB WR WR LS LB S

Noon TBA TBA TBA 6-3 6-4 6-3 6-5 6-3 6-2 6-4 6-6 6-1 6-2 6-4 6-2 5-10 5-10 6-2 6-3 6-5 5-11 6-5 6-3 6-0 6-2 6-2 6-4 6-3 6-2 6-3 6-0 5-10 6-1 6-5 6-3 6-3 6-0 6-1 6-1 6-2 6-5 6-1 6-0 5-11 5-11 6-0 6-2 6-0 6-0 6-3 6-1 5-7 6-3 6-6 6-2 5-11

263 JR 240 FR 208 FR 300 FR 221 JR 282 JR 205 FR 285 SR 226 SR 289 SO 305 JR 217 FR 180 SR 166 FR 202 FR 196 FR 294 SR 230 FR 240 FR 244 FR 184 JR 263 FR 287 FR 253 FR 290 JR 221 FR 263 FR 184 FR 187 FR 221 JR 230 SR 232 FR 291 JR 185 JR 268 FR 167 FR 278 FR 208 FR 239 SR 190 SO 191 FR 177 SO 193 JR 219 FR 178 FR 220 JR 196 SO 220 SO 153 SR 199 FR 224 JR 222 FR 205 FR

21


22

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

“He’s been one of our top leaders the last three years. He means a whole lot to our football team (and) football program — not only as a specialist, but as one of our top leaders.” – Purdue coach Danny Hope

Wiggs Boilers’ big weapon

P U R D U E

Snub for Groza Award ‘watch list’ motivates Purdue kicker BY JESS HUFFMAN jhuffman@therepublic.com WEST LAFAYETTE — Carson Wiggs’ booming right leg launches footballs so far with such regularity no kick shocks Purdue football coach Danny Hope anymore. Not even when Wiggs booted a field goal 67 yards in April’s spring game. “He nails world record field goals on a regular basis in practice,” Hope said during Big Ten media days. Wiggs has the golden leg, the accolades and the praise of teammates and coaches. But somehow, some way, Purdue’s senior kicker was left off the Lou Groza Award watch list, a collection of 30 names to be considered for the title of nation’s best kicker. That much made the Texas native feel snubbed. “It’s a little bit more of a motivator,” Wiggs said. “Maybe the spotlight won’t be as much on me as it will on other guys, which might let me coast on through and not have as much pressure.” Name a Purdue kicking record and Wiggs has it, or is approaching it. He ranks first in career field goal percentage (.715), third in field goals (37) and has kicked the three longest field goals in school history. His first successful field goal — a 53-yarder against Ohio State in October of 2008 — broke the school record and he’s since connected on long bombs from 55 and 59 yards. “He brings a lot to our football team,” Hope said. “I think he’s the most exciting field goal kicker in all of football.” Coming out of South Grand Prairie High School, Wiggs was the No. 4-ranked kicker by ESPN.com. He was also a soccer player, a strong defender who specialized in launching the ball long distances. “I did most of the goal kicks, trying to get it out of your territory,” Wiggs said. “I always was a bigger guy, so I took pride in that in the soccer field … to try and bully guys around.” Add a few more inches and pounds to Wiggs’s 6-foot, 192-pound frame, and Hope said he would have another linebacker. “He’s an outstanding football

“I was kind of like, ‘Really?’ I had no idea I was the most accurate so far. I think 72 percent for my career is a very low percentage for me.” – Purdue kicker Carson Wiggs player that’s trapped with a kicker’s leg,” Hope said. Kickers are notoriously outcasts — members of the team outside the 22 who start. Not Wiggs. Purdue players voted Wiggs one of the team’s captains, and he lives with five teammates in West Lafayette. “He’s been one of our top leaders the last three years,” Hope said. “…He means a whole lot to our football team (and) football program — not only as a specialist, but as one of our top leaders.” After knocking down 8 of 11 field goal attempts as a freshman, Wiggs entered his sophomore season on the Lou Groza watch list. He’s been honorable mention All-Big Ten the last two seasons. Last year he made 80 percent of his field goals and 5 of 6 attempts from 40 yards or more. He also punted 22 times with an average of 36.4 yards per kick and a long of 59. His accomplishments beg the question: Why no love from the people who make the Lou Groza watch list? Wiggs doesn’t have the answer. He can only guess what the people at the Palm Beach County Sports Commission were thinking. “I feel like the only reason would be that I missed a few short field goals last year,” Wiggs said. “… I attempted a lot of long ones. … A lot of kickers don’t attempt those long field goals. So I think when I have those attempts, it does lower my percentage. But at the same time, no one

PHOTO COURTESY PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Purdue kicker Carson Wiggs attempts a field goal last season. else is trying them.” When Hope spoke during Big Ten media day, the third-year head coach mentioned Wiggs as a weapon. He said his kicker has the most accurate leg in the history of the program. That much caught Wiggs by surprise. He said his career percentage is nothing to brag about. He said it’s

something to improve. “I was kind of like, ‘Really? I had no idea I was the most accurate so far,’” Wiggs said. “I think 72 percent for my career is a very low percentage for me. I’m shooting for the upper-95 (percent) range.” Maybe then Wiggs will catch the attention of the people in Palm Beach.


