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COUNTRY NEWS INTERIORS GARDENS FOOD & DRINK PROPERTY ANTIQUES FASHION TRAVEL FEBRUARY 2014. £3.75

EAST LOTHIAN Golfer Catriona Matthew on her beloved North Berwick

W

A WE IN TOP EKEND BOU IN T I Q HOTE UE L

JIM NAUGHTIE: MY LIFE AS A BROADCAST ICON

Plus

WILDFOWLING ON ORKNEY UNBEATABLE VENISON RECIPES LEITH’S GODFATHER OF POP ART SECRET WORLD OF BASKING SHARKS

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Scotland’s top schools

WEDDING PLANNER Our 25-page special report on how to stage the perfect nuptials Untitled-1 1

FEBRUARY 2014

06/01/2014 09:23:23


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welcome Over the Christmas holidays I ran into an old friend who was wearing a jumper that was – and there’s no easy way to put this – embarrassingly, disgustingly twee. It’s one thing to wear knitted Rudolph jumpers when you’re nine and your grandma is visiting, but as a grown man in one of Edinburgh’s earthier boozers? Just as I started ribbing my pal about how he was morphing into Giles Brandreth before my very eyes, he offered up an explanation. His jumper, he said, had been knitted for him by his girlfriend and by wearing it he was

‘I wasn’t going to say anything, but if my Rudolph jumper is ridiculous, have you seen your face recently ’

not only showing his solidarity, but had amassed enough brownie points to be allowed to go out for some guilt- and angst-free pints. ‘Besides,’ he said, ‘ I

wasn’t going to say anything, but if my jumper is ridiculous, have you seen your face recently?’ He had a point: he could remove his jumper every time he left the house without his beloved, but taking the badger-themed fuzz on my face on and off would be a good bit trickier. ‘I presume that it’s your wife

GET IN TOUCH

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who likes the beard and that’s why it’s coming back,’ he laughed, ‘even though you’ve spent the last hour scratching the thing and generally looking about as comfortable as a bull wearing roller skates.’ He was right and I hadn’t really appreciated just how obvious my itchy face had been; I’d obviously been scratching away for the best part of the last hour. But while we both looked mildly eccentric/weird, we’d both achieved our aim and were sitting enjoying a pint when we might otherwise not have been. It was, I felt, a spirit of compromise and pragmatism that would stand us both in good stead for 2014. So, in this month of Valentine’s Day, here’s tae us – the partners who will even endure silly jumpers and scratchy facial fuzz in the pursuit of a harmonious and beer-filled life.

WEB

WWW. SCOTTISHFIELD. CO.UK

Richard Bath, Editor

Contributors this month... CATRIONA MATTHEW Comfortably Scotland’s most successful female golfer, Catriona explains why her home town of North Berwick is at the very core of her being.

JIM NAUGHTIE The Radio 4 Today programme presenter is making a name for himself in the world of fiction, and is back in Scotland – but not so he can tell us how to run the independence referendum.

ANDREW MACDONALD The producer of films such as Trainspotting and Sunshine on Leith on what it’s like to have Cockney kids, the pain of supporting Dumbarton FC and his love of Gregory’s Girl. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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contents

94

72 Cover

Stones piled on Rannoch Moor by Damian Shields www.damianshields.com

To order more copies of this issue or subscribe scan this QR code with your smartphone



Cover stories

32

32 in the thick of it Interview with broadcaster and novelist, Jim Naughtie 40 the year of the caT Scotland’s best female golfer, Catriona Matthew on life in East Lothian 66 king of pop Scotland’s most celebrated sculptor, Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 100 the big friendly giant The weird and wonderful world of the basking shark 106 orkney’s dawn patrol Wildfowling at Balfour Castle on Shapinsay 114 getting all your deer in a roe Fantastic venison recipes from a beautiful new book 135 top of the class Review of Scotland’s best independent schools 153 the wedding planner All you need to make your special day unforgettable

Field sports

Here & now

22 Get fell in, you ‘orrible lot... The argument for the return of National Service 24 licence to cull Yet again the Scottish Parliament fails to understand rural Scotland 26 scotland through a lens Canals are a beautiful reminder of our industrial past 39 credo Acclaimed producer Andrew Macdonald on food, football and Irvine Welsh 58 the cruel sea Ten tragic incidents that have occurred in Scottish waters 60 TAKE IT FROM THE TOP How the creator of Sherlock Holmes popularised skiing 64 hoof miles The founder of charity On Horses for Horses, Loes Knopper 90 creative scotland The world of Pea Cooper, milliner to the stars 194 lady at leisure Having a dog can be rewarding – until it takes a shine to your wardrobe

113 land economy The go-ahead for a new land-based salmon farm signals a new dawn

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114 90

Life & style

60 40

130 ON TRACK TO SUCCEED How e-commerce could be the future for rural businesses

Homes & gardens

72 house for an art lover A beautiful home in the heart of Edinburgh’s New Town 94 winter’s wonderland The spectacular snowdrop garden at Gargunnock

Travel & leisure

126 home from home Our subscribers review private homes offering B&B and dinner 129 rising to the challenge Neil Lyndon road tests the new BMW X5 4x4

Food & drink

120 putting troon on the map Review of Two Fat Ladies in Troon 125 spirit of enterprise 2014 will see the creation and expansion of a number of distilleries

Subscribe to Scottish Field and receive a FREE pair of Ostrich 2 Love feather keyrings worth £29.95. See page 134.

Property

14 property market Island living, equestrian properties and a country house in Fife

News, views & events

08 Letters 12 Readers’ Photographs 19 In the Know 83 Interiors News 89 Art & Antiques News 92 Field Culture 104 Country News 122 Food & Drink News 179 Fashion News 182 Scene Around 188 Cover to Cover – latest book reviews

Offers & competitions

56 scots heritage magazine offer Subscribe to this Scottish heritage quarterly 134 subscribe to scottish field Subscribing to your favourite magazine is simple 190 puzzle pages The usual brain training prize crossword, quizzes and sudoku 193 competitions A two-night break worth almost £700 and a fabulous reader offer

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Mozolowski & Murray

Volume 111 Number 2 Established in 1903 Incorporating Scottish World Scottish field

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editorial and design Editor: Richard Bath Creative Editor: Heddy Forrest Senior Photographer: Angus Blackburn Staff Writer: Morag Bootland Deputy Editor: Tim Siddons Contributor: Judy Diamond Design: Mark Duncan Artworker: Andrew Balahura Production Controller: Madeleine Smith Intern: Kirstin Waller Email: editor@scottishfield.co.uk sales and marketing Sales Director: Brian Cameron Sales Team Manager: Clare Lorimer Senior Sales: Janice Johnston, Tracey Faulds Advertising Sales: Shona Smith, Rachel Beaumont, Amy Buchanan, Ashley Gilmour Email: adverts@scottishfield.co.uk Marketing: Torty Cocks, Emma Craig Circulation/Distribution: Gary Callcutt

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publishing Tel: 0131 551 1000 Fax: 0131 551 7901 Publisher: Alister Bennett, Scottish Field Magazine, Fettes Park, 496 Ferry Road, Edinburgh EH5 2DL London Office: 1 Gunpowder Square, Fleet Street, London, EC4A 3EP overseas USA Address: Scottish Field, PO Box 32510 Fridley, MN 55432 USA (Send USA Address corrections to above address). US Postmaster: Periodicals postage paid at Emigsville, PA. US Mailing agent: Scottish Field (ISSN No: 0036-9309) is published monthly for £43 per year by Wyvex Media Ltd, PO Box 1, Oban PA34 4JH and is distributed in the USA by SPP, 95 Aberdeen Road, Emigsville PA 17318. Subscriptions and Distribution Address: PO Box 1, Oban, Argyll PA34 4HB Tel: 01631 568000 Fax: 01631 568001 Subscriptions for one year UK: £45.00 Worldwide: £56.00 If you experience any difficulties in obtaining Scottish Field, please contact our circulation department or visit www.scottishfield.co.uk/shop Tel: 01631 568000

Published monthly by Scottish Field ©Scottish Field UK Scottish Field is a Registered Trade Mark of Wyvex Media Ltd. While Scottish Field is prepared to consider unsolicited articles, transparencies and artwork, it only accepts such material on the strict understanding that it incurs no liability for its safe custody or return.

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your letters

yourletters

Your Letters is sponsored by Balblair, the only distillery that releases vintages exclusively. Balblair 2003 is golden amber in appearance and has a floral and fragrant nose with aromas of citrus fruits, apricots and honey. www.balblair.com

not potty about potter

staterr let

At the risk of offending most of your readers of a tender age, may I have a rant about the Beatrix Potter legacy [The Tale of Peter McRabbit, Dec 2013] and simultaneously shout a loud cheer for the ‘comment’ article [Murder in Suburbia, Dec 2013] by Alan Cochrane? I am sure Potter was well intentioned and her stories are certainly well received by the very young, however in my opinion she is the root of this bizarre ‘animalist’ culture we are now forced to live in. Promoted enthusiastically by the BBC’s Countryfile programme and other media, today’s ‘natural’ environment is supposedly full of cute, vegetarian, anthropomorphic characters, while farmers and men in general are demonised as ruthless killers and eco-destroyers. Opposition to badger culls, blood sports and traditional country pursuits in general is actively promoted as today’s ‘great cause against oppression’. Not for five thousand years has there been a wholly natural environment in Britain; the landscape and its ‘wildlife’ are nearly entirely the result of human activity. Furthermore most of these wee brown furry things are predators in a largely carnivorous food chain, believe it or not. Magazines such as the Scottish Field have a duty to inform and open up this debate to a wider audience – so please, don’t be fooled by Potter’s animalist propaganda.

David Gilchrist, Renfrewshire

Hunter-gatherering

It is not possible in a short article [Top Ten Scottish plant hunters, December 2013], no matter how good it is, to mention everybody of genuine influence. Thomas Blaikie (1781-1838) of Corstorphine and Kew was the first British alpinist. The plants you attributed to Pitcairn and Fothergill were collected by him! His adventures in the Alps were legendary and were what made his diaries, which were published in the 1930s, so popular. Across the Channel he is better known as the Capability Brown of France.

J Forrester, Kirkcaldy, Fife

time to share

Congratulations! What superb photography, we have never seen such amazing photos of wildlife and people – your Autumn issues in particular were truly wonderful. We live in France and do so enjoy catching up with all the latest restaurants and hotels and have used your recommendations several times. We have a timeshare in Beauly which we will be visiting soon – we can’t wait and are looking forward to lots of lovely Scottish fare.

Desirie Neville Smith, La Garde Freinet, Var, France

send your letters to The Editor, Scottish Field, fettes park, 496 ferry road, Edinburgh EH5 2dl email editor@scottishfield.co.uk website www.scottishfield.co.uk 

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YOUR LETTERS

YOURletters NATURAL HIGH

Several years ago, on a beautiful, cloudless, windless summer morning I delivered two friends to the local airport, for a very early flight. When I got back home, on the spur of the moment, I decided to take advantage of the fine morning and take myself off to the golf course, which I duly did, driving off from the first tee before even the green staff arrived to start work at 7am. The sun was shining, the birds were singing, I had the world to myself; what more could I ask for? A small burn crosses the third fairway, and as I came onto the bridge I happened to glance downwards. There on the bank, not 10 feet away, crouched a mother stoat and three tiny kittens. I stopped, squatted down on my hunkers and watched. For about 30 seconds the mother studied me and I could almost see her considering her options; did she try to make a run for safety with her family; did she make a run for safety herself (unlikely); did she try to save one and abandon the others; did she face up to this apparent danger; etc etc? Finally, she made her decision, lifted one of the tiny kittens in her mouth, gave me a quick glance, scurried along the banking and disappeared up a drainage pipe. A few seconds later she re-appeared, alone, sidled back to the remaining kittens, which, in the meantime, had not moved a muscle or blinked an eye. She repeated the exercise, exactly, and arrived back at the remaining kitten, which had still not moved a muscle, or taken an eye from me. She lifted the last kitten in her mouth, gave me one last, apparently lingering, look as much as to say ‘thank you’, made her way, more slowly along the bank (I would like to think) and disappeared up the drainpipe. I didn’t move for a few seconds; for me it had been a situation that occurs only once in a lifetime. I felt that, for a short time, I had been privileged to be a part of nature. A truly unforgettable experience.

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POTTER ABOUT THE HOUSE

After reading your article about Peter McRabbit [The Tale of Peter McRabbit, December 2013] I would like to point out that Beatrix Potter sat down at Eastwood House in Dunkeld to write The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Noel Moore not Dalguise House. If you look at a copy of the letter she wrote it has Eastwood, Dunkeld at the top.

Jill Davidson, by email

THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN...

I was interested to read the piece on Damian, who was possibly the first man to fly, in a recent issue [Soaraway Success or Flight of Fancy? November 2013]. The photograph showing Pilcher flying was taken at Eynsford, Kent and he is flying his last glider, the ‘Hawk’, not the Beetle, which, though built in Glasgow, was not flown up here. Good to see Percy getting a bit of well deserved recognition – he was the first person to make repeated heavier than air flights in the UK, at Cardross during the Summer of 1895. It was also good to read the piece on John Byrne, a marvellous man and artist. He was the year below me at the Glasgow School of Art.

Professor Dugald Cameron OBE DSc (and former Director of GSA), Skelmorlie, Ayrshire THE WRITER OF THE STAR LETTER WILL RECEIVE A 70CL BOTTLE OF BALBLAIR SINGLE MALT WHISKY. ALL OTHER WRITERS WILL RECEIVE A MINIATURE (OVER 18S ONLY). WWW.BALBLAIR.COM

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MONTHLYmusings

Scottish

CHOICE

Field’s

S

cotland has some of the most stunning scenery and wildlife in the world, so don’t keep it to yourself. There is now a new way of uploading your great photos of Scotland – just go to www.scottishfield.co.uk/ muse and you could have one of your images on these pages. Above: Ferris Wheel by Lyndsey Paterson. Right: Pine Marten by Karen Edmond. Below: Evening light on the loch by Ruth Grindrod.

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Top left: A Pillow of Winds II by Douglas McMann. Top right: A nosey otter, Mossbank, Shetland by Amanda Johnson. Above: The end of the trail by Brian McDonnell. Left: Christmas trees, Achanalt by Allan MacIver.

Above: Pitlochry in winter by Lorna Dickson. Left: Kelpies by MGB.

FIELDONLINE

TO UPLOAD YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS TO OUR ONLINE GALLERY (NO MORE THAN 2MB PER IMAGE) GO TO WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK/MUSE WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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property market

Property of the Month lochmalony house, cupar, fife

Selling Agent: Savills Tel: 0131 247 3720 Offers over: ÂŁ1.3million A Georgian house set in around 14 acres of parkland and fields. The building originates from the 16th century, with the front section added in Georgian times. The house was upgraded in 2001 but retains a wealth of period features including fireplaces, cornicing and shutters. Accommodation includes a central hall with Jotul solid wood stove and front facing reception rooms on either side. There is a sitting room, family room, kitchen and breakfast room on the ground floor. The first floor comprises master bedroom with en suite bathroom and dressing room and a further four bedrooms. There are two further bedrooms on the second floor and a first floor flat in the north west wing. Outside there is a workshop, wooden garage, paddocks and a stable block with loose boxes, tack room and garages as well as a walled garden.

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Clockwise from top: The symmetrical facade; traditional fireplaces; light bedroom; stables; traditional dining room.

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PROPERTY

Three of the best... Equestrian

field facts

island living

From Faisal Choudhry, Associate Director at Savills.

The Old Manse of Blair, blair atholl, perthshire

Selling Agent: Strutt & Parker Tel: 0131 226 2500 Offers over: £1,280,000 This four bedroom C-listed property is set in about 9.5 acres of land. The asking price includes Banvie House – a comfortable 3 bedroom property, two paddocks, party room/gymnasium, double garage, stabling and a general purpose store.

Stonehill Farm, dunblane, perthshire

Selling Agent: Ristol Estates Tel: 01786 465782 Offers over: £795,000 A residential development opportunity in the rural landscape of Sheriffmuir comprising a large four bedroom farmhouse – which was fully refurbished 12 years ago – a separate two bedroom cottage in need of complete refurbishment, a range of traditional buildings with development potential and a grazing paddock. In all, the land extends to approximately 1.4 acres.

The Spott, By Stewarton, Ayrshire

Selling Agent: CKD Galbraith Tel: 01292 268181 Offers over: £550,000 An extended farmhouse with generously proportioned accommodation, landscaped gardens, stabling and grazing land extending to around 10 acres. As well as the main house there is an attached 3 bedroom cottage. The Spott offers equestrian facilities including a turn out paddock, five stables, a hay store, shed and unusually, a conservatory.

The residential market has shown strong performance, with a 10% annual increase in transactions. There has been strong performance in Midlothian, Renfrewshire and Angus. While transactions across Scotland are 25% lower than the 10-year annual average, core locations in the Aberdeen area, Edinburgh, East Lothian, East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire and Stirling are leading the market recovery. Scotland’s prime market above £400,000 has improved with a 6% annual rise in transactions. The Aberdeen area experienced a 13% increase in activity. In Tayside prime transactions have increased annually by 20%. We expect a gentle rise in Scottish prime values and transactions during 2014 as supply and demand rebalance.

islay house, Isle of Islay, argyll An impressive historic house in 28 acres of grounds at the head of Loch Indaal with superb views out to sea. Accommodation includes five reception rooms, 24 bedrooms and nine bathrooms as well as a staff flat and cottage. Agent: Knight Frank Tel: 0131 222 9600 Offers in excess of: £850,000

Greshornish House, edinbane Portree, Isle of Skye A country house set in around 9.8 acres on the shores of Loch Greshornish. The main house includes 10 bedroom suites and has mature gardens with a tennis court. A 4-bedroom garden house is available as a separate lot. Agent: Smiths Gore Tel: 0131 344 0880 Offers in excess of: £850,000

Cladach, cuidreach, Isle of Skye A four-bedroom property with views over Loch Snizort on the Trotternish Peninsula. The property includess a top of the range kitchen, lounge with open fire and a large dining room/sun lounge with patio doors. Agent: Bell Ingram Tel: 01463 717799 Guide price: £375,000 www.scottishfield.co.uk

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19/12/2013 15:28:13


IN THEknow

News of interesting events the length and breadth of Scotland

Big birthday bash Big Burns Supper is an annual event in Dumfries inspired by the life and work of Robert Burns. Celebrations take place over the weekend of 24-26 January – wrapping round Burns Night itself on Saturday 25. At the heart of the festival will be the Spiegeltent, a large 1920s-style mirrored tent where audiences can enjoy live music, cabaret, parties and shows. Events include the first ever Homecoming Carnival, which is expected to see around 2,000 people take part in a lantern-lit procession. www.homecomingscotland.com

PIPING USA

The Morrison’s Academy Pipe Band is heading for the ‘Big Apple’ next April as the Official Pipe Band of the 2014 Tartan Day Parade in New York. The event is part of Scotland Week and the Band will lead the parade along 6th Avenue in Manhattan. Other NYC events for the pipe band will include the NY Caledonian Club Ceilidh, The 10K Scotland Run through Central Park, a lunchtime concert for the American Scottish Foundation and a rooftop performance at the Saatchi & Saatchi World Headquarters.

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TO COMMENT VISIT THE LINK TO FACEBOOK OR TWITTER AT WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

Weir’s way Glasgow-based design company Eat Haggis has teamed up with the Tom Weir Statue Campaign to release a t-shirt and limited edition print celebrating everyone’s favourite bobble hatted hill walker. The Tom Weir Statue Campaign aims to raise around £50,000 for the creation of a bespoke sculpture of the late Scottish climber and much loved TV presenter. December 2014 would have been Tom’s centenary and the campaign would love to commemorate this date with the installation of the statue near Tom’s home in Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park. www.facebook.com/tomweirmemorial

THE SEAT OF A KING

A replica of Robert the Bruce’s throne is to be made ahead of the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn on 24 June 2014. An interpretation of the throne will be reconstructed based on studies of Bruce’s seal, which shows him sitting on a throne featuring clawed feet and the carved heads of four mythical beasts. The project will be undertaken by the Strathleven Artizans and the throne is due to be unveiled in time for the 707th anniversary of Bruce’s coronation, on 25 March. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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IN THEknow

News of interesting events the length and breadth of Scotland

BONNY BRIDGE

Two stunning images of the world-famous Forth Bridge have taken the top prizes in a photographic competition run in support of the Bridge’s World Heritage nomination. The winning entries are from Edinburgh’s Grant Ritchie and Billy Steven from Bathgate and will be used as part of the Nomination Dossier which will be submitted to UNESCO in early 2014. www.forthbridgeworldheritage.com

FIRST FIDDLE

A young viola virtuoso from Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian has beaten hundreds of the UK’s most talented young musicians to secure a place in the Main National Children’s Orchestra of Great Britain. Daniel Dalland, 13, from South Queensferry, has been chosen as one of the orchestra’s elite young musicians, who will rehearse and perform across the country in the coming year. The photograph shows Daniel Dalland (centre) performing with the National Children’s Orchestra at the Festival Hall, London.

TATTOO ON TV

A new Royal Edinburgh Tattoo DVD featuring highlights of this year’s 64th Castle Esplanade spectacular is now available. The recording includes previously unseen footage of performers as distinctive as Korea’s Traditional Band and Dancers, Mongolia’s acclaimed Central Orchestra, the New Zealand Army Band, and a 110-strong ensemble of musicians, singers and dancers from Mexico. It also features the world-famous Massed Pipes & Drums and the rousing music of the Massed Military Bands. Copies of the highlights from the 2013 Tattoo may be obtained on DVD from the Tattoo Shop, 33-34 Market Street, Edinburgh. This recording, priced at £17.95, can also be purchased online at www.shop.edintattoo.co.uk.

Best of three Scotland has been ranked one of the world’s top three countries to visit in 2014. The honour comes from the renowned travel guide publisher, Lonely Planet, whose ‘Best in Travel 2014’ guidebook is available now.

