Page 1

(July
24:
Dandy
Wandy)
 
 First
of
all,
the
ability
to
trade
players
is
one
of
the
reasons
sports
are
 awesome.

I’m
kind
of
surprised
that
no
one
has
ever
mounted
a
successful
Supreme
 Court
challenge
to
the
concept
of
transferring
human
beings
across
the
country
to
a
 new
workplace
(sometimes
with,
but
more
often)
without
their
consent.

Think
of
it
 in
layman’s
terms:



 That’d
be
pretty
cool,
unless
you
were
the
guy
traded
to
Starbucks
headquarters
in
 Seattle
for
a
crate
of
ballpoint
pens.
 Although
we’ve
played
great
baseball
after
the
break,
it’s
clear
that
we’re
 going
to
need
some
new
blood
if
we
want
to
hang
with
the
Reds
down
the
stretch.

 Two
months
ago,
the
Bucs
needed
to
pick
up
a
bat
like
Lazarus
needed
that
pick‐me‐ up
from
Christ.

Now,
with
the
offense
outpacing
that
of
the
Yankees,
a
starting
 pitcher
might
be
the
first
priority.

Jeff
Karstens
has
been
good
since
his
return
from
 injury,
but
Bedard
continues
to
flounder
and
Correia
is
basically
a
ticking
time
 bomb.

Soon
enough,
either
Bedard
will
be
sidelined
with
a
strained
right
kidney
or



Correia’s
ERA
will
jump
into
the
6.00
range
(or
both),
so
it
would
be
prudent
for
 Neal
Huntington
to
go
out
and
get
a
reliable
starter.


 The
big
names
in
the
starting
pitcher
market
are
Cole
Hamels
and
Zack
 Greinke,
neither
of
whom
are
realistic
options
for
the
Pirates.

In
the
second
tier
is
 the
Cubs’
Ryan
Dempster,
the
owner
of
MLB’s
best
ERA
this
season.

Dempster
isn’t
 a
marquee
name
like
Hamels
or
Greinke,
but
he’s
a
five‐and‐ten
guy
(five
years
with
 current
team,
ten
years
total
in
the
league)
and
therefore
has
the
right
to
veto
any
 trade
he
doesn’t
like.

Reports
have
linked
him
to
a
deal
with
Atlanta,
but
he’s
 stalling
on
that
and
it
looks
like
he
might
ultimately
reject
it.

If
he’s
reluctant
to
join
 the
Braves,
I
can’t
imagine
he’d
okay
a
trade
to
the
upstart
Pirates.

His
loss.
 Last
night,
word
broke
out
that
the
Pirates
might
be
interested
in
Astros’
 rotation
stalwart
Wandy
Rodriguez.




 (I’m
in
the
Olympic
spirit
now.
U‐S‐A.)
 


Rodriguez
has
been
the
personification
of
reliability
over
the
past
few
years,


which
is
exactly
what
the
Pirates
need
at
this
moment.

Pitching
in
the
anonymity
of
 Houston,
he’s
put
up
an
ERA
between
3.00
and
3.60
in
each
of
the
last
four
seasons.

 If
I
had
to
describe
Wandy
Rodriguez
in
one
word,
it’d
be
“solid.”

That’s
certainly
a



compliment.

He’s
under
contract
through
2014,
which
means
he’d
be
both
a
short
 and
long
term
addition—but
also
means
it
will
take
more
than
a
throwaway
 prospect
to
acquire
him.

As
long
as
the
price
isn’t
too
high,
I’d
jump
on
it.


 


Midway
through
a
depressing
5‐1
home
loss
to
the
Cubs
(the
Cubs,
really?),


the
Wandy
speculation
turns
into
reality.



 


Well,
this
is
more
exciting
than
watching
J‐Mac
sputter
against
a
39‐56
team.



Assuming
the
news
is
true,
the
only
remaining
question
is
what
the
Pirates
will
be
 giving
up.

There
are
five
prospects
in
the
Pittsburgh
system
that
I
consider
“off‐ limits”
unless
we’re
talking
about
a
major
pickup:
Gerrit
Cole
(RHP/21
years
 old/2011
#1
overall
pick),
Jameson
Taillon
(RHP/20/2010
#2
overall
pick),
Josh
 Bell
(OF/19/2011
2nd
round
pick
with
upper‐half
of
1st
round
talent),
Starling
 Marte
(OF/23/2011
Double‐A
batting
average
leader),
and
Luis
Heredia
 (RHP/17/Mexican
wunderkind
with
huge
ceiling).