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

Purdue University schedule, roster 9/3 9/10 9/17 10/1 NO. 21 22 88 31 27 53 3 23 49 6 47 81 34 41 70 25 48 59 75 14 54 67 10 13 32 18 44 78 46 90 29 39 2 3 11 1 36 36 15 5 39 30 86 77 11 61 40 7 28 57 68 51

MIDDLE TENN. ST. at Rice SOUTHEAST MO. ST. NOTRE DAME

NAME Ricardo Allen Ishmael Aristide Patrick Bade Kevin Ballinger T.J. Barbarette Dan Barry Dwayne Beckford Ralph Bolden Adam Brockman Gary Bush Chris Carlino Sterling Carter Max Charlot Sean Collins LaSalle Cooks Brandon Cottom Jared Crank Cody Davis Josh Davis Spencer Dawson Jack De Boef Peters Drey Mike Eargle Antavian Edison Albert Evans Nnamdi Ezenwa Landon Feichter Trevor Foy Kurt Freytag Bruce Gaston Doug Gentry Joe Gilliam Gerald Gooden Waynelle Gravesande DeVarro Greaves Normondo Harris Robert Harris Zack Heiniger Rob Henry Antwon Higgs Devin Hill Joe Holland Gabe Holmes Matt Huene Akeem Hunt Ryan Isaac Derek Jackson E.J Johnson Josh Johnson Kaulana Judd Dennis Kelly Justin Kitchens

Noon 3:30 p.m. Noon 8 p.m.

10/8 10/15 10/22 10/29 POS. CB S TE LS WR OG LB RB DE WR LB TE S CB DT RB FB C OT QB OT C CB WR S LB S OT FB DT RB LB DE WR LB CB K LB QB LB RB LB TE OT RB DT FB S CB LB OT OT

HT. 5-9 5-11 6-6 6-3 5-6 6-2 6-1 6-9 6-3 6-0 6-2 6-5 6-0 5-7 6-3 6-4 6-2 6-5 6-5 6-2 6-7 6-6 5-10 5-11 6-0 6-2 6-0 6-7 6-2 6-2 6-0 6-1 6-4 6-0 6-2 6-0 6-0 5-11 6-2 6-3 5-10 6-1 6-4 6-5 5-9 6-5 6-1 6-1 5-11 6-3 6-8 6-4

MINNESOTA at Penn State ILLINOIS at Michigan WT. 179 199 227 182 165 303 228 190 265 175 226 233 190 172 271 255 238 286 294 205 284 310 170 175 208 225 178 287 225 303 190 211 235 192 220 180 205 207 200 252 228 229 226 258 175 266 227 178 195 223 306 275

CL SO SO SO SR JR SR JR JR SR SO SR JR JR SO JR FR SR SO FR SR FR FR SR JR SR JR FR SO SO DT FR FR SR SR SR SO SO SO SO JR FR SR SO FR FR SO JR FR JR JR SR SO

85 38 26 83 40 35 52 45 16 58 9 22 43 56 84 87 62 65 8 60 95 17 33 89 73 29 4 20 10 4 97 99 76 50 24 63 93 80 2 84 92 74 55 19 12 17 42 37 31 15 6 82

TBA Noon Noon Noon

11/5 11/12 11/19 11/26

Robert Kugler Mike Lee Antoine Lewis Kurt Lichtenberg Collin Link Logan Link Henry Lorenzen Will Lucas Dolapo Macarthy Robert Maci Robert Marve Sean Matti Sam McCartney Eric McDaniel Eric Mebane Shane Mikesky Nick Mondek Austin Moret Raheem Mostert Brad Niemeier Kevin Pamphile Austin Parker Reggie Pegram Jalani Phillips Ken Plue Chris Quinn Taylor Richards Gavin Roberts Sean Robinson O.J. Ross Michael Rouse III Ryan Russell Ryan Schmeig Jesse Schmitt Akeem Shavers James Shepherd Kawann Short Zack Sigman Justin Siller Justin Sinz Calvin Smith Connor Snapp Brandon Taylor Caleb TerBush Tommie Thomas Charles Torwudzo Cody Webster Carson Wiggs Armstead Williams Charlton Williams Frankie Williams Crosby Wright

at Wisconsin OHIO STATE IOWA at Indiana TE LB CB WR LB S C LB WR DE QB RB K OG DE WR OT C WR DT DT QB RB LB OG S DB RB QB WR DT DT OG LS RB OG DT WR WR TE DT OG DT QB WR WR P K/P LB CB DB TE