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23/12/2013 14:44:43


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viewpoint

Get fell in, you ’orrible lot... Next month a bill before Parliament will attempt to bring back National Service. With so many young unemployed or lacking direction, it is a prospect we should embrace words KIRSTEN WALLER

af archive/alamy

T

he whole concept of National Service often suffers from something of a bad press, especially as it seems to attract some rather unpleasant fellow travellers. If you don’t know what I mean, consider for a moment the private members bill that is currently doing the rounds at Westminster and which calls for the reintroduction of National Service. This bill has been tabled by the same group of true blue MPs who pushed forward the ‘alternative Queen’s Speech’ in June of this year. A quick examination of the content of the alter-

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Above: National Service needn’t be militarybased square-bashing like this, but can also be community-oriented like America’s Peace Corps.

native monarch’s address to the nation suggests that its proponents don’t possess a particularly enlightened world view. Some of the more extreme ideas that this group of MPs proposed included the desire to bring back hanging, the privatisation of the BBC, and the ending of all foreign aid, along with the usual rumblings about pulling out of Europe. But there’s no reason why such a motley collection of ideas should dismissed in their entirety, especially when something genuinely useful is nestling among them. This point was

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National service made very succinctly by writer Stephen Moss in (of all places) The Guardian when he stated that ‘the Bone-heads on the Tory right have actually come up with a good idea’. Some form of National Service currently exists in a variety of countries all over the world, as well as in a fair few European locations. It is surprisingly common in countries we might think of as rather more liberal in character than Britain, with Denmark, Norway and Finland all requiring their populations to undergo either a military or civilian placement. Served terms range from four months in Norway to a year and a half in Denmark, with differing lengths for men and women, and depending on the task undertaken. It’s not an entirely youth-centred institution either – Norway’s upper age limit is 44. But arguably, it is the young who would benefit most from the reintroduction of National Service. Despite several measures that the Government are introducing, such as the fact that employers no longer need to pay National Insurance for those under the age of 21, youth unemployment remains a huge problem. The number of people under 25 who are not in work crept up in November by 0.5%, resulting in a figure of close to one million. By contrast, the rate of unemployment among those aged between 26-64 fell by 0.2% in the same period. There is a lack of investment in the young, and there is also a lack of structure in how they are expected to plan their lives. The path from school to apprenticeship, or university to first job, is ever more uncertain, with the small growth in our economy not making much of an impact in real terms, in either jobs or living costs. The pension age is being pushed back further and further, meaning that it will be even longer before swathes of jobs are freed up for those further down the chain. And then there’s their reputation. So many talking heads, from politicians to business leaders to various ‘celebrities’, decry those under 25 as feckless wasters, incapable of concentrating for more than 30 seconds, hell-bent on living an entitled life and with no discernible skills to recommend them. They forget that the young have always proved irksome to the old, no matter the century. And they also forget that they and their parents’ generations – with grants for university, and the spiralling worth of their property – have had considerably more lucky breaks. National Service wouldn’t fix all of these problems; in fact it could reasonably be argued that it won’t fix any of them. But it might help to raise a small sense of hope, a confidence that the future of the young is being considered and

‘There’s no reason why there has to be a military element to

National Service’

yourview

do you have strong feelings about this?

email editor@ scottishfield.co.uk

not just discarded. As ever, the important thing with any reintroduction is to avoid the mistakes of the past; and in particular, the spectre of conscription looms large. This is evident by the presence of a current petition on Change. org (which at the time of writing had gained 35,361 signatures) entitled ‘Stop the National Service Bill’. The mission statement declares that the undersigned do not want ‘conscription into the military for any reason that is not voluntary…[we] do not want our children and grandchildren to fight and die in wars that they or we have no control over.’ An admirable statement, with little cause for disagreement. But there’s no reason that the two ideas have to go together. We already let 16-year-olds join the army of their own free will; it seems pointless to add the option, even in a voluntary capacity, to what would be a mandatory service. Conscription does not need to walk hand in hand with National Service. In fact there’s no reason why there should have to be a military element at all; in America, for instance, there is a strong tradition of non-military service through organisations such as the Peace Corps. Let National Service stand for exactly that – a way for every young person to serve their nation at home and abroad; and more importantly, for the exchange to go both ways. In return for working as carers, in international development, in civilian public services or for charitable organisations, the young would gain realistic work experience in an environment that made allowances for their age and need to continue learning. They would be required to offer hard work and dedication to the task in hand – and in return they would be given a taste of the wider world, at no personal cost. The current bill makes a point of including accommodation, with additional payment for all work completed. The opportunity to live away from home, free from parents and at the government’s expense, would herald the first flush of independence for those who can’t afford or don’t want to go to university – though given the top age suggestion of 26 years, it would be perfectly possible for graduates to get on with completing their studies first. A second reading was due to take place in early September, but has now been pushed back to 28 February. It is unlikely that it will get anywhere near the statute books – and in retaining a military option, the bill is far from perfect. But perhaps it will occasion some food for thought. The Government can’t leave the young struggling for ever, with little hope for the future, and not expect to feel any repercussions. www.scottishfield.co.uk

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23/12/2013 17:24:49


comment

Licence to cull Proposals to nationalise the red deer population show just how little MSPs understand rural issues words alan cochrane illustration Stephen Day

O

ne of rural Scotland’s big problems is its rela­tionship with the parliament at Holy­rood. The devolved assembly has power over just about every aspect of life in the country­side but few of its 129 members have any knowledge of what goes on outside the cities. As a result, those who live and work ‘out there’ must spend an inordinate amount of time presenting their case to a largely ignorant – in the nicest sense of the word – mass of legislators and to counteract the skilful, articu­late and wellfunded charities and NGOs that represent the animal rights and ‘right-to-roam’ groups that are seeking to change the way the countryside is used and to transform its ancient traditions. It is worth wondering whether the various bits of legislation that have affected the countryside over the years of the parliament’s existence would still be passed today. I’m sure that foxhunting would still be banned. Equally, I feel the land reform and community right-to-buy legis­la­tion, intro­duced by the Labour/Lib Dem coalition, would be approved by the present lot of MSPs. Indeed there are signs that many are itching to go further in this respect. That said, I don’t think the hated (by rural workers, at least) laws banning tail docking would be passed by the present parlia­ment, and I think land

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field ONLINE

What are your thoughts? comment on our FACEBOOK page or TWITTER AT www. scottishfield. co.uk Alan Cochrane is the Daily Telegraph’s Scottish Editor

managers can thank the nationalists for Holyrood’s refusal to ban the use of snares for vermin control. Many new law-makers reckon they know it all, and I had to laugh the other day when one relatively new MSP told me he thought that the excellent Alex Hogg, of the Scottish Gamekeepers Association, would do better to engage more with the parliament. I’d argue the opposite: Mr Hogg has spent years trying to teach our tribunes the facts of rural life and, frankly, the parliament would do better if it engaged more with him. The immediate issue for Scottish land managers is a recurring one – deer management. Only 18 months after a Code of Practice was drawn up on how to control deer numbers, the problem is being revisited by the Rural Affairs, Climate Change and Environment Committee, headed by the SNP’s Rob Gibson. Tradi­tional land managers, I think, have cause to worry about where this committee is going. There is, for instance, a head of steam building among some MSPs to ‘punish’ landowners who do not meet their cull targets for red deer – the widespread assumption among some poli­ticians being that there are far too many of the beasts and that they’re damaging ‘biodiversity’. One way of cracking down on recalcitrant lairds, it would appear, is to license estates for shooting; if they fail to meet officially laiddown cull numbers their licences could be taken away and all stalking banned by law. That’s what Angus MacDonald, the SNP member for Falkirk East, suggested at a recent committee session. Dr John Milne, former chairman of the Deer Commission, responded: ‘A licence to do what? The estates do not own the deer.’ ‘Would it not be possible to remove that right if the status of deer were changed from being nobody’s property to communal property?’ asked Mr Gibson, the committee chairman. To which Dr Milne replied: ‘Absolutely, and that is one option that should be considered.’ So there we have it – another attempt to rewrite a Code of Practice for deer management. To some, this amounts to the nationalisation of Scotland’s red deer population. On a lighter note, country dwellers can perhaps take comfort from the fact that some law­makers haven’t a clue what they’re talking about. Take Richard Lyle, the SNP regional MSP for Central Scotland. He said he thought only the ‘establishment’ paying £5,000 a day could afford to shoot stags, and candidly admitted he’d never tasted venison in his life. ‘It’s not for sale in my local supermarket,’ he explained. So much for the expertise of our tribunes. But don’t laugh too soon because I understand that an attempt by Labour to tighten the ban on foxhunting has been only narrowly opposed.

www.scottishfield.co.uk

23/12/2013 13:58:57


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19/12/2013 15:45:33


scotland through a lens

The water way Scotland’s canals are part of the country’s industrial heritage and over the years have provided a great place to work, rest and play

S

words morag bootland images angus blackburn

cotland’s canals are a unique reminder of the industrial age of our country. At a time when Scottish transport relied on the sea, the canals provided new links between the coasts, improving access to supplies of raw materials such as coal, iron-ore, stone and agricultural produce. Scotland’s canals are unique in the UK due to their large size and the fact that they represent every facet of engineering innovation employed during the ‘canal age’.

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Today, the Caledonian, Crinan, Forth and Clyde, Union and Monkland canals still attract plenty of attention. They are havens for wildlife and sport, whether it be paddling or boating on the water or fishing from and cycling along the towpaths. The Falkirk Wheel is a working boat lift and one of Scotland’s top tourist attractions and the canals are also growing in popularity as a holiday destination providing peace, tranquility and time to watch the scenery glide by.

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The water way

‘Scotland’s

canals

represent every facet of

engineering innovation employed during the

canal age’

Left: A young team of boaters tackle a lock gate on the Caledonian Canal. Top right: A lock on the Caledonian Canal. Below: The Blue Hue, moored at Edinburgh’s Leamington Wharf.

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scotland through a lens

‘The canals are havens for

wildlife and sport’

Right: Yachts travel through the locks of the Crinan Canal. Below: The Kelpies stand sentry over the Helix’s new turning pool on the Union Canal.

Above: Boys and girls sing at the cathedral. Bottom right: A quiet moment before the singing begins. Bottom left: Preparation is key to a great performance.

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the water way

Left: Searching for the wide range of wildlife that call the Falkirk Wheelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basin home. Above: The Falkirk Wheel is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only rotating boatlift which links the Union Canal to the Forth and Clyde Canal 30 metres below. www.scottishfield.co.uk

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scotland through a lens

‘Scotland’s canals are

growing in popularity as a holiday destination’ Clockwise from top left: Steve Jones runs a successful cafe from his barge, Zazoo on the Union Canal in Edinburgh; the calm waters of Scotland’s canals make them the ideal place for young canoers and kayakers; Spiers Wharf on the Forth and Clyde Canal in Glasgow at dusk; living on the Union Canal in Edinburgh; one of the remaining sections of the Monkland Canal with Coatbridge’s Summerlee Museum of Scottish Industrial Life.

fieldfacts For more information on Scotland’s canals visit: www.scottishcanals.co.uk

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the water way

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23/12/2013 15:50:26


interview

‘Radio is all about rhythm, cadence, immediacy, making a connection with the person who’s listening’

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23/12/2013 15:40:55


in the thick of it

In the thick of it James Naughtie’s decades spent observing the most powerful figures of our time have given him vivid insight into the world of political intrigue – insight he uses to thrilling effect in his new novel words anna burnside images angus blackburn

W

hen James Naughtie was finishing his English degree at Aberdeen University, his careers advisor saw a great future ahead – in hospital administration. Naughtie – Jim in everyday life, James for BBC purposes only – was underwhelmed. ‘You clearly know nothing about me,’ he recalls telling the hapless academic. ‘I couldn’t administer the Sunday School picnic.’ He inquired tentatively about journalism. ‘Ho ho ho,’ the careers expert replied. ‘Nobody gets into journalism.’ Publishing, then? Cue even louder laughter, followed by Naughtie’s hasty exit. Experts shmexperts. Not only is Naughtie one of the foremost journa­ lists of his generation, he has succeeded in his fallback career as well. With three non-fiction books to his name, he has just finished his first novel. ‘I always felt I wanted to write, to tell stories,’ he says. ‘There is a danger of that sounding a bit pompous. But I never thought I’d like to join a bank.’ And so it turned out that bedpan ordering’s loss was the media’s gain, and Naughtie’s career trajectory was steep: covering his home turf with The Press & Journal in Aberdeen, Westminster for The Scotsman, then the same beat for The Guardian. He moved to radio in 1986 and joined the Today programme twenty years ago this month. It’s one of the best jobs in British journalism, but is it worth the 3am starts and what amounts to two decades of jetlag? ‘You don’t ever get used to it,’ he says. ‘Sometimes you find yourself running on adrenaline.’ To cover the American primaries, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the fallout from 9/11, however, he is prepared to set the alarm clock. ‘Usually, when someone asks you to come in at 4am, the answer is: piss off. But to present the Today programme?’ he laughs. ‘I’m not being precious about it. Image: James Naughtie at the BBC studios in Edinburgh.

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interview

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in the thick of it Farmers get up at whenever. It’s just what I do.’ Since October 2013, Naughtie has swapped a couple of his weekly stints at Broadcasting House for Pacific Quay on Glasgow’s Clydeside to become, in the run-up to the independence referendum, one of the voices of Good Morning Scotland. This dual role, he says, makes a lot of sense. Naughtie and his wife, the writer Eleanor Updale, have been part-time Edinburghers since 2010. He was not, repeat not, dispatched north to show the hapless Scots how it should be done. ‘I’m very anxious to avoid the impression that I was “sent up” to do this,’ he says. This interpretation comes, he claims, from the noisier end of the Nationalist spectrum – the so-called Cybernats, who pounce on slights, real and imagined, and respond with online invective. Naughtie describes them as ‘people with an axe to grind’ and shrugs off their attentions. ‘I had one the other day who said “we know where you are”.’ He’s unconcerned. ‘They’re people who don’t seem to be 16 annas to the rupee.’ There’s a bigger job to do. Namely: ‘To tell the rest of the UK how the argument goes, to explain the importance of this. Whatever the result, it has implications for the way the UK is organised. A lot of people in London haven’t quite tuned in to the maturity of the argument. They say’ – at this stage Naughtie swaps his regular Turiff gruff for RP – ‘What’s going on? Where did this chap Alex Salmond come from? He’s a very interesting man.’ He laughs at his well-polished response. ‘Well, he has been leader of his party, with one brief interruption, since 1990. He’s not a new kid on the block.’ Dotting between the studios of London, Glasgow and Edinburgh has not dulled the 62year-old’s appetite for frontline reporting. ‘Over the last few years Today has let presenters get out on the road more,’ Naughtie says approvingly. ‘It really sharpens you up. I’ve had two or three trips to Egypt, right in the thick of it.’ He warms to his subject. (Brevity, as he is first to admit, is not his strong suit.) ‘Radio is all about rhythm, cadence, immediacy, making a connection with the person who’s listening. It’s about pulling them in, explaining why they need to listen for the next four minutes. You don’t want to turn it into a piece of crude showmanship but’ – he grins – ‘you’ve got to get them into the tent. Otherwise they won’t see the show.’ Despite having a schedule that would keep a man half his age busy (Today, Good Morning Scotland, the monthly Radio 4 Book Club, oneoff series such as this year’s The New Elizabethans, a monthly interview for BBC Music magazine, presenting the Proms), Naughtie has found

‘You don’t ever get used to the

3am starts.

Sometimes you’re running on adrenaline’

Left: The part-time Edinburgher, photographed below Arthur’s Seat for Scottish Field.

www.scottishfield.co.uk

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interview

time for fiction. His first novel, The Madness of July, is published this month. Set in Westminster and Washington and featuring spy-turned-Foreign Office minister Will Flemyng, it’s Tinker Tailor/House of Cards. And while Naughtie hopes he has come up with a gripping political intrigue, what he really wanted to explore is a non-party fault line observed over his years on the press bench. ‘It involves the destruction of friendships by rivalries, which is the story of politics,’ he explains. ‘The various relationships in the book are driven by the central character’s knowledge that the most difficult thing to handle isn’t policy or a negotiation with the Treasury, important as those may be. ‘The more successful you are, the more you realise it will destroy your friendships, because that’s inevitable. The pyramid narrows. Look at the Miliband brothers. Look at Blair and Brown. The people who know, before they start, what the inevitable end is going to be, have a slightly melancholy, world-weary understanding of the pain as well as the joy.’ He pauses for a self-deprecating chuckle. ‘This is not Dostoyevsky. This is a thriller. It’s a mystery, there’s a denouement. I hope it’s a gripping story.’ What it’s not is a roman à clef. Naughtie decided straight away that he would not say

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whether the government was Tory or Labour. ‘I was never going to name anyone real. It’s sort of set in 1976, a hot summer. The places and the cities are real. The characters have elements of people I’ve known, of course, but there is no thinly disguised Mr X. That becomes tedious, a silly game for the reader.’ Like brevity, tedious and silly games are not Naughtie’s strong suits. Exposing what goes on behind the locked doors along the corridors of power, however, is. ‘The story engulfs a group of people at the heart of government in Washington and London. It’s one of the biggest crises of their lives; it has huge implications for them, their friends, the governments for which they serve. But no one outwith their coterie has the faintest idea this is happening. ‘That, in the end, is one of the lures of jour­ nalism. It’s saying: this is what it’s like, this is what’s going on.’ He smiles. ‘You’re not revealing Watergate every day, but you are getting behind the curtain.’ With so much to look forward to, Naughtie brushes off the idea of retirement like a badly briefed special advisor. ‘As long as someone wants me to write something or broadcast something, I will.’ He’s already planning novel number two. ‘I rather like this guy. I think he’ll reappear.’ That self-deprecating laugh again. ‘But people need to buy it first.’

‘The characters have elements of people

I’ve known but there’s no thinly

disguised

Mr X’

Above: Naughtie began working in radio in 1986.

field facts

The Madness of July by James Naughtie, is published on 27 February by Head of Zeus (£12.99). headofzeus.com

www.scottishfield.co.uk

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23/12/2013 15:42:28


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อดอฒอณอถย™ย‹ยŽยŽยƒยŽย•ย‘ย•ย‡ย‡ย…ยƒยŽยŽย•ย‘ย’ย‡ยย‹ยย‰ย–ยŠย‡ย‹ย”ย‘ย™ยยƒย‹ยŽย‘ย”ย‹ยย‰ย†ย‡ย’ยƒย”ย–ยย‡ยย– ย™ยŠย‹ย…ยŠย™ย‹ยŽยŽย‘ยˆยˆย‡ย”ยƒยŠย‹ย‰ยŠย“ย—ยƒยŽย‹ย–ย›ย„ย‡ย•ย’ย‘ยย‡ย‘ย—ย–ฯย‹ย–ย†ย‡ย•ย‹ย‰ยยƒยย†ย–ยƒย‹ยŽย‘ย”ย‹ยย‰ย•ย‡ย”ย˜ย‹ย…ย‡วค



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19/12/2013 15:52:47


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19/12/2013 15:56:36


CREDO

Credo...

Latin. (n) ‘I believe’. A set of beliefs which influences the way you live.

Andrew Macdonald The award-winning film producer of Sunshine on Leith and Trainspotting on sibling rivalry, having Cockney children and the most generous person he has ever worked with I wore a kilt at my wedding up the Empire State Building. I’ll never wear one outside Scotland again. My favourite place in Scotland is Kinloch Moidart on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, one of the most beautiful bits of Scotland. I spent some amazing Hogmanays there in my youth. It fulfils the idyll of Scotland; when I’m away it’s how I imagine my homeland. You only really know Scotland if you head north from Edinburgh and Glasgow. Sunshine on Leith and Trainspotting are wildly different versions of Scotland but there’s a grain of truth in both of them. There has to be a kernel of credibility if the story is to be believed. The black humour of Trainspotting is very true to Scottish life, as is the exuberance of Sunshine on Leith. I don’t have a favourite colour. People older than ten shouldn’t have a favourite colour. Sunshine on Leith is the film I’m proudest of. There’s a scene in which Peter Mullan tells his daughter to go to America – it’s more moving than anything else I’ve done. I have a daughter, and I’m keenly aware of Scotland’s history of emigration. My last meal as a condemned man would be roast lamb. My perfect weekend would be a long Saturday family lunch of Vietnamese food, seeing a film with my kids on Saturday night, and then Sunday roast lunch followed by going to the Arsenal at four o’clock – that’s as good as it gets. The thing I miss most about Scotland is knowing my surroundings so well, and having that easy familiarity. The country’s smallness is a lovely thing. Its human scale and manageability is wonderful.

For middle-aged foodies, Edinburgh is heaven. I love eating out but like relaxed dining. I think Tom Kitchin’s restaurant is amazingly good and when I’m through in Glasgow I love to eat at Crabshakk and Cafe Gandolfi. My grandfather [Emeric Pressburger] was a film writer and producer, which was inspirational, so I wanted to be a film director from the age of 16. I grew up in Scotland and went to a boarding school in the middle of nowhere, and no-one else I knew growing up wanted to work in films, whereas when I go to my sons’ schools in London, all his friends want to be filmmakers. Gregory’s Girl inspired me to work in films. It’s still my favourite film because it was the first time that Scots made a film about Scotland that wasn’t miserable; it was about things you recognised, full of jokes you’d laugh at, and streets you’d walked down. It was all that’s good in Scottish cinema. The most generous person I ever worked with is Irvine Welsh. He trusted us to turn Trainspotting into a film. Most people want control but he encouraged us to do our own thing. The first time I met him I was terrified: I thought we’d have to take drugs and drink a hundred pints, but he was the nicest guy. All my children have Cockney and Islington accents but I insist they spend time in Scotland so they remember where they come from. Being a Scottish football fan can be very embarrassing. So can supporting Dumbarton. People think sibling rivalry drives me as my brother Kevin is a film director, but that wasn’t true until he became very successful. Now people say to me ‘how are you Kevin?’. Helen Mirren said exactly that to me the other day, which was tough. Kevin and I do look alike and work in the same business. Sunshine on Leith and Kevin’s film How I Live Now came out on the same day so that’s the latest battleground. But he’s only got three boys and I’ve got four, so I’ve won that battle. I’m more ambivalent about independence than my brother Kevin, who’s absolutely against it. I can see opportunities – ‘Ambassador Macdonald’ has a nice ring to it, as does ‘Andrew Macdonald, Minister for Culture’. It’s good for people to think big but independence would be far tougher than austerity. Sunshine on Leith is available on DVD in the UK from 24 January. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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The year of the Cat Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most successful female golfer Catriona Matthew was born and bred in her beloved North Berwick and loves coming home to East Lothian words CATRIONA MATTHEW images angus blackburn

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‘As

a teenager I’d have barbecues on the beach with my brothers and friends. Those are fond memories’

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I

Above left: Matthew has had an excellent 2013 and was runner-up in the LPGA Championship. Above right: On the beach, with Berwick Law looming large in the background.

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was born and grew up in North Berwick and, apart from ten years in America, I’ve lived here all of my life. I have a lot of really happy memories of growing up here with my parents and two older brothers. And of course it was also the place where I learnt to play the sport from which I earn a living. I went to Law Primary School and then North Berwick High. I really enjoyed school, which was good fun. I was fortunate in that I was fairly clever and very sporty. I had a great childhood growing up in North Berwick. I have two older brothers and we’d play a lot together – I was a bit of a tomboy.

I have a lot of really fond memories of being on the beach with my brothers and friends. We spent a lot of time there and when I was a teenager we’d have barbecues. I think the weather always seems warmer when you’re a kid. Now when I’m at the beach with my kids, they’ll splash about in the sea whilst I’ll just dip my toe in the water. The beach at North Berwick is really good for kids and has a man-made sea pool, which makes it really safe. We’re a very outdoorsy family, which makes North Berwick the perfect place to live. We regularly take a walk up Berwick Law, from where you have great views of the town and,

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THE YEAR OF THE CAT

if the weather’s clear, the rest of East Lothian. We also enjoy a walk around the pretty harbour at North Berwick, coupled with a visit to the Seabird Centre, which my kids love. They offer boat trips around The Bass Rock, and we did it years ago although the girls aren’t so keen on the idea just now. Further afield, East Lothian is full of great places to visit. Just outside North Berwick are the ruins of Tantallon Castle, built in the 14th century. Perched on the clifftop, it has a visitor centre and is definitely worth visiting. Further along from the castle is Seacliff Stables, from where you can have lovely coastal pony treks.

My eldest girl went for her birthday, even though it was in December and freezing! As well as North Berwick, East Lothian has a wealth of great beaches, which is ideal for a place that is one of the sunniest in the UK. We tend to go to Yellowcraig, near Dirleton. There’s a small swing park there, which the girls love. It’s a bit of a hike to the beach but it’s worth the effort. Even in winter there’s a really nice walk through the trees, along part of the John Muir Way, which runs across the East Lothian coastline. Other beaches include Longniddry Bents, which is ideal for rockpooling, while the beach at Gullane is very popular.

