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Scott McCagherty Columbia University GSAPP 2013-2016


Studio Stacking Luminous Boxes Intimation/Imitation 15 135th St Fulton Park Volver

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Technology New New Inc. Facade New Light Industrial Adv. Curtain Wall

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Visual Studies Sauna in Woods

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STACKING

Critic: Jing Liu Location: Central Park, New York City My project began with the exploration of scale, more specifically, “what is the scale of a brick?” At what point does a brick cease to be a brick? Is there something inherent to ‘brickness’ that each brick posseses? This line of questioning led to notions of typology and brick’s ability to aggregate in an almost fractal way regardless of scale. Moreover, the language of a brick is simultaneously monumental and democratic. It is monumental due to its weight and durability as a a material. It is democratic in the sense that the process by which brick and brick buildings are created is extremely labour intensive and accessible. How might these concepts of typology, monunmentality and labour be incorporated into a design strategy? This proposal involes pavillion sized bricks as an urban playground for this exploration.

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One Brick

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Two Brick

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Assembly

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LUMINOUS BOXES

Critic: Jeffrey Inaba Location: Silver Lake, L.A. For Louis Kahn, light is inseparable from architecture. It is the undeniable thing that results from architectural form yet it is also an integral part of its perception. That is to say, it is both an effect and a cause of architecture. This entanglement has too often been either taken for granted or overlooked in contemporary architecture. In order to explore this reflexive relationship more thoroughly, the project aims to examine the different light qualities and requirements associated with a mixed use program. A workspace and a high end art gallery require divergent qualities of light. In order to temper and frame the harsh light of southern California, the building employs a protective thick roof. This serves to modulate the light creating different atmospheric effects according to programmatic need. Sections are designed to capture the cool ambient light – ideal for gallery space – emanating from the north. More social spaces, like a lobby or social space in the office, are designed to capture the warm direct light originating from the south. This change in the quality serves to frame and create different moods or atmospheres. Perhaps in this distilled environment free of architectural distraction the complicated relationship between light and architecture will untangle and reveal itself. *Selected for publication in Abstract Opposite: Concept Image Below: Diagrammatic Plan

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Art Gallery Below: South Elevation & Section Opposite: Model at work showing the differing qualities of light created by the roof

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Work Space Below: North Elevation & Section Opposite: Looking from Work Space into Gallery

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Below: Model at 1/8th Scale demonstrating the function of the ‘thick roof’ Opposite Above: Work Space showing the varying qualities of light produced at different levels of transparency in the floor Opposite Below: View of cantilevered work space over art gallery

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First

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Third

Roof

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Cantilevered work space with translucent flooring

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Gallery below work space

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INTIMATION/IMITATION

Critic: Janette Kim Location: Barry Farm, Washington D.C. Situated between two politically charged sites, the project attempts to produce dialogue and exchange on a broader social level. To the north-east lies Barry Farm, the site of one of America’s first public housing projects. It has been recently slated for re-development and thus the remaining population will be faced with re-location and re-settlemtent. All of this comes after years of neglect on the part of local housing authorities. Ironically, this site of long term disaster is situated immediately adjacent to Homeland Security’s Department of Emergency Management, the site for the coordination and management of D.C.’s short term disasters. By employing the spatial logics of each site the project attempts to create a larger urban project of a campus that engages and negotiates both types of disaster. The program of this campus is a university of ‘risk’ similar in curriculum to the Emergency Management Institute and will provide theoretical and practical training to mitigate systemic risk. Yet all of this will be done in the shadow of Barry Farm providing a spectre of localized long term tragedy of a more human scale. Opposite: First Floor Plan and Roof Plan

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Opposite: The building has the ability to adapt or change depending upon needs. Should an emergency situation arise certain programs of the building can adapt to change meet the needs of the sitation. A campus hallway with slight changes can become nerve center for responding to the diaster. Below (top): Section through the main part of the university and its hovering nature above the ground. Below (bottom): Section through Barry Farms and the universiy showing the that one is the inverse of each other architecturally.

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15 135TH ST

Critic: Robert Marino Partner: Jenny Zeckendorf Location: Harlem River Waterfront, The Bronx The housing scheme reflects an investigation to the horizontal distribution of infrastructure in high rise residential buildings. The goal is to free the floor plan of the constraints of vertical piping and columns. The free plan allows the user to create a space specifically to their living needs and an ability to continuosly transform the space as their lives evolve. The structural truss implemented to create the large horizontal span for the free floor plan becomes an occupiable level. Opposite to the free plan the truss level implements various architectural constraints to the space to create a dynamic living space. The stark contrast of the floors embodies the expression of the building. Concept Sketch: One supports the other and vice-versa.