6-3 6-2 5-10 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-2 5-11 6-5 6-4 6-1 6-0 6-4 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-2 5-11 6-1 6-5 5-11 5-10 6-4 6-7 5-11 5-10 6-0 6-3 5-10 6-4 6-5 6-3 6-2 5-11 6-7 6-3 6-1 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-7 6-1 6-5 6-1 6-4 6-1 6-0 6-3 6-2 5-9 6-3

TBA TBA TBA TBA 244 220 182 185 200 208 298 226 220 241 212 233 183 285 211 197 307 298 180 277 241 194 215 244 366 191 180 210 210 181 305 241 320 236 203 315 310 185 215 242 280 324 280 225 195 214 205 192 210 197 180 248

FR FR FR SR FR SR SO SO FR JR SR SR FR SO JR FR SR SR FR SR SO FR SO FR SR JR FR JR SO SO FR FR JR FR JR JR JR JR SR SR SO SO SO JR JR FR SO SR FR SR FR JR

23


24

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

N O T R E D A M E

Irish taking step up Strong close to 2010 season leaves Notre Dame faithful optimistic BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com Hasn’t he won the national championship yet? They are known for that type of impatience at Notre Dame, where winning national crowns is supposed to be a birthright and coaches have been run out of South Bend even after winning bowl games because they weren’t the second coming of Knute Rockne. For that matter, between Frank Leahy, Ara Parseghian, and Lou Holtz, the Irish have already had the second, third and fourth comings of Rockne and fans who genuflect to the so-called “Touchdown Jesus” mural on campus are impatient for a fifth. Enter Brian Kelly in 2010, succeeding the disappointing tenure of Charlie Weis, who could win Super Bowls as an assistant coach, but was not as effective as his own boss at the most famous college program in the land. There was a collective, major league uh, oh uttered when Notre Dame lost to Navy again under Kelly, who gave the University of Cincinnati its finest years on the gridiron before transferring to South Bend. But by the end of the season, Kelly, who is known as a doctor of sick programs, had taken the Irish to an 8-5 record. Although the team reward was the Sun Bowl, the type of minor bowl the program might previously have eschewed, the Irish thumped old rival Miami, 33-17 in it, so it was a feel-good conclusion to Kelly’s rookie year.

See NOTRE DAME on Page 25

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly yells instructions before the first half of their spring game in South Bend.

SIMPLY

The Best!

STERLING GARAGE DOORS 24-Hour Emergency Service! Parts • Garage Doors • Openers

Insurance Agency, Inc. 812-372-8456 • www.zellerinsurance.com

Columbus •

812.376.9868

WE REPAIR ALL MAKES & MODELS Corner of State St. & Behren Ct. in Columbus, Indiana


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

25

NOTRE DAME Continued from Page 24

At Notre Dame, when a team is on the rebound after a sorry period, fans call it “waking up the echoes.” Also at Notre Dame a coach could go deaf from just how loudly those echoes reverberate. This year, the Irish are expecting to be a top-25 program, again, a ranking in the past that would have been insulting, but is now viewed as a step towards resurrection. But Kelly isn’t satisfied with that type of mention. He is thinking bigger, as he is expected to do, in South Bend. “I want them to have good feelings about who they are and where they’ve come,” Kelly said of his players at his pre-season media conference. “But I think I’ve said this pretty clearly, and our players are in it for the same reason.” Being No. 1, he said, is the aspiration. “That’s why we’re here.” During the Weis regime, Notre Dame’s biggest flaw was surrendering too many points because of an average defense. Kelly has recruited hard to fill gaps, to get more size, and plug in top talent, so how the defense fares could determine how far the team goes. Offensively, quarterback Dayne Crist has the 6-4, 235-pound size of a pro thrower, but he has yet to make anyone forget Jimmy Clausen, his predecessor and he will be challenged for his spot under center by Tommy Reese, Andrew Hendrix

Notre Dame schedule 9/3 9/11 9/17 9/24 10/1 10/8 10/22 10/29 11/5 11/12 11/19 11/26

SOUTH FLORIDA 3:30 p.m. at Michigan 8 p.m. MICHIGAN ST. 3:30 p.m. at Pittsburgh TBA at Purdue 8 p.m. AIR FORCE 3:30 p.m. USC 7:30 p.m. NAVY 3:30 p.m. at Wake Forest TBA at Maryland 7:30 p.m. BOSTON COLLEGE 4 p.m. at Stanford 8 p.m.

and Everett Golson, one them likely being Notre Dame’s quarterback of the future. Crist is the odds-on-favorite to start, but he is coming off of a knee injury and it is not clear if he will have full mobility. The school that gave the world explosive Heisman Trophy backs like Paul Hornung and Tim Brown possesses a dynamite runner-receiver in Theo Riddick and can feature the return of receiver Michael Floyd, who after off-field troubles has been reinstated by Kelly. Floyd, seen as a potential top NFL draft pick, has scored 28 touchdowns at Notre Dame, but after being arrested for