‘East Lothian has a wealth of great beaches’

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Other attractions in East Lothian include Dirleton Castle, which the kids can run around, and East Links Family Park near Dunbar. The Museum of Flight at East Fortune and the Myreton Motor Museum are also a great day out. There’s a small golf museum next to the pro’s shop at Gullane and we even have a distillery, Glenkinchie, near Pencaitland. The swimming pool at Dunbar is also really good for the kids. Of course we’ve been all over East Lothian. It’s full of lovely wee villages, such as Dirleton, Gullane and Aberlady. When I was a kid, when it snowed we used go to Gifford and sledge in the Lammermuir Hills. And we’d always pop into the Goblin Ha’ Hotel on the way home for a bite to eat. There are so many golf courses in East Lothian it’s ridiculous. As well the championship course at Muirfield, where last year’s Open was played, there are three courses at Gullane and courses at Kilspindie, Dunbar and Archerfield, where I now practice. The Old Course in Musselburgh – which is inside the racecourse, which makes for one of the most memorable experiences in golf – is the oldest in the world. North Berwick has two 18-hole courses: The Glen, and North Berwick Golf Course, of which I

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was a member when I was growing up. I’m lucky enough to live right next to the eighteenth tee. It’s where I started so it will always mean a lot to me. It’s a real old-style links course, designed by East Lothian’s golf legend, Ben Sayers. I was about seven or eight when I started playing golf, on a small nine-hole course in North Berwick. My dad and brothers played; and my mum took it up when I went to school, just to keep up with us. She still plays now. When I was a kid there were lots of competitions on the small putting green.

‘East Lothian is full of

lovely wee villages’

Above left: Winning the Ladies Scottish Open. Above right: At North Berwick harbour.

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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ten facts about east lothian Haddington was once the fourth largest settlement in Scotland. Aberlady had strong links with the monasteries at Iona and Lindisfarne. The Saltire became Scotland’s flag after a Pictish victory at Athelstaneford in 832AD when clouds formed a white cross on the day of battle. Whitekirk Church was destroyed by a fire started by suffragettes in 1914. Civil engineer John Rennie (1761-1821) was born in Phantassie near East Linton. He designed Waterloo and London Bridge. Musselburgh’s Silver Arrow, contested annually by the Royal Company of Archers, is the UK’s oldest sporting trophy. Winton House, near Pencaitland, was requisitioned by Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Jacobite army in 1745. In 1797 12 people were killed by soldiers in Tranent after a protest against conscription into the British army.

Until I was about sixteen, as well as golf I played hockey, badminton and tennis. It was a very sporty childhood, but all of that made way for golf when I was about sixteen and I realised that I was actually quite good at it. I entered local tournaments and won a few, and did the same with tournaments further afield. So before I went to university I got some coaching from Jimmy Hume at Gullane. At that point golf pretty much took up all of my weekends and holidays. Prior to that I’d had a variety of summer jobs. My first job

was picking strawberries at Ferrygate Farm, just outside Dirleton, for five pence a punnet. I also caddied for visitors at North Berwick Golf Club, collected money on the kids’ course and worked in a local hotel. I went to Stirling University and did a degree in Financial Studies. I was one of the first students on a sports scholarship; they paid for me to attend tournaments all over the world. During this time I was coached by John Chillas at Glenbervie. I turned pro after leaving university in 1994.

The ‘Pagans of Scoughall’ used to lure ships onto the rocks by walking a horse and lantern slowly along the cliffs, making it look like a ship at anchor. The 1566 plot to assassinate Lord Darnley, husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, was hatched at Whittingehame Tower.

www.scottishfield.co.uk

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ten things to do in east lothian Prestongrange Industrial Heritage Museum This free museum is dedicated to the industrial heritage of Prestongrange. An open-air site, it was a 16th-century harbour, 17th-century glassworks, 18th- and 19th-century potteries and 19th/20th-century coal mine and brickworks. Hailes Castle This ruined fortified residence near East Linton is hidden away amongst stunning scenery. Dating from the 13th century, Hailes is one of Scotland’s oldest stone castles. It includes later extensions and two vaulted pit-prisons Lammermuir Festival This annual festival celebrates all that is great about classical music, with a range of concerts from major artists, orchestras and ensembles, performing in a range of historic, intriguing (the Concorde hangar at the Museum of flight, for example) and atmospheric venues across East Lothian. Pressmennan Wood With views towards the Firth of Forth, a lovely lake and a wonderful woodland walk – with a treasure hunt for the mythical Glingbobs and Tootfits hiding amongst the trees – this wood south of Stenton is a great family day out.

‘It’s really difficult to strike the right balance between golf and the family’ My first season was a disaster: during my second tournament I took ill and had to go in for emergency surgery and missed half the season. I managed to scrape a bit of a card, but it was a struggle. Luckily things took off after that. Winning the Women’s British Open in 2009 at Lytham St Annes was a great feeling. It was only eleven weeks after I’d given birth to my second child, so to win a Major was amazing. My husband, Graeme, was caddying, which made it even more special. I’ve also been lucky enough to play in the Solheim Cup on seven occasions. It’s nice to be part of a team in a sport that’s usually all about individuals, and it’s always a great atmosphere. Last year we beat the Americans on their turf for the first time, by 18-10, which was great. It is always difficult to strike the right balance between golf and the family. I’m away about half the year, although I’m never away for longer than three months at a time. So when I do come home I don’t really want to do anything; even driving to Gullane is a feat. But Above: When Matthew comes back to North Berwick after three months away, even going to Gullane is a feat.

Life’s a beach East Lothian has a wealth of magnificent beaches. Gullane Bents, Yellowcraigs and Seacliff are just three. And located in one of the sunniest part of the UK, you’re guaranteed at least one brilliant day at any one of them. Scottish Seabird Centre A discovery centre, gift shop, cafe, seasonal boat trips and live webcams are just some of the reasons why this fivestar award winning attraction in North Berwick is a must see for all visitors to East Lothian. John Muir’s Birthplace This five-star visitor attraction showcases the life of East Lothian’s most famous son. Here you can learn all about the conservation pioneer’s adventures, read extracts from his journals and view his sketches of plants and wildlife. Preston Mill & Phantassie Doo’cot Situated in East Linton, this NTS property was East Lothian’s last working water mill. The present buildings date from the 18th century, and visitors can experience the working machinery, plus a nearby 16th-century doocot. Newhailes This carefully preserved neo-Palladian villa is renowned for its spectacular roccoco interiors, which are some of the finest in Scotland. This NTS property offers multi media exhibitions, guided tours, a shop, cafe and visitor centre. Inveresk Lodge Garden Open all year, this charming hillside garden is split into two main areas: the sloping lawns and borders at the top of the hill, and the wilder woodland and ponds below. The garden also has an aviary in a restored Edwardian conservatory. www.scottishfield.co.uk

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The perfect venue for your perfect day

Luxury Self-catering accommodation in the beautiful seaside resort of North Berwick, sleeping 8-10 Craigview House Apartment is a 5-bedroom self-catering property situated in the centre of North Berwick, close to the railway station, beach, golf courses, shops and restaurants and other local amenities. An ideal base for anyone wishing to embrace the splendours of the lovely East Lothian coastline. • 3 superking/twin bedrooms • 2 king bedrooms • Central heating • Wi-Fi • Satellite TV www.CraigviewHouseApartments.com • 05601 524 502

5 star Exclusive use Country Mansion: beautifully refurbished to provide a high level of luxury accommodation Ideal for any occasion.

Athelstaneford, North Berwick, East Lothian, Scotland EH39 5LQ 01620 880207 reception@gilmertonhouse.com www.gilmertonhouse.com

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fieldfacts The east lothian directory

Accommodation

Art Gallery

Craigview House Apartments Tel: 05601 524502 www.craigview houseapartments.com

Fidra Fine Art Tel: 01620 895057 www.fidrafineart.co.uk

Gilsland Park Tel: 01620 893790 www.gilslandpark.co.uk Gilmerton House Tel: 01620 880207 www.gilmerton house.com Ducks Kilspindie House Tel: 01875 870 682 www.ducks.co.uk

‘When you travel so much it’s always a

great feeling coming home’

Above: With The Bass Rock in the background.

North Berwick is perfect because everything is within walking distance. We lived in Florida for ten years, which was great, but you have to drive everywhere, even to buy a pint of milk. That can become very wearing but it made us appreciate just how easy it is to live in a place like North Berwick. We’re not great cooks, but with having two girls, and being away a lot, we tend to eat in the house. When we do get out there are some nice restaurants in East Lothian. In North Berwick, for example, there’s Zitto, a little Italian restaurant on Quality Street. My eldest had her birthday party there recently and it’s one of my favourites. Osteria is also really nice. And the North Berwick Fry does great fish and chips. When you travel so much it’s always a great feeling coming home. For me, I know I’ve arrived back home as I drive into North Berwick from the north, and I can see the trees on the left hand side of the road. When I’m back I have all these ideas about what I’m going to do, but to be honest I don’t really want to be anywhere else. A holiday for us is just the whole family being together at home. Catriona Matthew will be defending her Aberdeen Asset Management Ladies Scottish Open title at Archerfield Links, East Lothian, Friday 29-Sunday 31 August 2014

Puffin’s Lookout Tel: 01620 890713 www.northberwick getaway.co.uk Traprain Cottage Tel 01620 825375 www.trapraincottage bandb.co.uk Redshill Bed & Breakfast and Self Catering Accommodation Tel 01620 810406 www.redshill.co.uk The House at the Beach T: 07868 735895 www.thehouseatthe beach.co.uk Lettings of Distinction Tel. 01620 482181 www.lettingsof distinction.com Linton Hotel Tel: 01620 860202 www.thelintonhotel. co.uk The Byre M: 07967 689831 www.thebyrecottage. co.uk

Westgate Galleries Tel: 01620 894976 www.westgate galleries.co.uk Property Simpson & Marwick Tel: 01620 892 000 www.eastlothian primeproperty.com Smiths Gore Tel: 01620 828960 www.smithsgore.co.uk Shopping Patricia Dudgeon Designs Tel: 01620 893133 www.patriciadudgeon. com Tisan Jewellery Tel: 01620 811184 www.tisanjewellery. co.uk The merry go round Tel: 01620 842222 www.themerrygo round.co.uk Spirits North Berwick Gin 0845 467 4547 www.nbgin.com Visitor Attractions John Gray Centre Tel: 01620 820695 www.johngraycentre.org Scottish Seabird Centre Tel: 01620 890202 www.seabird.org Musselburgh Racecourse Tel: 0131 665 2859 www.musselburghracecourse.co.uk

www.scottishfield.co.uk

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01620 892000 eastlothianprimeproperty.com

St Andrew’s Court Main Street, Gullane, East Lothian Apartment 14 – The Penthouse – Fixed Price £650,000 Apartment 12 – Fixed Price £399,000 Outstanding 4 bedroom penthouse with balcony and 3 bedroom apartment in converted mansion house UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY - LAST TWO APARTMENTS RELEASED - Prestigious village setting with stunning views, ideal location for golfing enthusiast. Suitable as a permanent or holiday home with quality fixtures and fittings throughout. Lift access and parking.

www.standrewscourtgullane.co.uk

The Wards Duns Road, Gifford, East Lothian Offers over £625,000 Outstanding 5 bedroom house with extensive and well stocked gardens Detached house in secluded setting in the heart of Gifford, with gardens of approx 0.7 acres and two garages. The accommodation comprises – Hall, sitting room, drawing room, dining room, breakfasting kitchen, cloakroom, utility, master bedroom with ensuite, 4 further bedrooms and bathroom. Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

13 Westerdunes Park North Berwick, East Lothian Offers Over £540,000

Flat 5, Tusculum 3c Links Road, North Berwick, East Lothian Fixed Price £485,000

Attractive 4 bedroom detached house with fine gardens and double garage

Unique 3 bedroom apartment with spectacular views, garages and garden

Individual detached house to the West of town in sought after location, ideal for a family or golfing enthusiast with large enclosed gardens.

In a magnificent stone built building in a prestigious location with outstanding views, with the added benefit of lift access, garaging and garden.

The accommodation comprises – Hall, sitting room, dining room, sun room, kitchen, utility, master bedroom with en-suite, 2 further double bedrooms, bedroom 4/study and bathroom.

The accommodation comprises – Hall, living room, breakfasting kitchen, master bedroom, 2 further bedrooms, bathroom, shower room and tower room.

Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

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01620 892000 eastlothianprimeproperty.com

10 WAVERLEY NORTH Gullane, East Lothian Offers Over £385,000

THE SCHOOL HOUSE Cockburnspath, Borders Offers over £349,950

Superb spacious 3 bedroom top floor apartment with balconies and stunning views

Immaculate 3 bedroom house with large gardens and studio annexe

Extremely spacious apartment, ideal as a permanent, holiday or investment property in convenient location with stunning views, lift access and balconies.

Delightful stone built house in the village centre which has been comprehensively upgraded whilst retaining original period features. The accommodation comprises – Hall, sitting room, dining room, breakfasting kitchen, utility, 3 double bedrooms, bathroom and shower room. Mature enclosed gardens and annexe.

The accommodation comprises – Hall, sitting room, dining room, family room, kitchen, utility, master bedroom with en-suite, 2 further bedrooms with en-suites and cloakroom.

Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

Viewing by appt tel Agent 01620 892000

THE HOUSE AT THE BEACH

A VICTORIAN TOWN HOUSE IN A LOVELY QUIET POSITION SITUATED RIGHT ON THE WEST BAY AT NORTH BERWICK Accommodation includes 4 double bedrooms, 2 en-suite, and sleeps 8 (+2)

Gilsland Park is a fa mily run, fa mily focussed holiday park located in the charming harbour town of North Berwick.

PERFECTLY LOCATED TO EXPLORE THE COAST AND COUNTRYSIDE OF EAST LOTHIAN. IDEAL FOR FAMILY BREAKS OR GOLFING HOLIDAYS. BRAND NEW PUFFIN LODGE – A LUXURY LODGE WITH HOT TUB Open Weekend - 22 & 23 March 2014. Register at www.gilslandpark.co.uk for exclusive discounts

COME AND MEET US AND SEE THE LODGE AT THE SECC, 6-9 FEBRUARY 2014 Tel: 01620 893 790 Email: carlene@gilslandpark.co.uk

www.gilslandpark.co.uk

T: 07868 735895 E. info@thehouseatthebeach.co.uk www.thehouseatthebeach.co.uk

Exquisite pieces of vermeil and silver jewellery, pearls and semiprecious stones

TISAN J e w e l l e ry

www.tisanjewellery.com tel: 01620 811184 email: info@tisanjewellery.com WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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EMPORIUM

Destination E A S T L O T H I A N Stunning beaches and pretty villages are not the only reason to visit Britain’s sunniest spot LETTINGS OF DISTINCTION

The most prestigious, luxury properties available have been handpicked for holiday rental in East Lothian. Guests can avail of a personalised concierge to oversee every meticulous detail of their holiday and ensure the very highest standards of service and luxury. Tel: 01620 482181 www.lettingsofdistinction.com

SEAHOLM

Located on the beautiful Victorian seafront of North Berwick, Seaholm bed and breakfast is perfectly located for the attractions of the town and East Lothian – ideal for singles, couples, families and golf parties. Seaholm offers high quality accommodation and a friendly, relaxed atmosphere, all at very competitive rates. Tel: 01620 895150, www.seaholm.co.uk

FIDRA FINE ART

Covering over 200 years of the best in Scottish painting, drawing and prints, Fidra Fine Art currently stocks over 60 works by traditional and contemporary Scottish artists. Open weekends from 12-5pm or by appointment. Tel: 01620 895057, www.fidrafineart.co.uk Painting – North Berwick from the Leithies by John Campbell Mitchell

GILMERTON HOUSE

Recently refurbished to provide a high standard of stylish accommodation, Gilmerton House is the perfect venue, whatever the occasion. And with four elegant reception rooms to host your event, over 20 years’ experience and its exclusive use policy, you can be assured of having their full attention. Tel: 01620 880207 www.gilmertonhouse.com

THE MERRYGOROUND

Next time you’re visiting Gullane pop in and browse their fabulous collection of stylish yet affordable clothing for ladies, girls and boys. Mention ‘Scottish Field Feb14’ for 10% off your purchase. Tel: 01620 842222, www.themerrygoround.co.uk

DUCKS KILSPINDIE HOUSE

Aberlady lies right at the heart of the East Lothian coastline, with its bay, the oldest nature reserve in the UK, abundance of great golf courses and quiet, picturesque village, only 30 minutes from Edinburgh. Ducks restaurant with rooms is ideal for a quick pub meal or a delicious dinner in its 2AA Rosette restaurant. Tel: 01875 870682, www.ducks.co.uk

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EMPORIUM

THE JOHN GRAY CENTRE

A hub of cultural activity for the county, it houses the East Lothian Archive and local history service, fantastic museum and exhibition space, plus Haddington library. There’s something for everyone. Tel: 01620 820695, www.johngraycentre.org

NB GIN

Produced in North Berwick, this new artisan gin is made from pure British grain spirit and eight carefully selected botanicals to produce a deep and balanced flavour. It’s stilled, blended, bottled and labelled by hand to ensure that every bottle is of the highest quality. Tel: 0845 467 4547, www.nbgin.com

SCOTTISH SEABIRD CENTRE

Control the cameras in the Discovery Centre and zoom in on wildlife action on the Firth of Forth islands, with gannets, puffins and seals to see throughout the year. Also enjoy seasonal boat trips, plus the gift shop and Seabird Cafe, which has a decking area and stunning views out to the world-famous Bass Rock. www.seabird.org

DUNBAR PET FOOD LTD

Established 27 years ago and specialising in wild bird food and accessories, quality dog food and all types of food for small animals and pets. Products include premium and wild bird seed, sunflower hearts, plus good quality cat and dog beds – everything you need for your pets. Tel: 01368 864352

GILSLAND PARK

A family run and family focused business established in 1930, Gilsland Park in North Berwick is a ‘get away from it all’ holiday and second home destination for families, walkers and golfers alike. Home ownership available as well as holidays and short breaks in camping cabins, caravans and luxury lodges. See them and Puffin Lodge at the SECC, 6-9 February 2014. Open weekend 22-23 March. Tel: 01620 893790, www.gilslandpark.co.uk

LYLE CRAWFORD & CO CA

Established in North Berwick for over 30 years, chartered accountants Lyle Crawford and Louise Presslie offer a wide-ranging accounting, tax and business service to meet the needs of private clients and businesses throughout East Lothian, Scotland and beyond. For professional service with a personal approach, contact Lyle Crawford & Co. Tel: 01620 892090, www.lylecrawford.co.uk.

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Musselburgh’s Premier Jumps Raceday attracts leading horses from Britain and Ireland en route to the Cheltenham Festival.

ROOM FOR TWO £115 for £50 if when you eat at Ducks!

Enjoy all the delights of East Lothian - only 30min from Edinburgh. Ducks, Main Street, Aberlady, EH32 0RE 01875 870 682 kilspindie@ducks.co.uk www.ducks.co.uk

Cheltenham via Musselburgh

Scottish Cheltenham Trials Raceday

Sunday 2nd February 2014

Packages, advance bookings and group discounts available online:

www.musselburgh-racecourse.co.uk

Puffin’s Lookout

Affordable Beach front luxury

2 Luxury side by side, 2 Units side Units by side, sleeping 6 & 8 people. Egyp sleeping 6 & 8 people. tian cotton sheets/towels, fully equipped with all conveniences. Walk to pubs/restaurants, in North Egyptian cotton sheets/towels, Berwick. fully equipped with all conveniences. Walk to pubs/restaurants, in North Berwick. jobrien@northberwickgetaway.co.uk www.facebook.com/northberwickgetaway www.northberwickgetaway.co.uk tech nology

REDSHILL BED & BREAKFAST

The Old Farmhouse is a recently restored cart shed which has been very tastefully restored to provide a perfect place to spend a day or two in the wonderful East Lothian Countryside in a home from home location, with delicious farmhouse breakfasts, made from locally sourced ingredients. A place of total peace and tranquillity. The Old Farmhouse, Redshill Farm, Gifford, Haddington, East Lothian EH41 4JN Tel: 01620 810406 / 07971115848

redshill@btinternet.com www.redshill.co.uk

THE BYRE COTTAGE A self catering cottage in the centre of East Lothian, Scotland Suitable for families and golfers. With easy access to the coast, Edinburgh and the countryside. bookings@thebyrecottage.co.uk

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SITUATED IN THE SEASIDE TOWN OF DUNBAR, EAST LOTHIAN. WE HAVE 16 EN-SUITE BEDROOMS AND THE BEAUTIFUL MAURETANIA RESTAURANT IS OPEN DAILY SERVING SOME OF EAST LOTHIAN’S FINEST PRODUCE. Station Road, Dunbar EH42 1JY T: 01368 238 002 F: 01368 681 212 info@royalmackintosh.co.uk royalmackintosh.co.uk

A warm welcome awaits you! On the edge of the Golf Coast within the Conservation Village of East Linton. Award Winning Food, Traditional Country Bar, 6 Stylish Bedrooms The Linton is the ultimate Cosy Country Treat.

