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Hip-hop didn’t save Darryl “D.M.C.”’ McDaniels’ life; it damn near killed him. On stage, Darryl McDaniels of the hip-hop trailblazing trio Run-DMC, had an energy and confidence that defied gravity. Draped in gold chains with a fresh pair of white untied Adidas, DMC’s lyrics led a generation into hip-hop, a budding music genre that would later influence global culture. But off stage, he was a man with demons. Depression is a sneaky son of a b***h. Sometimes, it is a slow, undiagnosed realization that comes when a person is at their ugliest, or never at all. For Darryl, his depression was trapped between his personal happiness and other people’s expectations. In his memoir, Ten Ways Not to Commit Suicide, Darryl writes, “My introduction to hip-hop – the very thing that would one day make me rich and famous – came as

Ebony  
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