Cele brating 32 years of N SA LE S, TIO C SERV ICE, & SATISFA

SALES • 800-681-4080 MON 8 AM–7 PM • TUES–FRI 8 AM–5:30 PM SAT 8 AM–3 PM

SERVICE • 800-699-7506 MON–FRI 7:30 AM–5:30 PM SAT 8 AM–3 PM

WWW.BOBPOYNTERGM.COM • 1209 E. TIPTON ST. • SEYMOUR

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame wide receiver Michael Floyd has been reinstated after his arrest four months ago on drunken driving charges. Coach Brian Kelly said he was comfortable with Floyd’s return because the senior has shown personal growth. a DUI in March it was uncertain if he would ever be on the field long enough to get another one. But Kelly gave Floyd another chance and when he was officially reinstated to the team at the beginning of August, Floyd said, “You can’t make mistakes like that. But once you make them, you have to change. That’s what I’m going through

right now.” Kelly said that every coach is optimistic about his team before it starts—Notre Dame opens against South Florida Sept. 3—and he is no different, but he said he believes in this bunch’s ability to achieve. “…confidence is always going to be there,” he said. “That’s in our DNA. That’s what we believe.”


26

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

NO. 4 43 12 49 27 21 44 56 40 52 73 28 29 30 60 10 98 16 75 80 41 46 38 45 3 48 47 88 5 81 59 4 25 37 65

NAME George Atkinson III Josh Atkinson Robert Blanton Blake Breslau Kyle Brindza Jalen Brown Carlo Calabrese Brad Carrico Connor Cavalaris Braxton Cave Lane Clelland Austin Collinsworth Patrick Coughlin Ben Councell Jordan Cowart Dayne Crist Sean Cwynar DaVaris Daniels Taylor Dever Tyler Eifert Matthias Farley Steve Filer Nick Fitzpatrick Darius Fleming Michael Floyd Dan Fox Jonathan Frantz Mike Golic Jr. Everett Golson John Goodman Jarrett Grace Gary Gray Jonas Gray Mike Grieco Conor Hanratty

POS. RB CB CB S K/P CB LB OL S C OT S RB LB LS QB DT WR OT TE WR LB WR LB WR LB LB C QB WR LB CB RB P OG

HT. 6-1 5-11 6-1 5-10 6-1 6-0 6-1 6-5 5-10 6-3 6-5 6-1 6-0 6-4 6-2 6-4 6-4 6-1 6-5 6-6 5-10 6-3 5-8 6-2 6-3 6-3 6-2 6-3 6-0 6-3 6-2 5-11 5-10 6-1 6-4

WT. 200 185 200 180 219 198 245 290 180 303 297 200 200 230 215 235 285 185 301 249 194 245 170 255 224 240 215 295 185 207 240 195 230 185 315

Same Great Service

Notre Dame roster CL FR FR SR JR FR FR JR FR FR SR SR SO GS FR JR SR JR FR GS JR FR SR JR SR JR JR SR SR FR SR FR GS SR SR FR

Since 1926!

34 77 93 12 50 2 90 7 50 18 37 89 42 39 93 74 19 71 72 72 86 14 15 33 54 8 17 99 64 58 9 76 50 49 32 36

Eilar Hardy Matt Hegarty Bruce Heggie Andrew Hendrix Chase Hounshell Bennett Jackson Ethan Johnson T.J. Jones Ryan Kavanagh Ben Koyack Eric Lee Kapron Lewis-Moore Nick Lezynski Ryan Liebscher Connor Little Christian Lombard Aaron Lynch Dennis Mahoney Nick Martin Zack Martin Arturo Martinez Luke Massa Dan McCarthy Cam McDaniel Anthony McDonald Kendall Moore Matthew Mulvey Brandon Newman Tate Nichols Troy Niklas Louis Nix III Andrew Nuss Sean Oxley Tyler Plantz Andrew Plaska David Posluszny

S OT DE QB DE CB DE WR LS TE WR DE CB WR LB OT DE OT OL OT TE WR S RB LB LB QB NG OT TE NG OG LB RB CB LB

5-11 6-4 6-5 6-2 6-4 6-0 6-4 5-11 6-3 6-5 5-9 6-4 5-9 5-11 6-3 6-5 6-6 6-7 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-4 6-2 5-10 6-2 6-1 6-2 6-0 6-8 6-6 6-3 6-3 6-2 5-9 5-11 6-0

177 291 280 220 265 185 300 187 200 253 180 300 180 190 225 301 265 294 280 303 250 220 205 192 238 242 191 303 320 250 326 303 235 195 185 235

FR FR SO SO FR SO DE WR SR FR FR SR GS SO FR SO FR SR FR JR SO SO SR FR SR SO SR SR SO FR SO GS SR SO SR SR

79 56 83 11 6 31 78 35 97 24 38 95 85 39 55 26 87 22 13 69 92 79 40 5 9 7 35 53 1 66 82 94 1 20 23