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Above: Free Level Below: Truss Level

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Above: Two Modules Stacked Below: Contrasting typical with out structural logic and demonstration of the efficiencies gained

Exterior Steel Truss

Cast-in-Place Concrete Mechanical Space

Interior Steel Truss

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The site is bounded on four sides by major urban infrastructures: the Harlem River, Madison Ave. Bridge, Major Deegan Express Way, and the Metro-North Rail Bridge. There are plans to convert the now derelict Harlem waterfront to a public walkway and park. The building responds to this unique site conditions by creating a street wall barrier and pulls away from the water allowing for public access. Opposite: Free Plan Below: Truss Plan

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Above: Intersecting modules and creation of plaza and public outdoor space in Opposite: Plaza view From Waterfront towards Madison Ave and Major Deegan Exp.

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FULTON PARK

Critic: William Arbizu Location: Fulton Mall, Brooklyn “In developed economies in the early 1990s a typical bank branch would receive on average 1-2 visits per month from its retail banking customer base. Today that activity has plummeted to 2-3 times a year, around a 90% contraction in banking activity. There is not a single financial services product today that is increasing in demand via the branch channel.� -The Economist, 2012 Opposite: View towards Fulton Mall Below: Architecturally defining the space below determines the space above using the area between the catenary structures as space for park infrastructure.

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Below: Park Level with white rubber and a view underneath. Opposite: Catenary spaces below and the fill-in of the park above.

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Upper Level - Park

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Lower Level - Bank

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VOLVER

Critic: Galia Solomonoff Location: Frederick Douglass Houses Volume: English. Denoting a roll of parchment containing written matter; from Latin volumen ‘a roll’, or from volvere ‘to roll’. Volver: Spanish. It roughly translates ‘to return, to revert, or to come back’. Circulation: English. From Latin circulat ‘moved in a circular path’, or circulare ‘to form a circle.’ Opposite: A view of bathing area. To the left of the image is a glimpse through translucent channel glass of ramps leading to changing rooms above. Below: Circulation of vary degrees of intimacy mix in the swimming pools in the middle of the building.

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Section Through Ramps, Pools, Changing Room, Auditorium. It shows that the programs are stacked veritically according to size and privacy required. The largest and most public, the auditorium, is on the bottom. The smallest and most intimate, the changing rooms, are at the top. These radically different types of spaces converge via a set of ramps at the pools. These are then held up by a large column at the center of the project.

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First

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NEW INC. FACADE

Critic: Joesph Vidich Partners: Leo Li, Pei Pei Yang, SohEun Han Location: New Inc., Nolita, Manhattan New Inc., attached to the New Museum has a problem with branding; no one knows that exists or that it has anything to do with the museum next door. Our proposal seeks to change this relationship by taking the module of SANAA’s orginial design and adapting for a new facade. We varied its scale and proportions to create a patchwork correspoding to the program inside. Moreover, in order to increase natural light we provide punch-outs that at night become their own beacon for the burgeoing institution.

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NEW LIGHT INDUSTRIAL

Critic: Kate Kulpa Partners: Grete Grublich, Britt Johnson, Emily Oppenheim Location: Industrial Park, The Bronx For over a century the light industrial building typology has concerned itself with an efficient relationship between sunlight and structural loads. Historically, they were designed to harness as much natural daylighting in factories as possible as daylighting was initially one of the only ways to economically light a building. Thereafter a similar set of concerns were embraced by modernism as a means to experience structure and provide a connection to nature. Structurally, industrial buildings are recognizable by their column and floor design. Long after the buildings have been renovated into luxury lofts in Tribeca, the thick printing-press columns persist visually; building Typology survives program.

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The pre-cast double tees act as both a main structural element and architectural parti while also providing a measure of cost-efficiency and material economy in the building. Architecturally, the double-tee is a simple formal gesture that yields a rhythmic quality when compounded across the span of an entire floor. The tee also allows for the integration of mechanical ductwork that can be hidden from view, and for the integration of a skylight system at the top double height space. The tees are robust structurally, able to span up to 50 feet and provide a column-free work space. We have chosen to customize the pre-cast tees to support our cladding system, with steel embeds supporting aluminum framing and insulated laminated glass units.