None
of
that
quintet
would
be
in
 the
conversation
for
Wandy.1

But
anything
below
them
I’d
be
okay
with.
 























































 1
It’s
becoming
clear
to
me
that
“Wandy”
is
one
of
those
names
that
lends
itself
to
 being
the
person’s
main
title.

You
say,
“Wandy”
and
people
know
immediately
who
 you’re
talking
about.

Like
Oprah.

Hearing,
“Rodriguez
is
pitching
tonight,”
is
like
 hearing,
“Winfrey’s
show
is
on
at
3.”



45
minutes
later,
it’s
official.



 Nice!

Let’s
see
the
early
reviews.
 (BucsDugout.com
contributor)



 (Baseball
America
writer)



I’m
right
with
them.




 
Grossman
was
the
principal
ransom
for
the
Astros
in
this
exchange.

He
had
 a
great
year
in
high‐A
ball
last
year,
walking
over
100
times
and
putting
up
a
stellar
 .418
OBP.

It’s
hard
to
envision
him
as
a
regular
big
league
corner
outfielder,
though,
 due
to
his
lack
of
pop.

I
could
see
him
developing
into
a
bench
bat/platoon
player
 sort
of
guy,
which
is
useful
but
not
anything
to
fret
over
losing.

Owens
was
a
low‐ minors
star,
but
struggled
mightily
once
he
got
to
Triple‐A.

He
likely
doesn’t
have
 major
league
value
going
forward.

Cain
is
something
of
a
question
mark;
a
high



school
bonus
baby,
he’s
posted
middling
results
in
rookie
and
low‐A
ball.

The
 chances
he
grows
into
an
MLB
starter
aren’t
great.

All
told,
what
we’re
giving
up
is
 probably
not
worth
2+
seasons
of
Wandy.

After
years
of
toiling
for
hopeless
Astros
 clubs,
I’m
sure
Wandy’s
thrilled
to
join
a
contender
for
the
stretch
run!



 Oh.

Well,
uh,
that
just
reflects
the
kind
of
commitment
and
dedication
you’re
 looking
for
in
a
new
addition!
(?)

Just
joshin’.

I
had
the
same
reaction
when
I
found
 out
my
cable
package
at
school
didn’t
include
MLB
Network.
 


There
are
also
a
few
hidden
sweeteners
in
the
deal.

For
one,
the
Pirates
add


a
veteran
pitcher
without
restraining
their
undersized
checkbook
as
much
as
you’d
 think
such
a
move
might.



The
Astros
are
moving
to
the
American
League
West
in
2013.

They
are
already
the
 worst
team
in
baseball
by
a
truly
laughable
margin.

Given
the
step
up
in
 competition,
they
will
likely
lose
between
100
and
105
games
in
each
of
the
next
 two
years.

And
in
the
midst
of
one
of
those
14‐3
drubbings
at
the
hands
of
the
 Rangers,
general
manager
Jeff
Luhnow
will
think
to
himself,
“We
have
paid
Wandy
 Rodriguez
thousands
of
dollars
during
this
game
alone,
and
he
cannot
help
us
stop
 the
bleeding
because
he
plays
for
the
Pittsburgh
Pirates.”

Such
is
the
price
of
 baseball
sometimes.

The
Pirates
are
doing
well
to
exploit
this.


 


Also,
should
Wandy
continue
pitching
in
the
general
manner
he’s
pitched
this


season,
his
results
will
improve
by
virtue
of
change
in
workplace
alone.





Great
work
by
Jon.

He
posted
a
graphic
documenting
the
landing
spots
of
all
HRs
 Wandy
has
allowed
at
home
in
2012,
imposed
on
a
map
of
PNC
Park.

It’s
pretty
easy
 to
see
that
nearly
all
home
runs
he’s
allowed
to
left
field
become
outs—or,
at
worst,
 doubles—if
they’re
hit
in
Pittsburgh.

Anyone
who’s
ever
watched
a
game
in
 Houston
knows
the
left
field
“Crawford
Boxes2”
are
the
definition
of
a
“short
porch”
 and
turn
many
long
flyballs
into
cheap
homers.

What
you
might
not
realize
is
just
 how
big
of
an
impact
that
can
have
on
a
pitcher’s
results
if
he
pitches
half
his
games
 there.