Jordan Prestwood Anthony Rabasa Mike Ragone Tommy Rees Theo Riddick Cameron Roberson Trevor Robinson Joe Romano David Ruffer Chris Salvi Joe Schmidt Kona Schwenke Ryan Sharpley Ryan Sheehan Prince Shembo Jamoris Slaughter Daniel Smith Harrison Smith Danny Spond Tony Springmann Tyler Stockton Matt Tansey Nick Tausch Manti Te’o Robby Toma Stephon Tuitt Ben Turk Justin Utupo Deion Walker Chris Watt Alex Welch Hafis Williams Ishaq Williams Cierre Wood Lo Wood

OT LB TE QB WR RB OG DB K S LB DE WR CB LB S WR S LB DE NG OL K LB WR DE P LB WR OG TE NG LB RB CB

6-5 6-3 6-4 6-2 5-11 6-0 6-5 5-9 6-1 5-10 6-5 6-4 6-4 5-10 6-2 6-0 6-4 6-2 6-2 6-5 6-0 6-6 6-0 6-2 5-9 6-6 5-11 6-1 6-3 6-3 6-4 6-1 6-5 6-0 5-10

287 240 250 201 198 218 311 173 193 190 220 285 210 177 250 198 215 214 242 280 302 265 190 255 185 295 185 251 206 310 245 295 255 215 195

FR FR GS SO JR SO SR SO GS SR FR SO SR SR SO SR SO GS SO FR JR JR JR JR JR FR JR SO SR JR SO SR FR JR SO


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

27

B A L L S T Local trio to the rescue A T E

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTOS

Left: Tyler Rayburn makes a tackle for Columbus East last season. Right: Columbus North receiver Chris Shillings heads upfield after catching a pass. Both are playing for Ball State this fall.

North, East grads hope to help bring Ball State back to prominence BY JESS HUFFMAN jhuffman@therepublic.com

Tyler Rayburn used to joke with Keenan Noel about playing college football together. Back when they were captains of their elementary school basketball team they laughed at the thought. It seemed as though they were dreaming up dreams bigger than their hands could grasp. “We always kind of teased that we’d go on to college together and play at the same school,” Rayburn said, reflecting on their days at Fodrea Elementary School. “...We were a little surprised when it actually happened.” Fast forward 10 years, and that’s exactly what’s occurring. Rayburn, Noel and Columbus North grad

Chris Shillings are preparing for their first season on the Ball State football team. Under the direction of new coach Pete Lembo, there’s an air of excitement in Muncie, and the three freshmen from Columbus are feeling it. “I’m proud to be a Cardinal right now,” said Shillings, a 6-foot-1, 200-pound wide receiver. “We’re all working hard. It’s definitely a different vibe — even the older players say so.” Since going 12-2 and playing in the GMAC Bowl in 2008, the Cardinals have experienced their share of struggles, winning a combined six games the last two seasons. Stan Parrish was fired in November and Lembo was hired as head coach a

month later. Noel, a fullback, admitted to being “wishy-washy” after hearing Parrish and his staff were leaving. After all, they had recruited him from North. But any uneasiness Noel felt was washed away when he got to know the new coaches. “I feel more comfortable with them than I did the previous coaching staff,” said Noel, a 6-foot-1, 255-pounder. As it turns out, Rayburn, an offensive lineman from Columbus East, and Shillings feel the same way. It’s a particularly nice change for Shillings, who thinks he will benefit from playing for a head coach who’s known for playing pass-andcatch football.

At Elon last year, Lembo’s team gained more than 3,500 yards through the air to just 1,200 on the ground. “I know they pass the ball a little bit more than they did last year,” Shillings said. “That’s something I’m definitely looking forward to.” At Lembo’s request, freshmen got acclimated to college life early. Shillings, Rayburn and Noel enrolled in classes in mid-June and started working out with the team. Official practices began Aug. 4. “Summer was a lot of running and lifting — trying to get bigger, faster and stronger,” said Rayburn a 6-foot-3, 274-pounder. “Camp is all

See BALL STATE on Page 28


28

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

BALL STATE Continued from Page 27

BSU PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES

Pete Lembo, Ball State head football coach, watches his team go through drills during practice.

BALL STATE SCHEDULE Sep. 3 Sep. 10 Sep. 17 Sep. 24 Oct. 1 Oct. 8 Oct. 15 Oct. 22 Oct. 29 Nov. 5 Nov. 15 Nov. 25

Indiana at South Florida Buffalo Army at Oklahoma Temple at Ohio Cent. Michigan at W. Michigan at E. Michigan at N. Illinois Toledo

7 p.m. TBA 7 p.m. 2 p.m. TBA 2 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2 p.m. Noon 8 p.m. 2 p.m.

