2016 Summer Eagles' Call

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MEMBERS // Tickle NTLC / Dolly Nabors

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Dolly Nabors

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Office manager retires after processing thousands of Eagle applications.

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As office manager for the Chickasaw Council in Memphis, Tenn., Dolly Nabors did it all. She turned on the lights each morning and filled in for vacationing staff members. But her passion was helping young men reach the rank of Eagle Scout. She figures she processed between 5,600 and 6,000 Eagle applications between 1985 and her retirement this spring — a task that often meant deciphering bad handwriting and tracking down missing merit badges.

a bonus (and a nice one at that). To accommodate attendees’ availability, conferences at the Tickle NTLC operate on three schedules: seven day (Sunday through Saturday), five day (Monday through Friday) and weekend (Friday through Sunday). Because the site is within a day’s drive of nearly two-thirds of the U.S. population, these schedule options let Scouters maximize their use of vacation days. Conference fees range from $175 to $530 per person. Adding to the appeal, the Tickle NTLC is just a short hike from the Scott Summit Center. There, conference participants can enjoy zip lines, challenge courses, aquatic activities and other attractions each evening. For more info about the Tickle NTLC, visit summitbsa.org/programs/training.

About John Tickle

An Eagle Scout gave his name and financial resources to the Tickle NTLC. John D. Tickle Sr. is chairman of the board for Bristol, Va.-based Strongwell Corp., the world’s leading producer of fiber-reinforced plastics. A past president and board member of the Sequoyah Council in Johnson City, Tenn., Tickle has supported a range of causes in the Appalachian region. The United Way, the National Society of Fundraising Executives and the American Composites Manufacturers Association have honored Tickle for his community and industry leadership. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award, the Silver Buffalo and Silver Beaver awards and the Heroism Award, which he earned at age 69 for using CPR to save a heart-attack victim.

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Dolly Nabors, Jeremy Palazolo

“It’s just unbelievable what these young men do,” she says. “I wanted to make it easy for them, not make it a hard process.” Nabors’ Scouting career began in 1956 when she joined the Chickasaw Council as a temporary typist. It ended on March 31, 2016, the day she facilitated the council’s annual Eagle Scout banquet. “She picked her retirement date around the Eagle banquet,” says Program Director Jeremy Palazolo, one of Nabors’ Eagle Scouts from 1992. To honor her service, the council has created the Good Nabors Award, which will go to outstanding council employees. “She’s the first recipient,” Palazolo says. “That’s pretty big shoes to fill for whoever receives the next honor. I don’t know how you match 60 years of service.”

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: DIGSAU; COURTESY OF THE CHICKASAW COUNCIL; COURTESY OF THE TICKLE FAMILY. OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP: ROGER MORGAN/BSA FILE; ANDREW HENSLEY

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ince it opened in 2013, the Summit Bechtel Reserve (SBR) in West Virginia has become a go-to destination for adrenaline-fueled Scouting adventures — as well as the permanent home of the National Scout Jamboree. But adventure and activity are just part of SBR’s mission. This summer, the sprawling facility is expanding its reach with the launch of the John D. Tickle National Training and Leadership Center (NTLC), which is part of the Thomas S. Monson Leadership Excellence Complex. Much like the Philmont Training Center in New Mexico, the Tickle NTLC offers a range of conferences for Scouts, adult volunteers and BSA professionals. Some, like Mountain Biking Instructor School, take advantage of SBR’s unique facilities. In other cases, like Dynamic Cub Scout Programming, the location is simply

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