3 Bridgend East Linton EH40 3AF infolinton@aol.com www.thelintonhotel.co.uk 01620 860202

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19/12/2013 16:14:14


EMPORIUM

CORE HEALTH

A unique health service for the ‘whole’ of you. Improve the quality of your life and manage your health with the help of experts, all under one roof. Tel: 01620 84 2004 www.core-health.com

WESTGATE GALLERIES

situated in the beautiful seaside resort of North Berwick, comprising a gorgeous gift shop, gallery and café. The gallery has pictures, sculptures, ceramics and art glass, whilst the gift shop sells unique jewellery, handbags, toiletries and more. Tel: 01620 894976 www.westgategalleries.co.uk

THE STABLES

Set within the grounds of the historic Tranent Manse – famous as part of the 1745 battle of Prestonpans – this renovated stable block provides five-star flexible accommodation for up to eight people, which can be tailored to suit guests’ individual requirements. An ideal rural retreat on Edinburgh’s doorstep and centrally located for all golf courses. www.Stables244.com

ARCHERFIELD WALLED GARDEN

With its dog-friendly estate walks, microbrewery producing craft ales with twice-weekly free tours, gallery shop stocking Scottish art, crafts and gifts as well as a café-restaurant and beer garden, Archerfield Walled Garden is the perfect addition to a trip to East Lothian – just minutes from Dirleton Castle and Yellowcraig Beach. Tel: 01620 388588, www.archerfieldwalledgarden.com

TRAPRAIN COTTAGE BED AND BREAKFAST

An Alastair Sawdays ‘special place to stay’ set in stunning East Lothian landscape beneath Traprain Law, with golf courses, castles and beaches on the doorstep. An ideal and comfortable base from which to explore East Lothian. Tel: 01620 825375, www.trapraincottagebandb.co.uk

THE ARCHES AND THE STABLES COTTAGES

Spacious four-star VisitScotland self-catering cottages on a working farm at Upper Bolton, 30 minutes from Edinburgh, 10 minutes from the coast or the Lammermuir Hills and ideal for golf. Enclosed garden, ample parking and pet friendly. The Stables is wheelchair accessible throughout. Tel: 01620 810476, www.upperbolton.co.uk

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19/12/2013 16:16:49


FOOD & DRINK

East Lothian

FOOD TRAIL

r s to dine, o e c la p t a re G omething s p u k ic p to go delicious to

THE WATERSIDE BISTRO Winners at the 2013 Scottish Restaurant Awards and East Lothian Food and Drinks Awards, The Waterside has firmly put itself back on the map. For 2014, in association with Edinburgh’s Hanging Bat bar, it is now serving East Lothian’s largest selection of craft beers. Tel: 01620 825674 www.watersidebistro.co.uk

LINTON WINES @ THE DELI Have you ever wondered what wine goes with cheese? Why not visit East Lothian’s specialist cheesemonger, where you will find the finest quality cheeses matched with a wide variety of wines. Linton Wines@The Deli, 18 High Street, East Linton. www.winewithoutwaffle.co.uk

THE CREEL RESTAURANT A true East Lothian eating institution where the award winning chef proprietor, Logan Thorburn, has thrown in his all to deliver great dishes with the best local ingredients from both land and sea since 2006. Pop in for some heart pleasing mouthfuls, all prepared in the rustic artisan way where the classics are truly revitalised. Please book in advance. Tel: 01368 863279 www.creelrestaurant.co.uk

OSTERIA Osteria is an intimate, award winning restaurant located in the picturesque town of North Berwick offering classic Italian dishes with a modern twist, and using only the best local produce. Osteria is a family run business that prides itself on good food and good service, so much so that the restaurant picked up the accolade Best Italian of the year at the Scottish Restaurant Awards 2013. Tel: 01620 890589 www.osteria-no1.co.uk

ARCHERFIELD WALLED GARDEN Situated in beautiful estate parkland near North Berwick, The Walled Garden bar-restaurant serves lunch every day, a delicious brunch on Sundays and a seasonal, locally-sourced dinner menu on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. The monthly Supper Club and gourmet deli make this is a ‘must visit’ foodie destination. Tel: 01620 388588 www.archerfieldwalledgarden.com

LA POTINIÈRE Being awarded East Lothian’s Best Fine Dining award from 2006 -2013, La Potinière is considered to be one of the finest restaurants in the area. The menu changes regularly according to the availability of the best produce and its own home grown fruit and vegetables throughout the seasons. Everything is prepared inhouse, and accompanied by a small but comprehensive wine list to ensure a culinary experience is enjoyed within a warm, friendly and relaxed atmosphere. Tel: 01620 843214, www.la-potiniere.co.uk WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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23/12/2013 09:04:46


10 OF THE WORST

HMS Natal

In 1911-12 the warrior-class armoured cruiser HMS Natal escorted the royal yacht for the newly-crowned King George V’s trip to India. During WWI it was assigned to the 2nd Cruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet. On 30 December 1915 in the Cromarty Firth, a series of internal explosions ripped through the rear part of the ship, capsizing it within five minutes. All of the 390 listed crew perished in the tragedy, a figure that does not include a number of civilians – including women and children – who were on board at the time.

01

The cruel sea War, storms, human error and the sheer destructive power of the ocean have all contributed to a number of tragic losses in Scotland’s waters

RMS OCEANIC Built for the White Star Line, until 1901 the Oceanic was the largest ship in the world. Like many merchant vessels, it was utilised during WWI, patrolling the waters from the north Scottish mainland to the Faroes. However, as it navigated its way around the island of Foula on its way north, it hit the notorious reef, the Shaalds of Foula, and was wrecked. Fortunately all of the crew were rescued. It was the first Allied passenger ship to be lost in the war.

SS Daphne

02

River Dee Ferry Boat Disaster

On 5 April 1876, a heavily overloaded ferry taking passengers across the Dee from Aberdeen to a holiday fair in Torry, capsized, killing thirty-two of the 70 or so people on board. The ferry operated a pulley system, so there was no need for an engine, or sails. The river was particularly high at the time and the fast-flowing water, coupled with the excessive passenger load, caused the ropes to be cast off and the boat to drift out to sea, before eventually sinking. 58

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04 THE ORION On 17 June 1850 the paddle steamer Orion left Liverpool for Glasgow with about 110 passengers on board. The following morning, whilst attempting to navigate close to the coastline in a thick mist, the boat struck a rock in the entrance to Portpatrick Harbour, Wigtownshire. It sank within minutes, killing 60 passengers – many of whom were still sleeping in their bunks. The captain and 2nd mate were charged with ‘culpable bereavement of the lives of the passengers’; the former was imprisoned for 18 months; the latter was transported for seven years. One of the passengers killed in the tragedy was the eminent surgeon John Burns.

On 3 July 1883 the passengercargo vessel SS Daphne sank moments after it was launched from the shipyard in Govan. At the time there were around 200 workmen on board ready to begin fitting SS Daphne out as soon as she was afloat. As it moved into the Clyde, its anchors failed to stop its progress, and the current flipped it over. Around 70 lives were saved but 124 lives were lost, many of them young boys, some of whose relatives will have been watching from the shore.

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23/12/2013 17:27:43


THE CRUEL SEA

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HMS SAUCY

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The Swan

The Swan was originally part of the Royalist fleet during the English Civil War, before its disgruntled crew were persuaded to join Oliver Cromwell’s Parliamentarians. It was part of the fleet of six which attacked Duart Castle, Mull, in September 1653. The same month a violent storm sank the Swan, and two other ships, in the Sound of Mull. The wreck was discovered in 1979, since when a number of important artifacts have been recovered, including a rare type of cannon and a pocket watch.

Tug boats were a crucial part of the war effort in both WWI and WWII. Working on the tugs was notoriously dangerous, out in all weathers and under enemy fire in conditions the vessels were not designed for. Twenty tugs were lost during the Second World War, including HMS Saucy, an armed deep-sea rescue tug which was sank on 4 September 1940 after hitting a mine in the Firth of Forth, with the loss of 28 crew.

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DO YOU AGREE WITH OUR SELECTION? TELL US ABOUT ANY INTERESTING WRECKS. VISIT THE LINK TO FACEBOOK OR TWITTER AT WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

HMS DASHER

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This Royal Navy aircraft carrier was one of the shortest lived escort carriers in British maritime history. A converted merchant vessel, it was commissioned into service in July 1942. Eight months later, in the Firth of Clyde, a massive internal explosion caused it to sink, killing 379 of its 528 crewmen – many of whom escaped the ship but died of hypothermia or burns from escaped fuel that ignited on the water.

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HMS VERONA This former luxury steam yacht was requisitioned by the Royal Navy during WW1, fitted with guns and took up anti-submarine patrol duties from its base in the Moray Firth. On 24 February 1917, the vessel was struck by a mine from a German submarine off the coast at Portmahomack and sank in under a minute, taking all 23 crew with her.

El Gran Grifon

This 650-ton 38-gun vessel was the flagship of the Spanish Armada that threatened to invade Britain in 1588. After being attacked and damaged in the English Channel, the ship managed to escape into the North Sea. However, a number of storms threw it off course, and as it attempted to anchor at the Fair Isle near Shetland, strong tides drove it into the rocks of Stroms Hellier. Stranded on the Fair Isle for two months, 50 of the crew died and were buried in the ‘Spaniards Grave’ on the island.

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23/12/2013 17:28:13


heritage

Take it from the top As this year’s ski season reaches its peak, it’s hard to imagine that just over a century ago skiing in the Alps was unheard of – and might never have caught on without the determined efforts of the intrepid Sir Arthur Conan Doyle words tim siddons

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23/12/2013 14:36:58


‘His friends had taken to practising at night to

avoid the ridicule of

the curious, amused locals’

Left: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle hosts a fashionable ski party in Davos in the mid-1890s.

I

n 1893 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle took his wife Louisa and two young children to Davos, in Switzerland, in the hope of finding a high-altitude cure for Louisa’s tuberculosis. While there, he wrote about his experience of a new pastime, skiing. The sport was almost unheard of in Britain at the time, and the Sherlock Holmes writer’s articles did much to popularise both it and the Alps. Born in Edinburgh in 1859, Sir Arthur Ignatius Doyle (he added the ‘Conan’ later on) might be best known today for his hugely

popular stories about the ingenious pipesmoking detective, but there was much more to him than that: as well as being a qualified physician, he was a political campaigner, had a fascination with spiritualism and the occult (including a steadfast belief in the existence of fairies) and was also a prolific sportsman. While all of these qualities are well docu­ mented, much less is known about Conan Doyle’s services to skiing. In 1893 he wrote an article for the Strand (the magazine which also serialised his Sherlock Holmes stories) entitled ‘An Alpine Pass on “Ski”’. In it, he described the wonder of skiing: ‘For a third of a mile we shot along over gently dipping curves, skimming down into the valley without a motion of our feet. In that great untrodden waste, with snowfields bounding our vision on every side, it was glorious to whizz along in this easy fashion.’ Today, some 110 million people ski in more than 80 countries around the world and the Alps are the biggest ski destination in the world, accounting for 45 per cent of all ski visits. For the vast majority of the Strand’s readers in the 1890s, however, Conan Doyle’s article was the first time they would ever have heard of skiing. The fact that he needed to describe skis shows just how new the sport would have been to his readers: ‘There is nothing particularly malignant in the appearance of a pair of “ski”,’ he wrote. ‘They are two slips of elm-wood, 8ft long, 4in broad, with a square heel, turned-up toes, and straps in the centre to secure your feet. No one to look at them would guess at the possibilities that lurk in them.’ This is not to say that skiing was anything new in 1893. Cave paintings found in northern Norway and dating from four thousand years ago depict a man on skis, and the remains of skis have been found preserved in bogs in other parts of Scandinavia – the oldest being one discovered in Sweden that is around four and a half thousand years old. The Norwegian military held skiing competitions from at least the 1670s, and the first known civilian ski race took place in Norway in 1843. The invention of skiing in its modern form has been accredited to Sondre Norheim (although there is some debate about this), from Telemark in Norway, who developed the equipment and techniques that led to skiing as we know it today. It was in the 1870s that he developed the short, curved, flexible ski that allowed for easy turning in soft snow. It was on a visit to Norway a few years before his trip to the Alps that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had first encountered skiing. Although he only observed the sport he had always harboured a desire to have a go, so when he arrived in Switzerland and realised the geography and www.scottishfield.co.uk

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image - Arthur Conan Doyle Collection - Lancelyn Green Bequest, Portsmouth City Council.

take it from the top

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CENTRE- ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE COLLECTION - LANCELYN GREEN BEQUEST, PORTSMOUTH CITY COUNCIL.

HERITAGE

climate was similar, he ordered a set of skis to be sent to him from Norway. He then set about teaching himself how to use them, which he found as difficult as the rest of us. ‘For a man who suffers too much dignity,’ he wrote, ‘a course of Norwegian snow-shoes would have a fine moral effect.’ Indeed, Conan Doyle’s Strand article is full of amusing lines about these early attempts to master his new hobby: ‘The “ski” are the most capricious things upon earth. One day you cannot go wrong with them. On another, with the same weather and the same snow, you cannot go right… Or, again, you may have had a long outing without any misfortune at all, and as you shuffle back along the road, you stop for an instant to tell a group on the hotel veranda how well you are getting on. Something happens – and they suddenly find that their congratulations are addressed to the soles of your “ski”.’ Of course, Conan Doyle was undoubtedly play ing up his incompetence for comic effect, because in reality he was a very accomplished sportsman. He told the editor of the Times that he had ‘sampled most British sports’ and, in his memoirs, he described himself as an ‘all-rounder’ but ‘second-rater’; which was somewhat overly modest for a man who was goalkeeper for Portsmouth Association Football

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Club, played ten first-class matches for the MCC and was captain of the Crowborough Beacon Golf Club. It did not take Conan Doyle long to master the basics of skiing, after which he found a couple of local skiers, the Branger brothers, and together they put their skis to the test. Without the aid of a ski lift, they made long and often treacherous journeys into the mountains, including the 7,700ft Jacobshorn, and a trip to Arosa – which in winter could normally only be reached by train – across an extremely dangerous pass almost 9,000ft above sea level. At one point they slid down a mountainside using the skis as a toboggan: ‘I dug my heels hard in, which shot me off backwards, and in an instant my two skis, tied together, flew away like an arrow from a bow... and vanished over the next slope, leaving their owner squatting in the snow... My tailor tells me that Harris tweed cannot wear out... He will find samples of his wares on view from the Furka Pass to Arosa.’ Crowds of curious, amused locals turned out to watch Conan Doyle and the Brangers. Indeed the Swiss pair had been skiing for well over a year but had taken to practising at night to avoid the ridicule. The irony, of course, is that Davos is now one of Switzerland’s most exclusive ski resorts. And there is no doubt that Conan Doyle helped in this development. His article on skiing, lit with self-deprecating humour, was hugely entertaining. However, his reason for being in Switzerland in the first place was a lot more serious. His wife, Louisa, had been diagnosed with TB and it was suggested that living at a high altitude would benefit her health. They lived in Davos for four years before returning to England. Louisa eventually died in 1906, her husband maintaining that it was the mountain air that had kept her alive for much longer than expected. So, rather unwittingly and in somewhat sombre circumstances, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – Britain’s first ski journalist – helped both to introduce skiing to Switzerland and popularise the sport in Britain. Indeed, his interest in spiritualism and the occult may also have extended to prophecy and second sight, because he certainly saw into the future when he wrote: ‘I am convinced that the time will come when hundreds of Englishmen will come to Switzerland for the “ski”-ing season’.

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23/12/2013 14:37:44


TAKE IT FROM THE TOP

‘I dug my heels hard in which shot me off backwards, and in an instant my skis flew away like an arrow from a bow and vanished over the next slope’

Left: Conan Doyle’s attempts to master his skis provided him with a wealth of hilarious anecdotes. Opposite: The author in New York in 1922 with his second wife, Jean, and their children. Above: Fashion and style on the piste has changed over the years.

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LOCAL HERO

Hoof miles Loes Knopper, the founder of On Horses For Horses, has inspired riders around the globe to mount their trusty steeds and ride as many miles as they can throughout September to help raise money for World Horse Welfare IMAGE ANGUS BLACKBURN

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What is the idea behind ‘On Horses For Horses’? On Horses For Horses is about horse riders around the world raising money for World Horse Welfare. The original aim was to get riders from as many different countries as possible to ride a combined 24,906 miles, which is the circumference of the earth. Now it’s evolved into an annual month-long event where horse owners can clock up hacking miles throughout September or organise an endurance style event.

When did you first start riding? As a teenager growing up in Holland, my best friend, Claudia, and I would be given our pocket money at midday on a Sunday and would cycle from Eindhoven to a farm

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23/12/2013 17:08:38


LOES KNOPPER

in the village of Son en Breugel, to spend all our money on renting two horses. We rode unsupervised across busy roads and parks to Eindhoven, to show off to our mothers, and then back again. It was the highlight of my life at that point… until I started noticing boys.

When did you buy Charlie? I didn’t start riding properly again until I was 41 years old and living in Kinlochleven. When I bought Charlie he was far from the perfect pony. He napped, bit, reversed, spun and reared every time I tried to hack him out alone. He scared the living daylights out of me and it was only after two years that I managed to ride him without any stress.

Tell us about your first fundraising ride on 25 September 2011. Nine riders spent a leisurely day riding across Airds estate and the beach in front of Castle Stalker. When we got back at the end of the day, I made everyone coffee and gave them a slab of my homemade apple pie.

How much interest have you had? I am incredibly touched by how many people have got involved. We have had riders from 17 countries take part and have managed to raise nearly £5,000. www.onhorsesforhorses.org/

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culture

‘The Paolozzi family ran a confectioner’s in Edinburgh; as a child Eduardo drew on old

wrapping paper from the shop’

Main image: Eduardo Paolozzi: the artist as a young man in Edinburgh. Top right: Sculpture from Paolozzi’s studio at the National Gallery of Modern Art.

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king of pop

King of Pop He spent much of his life abroad, but Pop Art pioneer Sir Eduardo Paolozzi never forgot his Edinburgh roots words claudia massie

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left - Lebrecht Music and Arts Photo Library / Alamy

R

esidents of Edinburgh will be familiar with the work of Eduardo Paolozzi. Many will have had to peel toddlers off the foot or hand of his great three-piece sculpture, Manuscript of Montecasino, which sits outside St Mary’s Roman Catholic Cathedral in Edinburgh. Paolozzi was born to an Italian immigrant family at the other end of Leith Walk in 1924 and remains Scotland’s most celebrated sculptor, as well as one of the leading printmakers of the twentieth century. Writing about Paolozzi, JG Ballard declared ‘that if the entire 20th century were to vanish in some huge calamity, it would be possible to reconstruct a large part of it from his sculpture and screenprints’. It is quite a claim, but one that reflects the enormous output and impact of Paolozzi’s work. The young Paolozzi grew up a in a manner typical of the Italo-Scots community, speaking the demotic of Leith at school and peasant Italian at home. The Paolozzi family ran a confectioner’s shop on Albert Street and throughout his childhood he drew on old wrapping paper from the shop and assembled scrapbooks full of pictures from British and American culture, developing an understanding of collage. When Italy entered the war in June 1940 everything changed for the young Paolozzi. AntiItalian sentiment was high and the Albert Street shop was looted. Fearful of fifth columnists, Churchill demanded the internment of enemy nationals: ‘Collar the lot’, was the command. Paolozzi, whose childhood had included annual trips to Italy to attend fascist summer camps, was then aged sixteen and found himself interned in Saughton prison for three months. His mother and sister were sent to Innerleithen.

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CULTURE

‘Paolozzi and his family were interred

during

World War Two; three were killed in a torpedo attack near Donegal’

Above: Paolozzi mosaic at Tottenham Court Road tube station, London. Right: Paolozzi sculpture in the grounds of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art.

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A much worse fate was in store for his father, maternal grandfather and uncle. They were sent from Edinburgh for internment in Canada, sailing aboard the SS Arandora Star. But on the 2nd July 1940, 100 miles west of Donegal, the vessel was torpedoed by a German U-boat with the loss of over 800 lives, including all three members of Paolozzi’s family. The final resting places of Paolozzi’s family remain unknown; 470 of the victims were Italian nationals and although many bodies were subsequently washed ashore on the coasts of Ireland and several Hebridean islands, only thirteen Italians were ever positively identified. Once freed from Saughton and reunited with his mother and sister, Paolozzi was obliged to help run the shop. He also trained as a motor mechanic, the visual legacy of which can be seen in much of his sculpture and graphic work. He began evening classes at Edinburgh College of Art, enrolling for a full-time course in 1943 only for his studies to be curtailed by military call-up. Sent for training in Slough, he was able to attend occasional classes at St Martin’s. Paolozzi was drawing all this time but it was only when he encountered a book called Foundations of Modern Art that he understood how he could communicate his vision and truly become an artist. He became increasingly absorbed in the language of modern aesthetics, a way of thinking, seeing and expressing that was heavily influenced by both primitive art and avant garde intellectualism.

Paolozzi escaped the army in 1944 by feigning lunacy to bring about a discharge on psychological grounds and, freed from the constraints of military life, continued his studies. While at the Ruskin School of Art in Oxford he worked as a fire watcher at the Ashmolean Museum, sleeping in the museum surrounded by the art of great masters and the ethnographic collections. Both were to have a formative influence on his work. After a period in Paris, where he met Alberto Giacometti among other influential artists, Paolozzi returned to London to teach textile design at the Central School of Art and Design. It was during this time that he began to establish himself as one of the the most innovative of the new wave of British artists. Anticipating Warhol by several years, he was producing collage-based screenprints based on contemporary ephemera, pop culture and news. Rich in language of advertising and photography, these were unprecedented pieces that offered a pointed rebuke of the high art sensibilities of the cultural establishment. Paolozzi is sometimes referred to as the ‘Godfather of Pop Art’ but his work was deeper and richer than that movement allowed. While Pop Art was essentially superficial, Paolozzi was anything but. He extended his collage approach to complex, cerebral sculpture, making assemblages and wax casts of found objects, contrasting the mechanical and organic, the modern and ancient. He defined his approach saying ‘a sculptor in the urban

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king of pop

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scottishstovecentre

Scottish Stove Centre, located 20 minutes north of Glasgow and 20 minutes south of Stirling, in the hamlet of Croftamie by Drymen, has established itself as the market leader for log/multifuel burning stoves. With 70 years of installation experience, Scottish Stove Centre

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How far would you go for a sofa to come home to?

Shop for your sofa off the high street. Pay for British craftsmanship, not unnecessary overheads. Key in lock. Jacket on newel post. Feet out of shoes. Ah, yes… that familiar welcome home as you sink into your Sofas & Stuff sofa. It’s the shape you chose from the dozens we offer. It’s stuffed anywhere from cloud soft to supportive. And it’s covered in the fabric, colour, texture and fibre you found most sympathetic from our samples (Harris

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tweed and Belgian linen are becoming very popular). By operating off the high street, at Sofas & Stuff we save you (and ourselves) stress and money. So you’re able to park near and for nothing; we’re able to offer a lifetime guarantee on every frame and spring. Window-shop the range on our website. Or let’s speak on 0131 346 2440.

N E W S H O W R O O M N O W O P E N - P L E A S E S E E W E B S I T E F O R D E TA I L S

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KING OF POP

world must concern himself with the contradictions of man and machine, with bizarre and hidden currents of antiquity, religion, and magic’. His ‘Icarus’ sculptures encapsulate this approach, marrying classical subject with the raw modernity of a surface structure created from casts of broken industrial forms. The trauma of his wartime experience was never overtly referred to in Paolozzi’s work but it left its mark in his lifelong pacifism and his ongoing desire to seek interconnectivity and unity in all things. Everything, he felt, can be art, and therefore perhaps art is in everything. While his work is very much of the machine age it bears none of the horror and dystopia so often associated with the modern and the mechanised. His sculptural vision remained emphatically European, despite the graphic nods to America, and he embraced Germany in particular, taking up teaching positions in Cologne and Munich. His later career saw him elevated to the establishment he once countered. Knighted in 1988, he undertook multiple public art commissions which ranged from monumental sculptures, such as the figure of Newton which guards the British Library, to graphic mosaics on the Underground. He would have enjoyed seeing children scrambling over his sculptures in Edinburgh and elsewhere as it underlines his ambitions for art to offer an interactive connection with the public, and also with nature – he incorporated hollows into works to catch

rainwater and provide impromptu birdbaths. Paolozzi died in 2005 and although he spent most of his career outwith Scotland, he remains one of our most revered artists. He never forgot his Scottish roots, gifting to the National Galleries of Scotland the contents of his studio while a number of important works were also donated by the collector Gabrielle Keillor. Edinburgh therefore became home to an extraordinary, unrivalled collection of Paolozzi’s work much of which, including a recreation of his studio, can now be seen at Modern Two. Paolozzi believed the artist ‘must use his vision to open wider views to others’ and his home town is enormously fortunate to have so much of his unique vision at its disposal.

Above: Paolozzi’s Studio. Top: Paolozzi collage, Real Gold (1949).

FIELD FACTS

Paolozzi’s Studio can be seen at the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art, 75 Belford Rd, Edinburgh EH4 3DR www.national galleries.org

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interiors

House for an art lover This house in Edinburgh’s New Town has proved to be the ideal gallery space to showcase the creative talent at the heart of the Murray family, as well as ensuring that they have the perfect family home words nichola hunter images angus blackburn

‘Art was the one thing that Rebecca and Andy had in

abundance’

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dinburgh as a place to live appealed to Andy and Rebecca Murray because of its rich culture but their home is equally culture-full. The couple started looking at places to live when Rebecca fell pregnant in 2002. ‘We wanted somewhere that was culturally interesting,’ Andy recalls. ‘Rebecca’s sister lived in Edinburgh and it was equidistant between our parents – Rebecca’s are in Belfast and mine are in Durham.’ Andy was keen to leave his career in HR in investment banking and launch his own property business and Rebecca’s career as a head hunter in London was focused on the financial sector so Edinburgh seemed like a sensible move. The only thing they needed was a house. This elegant, three storey townhouse in Stockbridge was the fifth house they viewed but they didn’t appreciate what area they were buying into. ‘We arrived in a taxi, ran in, looked round, loved it and spoke to our financial advisor in the taxi on the way back to the train station,’ says Andy. ‘We bought on the assumption that if it was on the

Above: Andy and Rebecca Murray in front of her sister’s painting of allotments. Right: The many works of art add a splash of colour all over the house.