football.” All football on the field. All football off of it. The hardest part, Shillings said, has been the learning part. The players must know the plays like they know the alphabet. “At Columbus North, camp was kind of hard in the first place,” he said. “I’m used to the physical stuff. ... In this offense there’s a lot of concepts. It’s a lot more mentally tough than it was in high school.” That’s all right, though, because Shilling learns quickly. He moved to Columbus before his freshman year of high school in 2007, having not played organized football since the third grade. By his sophomore year, he was starting at wide receiver. “My freshman year I wasn’t that good, to be honest,” Shillings said. “But by the end of my freshman year, I’d gotten a lot better.” Meanwhile, Rayburn was blossoming into a productive player at Columbus East, starting at right tackle by his sophomore year and moving to left tackle for his junior and senior seasons. Noel was a quarterback before he was a fullback. He started one game as signal-caller and also played defensive end for the Bull Dogs in 2010. Noel doesn’t know if he’ll see the field this year. Neither do his fellow freshmen. But they believe the program is headed in the right direction. “I feel the coaches know the past — the high points and the low points,” Noel said. “And I feel like they’re going to get us ready for a season like the (2008) season.” As far as the future goes, Noel hopes to graduate in four years and “maybe if I can go to the next level, I want to see that,” he said. Growing up, Noel and Rayburn laughed about their dreams through elementary school and middle school. No one is laughing now. It’s all business at Ball State. “I want to see this program in bowl games and at least contending for the Mid-American Conference championship every season,” Shillings said.

THE REPUBLIC FILE PHOTOS

Keenan Noel brings down a ball carrier during his senior season at Columbus North. Noel, North grad Chris Shillings and Columbus East grad Tyler Rayburn are playing for Ball State this year and hope to help turn around the team’s fortunes. The Cardinals kick off the season against Indiana Sept. 3 at Lucas Oil Stadium. While juniors at North, Shillings and Noel played Bloomington North in the Colts’ home. Shillings remembers the stadium being half-full. He remembers the thrill of playing where Peyton Man-

ning plays. Shillings expects to experience the same type of excitement again. Only this time he wants to be running routes for Ball State. “I would be so excited,” he said. “I know the stadium is going to be pretty close to full capacity.”

ISO 9001:2008 Certified

1080 S. Gladstone Avenue, Columbus, IN 47201

812-379-9581 www.boyermachine.com


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

BUTLER

STATE

SCHEDULES

9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 11/05 11/12 11/19

at Taylor 7 p.m. at Dubuque 6 p.m. Mt. St. Joseph 7 p.m. Earlham 7 p.m. at Hanover 1:30 p.m. at Bluffton 1:30 p.m. Defiance 1:30 p.m. at Franklin 1:30 p.m. R-Hulman 1:30 p.m. at Manchester 1:30 p.m.

Albion 1 p.m. at Indiana State 2 p.m. at Taylor 1 p.m. Drake noon at Dayton 1 p.m. at Campbell noon Valparaiso 1 p.m. Marist 1 p.m. Davidson noon at Jacksonville noon at Morehead St. 1 p.m.

9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 11/05 11/12

9/03 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

at Rose-Hulman at Allegheny at Rhodes Centre at Sewanee at Ohio Wes. at Austin Albion Wabash

6 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. TBA

PLAY THE GAME SAFE! Let Dr. Bartels fit you for an Under Armour Mouth Guard.

4570 W. Jonathon Moore Pike Columbus • 342-3969 www.TLDentist.com

HANOVER

at Univ. of South 2 p.m. Denison 1:30 p.m. Manchester 1:30 p.m. at Anderson 7 p.m. at Bluffton 1:30 p.m. Hanover 1:30 p.m. at Defiance 1:30 p.m. at Mt. St. Joe 1:30 p.m. Franklin 1:30 p.m. Rose-Hulman 1:30 p.m.

9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

FRANKLIN

DEPAUW

ANDERSON 9/01 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/15 10/22 10/29 11//05 11/12

EARLHAM

9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/29 11/05 11/12

29

Centre (Ky.) 1:30 p.m. at Th. More 1:30 p.m. at Defiance 1:30 p.m. at Rose-Hulman 2 p.m. Anderson 1:30 p.m. Earlham 1:30 p.m. Manchester 1:30 p.m. Bluffton (Ohio) 1:30 p.m. at Mt. St. Joe 1:30 p.m. Franklin 1:30 p.m.

INDIANA STATE

at Valparaiso 7 p.m. Wis.-Whitewater 1 p.m. at Bluffton 1:30 p.m. Defiance 1:30 p.m. Mt. St. Joseph 1:30 p.m. at Rose Hulman 1:30 p.m. Manchester 1:30 p.m. Anderson 1:30 p.m. at Earlham 1:30 p.m. at Hanover 1:30 p.m.

9/03 at Penn State noon 9/10 Butler 2 p.m. 9/17 at W. Kentucky 7 p.m. 9/24 Y'town St. 2:05 p.m. 10/01 at S. Dakota State 7 p.m. 10/08 at Northern Iowa 5 p.m. 10/15 W. Illinois 3:05 p.m. 10/22 at Illinois State 2 p.m. 11/05 N.Dakota St. 2:05 p.m. 11/12 at Missouri State 2 p.m. 11/19 So. Illinois 2:05 p.m.