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North Facade - Details

Elevation

Section

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South Facade - Details

Elevation

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The North Façade is sequenced as a series of columns spaced 5 feet apart. These columns double as our mullion system, and support both the pre-cast double tees as well as secure and stabilize our glazing system. The pre-cast columns are also customized with embeds that receive the aluminum frames for our glazing units. The columns expand in width to mimic the angled web of the tees, extending the architectural motif of the tee to the façade of the building. The columns are also tapered at the glazing line to allow for cleaning. The entire south façade is conceived as gigantic trombe wall for the efficient regulation and exchange of heat. We have enclosed the concrete structural wall in a glass box that continues the entire length of wall to the roof of the first floor where it meets a concrete extension of the core. Our solar heat gaining pipes are attached to this wall via embedded steel plates. By enclosing the entire structure on the east and west side by a concrete wall we have dealt with the lateral loads on the building in an isolated way. This has served two important functions, on the one hand it allowed us to remove any more structural restrictions on the north side that in turn allowed for an entire façade of just glass and concrete supported mullions. And on the other, it provided surface to articulate the mechanical (ventilation) aspects of the building in a nuanced way.

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EAST / WEST FACADE

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SOUTH FACADE

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NORTH FACADE

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STRUCTURAL - TYPICAL FRAMING PLAN 1

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Typical Structural Plan

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ARCHITECTURAL - TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 1

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STRUCTURAL - FOUNDATION PLAN 1

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SECTION A

CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

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A 4’ CONTINOUS CONCRETE FOOTING DEPTH B

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D 6” CONCRETE SLAB ON GRADE

SECTION B

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8” PRE-CAST CONCRETE WALL

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1/8" = 1'-0"

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ARCHITECTURAL - GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1

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Foundation Plan

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PASSIVE AIR EXHAUST THROUGHT WEST FACADE

PASSIVE AIR EXHAUST THROUGHT WEST FACADE

AIR EXHAUST

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CHILLED WATER SUPPLY CHILLED WATER RETURN HOT WATER SUPPLY HOT WATER RETURN

CHILLED WATER SUPPLY CHILLED WATER RETURN HOT WATER SUPPLY HOT WATER RETURN

AIR EXHAUST FRESH AIR SUPPLY

AHU

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AIR EXHAUST FRESH AIR SUPPLY

AHU

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Mechanical Plan

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THERMOSTAT

CHILLED WATER SUPPLY HOT WATER SUPPLY CHILLED WATER RETURN HOT WATER RETURN

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WC

CHILLED AND HOT RETURN LOOPS CHILLED AND HOT SUPPLY LOOPS LOOPS ARE ACCESSED BY RADIANT SYS. MANIFOLD LOCATED IN MER

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TROMB WALL 1" DIAMETER COPPER PIPING ALONG SOUTH FACADE IN GLAZING ENCASEMENT TROMBE WALLS 1 AND 2 PASSIVELY HEAT RADIANT FLOOR SYSTEM SYSTEM SWITCHES OVER TO SECONDARY MECHANICAL SYSTEM UNDER CERTAIN WEATHER AND CLIMATE CONDITIONS SWITCH LOCATED IN MECHANICAL ROOM

HOT WATER SUPPLY CHILLED WATER SUPPLY CHILLED WATER RETURN HOT WATER RETURN

MER

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TROMB WALL 1" DIAMETER COPPER PIPING ALONG SOUTH FACADE IN GLAZING ENCASEMENT TROMBE WALLS 1 AND 2 PASSIVELY HEAT RADIANT FLOOR SYSTEM

RADIANT TYPICAL PLAN 1/32" = 1'

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Radiant Piping Plan

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Roof Plan


BANDING

Critics: Robert Heintges & Dan Vos Agnes Martin’s Flower in the Wind can be read in multiple ways; on the one hand it is abstract and de-materialized and on the other it is objective with its grid composition. The drawing is ordered and structural with thick horizontal bands breaking up the painting. Beneath this layer is a more chaotic deeper field where larger more complex patterns can be found. My curtain wall embraces this ambiguity between definition and irregularity developing it further by literally separating these characteristics into a doublelayer curtain wall. Sited in the Montreal on a busy south facing street, the curtain wall provides a thermal and acoustical barrier for the offices located inside. The outer more abstract layer of thick horizontal bands is broken up by larger pattern of gradated bronze tinted ceramic frit. This thick outer extrusion that allows for a subtle change in the spacing of mullions. In turn, this outer layer is supported by a more rigid and ordered layer behind. It is the tension and interdependent relationship between these layers system that lend the curtain wall multiple readings.

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Mullion Plan 1

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Mullion Plan 2

Horizontal Mullion Plan

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SAUNA IN WOODS

Visual Studies Elective - Ultrareal This class sough to explore the design process through the medium of realistic rendering and visual composition. The small scale project is nestled in the mountains on the precipce of a bluff. It seeks to provide a place of refuge and relaxation. It is a process from the changing rooms at one end of the structure through the pool at the other end over looking the valley.

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Scott McCagherty - Academic Portfolio  

Columbia University GSAPP 2013-2016

Scott McCagherty - Academic Portfolio  

Columbia University GSAPP 2013-2016

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