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house for an art lover

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interiors

Above: The bright bay windowed sitting room. Left: The staircase provides yet more space to display artworks, paintings and poetry.

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house for an art lover

outskirts of the city centre it would have everything we needed within walking distance. We didn’t do a recce until we arrived with our luggage and babe in arms. When I discovered Raeburn Place and Stockbridge you can imagine my delight.’ The amenities were a pleasant surprise but the house needed a little inspiration. ‘It was in a decent state,’ says Rebecca, ‘but it was very dark and traditional with dark blue carpet and lots of gold which was in keeping with the period just not with our taste.’

Andy continues: ‘Structurally we didn’t want to do anything too drastic as I think with a Georgian property you already have great proportions. The only structural changes we made were to the kitchen and dining room on the ground floor and to the shower rooms on the attic level. The dining room only had a tiny window and a door to the garden so we removed the wall between this and the kitchen, which has made a massive difference. On the top floor there were two small shower rooms which were back to back and obviously a later addition to

‘The house devours art. There are a hundred or more pieces on the walls’

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interiors

Above: The colourful kitchen gives a modern twist. Right: Plenty of the essential elements of a family kitchen.

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the house. We decided to create a nice guest bathroom by knocking them into one.’ When it came to furnishing the house, the couple did fall a little short. ‘Virtually all the furniture we had in our flat in London fitted into the sitting room,’ Andy recalls. ‘As we couldn’t afford to start again, we thought carefully about how we could make it our own and the answer was the odd statement piece of furniture here and there and art

work. I try to shop locally and use Catalog on St Stephen’s Street for contemporary furniture, rugs, textiles and lighting, plus The Original Chair Company for traditional sofas and chairs. I can’t recommend them highly enough.’ Art was the one thing that Rebecca and Andy had in abundance as Rebecca’s sister is the artist Sarah Longley. ‘Sarah studied at Edinburgh College of Art and she’s painted many Edin-

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house for an art lover

burgh urban landscapes,’ says Rebecca. ‘Her painting of the allotments at the Dean Gallery now hangs in our drawing room and previously it was exhibited in the Scottish National Gallery’s annual exhibition. The space for paintings was one of the things we loved most about the house. This house devours art and you wouldn’t necessarily notice that there are a hundred or more pieces on the walls with room still for many more.’ www.scottishfield.co.uk

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house for an art lover

‘We feel we have created a

real family home here’

Rebecca’s father, the renowned Irish poet, Michael Longley CBE, also contributes to the cultural decoration as many of his poems are framed on the staircase. ’When people visit I think the art is the thing they notice most and it’s really given this house its individuality. With both my father and Sarah’s work it’s an incredibly diverse collection as well.’ However, it’s not just the Longley side of the family that has the licence on creativity; Andy is quite the designer and entrepreneur as well. ‘I’m quite good at visualising space and I’ve been lucky enough to flex my creativity on my own property projects so it was natural for me

to project manage the changes to the kitchen and dining room, while I also designed the storage/TV console in the dining area. I have the ideas and then I find the right people to execute them. For the drawing room I found an excellent cabinetmaker (www.verny.co.uk) to whom I gave my concept drawings and they built a wonderful bookcase/wine rack with a hidden wine fridge. I also designed the lampshade in the sitting room. I took my design to a company in Edinburgh who manufacture lampshades and they made it up for me. It’s made of thick parchment paper so you can actually have it in any colour you like.’

Above: The bathroom is a fusion of the traditional and the modern. Below: Plenty of colour makes for the perfect boy’s bedroom.

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interiors

‘When I

discovered Stockbridge you can only

imagine my delight’

Above: Traditional fireplaces provide the perfect place over which to hang artwork. Below: The Georgian frontage will have changed little over the years.

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It’s this attention to detail that prompted Andy to expand his property portfolio into the boutique property management business, Lovely Lettings. With Rebecca working from a home office (Rebecca set up The Murray Partnership in 2009 after ten years with Whitehead Mann) and raising their family, the house has had to adapt and Rebecca strongly affirms that it’s still a work in progress. ‘When we bought this house it wasn’t ideal for raising a family and over the last three years we have thought about moving (Ben is now 10 and Eddie is 8). However, we enjoy town living and it’s an ideal location now that I work from home. We feel we have created a real family home here and as the boys become more independent there are plenty of things for them to do. We still feel there’s work to do and we just couldn’t leave this house unfinished. ‘I feel privileged to live here – I really do, and it has been a brilliant informal gallery for Sarah – we’ve even sold some of her paintings off our wall to our friends.’

field facts

Lovely Lettings Tel: 0131 644 3113 www.lovelylettings.co.uk Sarah Longley www.sarahlongley.co.uk

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INTERIORSnews

A touch of inspiration with colour and design

ALL IN ONE Located on the Moray coast, Brodie Countryfare offers quality gifts, contemporary furniture, design-led accessories, ladies’ fashion and leisure wear and menswear – plus a foodhall, deli and family restaurant, with plans for a major new Home and Interiors department and restaurant for autumn 2014 – everything you need under one roof. By Forres, Moray. Tel: 01309 641555, www.brodiecountryfare.com

FIELDONLINE

TO COMMENT VISIT THE LINK TO FACEBOOK OR TWITTER AT WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

SHOWER POWER Aquademy’s patented system of highperformance functioning at reduced water volumes won Gold at the 2013 Designer awards. In keeping with the company’s philosophy of environmental responsibility, its Spa series provides features such as Rain, Mist, Waterfall and Tropical Storm while respecting the natural world that inspired them. Chromotherapy and aromatherapy are also combined to turn a shower into a sensory experience. Aquademy products are available at Victor Paris in Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow. www.victorparis.com

COOKING IN STYLE This Deco kitchen is just one of five design concepts from Callerton. Chelsea dark walnut doors provide a contrast with the Allan drawer boxes, painted in old English white. The visually striking island is packed with detail: the black panel features heavily grained, sap finished walnut, whilst the circular sandblasted glass worktop sits on a dark walnut base and pedestal – design that typifies the quality and flexibility of the Callerton’s furniture and service. www.callerton.co.uk

LEADING LIGHT Cotterell & Co has extended the geographical range of its ‘heavenly heritage’ selection to Africa, with the launch of the Kudu table lamp, inspired by the magnificent horns of this African woodland antelope, complemented by the eastern-inspired Zen console table. Both sit comfortably within the full collection, found in the ‘shop by style’ section of the revamped website, which you can browse to see many more new lighting and furniture products. Tel: 0131 662 0000 www.styleandlight.com

WINNING DESIGNS It has been a memorable year for Colin Wong and his team at Development Direct. As well as accomplishing a hat trick at the NEFF Master Partner Awards, they also scooped the award for UK’s Best Kitchen Designer 2013 (under £25k category) for the second year running – a first in the history of this prestigious event. Development Direct specialise in high quality German kitchen furniture from Hacker and bespoke kitches from Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Tel: 0131 337 2579 www.developmentdirect.co.uk

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emporium

Distinctiveliving Unique and stylish ideas to help make your house a home grille city Would you like to lend a distinctive quality to your balcony or deck for this year? A stylish glass balustrade from Grille City can do just that. Check their website for a host of photos showing the various options, or give them a call and they will be happy to discuss your requirements. Tel: 01738 639429, www.grillecity.com

acorn shutters For inspirational ideas that will reflect your own identity and distinguish your home from others choose from the bespoke Plantation Shutters range from Acorn Shutters – providing creative, aesthetic solutions for your home. Tel: 01292 263503 www.acornshutters.co.uk

stirling stove centre The Ruegg Cook Cook is available exclusively at Stirling Stove Centre. No need to wait for the ‘good’ summer days, you can now make those definite BBQ arrangements in the coldest winter months. Tel: 01786 440028 www.stirlingstovecentre.co.uk,

clive christian supply timeless furniture for every room in your house. Be distinct and use unused rooms to create great entertaining spaces. Tel: 0141 332 8989, www.clive.com

murray & murray Media equipment has become an inherent part of our everyday lives, but it’s often a challenge to find the right storage unit that is both beautiful and practical. Their bespoke cabinetry can be made to fulfil all of your technical requirements, without compromising on style. Tel: 01592 774 363 www.murrayandmurray.co.uk

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EMPORIUM HEATWORKS is Perthshireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier stove and cooker centre. A one-stop shop for stove and cooker installations, you need not go anywhere else for advice, surveys, supply or installation. HeatWorks offer a large selection of brands with many on display. Ruthvenfield Road, Perth. Tel: 01738 624842 www.stoveandcookercentre.com

COUNTRYSIDE KITCHENS Materialise your dreams with a bespoke kitchen that will last you a lifetime. Tel: 01573 228030, www.countrysidekitchens.co.uk

MOZOLOWSKI & MURRAY A custom-built glass and solid-wall conservatory, designed by Mozolowski & Murray. The extension offers a distinctive and stylish living space which can be used as a dining area throughout the year. Tel: 0845 050 5440 www.mozmurray.co.uk

CARTE BLANCHE This beautiful and subtly metallic wall finish was created for Fasque House. Carte Blanche provide luxury finishes for finer living â&#x20AC;&#x201C; exclusive, bespoke walls without seams that define a living space as distinctive. Tel: 01738 587600 www.decoratescotland.com

WILLIAM WILSON Designed to withstand passing fashions, the timeless St James Collection of bathroom brassware will give you an opulent classic bathroom which will stand the test of time. Available across Scotland from William Wilson bathroom showrooms. Tel 0141 892 6010, www.williamwilson.co.uk WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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EMPORIUM

Sittingcomfortably Cool, comfortable and elegant chairs and sofas to brighten up any room SOFA WORKSHOP Voted into the top ten World’s Comfiest Sofas – well, by Sofa Workshop! The aptly named Comfy Joe really is possibly one of the comfiest sofas you will ever sit in. Simply styled with generous seats, a perfect rake and softly curved arms. Tel: 0131 554 6599, www.sofaworkshop.com

MARTIN & FROST is a centre of excellence for Parker Knoll’s extensive range of handcrafted and beautifully designed fabric and leather sofas, recliners and chairs. Tel: 0131 657 0820 martinandfrost.co.uk

COUNTRY SOFAS A good sofa or chair feels like it is made just for you. Country Sofas build everything specifically around you, combining style with traditional British quality manufacturing. You can really feel the difference. From an unlikely converted farm steading outside Pitlochry, this shopping experience offers superior advice and service from concept to delivery. And huge choice does not only mean design and fabric but a range of seat fillings that’s hard to beat. Tel: 01796 474433, www.countrysofas.co.uk

TRADITIONAL CANE SEATING Restoration to handwoven chair seating in cane and Danish cord. Tel: 0131 554 5867, www.traditionalcaneseating.co.uk

REJECTS DEPARTMENT STORE Greta chair by Sits. This style is elegant, durable and amazingly comfortable. Gently curved backrest with beautiful wooden legs. Available in a choice of fabrics, from £583, at Rejects Department Store Tel: 01592 655955 www.rejectsonline.com

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EMPORIUM

STERLING The Glamour sofa range at Sterling Furniture combines chic, modern styling with smooth curves and vibrant upholstery, making the Glamour collection the perfect choice for modern living. With foam and fibre filled seat and back cushions to provide comfort and support, Glamour is the epitome of Sitting Comfortably. www.sterlingfurniture.co.uk

THE ORIGINAL CHAIR COMPANY aim to appeal to discerning and creative people with traditional style and longevity in mind, offering for sale a wide range of both antique and custom made upholstered furniture, as well restoring clients own furniture. They source and sell comfortable and timeless bespoke furniture including armchairs, sofas, occasional chairs, dining chairs and chaise-longues, plus vast selection of quality fabrics. Tel: 01738 564777. www.theoriginalchaircompany.co.uk

FAIRLIE FURNITURE This curved oak recliner is handmade in scotland by Fairlie furniture. A laminated oak frame gives a smooth curved form with a bit of bounce. Seen here in natural timber but also available with upholstered finishes. Tel: 01475 560109 www.fairliefurniture.co.uk

SOFAS & STUFF Make sure you’re sitting comfortably with a British-made sofa or armchair from Sofas & Stuff. Feeling creative? Let Sofas & Stuff produce your perfect piece – simply visit the upholstery specialist’s showroom to order a bespoke chair, sofa or bed. Not only can you pick the fabric of your choice from any supplier, you can also tweak dimensions for a truly one-of-akind look. Amberley chair (pictured) from £1,115. Tel: 0131 346 2440 www.sofasandstuff.com INTERIOR FURNISHINGS Curl up in cosy 100% wool on a sofa reupholstered and filled to your specified comfort. This one in luxurious check. Just one of the many, designer fabrics you will find when you visit our Stirling workshop. Tel: 01786 451 451 www.interior-furnishings.com

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ANTIQUESnews

Searching the salerooms for interesting lots and the latest prices

Pay and display

Hidden treasure

One of the star lots at a recent Antiques and Collectables sale at Mulberry Bank Auctions was this Edwardian rosewood display cabinet. After receiving a lot of interest, it finally sold for £4,600, well over the estimate of £300-400.

A collection of jewellery which had lain forgotten in an attache case in a Scottish attic for 70 years has been sold at Bonhams, Edinburgh. The case was believed to contain old family documents but when its owner forced it open she was astonished to find 22 pieces of family jewellery, spanning a wide range of styles and gemstones, pearls and diamonds. Estimated at £55,000, the collection eventually fetched £89,000.

All eight cars in Dick Skipworth’s collection from Ecurie Ecosse, the legendary Scottish team that won two consecutive Le Mans 24-Hour races in 1956 and 1957, sold at Bonhams for a whopping £8.8 million. The stars of the show were three Jaguars – the 1952 C-Type (£2.9m), the 1956 ‘Shortnose’ D-Type (£2.6m), the XK120 Roadster (£707,000) – and the unique 1960 Commer TS3 threecar transporter, which sold for £1.8m.

13 February: General EAST Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh 12 February: Jewellery & Silver, 13 February: Asian Art

1 February: General Bonhams, Edinburgh

13 February: Antiques & Pictures, 26 February: Whisky

The Flora of Scotland

FIND US ON FACEBOOK AND TWITTER WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

NORTH Lindsay Burns, Perth

Shapes, Edinburgh

SUPER 8

FIELDONLINE

Sales dates

A rare portrait of Flora MacDonald, a heroine of the Jacobite risings, went under the hammer at the Bonhams Scottish Art sale. The painting, by respected English artist Thomas Hudson, depicts Flora wearing a satin dress and tartan bow, holding a rose. Estimated at £7,000-10,000, it realised £27,500.

Over the asking price A pocket watch belonging to Robert Burns valued at £2,500 was sold at Lyon & Turnbull for an impressive £32,000. The silver pair cased pocket watch contains a paper insert with bird and heart motifs and initials in ink from his wife, Jean Armour. The rear cover has the name RobT Burns Mauchline 1786.

Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh 6, 13, 27 February: Home Furnishings & Interiors, 20 February: Collectors Sale WEST Great Western Auctions, Glasgow 1, 15 February: Antiques & Collectables SOUTH Thomson Roddick, Dumfries 11, 25 February: Home Furnishings & Interiors

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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ANTIQUESnews

Searching the salerooms for interesting lots and the latest prices

Pay and display

Hidden treasure

One of the star lots at a recent Antiques and Collectables sale at Mulberry Bank Auctions was this Edwardian rosewood display cabinet. After receiving a lot of interest, it finally sold for £4,600, well over the estimate of £300-400.

A collection of jewellery which had lain forgotten in an attache case in a Scottish attic for 70 years has been sold at Bonhams, Edinburgh. The case was believed to contain old family documents but when its owner forced it open she was astonished to find 22 pieces of family jewellery, spanning a wide range of styles and gemstones, pearls and diamonds. Estimated at £55,000, the collection eventually fetched £89,000.

All eight cars in Dick Skipworth’s collection from Ecurie Ecosse, the legendary Scottish team that won two consecutive Le Mans 24-Hour races in 1956 and 1957, sold at Bonhams for a whopping £8.8 million. The stars of the show were three Jaguars – the 1952 C-Type (£2.9m), the 1956 ‘Shortnose’ D-Type (£2.6m), the XK120 Roadster (£707,000) – and the unique 1960 Commer TS3 threecar transporter, which sold for £1.8m.

13 February: General EAST Lyon & Turnbull, Edinburgh 12 February: Jewellery & Silver, 13 February: Asian Art

1 February: General Bonhams, Edinburgh

13 February: Antiques & Pictures, 26 February: Whisky

The Flora of Scotland

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NORTH Lindsay Burns, Perth

Shapes, Edinburgh

SUPER 8

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Sales dates

A rare portrait of Flora MacDonald, a heroine of the Jacobite risings, went under the hammer at the Bonhams Scottish Art sale. The painting, by respected English artist Thomas Hudson, depicts Flora wearing a satin dress and tartan bow, holding a rose. Estimated at £7,000-10,000, it realised £27,500.

Over the asking price A pocket watch belonging to Robert Burns valued at £2,500 was sold at Lyon & Turnbull for an impressive £32,000. The silver pair cased pocket watch contains a paper insert with bird and heart motifs and initials in ink from his wife, Jean Armour. The rear cover has the name RobT Burns Mauchline 1786.

Thomson Roddick, Edinburgh 6, 13, 27 February: Home Furnishings & Interiors, 20 February: Collectors Sale WEST Great Western Auctions, Glasgow 1, 15 February: Antiques & Collectables SOUTH Thomson Roddick, Dumfries 11, 25 February: Home Furnishings & Interiors

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creative scotland

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PEA COOPER

Mad as a hatter Glasgow based milliner Pea Cooper and famous clients like Paloma Faith are leading the charge in the renaissance of the hat WORDS MORAG BOOTLAND IMAGE ANGUS BLACKBURN

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t isn’t often that a collection of granny’s hats is cited as the inspiration for cutting edge fashion design. But this is the spark that ignited milliner Pea Cooper’s career. ‘It may sound odd but I have always loved anything to do with the head,’ says Cooper. ‘As a child I loved hats and hair because my granny had so many hats.’ It wasn’t, however, until her mother fell ill that Cooper decided to ‘live the dream’ and turn that love of hats into a career. She had studied graphic design and print and worked in this field for ten years. On her 30th birthday she moved to London and began a course in millinery at art school, studying the history of fashion and hats while learning her craft. Today, Cooper lives in Paisley and works from Wasps Artists’ studios in Glasgow’s Merchant City. Cooper’s creations are no strangers to the red carpet and the diversity of her famous clients list – which includes Camilla Parker Bowles’s daughter, Lisa Lopes; the Queen’s cousin, Lady

Helen Taylor; singer Paloma Faith and Romy from indie pop band The xx – is testament to the wide-ranging appeal of her hats. Most of Cooper’s creations are made as commissions, but she does release two collections each year to showcase her work. In the winter months she finds herself focusing on felt hats, many of which are inspired by vintage hat designs from the 1920s through to the 1950s. In the summer her focus tends to shift to straw hats. She has worked in collaboration with Harris Tweed and the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and has exclusively revealed to Scottish Field that she will release a special bridal collection this year. Cooper is passionate about hats, describing them as ‘the cherry on top of the icing on the cake’. A hat, she believes, can not only alter the way you look, but more importantly it can also change the way you feel. She firmly believes that the popularity of hats is growing and that people’s perception of hat wearing is changing. Hats off to that. www.peacoopermillinery.com

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FIELDculture Madama Butterfly

Scottish Opera has commissioned prominent artist Alison Watt to create a design for a major new tapestry to be woven in collaboration with Dovecot Studios. The completed tapestry will hang over sweeping new walls connecting the old Theatre Royal to new foyer spaces, which are currently under construction in Glasgow. The tapestry design is called ‘Butterfly’ and uses striking yellows, pinks and golds with the artist taking inspiration from an obi, the sash worn as part of a Japanese kimono. www.dovecotstudios.com

Fine feather

Wildlife artist Colin Woolf’s latest work, The Christmas Tree, is painted with the pin-feather from the wing of a rare black grouse. One feather – which was given to the artist by a breeder of game birds – was used to paint the entire picture. For more information visit www.wildart.co.uk

Botanic bronze

Two bronze sculptures, Ascending Form (Gloria) and Rock Form (Porthcurno), by the British sculptor Dame Barbara Hepworth, have been acquired for the nation by the National Galleries of Scotland through the Government’s Acceptance in Lieu (AIL) scheme. The works, currently on show at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh, will remain in place in the Gardens through a reciprocal arrangement with the National Galleries. www.rbge.org.uk

CELTIC COLLECTIONS

Two Scottish museum collections which both offer unique insight into two very distinct and iconic Scottish art forms – Celtic art and Shetland textiles – have been awarded national importance status by Museums Galleries Scotland. The George Bain Collection, cared for by Groam House Museum in Rosemarkie and the Textiles Collection, cared for by Shetland Museum and Archives in Lerwick, become the latest Recognised Collections of National Significance. www.groamhouse.org.uk, www.shetland-museum.org.uk

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Galleries, outings, exhibitions and music Look north

Timespan has just launched the Artlands North website – www.artlandsnorth.timespan. org.uk/ – which highlights arts activities and enables artists and makers north of the Caledonian Canal to share their practice and profile. By clicking on the map visitors can take 3D tours of an individual artist’s studio, browse local galleries and discover what public art is on offer in the area. Timespan is celebrating the culmination of the Kildonan Clearances Bi-centenary Year with the news that the Sutherland coastal village is on the shortlist for the Creative Place Awards 2014. www.timespan.org.uk

The phantom of the opera Direct from the West End, the smash-hit musical Ghost comes to His Majesty’s Theatre in Aberdeen. Based on the Oscar-winning movie that captured the imaginations of a generation in the 90s, Ghost is a timeless fantasy about the power of love. The musical runs from 21 January-8 February. www.aberdeenperformingarts.com

The evolution of art

PHOTO: SUSSIE AHLBURG

A fascination with creatures and their portrayal in art is a recurring theme amongst the artists at the Glasgow Print Studio, and this is certainly evident in their latest exhibition. Living Proof refers to the research that Charles Darwin undertook to find the living examples and fossil evidence that led to his theory of evolution and the exhibition showcases fine art prints, paintings and sculptural work. The exhibition runs from 6 December 2013-2 February 2014 at the Glasgow Print Studio, Trongate 103. www.gpsart.co.uk

Centenary concerts

Hebrides Ensemble marks the centenary of the outbreak of World War One with a programme commemorating the era and its recurring themes of tragedy, loss, demoralisation, defiance and hope. Baritone, Marcus Farnsworth joins the ensemble for performances in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Perth and Gateshead from 1013 February 2014. www.hebridesensemble.com

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gardens

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WINTER’S WONDERLAND

Winter’s wonderland In spring Gargunnock’s gardens turn gold with daffodils. In summer they’re ablaze with rhododendrons and azaleas. But it’s the carpets of snowdrops that appear in winter that are really the estate’s crowning glory WORDS ANTOINETTE GALBRAITH IMAGES ANGUS BLACKBURN

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gardens

‘When he arrived 14 years ago, there were just two large

congested plantings of

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very year, as soon as the snowdrops are in flower, Willie Campbell, head gardener at Gargunnock House near Stirling, begins splitting up the clumps and drifts of blooms that line the drive and spread back into the woods. Digging up congested clumps and working with a bulb planter (‘like a daffodil planter,’ he says), he opens a plug and drops in half a dozen bulbs, about three inches deep. ‘I like to start early,’ Willie says, ‘when the snowdrops are just coming up and are starting to flower. That way you have an immediate

display. The move may knock them back briefly but they always revive.’ This method is clearly successful. When he arrived here 14 years ago there were just two large congested plantings of snowdrops under two sycamore trees. From these, Willie, now with the help of the part-time assistant gardener, Wendy Pizey, has established an extensive display that forms part of an unusual Snowdrop Walk packed with historical detail. Set in fertile farmland overlooking the carse of the River Forth, Gargunnock first came to

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winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wonderland

prominence in 1297 when William Wallace captured the Peel of Gargunnock, the fortified defence sited at the strategic ford over the River Forth, en route to victory at the battle of Stirling Bridge. Thereafter, the estate passed to the Hepburn, Seton and Elphinstone families before the Campbell of Ardkinglas family took possession in 1675. Later, during the Scottish Wars of Indepen­ dence, the Campbell family planted shelter belts of trees and, in 1720, added the remarkable four-acre trapezoid-shaped walled garden that

mirrored the one at Ardkinglas in Argyll. It is used nowadays for grazing and propagating. In the grounds, behind the house, Willie points out the remains of the tree under which Bonnie Prince Charlie rested in 1745 when travelling east from Fords of Frew. Just over a century later, in 1848, Frederic Chopin rode down the now snowdrop-lined drive, accompanied by his pupil and benefactor Jane Stirling. The piano the composer played on that visit is still in the house and is currently being restored by the Trustees. Visitors wishing

Above: From early February until mid-March, the gardens are carpeted with snowdrops.