Proud To Support Columbus High School Football

Go north! go east!

Your Columbus Printer Since 1902 4505 Kelly Street • Columbus • 812.372.2896 • pentzerprinting.com


30

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS 9/01 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

Ky. Wesleyan 7 p.m. at Ashland 7 p.m. Grand Valley St. 6 p.m. at Mich. Tech 1 p.m. Findlay 6 p.m. at Northwood noon Sag. Valley St. 6 p.m. N. Michigan 6 p.m. at Ferris State 2 p.m. Wayne State 6 p.m. at Ohio Dom. noon

MANCHESTER 9/01 9/10 9/17 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

Trine Kalamazoo at Earlham Rose-Hul Bluffton at Franklin at Hanover Mt. St. Joe at Defiance Anderson

7 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m.

MARIAN UNIVERSITY 8/27 9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 11/05

Olivet Nazarene 6 p.m. at Grand View 2 p.m. Quincy U. 1 p.m. Notre D. Coll. 1 p.m. at Malone Univ. 2 p.m. Walsh 1 p.m. Taylor 1 p.m. at St. Francis noon at Concordia 1 p.m. Saint Xavier 1 p.m.

STATE SCHEDULES ROSE-HULMAN 9/03 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

DePauw 6 p.m. at Kalamazoo 7 p.m. Hanover 2 p.m. at Manchester 1:30 p.m. Franklin 1:30 p.m. Mt. St. Joseph 1:30 p.m. at Bluffton 1:30 p.m. Defiance 1:30 p.m. at Anderson 1:30 p.m. at Earlham 1:30 p.m.

at St. Ambrose 2 p.m. McKendree noon at Concordia 1 p.m. St. Xavier noon at Walsh noon Marian noon Malone noon at Quincy 2 p.m. at Taylor 1 p.m. Central State noon

LAWSON, PUSHOR MOTE & GAMSO LLC

Attorneys at law THOMAS N. MOTE and STANLEY A. GAMSO PERSONAL INJURY | PROPERTY DAMAGE CRIMINAL DEFENSE | DIVORCE & FAMILY LAW BUSINESS & CORPORATE LAW WILLS, TRUSTS, ESTATES | REAL ESTATE LAW

379-2331

426 4TH STREET, COLUMBUS, IN

9/01 9/10 9/17 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

TAYLOR 9/01 9/10 9/17 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

ST. FRANCIS 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10.15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

TRINE

Anderson at Iowa Wes. Butler Quincy at Marian Concordia at St. Xavier at Walsh St. Francis at Malone

7 p.m. 2 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 2 p.m. 7 p.m. 1 p.m. 1 p.m.

ST. JOSEPH’S 9/03 9/10 9/17 9/24 10.01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05

at Ohio Dom 11 a.m. Shepherd noon at Lindenwood 6 p.m. Southwest Baptist noon Robert Morris 2 p.m. at N. Dame Coll. 11 a.m. at Urbana 11 a.m. Ky. Wesleyan noon William Jewell noon at Missouri S&T noon

at Manchester 7 p.m. Bluffton 1 p.m. Wis.-River Falls 1 p.m. Adrian 1 p.m. at LaGrange 1 p.m. at Alma 1:30 p.m. Hope 1 p.m. at Olivet 1 p.m. Kalamazoo 1 p.m. at Adrian 4 p.m.

WABASH 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12

at Wooster 1 p.m. Ohio Wesleyan TBA at Univ. of Chicago noon Kenyon 2 p.m. Wash. St. Louis 1 p.m. at Oberlin 1 p.m. Denison 1 p.m. at Allegheny 1 p.m. Wittenberg 1 p.m. at DePauw 1 p.m.

VALPARAISO 9/03 9/10 9/17 10/01 10/08 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/05 11/12 11/19

Franklin 7 p.m. at Ytown St. 3 p.m. at Duquesne 11 a.m. Morehead St. 1 p.m. San Diego 1 p.m. at Butler noon at Drake 1 p.m. Dayton 1 p.m. at Marist 11 a.m. Campbell 1 p.m. at Davidson noon

“Award Winning”

DARLAGE CUSTOM MEATS GREAT FOR PARTIES AND GRILLING T-BONES • RIBEYES • FILETS • GROUND BEEF • PORK PORK BURGERS • BEEF FREEZER BUNDLES AVAILABLE Just off Highway 50 • 5974 E. CR 410 N., Seymour • 522-1635