In
2011,
Wandy
Rodriguez
and
Mike
Pelfrey
had
nearly
identical
batted
ball
 profiles:
when
contact
was
made,
Rodriguez
induced
20.0%
line
drives,
45.2%
 groundballs,
and
34.8%
flyballs
compared
to
Pelfrey’s
19.6%,
45.6%,
and
34.7%
 marks
in
the
same
categories.


It’s
not
a
stretch
to
say
that
the
difference
in
their
 home
run
per
flyball
rate
(HR/FB)—13.0%
for
Wandy,
9.1%
for
Pelfrey—probably
 had
something
to
do
with
the
fact
that
one
of
them
pitched
their
home
contests
in


























































 2
Named
as
such
because
they
run
parallel
to
Crawford
Street
in
downtown
 Houston,
thank
you
Wikipedia.



front
of
the
Crawford
Boxes
while
the
other
started
15
games
in
the
spacious
 dimensions
of
New
York’s
Citi
Field.

Science
rules.3
 


I’m
not
saying
I
have
no
reservations.

We’re
talking
about
a
33‐year
old


pitcher
who
probably
won’t
be
improving
with
age
(unless
he
goes
the
Barry
Bonds
 route,
which
is
illegal
both
by
baseball
rules
and
federal
law)
and
is
already
showing
 some
mild
signs
of
decline.



 Wandy
has
traditionally
been
a
high
strikeout
guy,
but
his
K/9
has
been
falling
 incrementally
since
2008
and
currently
sits
at
6.13.

Hitters
are
making
more
 contact
on
his
pitches
both
in
and
out
of
the
strike
zone,
which
indicates
that
the
 drop
isn’t
just
a
coincidence
of
sequencing.4

Fortunately,
it
doesn’t
look
like
a
 product
of
diminished
stuff—his
average
fastball
velocity
is
actually
higher
than
it
 























































 3
Yes,
that
was
a
Bill
Nye
the
Science
Guy
theme
song
reference.

Born
in
the
‘90s
and
 proud
of
it.
 4
“Coincidence
of
sequencing?”
Consider
this:
Pitcher
A
and
Pitcher
B
both
get
10
 swinging
strikes
in
a
game.

Pitcher
A
racks
up
10
strikeouts,
because
all
his
whiffs
 came
with
two
strikes.

Pitcher
B
strikes
no
one
out,
because
he
induced
swings‐ and‐misses
early
in
the
count
exclusively.

They
probably
have
similar
“whiff
skills,”
 even
if
the
results
differ.

If
you
had
to
predict
their
future
strikeout
rates,
you’d
 want
to
have
this
information
on
hand.



was
in
his
best
strikeout
year
(2008).

Pitch
FX
data
also
reveals
an
uptick
in
2‐seam
 fastballs
this
year,
indicating
that
the
spike
in
groundballs
is
intentional.

The
more
 groundballs
one
gets,
the
more
one
can
get
away
with
fewer
strikeouts,
because
one
 is
reducing
the
possibility
of
the
ball
being
hit
in
the
air
for
a
home
run.

As
expected,
 we
conclude
our
description
of
Wandy
Rodriguez
with
the
word
“solid.”

Wandy
 Rodriguez
is
a
solid
pitcher.
 (July
26:
Change
You
Gotta
Believe
In)
 



 


Wheeling
and
dealing
isn’t
the
only
method
of
roster
improvement
available


to
the
Pirates.

Tonight,
they’ll
upgrade
from
within.

Much
ballyhooed
prospect
 Starling
Marte
is
set
to
make
his
major
league
debut
in
Houston
after
it
was
 announced
yesterday,
to
widespread
glee,
that
he’d
be
joining
the
big
club.



To
this
point,
the
Pirates’
left
field
situation
has
consisted
of
Alex
Presley
 (.231/.269/.364),
the
recently
demoted
Jose
Tabata
(.230/.295/.341),
and
folk
hero
 Drew
Sutton
(.241/.250/.431,
but
with
the
defensive
prowess
of
a
wandering
 sheep).

Meanwhile,
Marte’s
been
coming
into
his
own
at
Triple‐A
Indianapolis
 (.286/.347/.500,
with
13
triples
and
12
homers
in
99
games),
and
the
clamors
for
 his
promotion
have
grown
deafening
recently.

I
understand
the
reluctance
to
rush
a
 prospect
to
the
big
leagues
before
he’s
absolutely
ready,
but
dire
times
call
for
dire
 measures.