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gardens

‘ These trees have a mindboggling

150 years of growth remaining’

Above: Willie separates the clumps of snowdrops, replanting them to extend their reach. Right: There’s an 18th-century doocot in the grounds of the estate.

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to venture further afield can walk along the original ‘Great Road to Stirling’, which leads from Stirling Castle to Dumbarton Castle. The road winds through the estate and past the walled garden before turning to run along the edge of the Carse, the farming land reclaimed from marshes that were drained around 1850. All this and much more was the ideal site for Willie Campbell, a former executive with BP and passionate plantsman who came here in 2000. The son of a head gardener, Willie learnt to propagate as a child, and today grows most of his plants from seed – rhododendrons, magnolias, sorbus and acers. His wife Fiona and a group of friends from Gargunnock village have been equally enthusiastic helpers:

Fiona is currently cataloguing the ever-growing rhododendron collection. The long line of talented gardeners who have tended this historic garden is set to continue when Wendy eventually takes over. ‘These plants are well suited to the growing conditions at Gargunnock,’ says Willie, adding that the established shelter belt of mature trees helps immensely. These include the line of Wellingtonia Sequoiadendron giganteum planted on the north side of the house by the botanist John Stirling around 1865. He also planted Douglas Fir and Western Hemlock in the woods on the south side on the edge of the Great Road – remarkable trees which still grow at a rate of 18 inches annually. ‘And they almost certainly

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field facts

have a mind-boggling further 150 years of growth remaining,’ he estimates. John Stirling later planted the magnificent cut-leaf beech Fagus sylvatica heterophylla behind Gargunnock House and the collection of trees and shrubs to the west of the house, including a pink, spring-flowering Kalmia latifolia reputed to be one of the oldest in Scotland. In the 1930s John Stirling’s granddaughter Viola and her companion Miss Fairlie devoted 30 years to planting the gardens west of the house and at the side of the drive. Since Viola’s death the Gargunnock Charitable Trust has run the estate. Sir James Stirling’s son Archie is now taking an active part in the management of the estate, house and garden.

There are plenty of other surprises for early visitors to Gargunnock besides the snowdrops. Barring a frost, the first plant you will see on arrival is a pair of pink Rh praecox. The main garden, tucked into the side of the yellow harled house, has recently been boosted for winter interest with snowdrops, aconites and hellebores. Here, Wendy is bringing a more con­tem­porary feel to the garden: ‘I want to plant more grasses and perennials to give the garden year-round interest. Grasses look great on a frosty morning.’ Regarding future plans she is modest: ‘I hope to take over one day. I have already got my chainsaw certificates but Willie still has a few more snowdrops to transplant before he completes the job.’

Gargunnock House, FK8 3AZ, is five miles west of Stirling on the A811. Gardens open regularly under Scotland’s Gardens. www.gardensof scotland.org Open daily for snowdrops from early Feb until mid-March, 11am to 3pm. For guided tours with Willie, an excellent raconteur, email: william. campbellwj@ btinternet.com Tel: 01786 860392

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wildlife

The big friendly giant With its gaping jaws and vicious glare, the basking shark looks a ferocious predator. But this mysterious creature has no interest in human flesh and deserves its protected status in Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waters Photoshotholdingsltd/alamy

words polly pullar

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the big friendly giant

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he basking shark has always been sur­­ rounded by myth. Shetland fishermen believed that the world’s second largest fish attached itself to the hulls of their boats to drag them under and drown all those on board. Other coastal dwellers told tales of fabulous marine monsters and sea snakes of massively exaggerated proportions. In 1906, for example, there were reports of a gigantic sea monster, 50 foot long, in Loch Broom, which was shot dead by the authorities. Even when monster theories were disproved, the tales continued. These weird and won­­der­ful beasts were usually basking sharks – known as brigda, mul­­ doan, cearban, carfin, pricker, sunfish, homer or hoe mother in various parts of Scotland. It was not until 1796 that Thomas Pennant finally replaced the word sunfish, another species altogether, with basking shark. The basking shark’s value was recognised very early on. Large carcasses, washed ashore, were quickly commandeered as blubber and bone was removed; valuable oil found in the shark’s massive liver was extracted for fuel for lamps. Compared to the oil from whales and seals, it burnt with less smoke and was used until replaced by petrol. It was also frequently employed as medicine, and as a panacea for many ailments, especially rheumatism. Sharks were hunted in a primitive fashion from the mid-1700s. Sometimes they would be caught up accidentally in other fishing activities,

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wildlife

‘As the shark

slipped silently beneath the boat,

we reckoned it was almost 30ft long’

Above: Divers watch as Cetorhinus maximus swims by. Right: With its jaws agape, the shark can filter over 300,000 gallons of seawater an hour. Below right: An illustration from 1868, showing a landed basking shark.

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something that is still a serious threat to them today. The Statistical Account of 1790 reports the following from Loch Fyne: ‘This sluggish fish sometimes swims into the salmon nets, and suffers itself to be drawn towards the shore without any resistance, till it gets near the land that for want of a sufficient body of water, it cannot exert its strength, in disentangling itself from the net. The fishers in the mean time take advantage of the situation and attack it with sticks and stones till they have it secure.’ Doubtlessly this would have been an easier method of catching a shark. Small boats were badly equipped and the hunters were often injured as thrashing, wounded sharks battled for their lives. Harpoons were cruel and ineffectual, and prolonged death. Shark fisheries came and went on a small scale from the Sea of the Hebrides to the Firth of Clyde. The first fishery survived until the 1830s, and then there was a lull in shark hunting. Anthony Watkins largely pioneered a modern basking shark fishery in Scotland, but Gavin Maxwell and Tex Geddes also set up the Isle of Soay Shark Fishery in 1944, hoping to provide enough income for themselves as well as work for the island community. Maxwell had the enthusiasm, but his experience was woefully lacking. The venture was a fiasco fraught with failed equipment, breakdowns and weatherinduced catastrophe. The final blow came when they discovered their hard-won shark livers had become flyblown in storage, rendering them unfit for sale. Maxwell lost heart; in any case he had begun to doubt the ethics of the pursuit. The best outcome of his fishery was his linkup with two eminent zoologists, L Harrison Matthews and WW Parker, whom he had met while lecturing at the Linnean Society in London. He agreed that they could visit Soay to carry out valuable research on shark carcasses.

Matthews commented: ‘It was an enormous help to us to be able to use the machinery Gavin had installed for cutting up the sharks, because these creatures were not easy things to dissect – some of the organs were so big and heavy we could barely handle them, and if your scalpel slipped and you punctured the stomach, you could release half a ton of semidigested plankton all over your dissection.’ Sharks were fished in Scotland until 1994, when nine were taken by the last sharker, Howard McCrindle, who has since been work­ ing with researchers to protect sharks. Finally, in 1998, the basking shark received full legal protection under the Wildlife and Countryside Act. When out of UK waters, it is still sought, its massive body discarded, its fins used to make soup for the East Asian market. Here, marine tourism remains a worrying threat – jet skis and speedboats can inflict fatal injuries to the sharks. An important marine code of conduct is now in force to protect them. Basking sharks appeared frequently off Ardnamurchan when I was a child – some summers they were so abundant in the Sound of Mull, off Coll and Tiree and around the Small Isles, that when we fished for mackerel in a small boat we frequently puttered along close beside them. Sometimes there was just one; on other occasions, many. They swam with their cavernous mouths agape. We watched as they soundlessly filtered vast amounts of sea­water (up to 330,000 gallons an hour), filling their stomachs with a rich broth of plankton and minute marine life. In the past decade, some of my best sightings have been around the Sound of Canna, and off Coll, areas of rich planktonic bloom. One morning, rising early on the boat I was crewing, there was an impressive shark close into the pier. The same day we came across a notably large shark off Ardnamurchan Point. As it slipped silently beneath the boat, we estimated it to be almost 30ft (9m) long. The following year, sightings were scant. There have been few serious incidents as a result of direct contact with basking sharks. The best documented was the tragedy that occurred off Carradale in the Mull of Kintyre in 1937. Three people in a small boat lost their lives when a shark struck the boat and caused them to fall into the sea. This incident was followed by an anti-shark campaign. Many basking sharks had been seen in the Firth of Clyde that summer; when other boats’ skippers claimed to have been attacked by a vast rogue shark, chasing after them, it blew the initial incident out of all proportion and led to further unsub­stantiated stories of ‘shark attacks’. But these are slow-moving

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THE BIG FRIENDLY GIANT

creatures, and any incidents were likely to have been purely accidental. Nevertheless, divers have to remain mindful of the fact that sharks, like all wild creatures, are unreliable. Though they do not play in the same way as whales and dolphins, they can do so without warning, which is why it is unsafe to venture too close. Until recently, little was known about these beasts that disappear to spend much time in the open ocean. They are thought to reach sexual maturity late and give birth to between one and six live young, measuring up to 2m in length. There are still huge gaps in our knowledge of a creature that appears during a migratory surge. Unlike other migrations, though, the basking sharkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appears to be more fickle. Scottish

Natural Heritage and Exeter University have begun an exciting new tagging project that will hopefully unveil valuable information on the sharks and their movements. But it seems appropriate that an extraordinary creature that has intrigued and mystified us for so long should retain a few secrets at least. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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COUNTRYnews TRIED & TESTED WHAT IS IT: Merrell Mens’s Fractal 2.0 fleece I WANT IT BECAUSE: It’s light, versatile, comfortable and looks pretty cool to boot. USEFUL FOR: Pretty much anything. It’s ideal for being worn under a jacket, and it is light enough to be easily folded up into a rucksack. HIGH POINT: It’s warm, comfortable and feels more like a cool sweater than a fleece. And the ribbed side panels allow for a better fit than a traditional fleece.

Claytime

Set on an estate in the Eildon Hills in the Scottish Borders, just south of Edinburgh, Bisley at Braidwood is Scotland’s largest and most versatile clay shooting ground. The set up includes simulated game experiences and the highest clay pheasants, rising teal, bolting rabbits and driven grouse. Bisley at Braidwood is also home to Scotland’s first 100m full-bore pipe range, perfect for rifle enthusiasts. The rifle range provides a safe and controlled environment that can be enjoyed all year round. For more information visit www.bisleyshooting.co.uk

LOW POINT: It is debatable how much protection it offers by itself on a cold, windy day, and at £70 it’s not cheap. WHAT IS IT: Ariat® Women’s Grasmere Tall boots. I WANT THEM BECAUSE: I ride a lot of horses and the boot is designed to keep feet that walk and spend a lot of time in stirrups comfortable. USEFUL FOR: Anyone who has to go from town to country and doesn’t necessarily want to change boots all the time HIGH POINT: Comfort and looks are great, there was no wearing in to do and they are insulated so keep your feet warm on the coldest day. LOW POINT: Small point but the laces are very long and I ended up tying them in fiddly knots

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COME WHAT MAY

Over 10,000 people visited the Isle of May in 2013, breaking the record for the national nature reserve in the Firth of Forth by more than 1,500. A total of 10,800 visitors made the trip to the island on the May Princess, the Scottish Seabird Centre boat and the RIB Osprey, bolstered by an amazing 111 kayaks and a number of small privately-owned boats.

Country life

The Final Report and Policy Recommendations from the independent Scottish Rural Commission has set out 97 improvements to the lives of rural Scots. The commission was chaired by Hughie Campbell Anderson, a land agent and former chairman of the Association of Salmon Fishery Boards. He and the five other commissioners have spent more than a year examining all aspects of rural life, including agriculture, housing, planning, transport and environmental issues. One of the measures called for is that broadband providers should be held to a universal service obligation, to ensure that parts of rural Scotland do not miss out.

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News and views from around the countryside OFF THE BEATEN TRACK

Nine of Scotland’s leading environmental charities are calling on the Scottish Government to put an end to the unregulated system for hill track construction, which allows landowners to build tracks without any public oversight. Instead, they want hill track construction brought within the planning system. The ‘Track Changes’ report is available at www.scotlink.org/hilltracks

CANINE HELP FOR CAPERCAILLIE

Dog walkers in an area important for capercaillie are keeping their pets under control or on a leash, a survey conducted by Scottish Natural Heritage has revealed. The woods at Boat of Garten in the Cairngorms National Park are a breeding site for the birds, which are sensitive to disturbance by people and dogs. The work was carried out to examine walkers’ behaviour following a campaign to promote responsible dog walking. The survey found there have been some startling changes since the campaign started. Overall, there has been a 66% reduction in the number of visits by people with dogs in the sensitive part of the woods. The proportion of dogs on leads has increased from 17% to 37%, and 71% of dogs are now assessed as being under close control.

North star PHOTO: GRAHAM MACKAY

A new guide to star gazing in the north Highlands of Scotland gives visitors a greater chance than ever before of seeing the Northern Lights and other astronomical highlights. The skies of the north Highlands are some of the darkest in western Europe making them ideal for spectacular views of the night skies. The new guide, The North Highland Dark Sky Experience, suggests 40 locations across Caithness, Sutherland and Ross-shire to view the skies. The guide can be downloaded from www.northhighlandsscotland.com

NOTHING TO GROUSE ABOUT The 2013 grouse season is now officially over and Scottish sporting agency, Sporting Lets, has reported one of the strongest shooting seasons for many years. Experts believe this year’s grouse season has generated an estimated £38 million for the Scottish economy, which includes the supplementary boost to rural communities in terms of tourism spending and seasonal employment.

GOLD STANDARD

It’s hailed as an icon of wild Scotland and was recently voted the nation’s favourite animal. Now a new campaign is aiming to see the golden eagle named as the country’s national bird. Fronted by wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan, RSPB Scotland has submitted a petition urging ministers to formally designate the species as a national symbol, placing it alongside the lion rampant, saltire and Scottish thistle as emblems of the country. To find out more visit www. scottish.parliament.uk/gettinginvolved/ petitions/goldeneagle

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field sports

Orkneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dawn patrol A wildfowling foray to the most northerly shoot in Scotland turned into a memorable 24 hours at Balfour Castle on the Orcadian island of Shapinsay words richard bath images angus blackburn

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orkneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dawn patrol

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field sports

‘I’ve got something to tell you, Charlie said – I’m a goose virgin’

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itting in an improbably small propellor plane as we were buffeted by 50mph winds on our way to Orkney, one of our party looked a little sheepish. This shouldn’t have been that surprising, although it wasn’t the ride that was causing him discomfort but the fact that he had a revelation to share with us. Eventually, in his own sweet time, it duly arrived. ‘I’ve got something to tell you,’ he said, in mock sombre tones. ‘My name’s Charles MacLean and I’m a goose virgin.’ Well done Charlie, confession is the first step to recovery. The fact that he has never shot geese must have been a difficult admission for a man who has shot 15 to 20 days a year since the days when his magnificent Lord Kitchineresque ‘tache was mere top-lip bumfluff, but we soon set him right. He hadn’t, we all agreed, missed that much: wildfowling all too often consists mainly of sitting in a wet and windy butt, freezing your knackers off in the gloaming for a pitifully small return. ‘Hmm,’ he said, ‘doesn’t exactly sound like a laugh a minute...’ As it turned out, we could not have been more

wrong. But then this wasn’t run-of-the-mill wildfowling; this was the 24-carat blingtastic variety where our billet was one of Scotland’s most luxurious castles, the lochside butts were bone dry and decked out with benches, the ditches boasted armchairs, and huge flocks of geese and ducks seemed intent on landing on the waiting barrels of our wee party’s shotguns. This was not wildfowling as we know it, but wildfowling as practised at Balfour Castle, home to the most northerly pheasant shoot in the world and to the most civilised duck and geese shooting operation in God’s country. Just how extraordinary this lovely little shoot would prove became clear to us over the next 24 hours. During that time, three guns shot almost fifty duck and geese, Charlie lost his goose virginity and I registered two leftand-rights of geese. Not only that, but we ate course after course of gorgeous food prepared by a chef of Michelin-star quality, quaffed storied wines from one of the finest cellars I’ve ever seen, and slept in goose-down downies surrounded by exquisite antiques and intri-

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orkney’s dawn patrol

cate hand-painted wallpaper. This was a truly surreal experience: we had arrived with expectations of a fieldsports boot camp, and floated back to Auld Reekie barely a day later on a fug of five-star contentment. Our journey had started at Edinburgh airport where we caught a flight to Kirkwall, the capital of Orkney, and a town that was in the Norwegian diocese of Trondheim until the mid-fifteenth century. Six minutes to the north by a bracing 20-knot motor launch lies Shapinsay, a 7,000-acre island whose harbour is dominated by Balfour Castle, a muckle, turreted Gothic pile standing like a sentinel looking out over the sea. Our destination, the castle already had a formidable reputation for its wildfowling when the 1,200-acre estate was bought five years ago by City financier Chris Harrison, the nephew of Rex Harrison. Not a man to do things by half, he had the whole chilly edifice rewired and had central heating added. A complete rootand-branch renovation – plus the addition of a maze and spa – has created one of the most

Previous page: Charlie MacLean, Chuck the dog, the writer and Karl the gamekeeper focus on the arrival of the geese. Clockwise from left: Poised to strike; the morning bag of 18 geese, two pigeon and a crow; Chuck the unfeasibly strong Chesapeake Bay Retriever.

sumptuous destinations that I’ve ever stayed in. However, it is, above all, Harrison’s home. He and his family spend a good chunk of the summer and every Christmas and New Year at Balfour. While there they have a pheasant shoot based around the 30 acres of woodland surrounding the castle (the only woodland on the whole of Orkney) it’s the wildfowling that he really loves. It is also what draws in Europeans such as the head of Cartier, who has taken two weeks each year since the 1990s. In charge of the whole operation is Harrison’s brother-in-law Patrick Lloyd, an engaging trout fishing and wildfowling enthusiast who was master of works when the castle was renovated by up to 50 workmen at a time, and who now spends half his year at Balfour and half fishing at his home on the River Wye in Wales. Lloyd had told us that we need bring nothing with us, and that everything we required, from wellies and camouflage gear to shotguns and cartridges, would be provided. I hadn’t believed him, but he was absolutely right: it was all there and of the highest quality, including a substantial range of shotguns. ‘The thing to remember,’ he said, ‘is that this is a lovely house to stay in, and that it comes with some wildfowling.’ After a light lunch, we were up and at ‘em, Patrick driving myself, whisky guru Charlie, photographer Angus and former Tony Blair speechwriter David McCowan-Hill out to meet gamekeeper Karl Kowolik, a mountain of a man who reminded me of Oddjob in camo, and who had been busy placing duck decoys on Loch Cumin, a small loch next to the sea. Although it was only 3.30pm, it was already getting dark by the time we climbed into butts that had been sunk deep into the land surrounding the loch. And then we waited. And waited some more. Then yet more. Finally, the duck started arrivwww.scottishfield.co.uk

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20/12/2013 09:05:19


orkney’s dawn patrol

ing; in singles at first and then in small groups, more frequently as the darkness intensified. We blasted away but duck move deceptively quickly, and I was also adjusting to using an over-andunder shotgun for the first time (although it was a 12-bore Beretta, like my own). Every so often there would be a splash as one of the three guns downed a bird, although soon we could hear the duck arriving but could barely see them. That’s the point at which the geese – larger and thus still shootable despite the lack of light – started arriving in such huge numbers that Patrick could scarcely contain himself. At one stage a mass of between 200-300 greylags descended at once, a number so large that we (completely predictably) missed them all. Yet throughout the next hour there was a steady attrition rate amongst the arriving birds to the point where I had used up all 50 cartridges I’d been allocated, something which I’d joked before we left could never happen. At the end of the drive we’d downed 19 duck, eight geese (including my left-and-right) and Charlie was no longer a goose virgin. What a night! One of the best so far this year, said Patrick. If we shot with the eagerness of hungry peasants desperate for a goose supper, we dined like lords thanks to Jean-Baptiste Bady, the former head chef at Kinnaird, and saluted our haul with a few late drams. Does life get much better than this, we asked ourselves. The answer was yes. Despite a porridge-fuelled dawn start, the morning shoot was even more

Top (l-r): The writer, Patrick Lloyd and Charlie MacLean with our moonlit bag. Above: Balfour Castle.

field facts Balfour Castle, Shapinsay, Orkney KW17 2DY. Tel: 01856 711282 www.balfour castle.co.uk

spectacular. By the time we bumped across the field to our allotted ditch, Karl had laid out the goose decoys and placed comfy folding chairs into the ditch. We didn’t have long to wait as the wind whipped over our heads, and within minutes we were back into it again. This time it was pretty much a geese-only party, punctuated by a few pigeon. I’ve never had such hot barrels while wildfowling but the geese came in waves and kept coming. By the end of hostilities, 18 geese, two pigeon and a crow were in the back of the Argo. As we headed back to Edinburgh, I felt almost sorry for Charlie. Taking part in such luxurious and exhilarating wildfowling was like shooting an imperial on your first stalk, catching a salmon on your opening cast, or winning the jackpot on your first slottie – it’s unforgettable, but an experience that you are unlikely to ever replicate. But what a way for him to lose his goose virginity; and what a blast for the rest of us. www.scottishfield.co.uk

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23/12/2013 14:40:39


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23/12/2013 11:52:21


tales from the riverbank

Land economy Thanks to a Scots visionary, fish farming is moving onto terra firma, and only good can come from it words jon gibb