The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

31

‘Favorites’ as sweet as apple pie BY LEW FREEDMAN lfreedman@therepublic.com It was a throw-in question, the one in the mix that was serious compared to the rest of the light-hearted survey. After asking players at Columbus East and Columbus North what their favorite football movie is, their favorite dessert, and who they would like to play them in a movie, among others, The Republic asked, “What is the most memorable thing a football coach has said in a lecture or pep talk?” If East coach Bob Gaddis wants to know MAX FISCHER what his guys are recording in their brains when he speaks, he’s got the answer now. Olympian after Olympian, 15 in all, answered: “Do what champions do.” Perhaps the phrase should be posted at the home field. Another comment that registered with senior George Macy was, “Big players make big plays in big games.” Defensive back Eric Olds recalled

hearing, “It’s never as good as it seems and it’s never as bad as it seems.” The comment, “If everyone followed you, what would the team be like?” made an impression on junior Cody Edwards. At Columbus North players responded differently. “There is going to be adversity. What are you going to do about it?” junior Zak Ruehman said. “Make this memorable,” is something that stuck with sophomore Neal Shaw. Trace Fetterer was clearly inspired by a very Lombardi-ish statement, “You could’ve laid down and died and gave up, or you could stand up and kick them in the throat, and you chose to stand up.” Finally, an observation noted by both Michael DeDomenic and Nick Oliver was: “We don’t wait around for dead raccoons or joggers.” The statement begs for context. Back to fun and games, players at East mentioned a wide variety of favorite movies, and favorite football movies. Senior Max Fischer likes “the Rocky series” and “Remember The Titans.” Aaron Richardson went for “Saving Private Ryan” and “Rudy.” Sophomore Baylen Burton voted for

“Forrest Gump” as his favorite, saying, “Great life-changing movie.” Among other choices for best movie were “Green Mile,” (Luke Hampton), “Caddyshack,” (Jordan Patterson) and “Braveheart,” (Zack Lawson). At North, wide receiver Christian Williams gave a vote to “Jerry Maguire” and noted, “I’d love to be a sports agent after high school.” Deonta Dismuke backed “Training Day,” as the best. Senior Austin Sizemore appreciated “Meet Joe Black” because “It showed me what love is.” There were many votes for “The Longest Yard,” “Waterboy,” “Remember The Titans,” “The Blind Side,” and “Rudy.” The fanciful question of having someone play a player in a movie elicited many Hollywood A list nominees: Tom Hanks, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Brad Pitt, Sean Astin, Chris Farley, Will Farrell, Steve Carell, Adam Sandler, Will Smith, Johnny Depp, Matt Wahlberg, Denzel Washington, Matt Damon, Jim Carey, Vin Diesel, Ben Affleck, Vince Vaughn, LL Cool J, Tom Cruise, and Liam Neeson. Endorsements of special dessert treats did not highlight nutritional delights. There was big support for ice cream,

apparent typographical errors in favor of tuna fish and salad, cheesecake, brownies, milkshakes, chocolate chip cookies, apple pie, Twinkies, cherry pie, and yogurt. East quarterback Gunner Kiel plugged “Milky Way pie.” And Patterson scored points on the home front citing his mother’s recipe for black-bottom cupcakes. Good luck to a coach trying to please squads with a commonly appreciated pregame meal. Favorites were issued for lasagna, pizza, fish tacos, steak, chicken alfredo, Cajun shrimp pasta, pork chops, hamburger helper, pulled pork, cheeseburger and fries, biscuits and gravy, sloppy Joes, spaghetti, and sushi. Some guys suggested entire meals. East’s Fischer would smile if you put a plate containing sausage, potatoes and green beans in front of him. North defensive back Taylor Summa was a detailed meal planner whose favorite dinner is steak ham, mashed potatoes, corn, macaroni and crescent rolls. If Summa needs an accomplished chef to feed his desires, teammate Jaden Wilson has simpler tastes. Wilson’s favorite repast? A Happy Meal.

Innovation Under Construction. sm ...with a new 2012 Harley-Davidson!

CONSTRUCTION • Roads & Streets SPECIALISTS • Subdivisions • Utility Construction • Bridges & Drainage Structures • Commercial Site Development • Industrial Construction

Bloomington (812) 330-2037

Mann’s Harley- Davidson

Columbus (812) 579–5248

3250 W Market Place Dr. Edinburgh 812 - 526 -3485

Lafayette (765) 772-7500

Indianapolis (317) 788-6885

www.milestonelp.com

Richmond (765) 935-4231


32

The Republic, Columbus, Ind., Friday, August 19, 2011

t r o p p u S o t d Prou

NORTH & EAST FOOTBALL PROGRAMS & THEIR PLAYERS Our board-certified orthopedic surgeons provide the best possible medical care with kindness and courtesy. Treating athletes and non-athletes alike, our physicians have expertise in the full-spectrum of orthopedic and podiatric medicine.

Thomas W. Marshall, M.D.

Larry D. Olson, M.D.

David D. Gallagher, M.D.

Darryl A. Tannenbaum, M.D.

John B. Chambers, M.D.

Douglas J. Federle, M.D.

Cary M. Guse, M.D.

Lisa R. Lanham, DPM

COLUMBUS 940 North Marr Rd. Suite C • Columbus, IN 47201-6664 (812) 376–9353 • (800) 886–9353 SEYMOUR • GREENSBURG • NORTH VERNON

www.southerninortho.com


Columbus Football 2011