Unfortunately,
I’m
sitting
on
a
plane
right
now
en
route
to
vacation
in
 South
Carolina,
so
I
won’t
be
able
to
watch.

Starling’s
batting
leadoff.

Hope
the
kid
 makes
something
happen.
 [Flight
lands
at
8:20,
I
immediately
turn
my
phone
on
and
refresh
Twitter]



First
pitch
of
the
ballgame!
He
could
go
0‐for‐August
and
still
maintain
the
fans’
 support
after
this
entrance.

The
future’s
so
bright,
we
gotta
wear
flip‐down
shades.5
 (July
29:
Speculation)
 


Everyone
is
happy
about
the
Wandy
acquisition.

With
the
exception
the
guy


who
got
forced
out
of
the
rotation
as
a
result.
 























































 5
Patented
by
Pirates
Hall
of
Fame
player‐manager
Fred
Clarke
in
1915!
#BUCN



Correia
wants
to
be
a
starter,
and
he’s
not
content
with
being
a
long
relief


option
in
Pittsburgh.

Understandable.

Being
a
starting
pitcher
has
a
certain
badge
 of
honor
quality
about
it,
especially
for
someone
who’s
started
105
games
in
the
last
 four
years.

I
wouldn’t
be
happy
either.

But
I
think
I’d
realize
that
I
was
a
 replacement‐level
commodity
to
begin
with.
 


The
other
thing
I’ve
heard
today
is
a
vague
rumor
that
the
Pirates
are
one
of


the
teams
probing
the
Indians
about
Shin‐Soo
Choo’s
asking
price.

Allegedly,
it
 would
include
Marte.

That’s
gonna
be
a
no‐go.





 


We
lost
to
the
Astros
today.

J‐Mac
walked
SEVEN.

I’m
starting
to
become


concerned.

He
really
needs
to
turn
it
around
or
else
the
rest
of
the
season
is
going
to
 be
“A.J.
and
Wandy
and
pray
for
rain.”

46
hours
left
to
make
some
deals.

In
Neal
We
 Trust.



(July
30:
Bye,
Bye,
Brad;
Salut,
Snider)
 


Ever
see
that
Jean‐Claude
Van
Damme
movie
Sudden
Death,
where
the
setting


is
Game
7
of
the
Stanley
Cup
Finals6
but
the
focus
of
everything
is
the
events
 happening
off
the
ice?

Tonight’s
game
against
the
Cubs
is
exactly
like
that,
except
 that
Wrigley
Field
isn’t
laden
with
bombs
intended
to
kill
the
Vice
President
and
a
 bunch
of
other
important
people.

The
Bucs
are
getting
smashed
by
the
Baby
Bears,
 but
we’re
more
focused
on
possible
transactions
that
are
being
negotiated
during
 the
game,
and
they’re
more
concerned
about
sending
their
recently
traded
players
 off
with
hugs.



 Chicago’s
traded
Paul
Maholm
and
Reed
Johnson
to
the
Braves,
and
moved
Geovany
 Soto
to
the
Rangers—and
this
game
isn’t
even
over
yet.

Each
time,
the
Cubs
have
 convened
in
the
dugout
and
taken
turns
embracing
their
now
ex‐teammates.

Watch
 out,
Cubbies:
a
lengthy
pat
on
the
back
after
a
good
play
might
mean,
“Nice
knowing
 you,”
and
not,
“Nice
job.”




























































 6
In
Pittsburgh,
coincidentally.



For
once,
I
could
care
less
if
Erik
Bedard
has
given
up
given
up
nine
runs


without
getting
out
of
the
5th,
because
the
trade
winds
are
blowing.

The
Choo
 rumor
isn’t
dead
yet.

Stephen
Drew’s
name
has
been
mentioned.

Putting
together
a
 package
for
San
Diego’s
Chase
Headley
is
still
a
remote
possibility.

Something
is
 going
to
happen
in
the
next
18
hours.

Nobody’s
quite
sure
what.



 


What,
now?

I
know
who
Travis
Snider
is.

He’s
one
of
those
guys
who’s
been


talked
about
as
a
big
prospect
for
years
but
hasn’t
been
able
to
establish
himself
in
 the
bigs.

Snider
brings
a
ton
of
upside.

I
would
never
have
guessed,
however,
that
 he’d
be
on
our
radar
as
a
potential
deadline
pickup.

When
you
think
deadline
 acquisitions,
you
think
of
proven
vets
brought
in
to
stabilize
a
team
in
the
short‐ term,
not
youngsters
with
untapped
potential.