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robably along with every angler in the country, I was delighted to hear last month that Scotland’s first commercialscale land-based salmon farm has been given the planning go-ahead. Andrew Robertson’s Fishfrom company has been given the green light by Argyll and Bute planning authorities to build a 3,000-tonne salmon farm on a 3.5-acre site near Tayinloan on the Kintyre Peninsula. The £15 million development will grow smolts to 5kg adults in just nine months and will be operated using the latest recirculation technology from Denmark, pumping 32 million litres of fresh and sea water through vast fish rearing tanks every hour. With an expected output of over 800,000 salmon per annum, the first fish from the unit are expected to hit supermarket shelves in time for Christmas 2015. For those of us who have been involved in nearly three decades of tension surrounding the impact of the fish farm industry on the wild salmon and sea trout stocks on the west coast, the news comes as a major beacon of hope for a more sustainable future. This farm will have zero interaction between fish, parasites and predators – and its controlled environment will not only benefit the overall product (a panel of 10 chefs recently favoured the land-based product over the traditional open cage variety) but it will also remove the unpredictable and sometimes catastrophic effects of storms, seal attacks and jellyfish infestations. But its sustainable credentials do not end there. The considerable power requirements will come largely from photovoltaic panels installed in the roof and the fish will be fed

‘This may

prove to be the defining moment in an

eco-friendly future for Scotland’s

aquaculture industry’

field ONLINE

comment on this via our facebook page or twitter www. scottishfield. co.uk

on pellets made from ragworm and algae. One of the greatest criticisms of current industry practices is that it takes approximately 2.5 tonnes of fish feed created from species at the bottom of the food chain to produce one tonne of farmed salmon. The Fishfrom model has a Food Conversion Ratio (FCR) of 1 to 1 (it takes 8kg of cattle feed to produce a kilo of beef and 2kg of feed to produce a kilo of chicken). I had the pleasure of meeting Robertson recently and was immediately impressed by his infectious enthusiasm and a far-reaching vision. As he pointed out, by 2050 an estimated 9.2 billion people will be walking our planet and a vast number will have no access to basic nutrition. With the increasingly devastating impacts of climate change resulting in soaring commodity prices, a key concern for humanity must be long-term food security. Unless we change the existing methods of agriculture and aquaculture we will not be able to deliver the world’s food requirements. What also immediately struck me about Robertson was his obvious passion for wild salmon – indeed he used to be the PR guru for the Atlantic Salmon Trust in a former life. He reminded me that many of Scotland’s original pioneer fish farmers had a genuine affinity for the wild creature that they were attempting to domesticate, and that many of the mistakes that they were making, and which would come back to haunt them, were made unwittingly. Much of this understanding of the wild species has been lost in the industry over the years and it is refreshing to see it take centre stage again. The Fishfrom venture had to jump through two years of hoops to gain support from the Scottish Government, and there remain nervous vested interests in the large Norwegian multi-nationals that still question its sustainable credentials and financial viability. But don’t forget that these companies did the same when the first independent land-based smolt farms appeared a decade ago and now practically all new juvenile salmon units being built are of the land-based variety. What is not known though is whether the same technology can be used on a genuinely commercial scale for the final grow-out from smolt through to adult. Robertson’s dream may not end up feeding the planet but he has far larger plans in the pipeline should this initial venture prove successful. One thing is for sure though – while the salmon farm industry has provided a vital economic lifeline to local communities in the West Highlands, it cannot continue as it is. The granting of this planning permission at Tayinloan may just prove to be the defining moment in an eco-friendly future for the Scottish aquaculture industry. www.scottishfield.co.uk

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23/12/2013 14:45:18


food & drink

‘Solid Grampian basics and innovative sophistication characterises Walker’s menu’

Getting all your deer in a roe Chef and food writer Maxine Clark has set out to popularise venison, and her latest wonderful book on cooking with roe venison may do just that words Richard bath images Angus Blackburn

I

t’s often the chance encounters that have the most profound impact, and so it proved for chef and food writer Maxine Clark. Ten years ago, after 35 years working in top London kitchens, as a food stylist and penning food articles, she had returned to her native Broughty Ferry and was working for the now-defunct Caledonia magazine running its food coverage. Trying to source some rabbit, she met Christian and Ingela Nissen of Highland Game and a collaboration was born. ‘We got on like a house on fire and I completely bought into what they were trying to do for venison,’ she says. ‘For some reason people have this very strange attitude towards venison: they think it’s a Toffs-only food, or that it’s smelly, tough or expensive, and the Nissens want to educate people and fight back against that prejudice.’ One of the biggest hurdles in persuading people to cook venison is an unfamiliarity that leads to many people being daunted, so in an attempt to demystify the whole process, Clark produced a small book of simple venison recipes which has gone down a storm. With more and more venison being sold in high street supermarkets, it’s one of several innovations that have led to a sharp increase in the amount of venison sold. Clark’s latest book is a sumptuous hardbook tome called ‘7 Days in Scotland: Roe Deer & Recipes’, which is a collaboration with photographer Mikkel Adsbol and is part photographic paean to the roe deer, and part recipe book. ‘It’s all part of the ongoing attempts to educate people,’ says Clark. ‘Roe deer venison is different to that from red deer – it has a far more subtle and sweeter taste, and a finer texture – and is available all year round, so we want people to realise just how amazing a meat it is, just how easy it is to cook with it, and just what good results you can achieve. Now is a particularly good time of year because if you’re looking for an alternative to turkey, it’s as easy to cook as a big bit of beef and every bit as tasty.’ If nothing else, the recipes over the next four pages prove as much. Right: Maxine Clark is an evangelical advocate of venison who is now turning her attention to promoting roe deer venison.

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23/12/2013 17:58:08


roe deer venison

‘For some reason, people still have this really strange attitude towards venison – they seem to think it's a toffs-only food’

Image: Xxxxxxx

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food & drink

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23/12/2013 17:59:00


roe deer venison

Smoked roe deer on rye with swede, apple, horseradish and chives Serves six A lovely light lunch dish to be eaten accompanied by plenty of chilled lager. Smoked venison is fabulous – have a go at smoking this yourself (muscles from the haunch are particularly good cuts to smoke), or buy it ready-smoked. The vegetables can vary depending on what is in season (swede, kohlrabi, celeriac, pumpkin, celery, even carrot or parsnip), but it is the horseradish that makes the dish sing. 300g thinly sliced smoked roe deer venison ½ swede (pumpkin or celery can be used as an alternative) 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 1 tbsp acacia honey 2 eating apples, cubed 30g freshly grated horseradish 1 bunch of chives 6 slices of wholemeal rye bread Salt and freshly ground black pepper Method: Peel and cut the swede into 1cm cubes and rinse in cold water. Put the oil, vinegar, honey, salt and pepper into a medium bowl and whisk together to make a marinade. Bring a saucepan of salted water to the boil and cook the cubed swede for about 2 minutes, until tender but still crunchy. Drain well and add to the marinade. Add the cubed apple and grated horseradish. Carefully stir

to coat thoroughly, then leave to cool down until just warm. Right before serving, add lots of chopped chives. To serve: Lay the slices of smoked roe deer over each piece of rye bread and top generously with the swede mixture. Serve immediately sprinkled with extra chives.

Fillet of venison wellington

‘Smoked venison is

fabulous – have a go at smoking it yourself ’

Serves four A dish for the real game lover, combining venison and pheasant in one glorious parcel. The mushroom and pheasant stuffing protects the venison from overcooking in the hot oven. Make a red wine sauce ahead of time from any bones you may have from the saddle. For the mushroom and pheasant stuffing 25g unsalted butter 275g chestnut mushrooms, finely chopped 1 onion, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 50g sliced smoked pancetta, finely chopped 1 tbsp chopped fresh sage and thyme 25g fresh breadcrumbs 200g boned, trimmed, skinless pheasant breast 1 egg, beaten

Left: Serve the thinly sliced meat on delicious rye bread. Above: The traditional beef wellington is given a twist by using venison instead.

For the wellington 300g all-butter puff pastry 1 roe deer loin/fillet (approx 750g), trimmed 50g unsalted butter 2 large thin savoury crêpes (with chopped parsley to flavour) www.scottishfield.co.uk

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food & drink

‘The

mushroom and pheasant stuffing protects the venison from overcooking’

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1 egg, beaten 600ml red wine sauce or rich game gravy, to serve Salt and freshly ground black pepper Method: To make the stuffing, melt the butter and add the mushrooms, onion, garlic, bacon, sage and thyme and cook over a brisk heat for about 5 minutes until soft but not coloured. Cool, then stir in the breadcrumbs. Roughly cut up the pheasant breast and put in a food processor. Season well then add the egg. Process in short bursts until it turns into a smooth thick paste. Beat this into the cold mushroom mixture. Taste and season. Roll out the pastry directly onto a baking sheet until large enough to wrap around the venison. Chill for 30 minutes. Season the venison and seal it in a hot pan with the butter until evenly brown but not cooked. Leave to cool for 15 minutes.

To assemble the dish, lay two pancakes slightly overlapping in the centre of the pastry and spread a third of the stuffing over the centre. Lay the venison on top and spread the remaining stuffing on top and down over the sides of the meat so that the venison is entirely covered. Bring the pancakes up over the stuffing to completely enclose it. Brush the edges of the pastry with beaten egg and fold over to enclose the meat completely, pressing the edges to seal well. Trim off any excess pastry and slide the parcel onto a baking sheet. If you like, you can decorate it with the pastry trimmings. Chill for 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 220˚C/425˚F/gas mark 7. Remove the parcel from the fridge and brush with more beaten egg. Bake for 20-25 minutes for medium venison (test with a meat probe if uncertain). Remove from the oven and leave to rest in a warm place for 10-I5 minutes. Slice and serve with your favourite red wine sauce or gravy.

www.scottishfield.co.uk

23/12/2013 17:59:49


ROE DEER VENISON

Wine to dine

Noisettes of roe deer with a bitter chocolate, orange and port sauce Serves six This utterly delicious traditional rich dark sauce for venison is of ancient Italian origins. It has a hint of chocolate added at the end – just enough to enrich the sauce without overpowering it. The secret of this sauce is to make a really good stock from the saddle bones. It’s delicious served with a root vegetable mash, or you could also try it with potato gnocchi. 1 saddle of roe deer venison (about 2.5-3kg), boned and trimmed, bones reserved 1 large sprig of fresh thyme 100ml good olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 celery stick, chopped 2 carrots, sliced 1 clove garlic, crushed 8 juniper berries 50g plain flour 200ml Guinness, Newcastle Brown Ale or other really dark beer 100ml port 750ml beef or game stock 1 strip of orange zest 50g dark chocolate (70% cocoa solids or more) Salt and freshly ground black pepper Root vegetable mash, to serve Method: Preheat the oven to 220˚C/425˚F/gas mark 7. Slice the venison into thick noisettes or small thick medallions (about 3cm thick) and place in a shallow dish. Season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper, then add the thyme and sprinkle with a little olive oil. Cover and chill. Chop up the bones if you can and put into a large heavy roasting pan along with any venison trimmings. Roast in the oven for about 20 minutes until beginning to brown, then add the chopped vegetables, garlic and juniper berries. Roast for another 10-15 minutes until all tinged with brown. Remove from the oven and tip the bones and vegetables into a saucepan. Stir in the flour. Pour the beer and port into the roasting pan, bring to the boil and scrape up all the sticky bits from the bottom of the pan. Tip this into the saucepan, pour in the stock and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer very gently for an hour (or more if you have the time). Strain through a fine sieve and set aside. Heat a heavy frying pan until smoking hot and sear the noisettes for about 2 minutes per side, making sure they stay rosy pink in the middle. Remove from the pan to rest and keep warm while you finish the sauce. Deglaze the frying pan with the strained stock. Add the orange zest and boil hard to reduce until syrupy. Remove the orange zest and stir in the chocolate and swirl around until it melts into the sauce. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve the noisettes with the sauce and root vegetable mash.

‘A hint

of chocolate

is added at the end – just enough to enrich the sauce without overpowering it’

Left: The roe deer is served with root vegetable mash and a rich, deep sauce flavoured with chocolate.

FIELD FACTS

For a special offer on 7 Days in Scotland: Roe Deer and Recipes for Scottish Field readers, see page 193. www.highland game.com

Wine expert David Austin of Reuben’s Wine Store in Dunfermline selects three wines to accompany Maxine Clark’s dishes. STEINBERG RIESLING SPÄTLESE, RHEINGAU,GERMANY, £27.99 Roe deer venison is more delicately flavoured than red deer venison and an exotic German Spätlese Riesling is a great match. The acidity of the noble grape cuts through the smokiness of the venison, while the apple and horseradish brings out the sweetness and nutty nuances of the wine. BEST’S GREAT WESTERN PINOT NOIR, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA, £18.99 Roast venison does not like a wine with too much tannin, so a red burgundy or a pinot noir from the new world would be a superb match. Best’s have grown pinot noir vines at their Concongela vineyard since 1866 and have some of the oldest pinot vines in the world. Bursting with wild raspberry and strawberry flavours, this wine enhances all the rich gamey characteristics of this classic dish.

MUNGO PARK SINGLE VINEYARD SHIRAZ, BAROSSA, AUSTRALIA, £23.99 This stunning Shiraz is made from gnarled vines that are at least eighty-years-old and may have been around for a whole century, and which are located at the famous Marananga vineyards in the Barossa valley. Big juicy bramble fruit flavours, hints of dark chocolate and gentle spice bring out the richness of the meat and the subtle influences of the port and orange.

Reuben’s Wine Store, 14 New Row, Dunfermline, 01383 731475, www.reubenswinestore.com

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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restaurant review

Putting Troon on the map The seaside town is better known for golf than food, but that might be about to change since Two Fat Ladies checked into the Marine Hotel words cate devine

Above: Beautifully presented food, prepared largely from locally sourced ingredients, is a hallmark of Two Fat Ladies at the Marine Hotel.

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T

he Ayrshire resort of Troon has several grand old hotels along the seafront, each a magnet for golf parties and wedding receptions: this, clearly, is a town that can cater on a banqueting scale. The Marine Hotel, though, is swimming against the tide. It is as grand as the rest, but its new restaurant is an intimate place, with a focus on locally caught fish and seafood. When we first arrived we wondered about the decorative pewter birds on each table, and were told they came from The Buttery in Glasgow, where Two Fat Ladies has its flagship res­tau­rant. It’s a clever touch that creates a link between that revered institution and this bold new venture in its rambling Victorian hotel surroundings.

In the newly designed restaurant, where a panel of Vivienne Westwood wallpaper featur­ ing fantas­tical fish catches the eye, all tables have a view to the isle of Arran from frontfacing windows. There are no amuse-bouches or appetisers; you go straight to the starters. This is perhaps just as well, for my special of sea bream fillet atop a butter-bean, tomato and chorizo stew was not only delicious, it was also quite filling. The robustness of the creamy beans was a match for the smoky, spicy sausage and together they complemented the distinctive firmness of the fish, which was delivered to the table sizzling and with a properly crispy skin. It was a knockout start to our meal, and

www.scottishfield.co.uk

23/12/2013 17:14:27


two fat ladies, troon

field facts Price Dinner for two, without drinks: £78.35 rating

 Two Fat Ladies at the Marine Hotel, Troon, Ayrshire Tel: 01292 676220 www.twofatladies restaurant.com Cate Devine is food writer at The Herald

signalled that the kitchen had embarked on a totally new direction. My companion’s mussel and chorizo risotto with a – hello! – smoked tomato oil was a clear hint that the chef has his eye firmly fixed on new horizons. This dish was full of flavour, the mussels blending well with the loose, light risotto, which wasn’t too creamy or too heavily seasoned with parmesan. The crumbly black pudding in the centre of my dish of pan-fried scallops wasn’t immedi­ ately recognisable as Stornoway’s finest, but then I realised it looked different because the chef had added to it his own ingredient of diced apple. This early show of culinary flair both transformed its appearance and provided enough acidity to cut through the pudding and complement the natural sweetness of the soft, plump molluscs. For good measure, a smoked haddock cream with samphire countered this with its salty, creamy depth to provide the most delicious balance of flavour and texture. The freshest piece of flash-fried halibut, skilfully cooked and simply seasoned with a well-judged sprinkling of sea salt, accompanied by a stunning deep-flavoured langoustine bisque, and sitting on a bed of parmesan mash, so beguiled my companion that she almost (I did say almost) felt she could dispense with dessert. These were a clever choice of seasonal flavours such as clootie dumpling with apple compôte, and iced dark-chocolate parfait with sticky orange sauce. After a bit of feigned hesitation it didn’t in the end take much to persuade her to try a crème brûlée with stewed plums and an orange and polenta shortbread. The cream was rich and cool with a pleasant sugary crackle; the plums, served separately in chunks and a little puddle of jus, were pink and properly tart; the shortbread sent my friend, a skilled shortbread baker in her own right, into blissful orbit. My raspberry poached pear with Glayva cranachan also took my breath away. Standing upright on the plate, stalk on, it glowed like a bejewelled lightbulb throwing its light onto a quenelle of creamy cranachan and a disc of honey-toasted oatmeal. The chef’s brilliant decon­struc­tion of the classic dish managed to highlight the individual flavours while pre­serving the original’s dignity; no mean feat. The seasonal fruit yielded firmly under my fork, revealing its beautiful interior of graduating pinks-to-whites and it tasted simply divine: the two fruity flavours a very cool blend indeed and pretty outstanding when savoured with the sweet cranachan and crunchy oats. With bold, contemporary Scottish cooking like this, I reckon that it won’t be long before Troon throws off its reputation as a culinary backwater once and for all.

chef’schoice Ian McAndrew, head chef at Blackaddie Country House Hotel, picks his top Scottish restaurants 21212, Edinburgh This is one of the capital’s best restaurants, with an eclectic approach to haute cuisine. The menu changes weekly and much of the produce comes from local suppliers such as Valvona & Crolla and Armstrong’s. 0131 523 1030; www.21212restaurant.co.uk Andrew Fairlie, Gleneagles As its two Michelin stars show, this is one of Scotland’s most respected restaurants. The menu offers an abundance of game and fish, boasting scallops from Ulva and locally sourced roe deer. It’s a dining experience for a very special occasion. 01764 694267; www.andrewfairlie.co.uk Kirkpatrick’s, Kirkcudbright Kirkpatrick’s sits above a kebab shop, but don’t let that put you off. Breast of pigeon, venison with turnip purée and chocolate breadand-butter pudding regularly appear on the menu. The Thursday Tapas night offers intriguing morsels such as Irn-Bru sausages. 01557 330888; www.kirkpatricksrestaurant.co.uk Brodies of Moffat, Moffat Brodies offers a lunch menu, an afternoon cake stand and all-day brunch on Sundays. By evening, there’s fine dining, with the likes of braised hogget and Moffat trout. There’s also a good range of vegetarian options. 01683 222870; www.brodiesofmoffat.co.uk Del Amitri, Annan A wonderfully unpretentious place, which does fine dining in an informal setting, Del Amitri has recently won an AA rosette. The menu changes regularly, and has included local rib-eye steak, pan-fried plaice with brown shrimp, and delicious local cheeses. 01461 201999; www.del-amitri.co.uk New City Cantonese, Ayr A specialist in Cantonese cuisine, the New City also does West Coast seafood and steaks. It has an astounding wine selection, too, featuring Château Lafite, Pétrus. Romanée-Conti and Dom Perignon. 01292 266 544; www.newcitycantoneserestaurant.co.uk

yoursay

what do you think of ian McAndrew’s choices? let us know on our forum at www.scottishfield.co.uk www.scottishfield.co.uk

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FOOD&drink THE BIG CHEESE

The Cheese Pantry at Connage Highland Dairy at Adversier, Inverness, is now a 5-star tourist shop after being awarded another star by VisitScotland. The traditional, family-owned dairy, which opened a few years ago, has recently expanded and now has one of the largest cheese selections in the Highlands. It also has a viewing gallery, where visitors can watch the cheese being made, a cafe and a shop. www.connage.co.uk

Scotland hit for six

The new Sunday Times Food List features six Scottish restaurants. Now in its fourth year, the list of Britain’s top 100 restaurants is compiled by The Sunday Times in association with Harden’s, and is based on 80,000 reviews from 9,000 consumers. The Scottish restaurants featured on the list are: Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles, Restaurant Martin Wishart, The Kitchin, Castle Terrace (Pictured: Head Chef, Dominic Jack), The Honours and The Peat Inn.

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New spirit TRADITIONAL TWISTS

IMAGE: ANGUS BREMNER

Macsween, the pioneers of Scotland’s national dish, is celebrating its 60th anniversary with the launch of two new products. Three bird haggis is a trio of grouse, pheasant and duck smoked with quince, lavender and spices, whilst venison haggis is infused with port, juniper, redcurrants and spices. These gourmet editions allow for even more creative recipe ideas (such as haggis wellington, pictured) from this versatile food and are available online as well as selected delis and farm shops, RRP £4.99 each. www.macsween.co.uk

Newly opened in summer 2013, Stirling Whisky Shop stocks Stirling’s largest selection of Scotch whisky, with whisky brand ambassadors and former distillery managers amongst the staff on hand to assist and guide you in finding perfect tipple. 29 Spittal Street, Stirling. Tel: 01786 449152, www.stirlingwhiskyshop.com

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23/12/2013 18:05:25


A marketplace for culinary news and delicious gourmet goodies

Paté provenance

For 30 years Castle MacLellan has been a leading purveyor of patés. From its headquarters in the pretty market town of Kirkcudbright, its chefs scour the country to source the finest ingredients to create its distinctive, high-quality patés. The company has also forged close partnerships with local food artisans to ensure the authenticity of its home grown produce. www.castlemaclellan.co.uk

MEY THE FORCE BE WITH YOU

In 2005 His Royal Highness, Duke of Rothesay, launched the North Highland Initiative (NHI) to help promote the economic development and sustainability of the area. One of the projects was Mey Selections, set up to provide top quality beef and lamb – naturally grass reared, SSPCA assessed and traditionally aged and butchered – from small family farms and crofts in the North Highlands. Mey Selection products were served at the royal wedding receptions and now you can enjoy it delivered fresh to your door from www.campbellsmeat.com, mey-selections.com

Executive decision

Turnberry, a Luxury Collection Resort, has appointed a new Executive Chef. Munur Kara joins the resort from The Dorchester Hotel in London, where he was Head Chef of the busy Promenade Restaurant. He will lead a team of over 50 people and oversee the operations of the resort’s six restaurants, including its signature restaurant, 1906. www.luxurycollection. com/turnberry

SPREADING THE LOAD

Whitmuir Farm has used Crowdfunder. co.uk to raise the £5,000 required to get its food truck, Frank, ready to deliver fresh produce from farm to plate. The money will be used to buy the cooker, fridges, sinks, gas, electric and water supplies for the van, which will be pitched in Edinburgh as well as visiting various events around Scotland. In return for pledges supporters will be rewarded with food hampers, tea and scones and lunch or an evening meal for two. www. crowdfunder.co.uk/frank-the-food-truck

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20/12/2013 09:23:51


WHISKY

Spirit of enterprise It seems that Scotland’s distilleries are set to follow the mantra of ‘don’t move, improve’ with ambitious expansion plans afoot for some of the industry’s big players

N

ot a week goes by at the moment without some sort of announcement about a new distillery getting built or another distillery expanding. Diageo, who own Mortlach, has announced that they are to expand Mortlach distillery in Dufftown. Mortlach’s spirit is highly regarded by whisky blenders and connoisseurs alike. Over the years Mortlach have only ever released a handful of official bottlings but that is set to change. Along with announcing the expansion of the distillery Diageo have also announced that they will be releasing four new expressions from Mortlach. These include two no-age statements called Old Rare and Special Strength along with two aged bottlings at 18 years old and 25 years old. If previous bottlings are anything to go by these new expressions are going to be phenomenal. For a long time, as part of the Flora and Fauna range bottled by Diageo, Mortlach 16 yearold has been highly prized but this bottling will be discontinued. So if you see a bottle of Flora and Fauna Mortlach 16 year old I would definitely recommend grabbing it. Firstly, because it’s a brilliant dram but also because it could be worth quite a bit in a few years. Mortlach Distillery was the first distillery to be built in Dufftown, which is now dubbed the ‘whisky capital of the world’ by whisky enthusiasts. Diageo will be spending £18 million on the expansion of Mortlach Distillery as part of their ongoing £1 billion investment in whisky production over five years across Scotand. Not to be outdone, The Edrington Group, who own The Macallan, has announced that it will be investing £100 million in The Macallan estate in order to increase capacity and construct a new visitor centre. The project has been awarded to architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners who Edrington says ‘share our values and push the boundaries of style and quality’. The project is quite unusual. They are going to build an entirely new distillery on The Macallan estate and close the old distillery. They say that when the new distillery is operational the old one will be preserved.