But
getting
beyond
the
surprise
 factor,
it
sounds
like
a
really
good
deal.




(Meaning
we
just
got
a
steal.)



 (Morosi=FOXSports.com
national
baseball
writer)



 (I
thought
that
was
a
really
funny
response.)
 


Assuredly,
some
people
are
going
to
be
upset.

The
Pirates
are
surrendering


their
0.50
ERA
7th
inning
man
for
an
unproven
outfielder.





It’s
true:
Brad
Lincoln
has
been
completely
fantastic
out
of
the
bullpen
this
year.

 That’s
exactly
the
issue,
though:
the
consensus
is
that
Lincoln
is
never
going
to
be
 much
more
than
a
good
reliever.

There’s
value
in
getting
60‐80
quality
relief
 innings
a
year
out
of
a
guy,
but
bullpen
parts
are
also
a
dime
a
dozen.

Just
look
at
 the
names
the
Pirates
have
picked
up
for
essentially
nothing
over
the
last
few
years:
 Jason
Grilli
(plucked
from
Phillies
Triple‐A
affiliate,
sub‐2.00
ERA
this
year),
Juan
 Cruz
($1.25
million
free
agent,
2.61
ERA),
Jose
Veras
($1
million
free
agent,
9.2
 career
K/9),
Javier
Lopez
($775,000
free
agent,
2.79
ERA
in
2010),
and
the
list
goes
 on.

You
can
take
failed
starters
with
good
arms
(i.e.
Lincoln
himself)
and
train
them
 to
be
effective
relievers.

If
Travis
Snider
develops
into
an
average
position
player—


and
there’s
no
reason
to
think
he
won’t—he’ll
easily
equal
Lincoln’s
worth
through
 the
end
of
their
respective
team
control
periods.





 


Travis
Snider
has
put
up
a
respectable
.248/.306/.429
line
for
the
Blue
Jays,


while
receiving
infrequent
playing
time.

He’s
never
had
a
chance
to
settle
in
at
the
 major
league
level
for
more
than
half
a
season.

Has
he
lived
up
to
expectations?

Not
 quite.

Can
we
throw
him
up
there
with
Ryan
Leaf
and
Kwame
Brown
in
the
Bust
 Hall
of
Fame?

Absolutely
not.





For
someone
who’s
been
dogged
for
not
yet
having
reached
his
potential,
he
doesn’t
 have
very
many
candles
on
his
birthday
cake.

(24,
to
be
exact.)

Chase
Utley
didn’t
 even
make
his
MLB
debut
until
he
was
older
than
Snider
is
today.

He’s
an
asset
 already,
and
there’s
plenty
of
time
for
him
to
improve.


 


Thanks
to
the
miracle
of
social
media,
we
can
see
the
players’
own
reactions


to
being
traded.

The
new
Bucco
first:




 @Lunchboxhero45?

Apparently
a
simple
tribute
to
his
love
of
eating.

I
can
dig
it.

 Also,
“Pittsburg”
is
a
town
of
20,233
in
Kansas.

“Pittsburgh”
is
the
City
of
 Champions.

Common
mistake.

Won’t
hold
it
against
him.

Your
turn,
Mr.
Lincoln:



It
gets
better.
 (Lincoln
II;
I
think
autocorrect
turned
“believe”
into
“beloved.”)



 Very
classy
exit
by
Lincoln.

I
sure
hope
he’s
right.

For
the
record,
Brad,
I
don’t
hold
 it
against
you
that
you’re
not
Tim
Lincecum
or
Clayton
Kershaw.


 (July
31:
All
Merchandise
Must
Go
By
4
p.m.)
 


I’m
not
going
to
pretend
for
a
second
I
know
what
Neal
Huntington
is
trying


to
do
in
the
last
hours
before
the
non‐waiver
deadline
arrives.

It’s
been
pretty
much
 ruled
out
that
any
of
the
big
names
are
coming
to
the
Pirates,
so
we’re
probably
 looking
at
a
few
minor
additions.

The
combination
of
Wandy
and
Snider
is
already
a



bigger
yield
than
what
we
picked
up
around
the
deadline
in
2011—adding
Derrek
 Lee
and
Ryan
Ludwick
for
practically
nothing—so
anything
else
is
gravy.



 Gaby
Sanchez….interesting.





 .202/.250/.306
doesn’t
sound
like
a
line
of
a
player
that
a
contending
team
would
 want
to
add
to
its
August/September
lineup.

He’s
also
endured
two
separate
 demotions
to
Triple‐A
in
2012.

If
this
goes
through,
we’re
really
counting
on
him
to
 rediscover
his
2010‐2011
hitting
skills.





All
right,
then.

I
don’t
believe
that
Sanchez
has
forgotten
how
to
hit,
but
it’s
less
than
 a
sure
thing
that
his
numbers
will
recover
to
their
previous
“All‐Star”
levels.7

The
 Pirates
clearly
believe
in
either
him
or
their
own
staff’s
ability.



 Update
on
the
specifics
of
the
deal.


























































 7
“You
get
to
be
an
All‐Star,
[points
at
different
person]
and
you
get
to
be
an
All‐Star,
 [points
at
another
different
person],
and
you
get
to
be
an
All‐Star!
[points
at
James
 McDonald,
Ryan
Vogelsong,
Johnny
Cueto,
and
Ryan
Dempster]
Sorry,
guys,
we
only
 have
so
much
space.”



So
a
uniquely
named,
but
light‐hitting
defensive
outfielder
(Gorkys
Hernandez)
and
 an
end‐of‐first‐round
draft
pick8
for
a
former
“All‐Star”
and
a
minor
league
relief
 pitcher.

I’ll
miss
watching
Gorkys
snatch
every
ball
in
the
area
code
as
a
late‐inning
 defensive
replacement,
but
ultimately
he’s
not
very
valuable.

Let’s
hope
the
Marlins
 don’t
use
the
draft
pick
to
take
a
Hall
of
Famer.


 


Time
for
a
worry‐relieving
joke.


























































 8
Another
part
of
the
new
draft
rules
gives
small
market
teams
and
low‐revenue
 teams
a
chance
to
win
one
of
the
six
“competitive
balance”
picks,
which
will
be
 selections
#31‐36.
Unlike
regular
draft
slots,
these
can
be
traded.
I
can’t
find
 anything
to
complain
about
here.






Ozzie
Guillen
wanted
to
be
a
sailor
when
he
was
a
kid,
but
his
language
made
sailors
 too
uncomfortable
and
he
was
forced
to
turn
to
baseball
instead.
 


I’ve
been
giving
Jake
(the
fellow
Lincecum
lover)
the
play‐by‐play
on
today’s


trade
action
because
he
doesn’t
have
Twitter
access
at
the
moment.

He
raises
a
 good
point
about
the
logistics
of
bringing
in
Sanchez.



 Assuming
Snider
was
set
to
become
the
everyday
right
fielder,
first
base
was
going
 to
be
a
platoon
of
Garrett
Jones
and
Casey
McGehee.

Now
there’s
another
right‐ handed
hitting
first
baseman
in
the
mix.

Or
is
there?



It
becomes
official
minutes
later.

Color
me
confused.



Jonah
Keri
(author
of
The
Extra
2%
and
my
favorite
baseball
writer)
is
similarly
 perplexed.



Harsh,
but
true—he’s
been
terrible
for
the
better
part
of
the
last
three
years.
2010‐ 2012
ERA:
5.13.

Ouch.
 


Wait,
I
just
figured
it
out.

We
were
probably
going
to
cut
McGehee
anyway,


so
we’re
just
picking
up
a
free
player
for
him
instead.

Makes
a
little
more
sense
 now.

Still
not
thrilled
about
having
Chad
Qualls
on
the
roster.
 


So
now
we
can
call
the
action
final
and
appraise
the
moves.

Wandy=solid.



(obviously)
Snider=good
in
the
short
term,
possibly
GREAT
in
the
long
term.

 Sanchez=why
not?

Qualls=why?
(but
not
totally
inexplicable)

The
lack
of
big
names
 reeled
in
will
be
no
doubt
cited
by
the
anti‐ownership
forces
as
proof
of
indifference
 on
the
front
office’s
part,
but
that’s
because
nothing
would
satisfy
them.



Personally,
I’m
pretty
happy
with
the
overall
results.

We
solidified
the


rotation,
added
a
couple
bats,
and—most
importantly—didn’t
sacrifice
any
major
 assets
to
do
it.

All
the
pieces
are
in
place
for
a
run
at
October
baseball.

Now
pardon
 me
while
I
go
pound
some
Advil
and
take
a
nap.





 The
deadline
is
grueling
on
GMs
and
fans
alike.


 
 
 
 


Deadline, 2012  

The trading week that was.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you