In 2010, The Glenlivet Distillery invested £10 million in a major expansion project. This increased their capacity by 75% and they predict that it will not need to be extended again until at least 2100. However, there is a major difference between the two projects; The Glenlivet decided to incorporate the old distillery into the new one. The Glenlivet could have quite simply run the new distillery as an entirely separate operation but they had no intention in doing this and made sure the old distillery site was part of the new one. This probably means that they have had to compromise on efficiency but have maintained the Glenlivet house style. As well as the new distillery, The Macallan is going to build an entirely new visitor centre. Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have been involved in some impressive projects in the past including The Millennium Dome, Terminal 5 at Heathrow Airport, Lloyd’s of London and the Pompidou Centre. The architectural plans for both the new distillery and visitors centre look excellent and will incorporate Easter Elchies House, which is seen as the brand home and is very important to the history and future of the brand. The house features on the label of all The Macallan bottles. Unfortunately for The Macallan, some whisky bloggers have spotted that images of the new distillery look a bit like the set of The Teletubbies. However, its architects have an excellent track record and I have no doubt the new distillery will be very impressive when it opens in 2017.

WORDS BLAIR BOWMAN

‘Dufftown is now dubbed the ‘whisky

capital of the world’

Below: An impression of the new expansion to the Mortlach distillery.

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HOTEL REVIEWS

Home from home This month sees Scottish Field’s subscribers welcomed into some stunning family homes. Each of these unique Wolsey Lodges provides so much more than just B&B

Skirling House, Skirling by Biggar.

Bealach House, Duror Argyll

Reviewed by Sandra MacDougall and Joy Monteith from Greenock Bealach House is a small and very friendly luxury guest house near Duror, halfway between Oban and Fort William. The house lies one and a half miles up a well maintained forest track in Salachan Glen. On arrival, our hosts, Jim and Hilary McFadyen welcomed us with pots of tea and coffee and delicious home-made flapjacks and cookies. The McFadyens are experienced hoteliers and this shows in their exceptional attention to detail. The house was originally a shepherd’s croft but has been added to over the years, making it a substantial home. Downstairs, a separate guest entrance and cosy sitting room led through to the conservatory and dining room and upstairs our twin bedroom was well appointed and very comfortable with some nice additional touches such as a small decanter of whisky. Our evening meal was very special. Faced with some difficult choices, we enjoyed baked haggis topped with creamy whisky and onion sauce, spicy thai style carrot and coriander soup, pan fried sea bass with roasted cherry tomatoes with a basil pesto dressing and hot chocolate soufflé with raspberries and white chocolate drambuie sauce. The meal was presented beautifully and cooked to perfection. We had also been advised that we should bring our own wine, and glasses and ice were supplied on request. The high standard of cooking continued at breakfast with cereals, porridge, homemade bread and jams, full English breakfast and a daily special scrambled eggs with smoked salmon on a toasted muffin. It came as no surprise to learn that Jim and Hilary have received several awards over the years including a Ce`sar award from the Good Hotel Guide for Scottish Guest House of the year and 4 Gold Stars from Visit Scotland for consistently achieving the highest levels of excellence with grading and a 100% rating for food since they started. Suffice to say - it was such a good experience that we booked to stay a second night. Prices from £80 per night for dinner, bed and breakfast

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Reviewed by Anne & Barclay Sinclair from East Kilbride. Skirling House was built in 1908 as a collaboration between Lord Carmichael and architect Ramsay Traquair Bought by Bob & Isobel Hunter in 1993 the house more than justifies the Wolsey Lodges description of luxury B&B in friendly, fascinating and unique homes. We enjoyed the comfort of the Traquair ground floor twin bedroom. We were tempted by the extensive range of malt whiskies and having enjoyed pre-dinner drinks in the 16th century drawing room we were then treated to Bob’s kitchen skills with a delicious four course dinner using locally sourced salmon, pork and vegetables and fruit grown in the garden. Breakfast was equally wonderful and served by helpful smiling staff. Prices from £80 per night for dinner, bed and breakfast

Cardross House, Kippen, Stirlingshire

Reviewed by Helen and James Montgomery from Perthshire On arrival we were greeted by our hosts and dogs and shown to our enormous room with the most beautiful outlook. The ensuite was modern and spacious. The hall had a roaring log fire where we relaxed until our evening meal which we took in the small dining room. On heading to bed we found that it had been turned down which was a nice wee touch. We had a very peaceful and restful sleep in the comfiest of beds. Overall it was a great stay. Before we left, our host, Archie took us on a tour of the house and gardens. We arrived as guests and left as friends. Prices from £90 per night for dinner, bed and breakfast

www.scottishfield.co.uk

23/12/2013 17:48:17


WOLSEY LODGES

Cosses Country House, Ballantrae, Ayrshire

Reviewed by Kay and David Finlay from Hamilton After a pleasant drive through the Ayrshire coastal and country roads, we arrived at Cosses Country House, part of the Wolsey Lodges Collection. Cosses Country House is idyllically set next to Chailoch Burn within an intriguing hidden valley. It has 12 acres of woodland with a beautiful pond and garden, a true nature lover’s dream. The area is also part of the UNESCO Biosphere and Dark Sky Park. We were welcomed by our hostess, Susan, with tea and homemade cakes and escorted to our luxury room for the weekend, a classically decorated, self-contained style cottage dating back to the 1600s. That evening, we shared pre-dinner drinks with Robin in front of the log fire before being served a four-course culinary delight made from local and homegrown produce from the garden. Before checking out, we enjoyed a locally sourced breakfast with homemade bread followed by a lovely

FIELD FACTS

5 1 3

walk around the gardens. However, we couldn’t leave without purchasing Susan’s cookery book, beautifully illustrated with her paintings, recipes and an array of local history. A wonderful, comfortable and peaceful location, with exceptional food and wine – we hope to return to see this beautiful part of Scotland in the spring and enjoy the walks, wildlife and peaceful tranquility. Prices from £85 per night for dinner bed and breakfast

The Dean, Longniddry, East Lothian

Lynturk Home Farm, by Alford, Aberdeenshire

Reviewed by Diana Allan and Helena Bell from Comrie and Crieff On a pleasant day we set off for Lynturk in the heart of Aberdeenshire, which is ideally placed for exploring Speyside & Deeside. We anticipated a tranquil, relaxing break surrounded by magnificent landscape and being feted with wonderful hospitality and good food - and that is exactly what we found at the home to Veronica and John. Lynturk is a listed farmhouse showing much evidence of loving occupation for over 200 years by the McCombie family. One feels instantly welcomed into a family home with log fires, deep comfy sofas, antiques, portraits and congenial company. Bedrooms are cosy and well-appointed. Our room was bright and warm, with amazing views to the hills and part of the 300 acre estate which encloses Lynturk. Our hostess is a Cordon Bleu cook and the excellent four course candlelit dinner was mainly provided by the estate and kitchen garden - the roe venison in particular was delicious, accompanied by the crispiest-ever roast potatoes. Next morning found us well rested and in laid-back mode, but we still managed a massive, tasty breakfast of local produce. Prices from £80 per night for dinner, bed and breakfast

Reviewed by Jillian and John Reynolds from Blairdrummond, Stirlingshire We arrived at The Dean after a long day at the BBC Good Food Show researching for our new Deli in Doune. We were greeted by Caroline and her dog. Caroline had recently had an operation on her foot but was still the perfect host. The house was beautifully decorated as was our spacious king size bedroom which had a tasteful ensuite with stand alone bath and walk-in shower. After giving us an hour or so to relax in our room, Carolyn invited us into the Drawing Room for predinner drinks and nibbles. The Drawing Room was filled with photos and memories from throughout Caroline’s life and she was happy to share these and her stories with us. We were then served a delicious home cooked three course meal in the large dining room. Again Caroline was the perfect hostess. After dinner we retired to our bedroom where there was a good selection of books and information on the surrounding area. In the morning we were served a wholesome Scottish breakfast with muffins and croissants. After breakfast we had a chance to explore the gardens which included tennis courts. We would definitely return to The Dean and would certainly recommend it to anyone who is looking for a relaxing time away in beautiful surroundings. Prices from £70 per night for dinner, bed and breakfast

4

1) Bealach House Tel: 01631 740298 www.bealach-house.co.uk 2) Skirling House Tel: 01899 860274 www. skirlinghouse.com 3) Cardross House Tel: 01877 385223 www.cardrossestate.com 4) Cosses Country House Tel: 01465 831363 www. cossescountryhouse.com 5) Lynturk Home Farm Tel: 01975 562504 www.lynturk.co.uk 6) The Dean Tel: 01875 853272 www. thedeanbandblongniddry. co.uk www.wolseylodges.com

FANCY YOURSELF AS A REVIEWER?

If you are a subscriber and would like to spend a free night away in one of our chosen establishments and send us your review, please get in touch and include your subscriber number. Email: editor@ scottishfield.co.uk or write to: Scottish Field Subscriber Reviews Fettes Park, 496 Ferry Road, Edinburgh EH5 2DL For terms and conditions go to www. scottishfield.co.uk and click on ‘hotel review’ on the left-hand menu.

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NE W

2014

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Ben Thorburn

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Stopping by woods on s snowy evening, Robert Frost.

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20/12/2013 09:27:14


MOTORING

Rising to the challenge The BMW X5 has evolved into a 4x4 that really gives the competition a run for its money WORDS NEIL LYNDON

‘Y

ou know what’s wrong with the Range Rover Sport?’ demanded the horsey lady at the dinner party. It would have been impolite to guess so I mutely gave way to the answer she was obviously determined to deliver. ‘No split tailgate,’ she declared. ‘For everybody like me who hunts or goes to polo matches, the first thing we do when we arrive is put down the lower section of the tailgate and sit on it. It’s a terribly serious mistake of Range Rover to make the tailgate one-piece.’ BMW have obviously done their research and have carefully avoided giving offence to this important sector of the market for the new X5 4x4. The tailgate of the X5 does split – with a chunky lower section that can be lowered independently to form a seat for two or three horsey bottoms. Phew! In every other respect, also, the new X5 is a serious rival for the Range Rover and its nimbler, flashier sister the Range Rover Sport. A telling indication of BMW’s intentions can be taken from the price. The three-litre M50d version I drove at the recent launch had a basic price of £63,715; but BMW had loaded it with extras and accessories that drove up the true price of that particular car to more than £76,000. That’s Range Rover territory and no mistake. Anybody who doubts that a BMW 4x4 could rival Range Rover’s astounding abilities off-road can preserve their scepticism undiminished. The off-road section of the recent launch on the Goodwood estate near Chichester was so unrugged that I could probably have negotiated it safely in my Nissan Leaf electric car. There was a vertiginous descent on a muddy

‘On the road the X5 gives the Range Rover Sport a real run for its

fancypants money’

Below: The new BMW X5.

track that brought into action the Hill Descent Control that BMW actually lifted from Range Rover during their brief, ill-fated marriage in the 1990s. And there were a couple of moments in the woods when the wheels on one side of the car were up the side of a bank while the ones on the opposite side were using BMW’s own four-wheel drive system named xDrive, which varies the power to the wheels according to the surface and were, therefore, doing most of the business of driving the car. Otherwise, our impressions of the new X5 were largely gathered from driving it on the road. There – on the road – the X5 gives the Range Rover Sport a real run for its fancypants money. With 381 bhp available instantly on demand and three turbochargers all spinning up together, the X5 puts out a lusty bellow when you floor the throttle pedal and will hurtle this very large lump of seven-seater car from 0-60 mph in just a fraction over five seconds. If it weren’t electronically restrained to a top speed of 155 mph, it might touch 170. It zips through corners, flat and true, and the only complaint about its ride is that the ‘comfort’ settings on the suspension selector actually make it uncomfortably flaccid. The harder the setting, the better this car rides. In the late 1990s, the original X5 was conceived out of a cold-blooded union of commercial calculations and self-interested expediency. BMW was successfully making the 5 Series saloon and, at the same time, the world was mopping up all the SUVs that companies like Nissan and Toyota could turn out. Some genius at BMW’s HQ in Munich discerned a potential connection between these phenomena and suggested that the company should make an up-market SUV on the foundations of the 5 Series platform. That first X5 was as robust an offspring as you might expect from such passionless reckonings. In the 13 years since it first appeared, BMW have turned the X5 into a properly desirable car in its own right. Though I didn’t fully share her criteria of judgment, the horsey lady wasn’t the only one who would have the new X5 in a heartbeat.

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your money

On track to succeed W

Words bill jamieson

‘Tumultuous change in the business universe has the capacity to be a good friend to Scotland’s rural economy’

Right: The hot summer of 2013 saw tourist businesses report a massive upturn in visitor numbers.

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hat are the prospects for a rural busi­ ness renaissance in Scotland? Until recently I would have said ‘very little’. Rural depopulation has continued, farming remains a struggle and the recent sharp decline in high-street retailing has hit many of our smaller towns hard. All this seems to conform to a long-term trend. I was born and bred in Ayrshire, to the east of Kilmarnock in the rolling pastures of the Irvine Valley. In the 1950s the valley was certainly a more prosperous place than you find it now. Many shops and small businesses have gone. Light engineering has gone. Coal mining has gone. Lace manufacture has gone. Very little of the heavy traffic that roars along the A71 through the valley towns has cause to stop. It is tempting to see our future as a continuing battle against this baleful attrition. But there are growing grounds for hope that this ebbing tide could be set to turn over the next decade. Today we are seeing a tumultuous change in the business universe, and it has the capacity to be a very good friend indeed to Scotland’s rural economy in the years ahead. First, there has been an immediate upturn in 2013 after the near wipe-out of rural tourism last year. The Year of Natural Scotland did not start well. The longest period of cold weather in living memory stretched well into May. That prolonged cold winter had followed the wettest summer for a century. But barely had dire warnings been uttered than we went on to experience one of the warmest summers in years. All across Scotland tourist businesses enjoyed an upturn in visits and forward book­ ings. Some destinations reported business up by 40 per cent on the previous year. A broad economic recovery is well underway and conditions are more conducive to business enterprise and innovation now than for five years. A Bank of Scotland PMI report in the late autumn showed Scotland’s private sector economy continuing its strong performance into the final quarter.

This recovery is not without its problems or limitations. But there can be little doubt as to the sharp improvement in business confidence. The CBI’s latest SME Trends Survey showed optimism among small and medium-sized manu­­facturers rising at the fastest pace since records began in 1988. And optimism around export prospects for the next twelve months has increased strongly. Many businesses, of course, are still strug­ gling. But combine this with growing evidence of economic upturn overall – from labour market data to retail sales, business start-ups to mortgage lending, upbeat manufacturing and construction surveys through to the encoura­ ging service-sector figures – and there is little doubt that 2013 turned out markedly better than many had feared. And this upturn matters, because according to Scottish Natural Heritage, one in seven jobs in Scotland relies on the natural environment, a most undervalued economic asset. Our two national parks alone draw in one million domestic visitors. Taking into account the towns and businesses within the parks, they are reckoned by VisitScotland to contribute £600 million to the Scottish economy. Just as important as all this is the im­prove­ment in outlook for our food and drink industries. Bank of Scotland research in the autumn fore­ casted that more than 5,600 extra jobs could be created in Scotland’s food and drink sector by 2018 and that it could ‘significantly exceed’ an industry target of achieving annual turnover of £12.5 billion by 2017. Recent figures on the strength of commercial planning applications into the parks may come as a surprise. In the Cairngorms National Park the number of business applications has risen more than 36 per cent over the last year and is comfortably twice their 2011 level. The applications range from outdoor sports shops to pedestrian bridge proposals across the Dee. Loch Lomond National Park last year saw a 20 per cent increase in business applications

bikeriderlondona/shutterstock

E-commerce and tourism are the potential saviours of Scotland’s rural economy – so long as broadband connectivity keeps up

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on track to succeed

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your money

‘Broadband and wi-fi

dissolve the barriers of geography, enabling people to work

wherever they want’

over 2011. These include the Cononish gold mine by Tyndrum and the Ben Arthur resort by Arrochar, with jobs for 300. The resort com­prises a £70 million five-star hotel complex, to be run by the Wyndham Group. Other applications in progress include the former Highland Way Hotel site at Balmaha for a restaurant and hotel, and further restaurant development by Tom Lewis at Mhor 84 near Strathyre. Thousands of small businesses are also making a contribution in the park, from the Sula soft furnishings firm built up by Catriona MacGeoch next door to Mhor 84, to the bijou Riverside Garden Centre at Tullybannocher near Comrie, run by Jonathan MacDonald. A further reason for hope is the evidence of a surge in business start-ups. The total number of businesses in Scotland hit a record 343,000 in the year to end March. Of this total, 341,000 or 99 per cent comprise small and mediumsized businesses (SMEs). These now employ 1.1 million people in Scotland. The biggest element of growth – 73 per cent of the increase in the year to March – was in the ranks of sole traders and unregistered businesses. It is the longer-term potential of this trend that may spring the biggest surprise for rural Scotland. Conventional measures of GDP are failing to capture the changing nature and composition of our business base. The dynamic of the economy emerging from recession is different to that which entered it. Between 2008 and 2011 e-commerce busi­ ness grew by 44 per cent. The weekly average spent online is now more than £570 million. Almost 11 per cent of all UK retail sales are made over the internet. Online-supported

Ask the experts We answer your financial queries

Lynn Richmond, Senior Solicitor, Turcan Connell www.turcanconnell.com

yoursf

TO have your questions answered email them to editor@scottishfield.co.uk

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trade in the hotel and food services sectors, while starting from a low base relative to other sectors, has more than doubled since 2008 with online-supported turnover now estimated at £6 billion. This reflects the way in which dramatic advances in electronic communications and information technology has opened the doors of opportunity for young entrepreneurs. Ecommerce shrinks geography. It is now possible for a micro business such as Rothesay-based Bonnie Bling to build a nascent export-driven business serving the Scottish diaspora overseas over the internet. A 2012 survey of e-commerce in Scotland by business research firm SQW for Scottish Enterprise estimated that 200,000 direct jobs and £9.7 billion of gross value added are associated with Scotland’s £31 billion a year of e-commerce sales (of which about £8 billion are over websites). The relevance for rural Scotland is that broadband and wi-fi dissolve the barriers of location and geography. They enable people to work wherever they want, in beautiful sur­roundings and with the minimum of environmental damage and intrusion. Instead of cities as the place to work and rural Scotland as the place for leisure, the countryside may actually emerge as the preferred location for work, and cities as the destination points for leisure. But for that to happen we need to see urgent and extensive improvement to mobile and broadband connectivity, cluster premises for micro businesses – and a sharp improvement in the culture of tourist service to build visitor volume.

Q: A  re landowners automatically liable for the unlawful killing of birds on their land? A: The Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011 introduces the concept of vicarious liability for certain offences, including the killing of wild birds. The Act is not specifically directed at landowners but applies to anyone who has a ‘legal right to kill or take a wild bird on land or any person who manages or controls the exercise of that right’. Landowners will generally fall into one of those categories. The effect of the legislation is such that where an employee or agent of a landowner is found guilty of an offence under the Act, the landowner or manager is also potentially guilty of that offence and liable to criminal prosecution. It is therefore important to ensure that contracts with employees and agents outline the responsibilities of the parties and give clear warnings not to breach the terms of the Act. Ongoing monitoring and training procedures for employees and agents also reduce the prospect of falling foul of the legislation. While the Act predominantly affects landowners, sporting and agricultural tenants, factors and agents may also be affected if they manage or control the operation or activity of killing or taking wild birds; the habitat of such birds; the presence on or over that land of predators of such birds; or the release of birds from captivity for the purpose of being killed. However, it is a defence to any prosecution to show that the landowner did not know that the offence was being committed and that all reasonable steps were taken and all due diligence exercised to prevent the offence being committed.

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the business

Leading the way Five years ago Nir Shihor spotted an opportunity looking after the beloved pooches of Edinburgh’s commuters – and has never looked back words tim siddons IMAGE ANGUS BLACKBURN

‘I’ve always worked with dogs,’ explains Nir Shihor, Israeli-born owner of Dogmore Daycare Centre in Kirkliston, near Edinburgh. ‘I’ve trained dogs in Israel, South Africa, Europe and America.’ When he came to Scotland – his wife is Scottish – Shihor eschewed his canine past to study law and worked for a variety of companies. ‘Five years ago I was working for a property developer’, he explains. ‘I could see the property bubble about to burst and knew I had to find something else. That it would involve dogs was a happy coincidence,’ he laughs. ‘A friend of mine was

talking about how he left his dog with someone whilst he was at work, and that’s when I came up with the concept of dog daycare, combining it with boarding and dog training – but it’s the daycare element of the business that has really taken off. Customers can either come to us, or we can pick the dog for them, which is just the sort of flexibility that people require.’ In fact the business has been so successful that a new, daycare-only facility has recently opened in Fife, just proving that, in Shihor’s case, every dog does indeed have its day.

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20/12/2013 09:28:44


Independent Schools

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schools feature

Clockwise from left: On the beach at Belhaven Hill; fun and games at Gordonstoun; inspiring pupils at Morrisons Academy; learn to succeed at Gordonstoun; aiming high at Ardvreck; drama at Belhaven; music at Lathallan.

Choice, Diversity, Excellence

I

ndependent schools in Scotland offer you the choice of small and large day schools, boarding schools, co-educational and single-sex schools. As a group independent schools draw students from all sections of the community and students who attend independent schools are as diverse as the schools themselves. Choosing a School Parents choose to send their children to independent schools for many different reasons but above all, they choose independent schools because they feel a particular independent school will best serve their child and their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social and educa-

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tional needs. All independent schools in Scotland have their own unique ethos and values but they share a common goal of encouraging each individual pupil to be all that they can be and to make the most of their time at school. They enjoy a reputation for wide subject choice, a focus on co-curricular pursuits, smaller pupil/teacher ratios and consistently strong exam results. The choice of mainstream schools is wide and there are also special schools that provide care and education for children with additional support needs. All schools encourage visits from prospective families during their Open Day or at any time during the school year. Staff will be delighted to answer any questions that you may have.

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independent schools

‘Around 31,000 children of mixed abilities from diverse social backgrounds are educated at independent schools in Scotland, with around 20% of pupils receiving some financial assistance from the schools’

Curriculum and qualifications Independent schools in Scotland have a strong tradition of academic attainment, reflected in pupils’ performance in public exams. Many schools follow the Scottish curriculum with exams awarded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Most boarding schools follow the English curriculum, offering GCSEs, AS and A levels. A few now offer the International Baccalaureate and others are considering its merits. Meeting the Cost Fees vary widely between independent schools. Schools are sensitive, particularly in the current economic climate, to the

sacrifices that many parents make in order to afford school fees. All schools provide some level of fee assistance, usually awarded on the basis of financial need. This is done to enable children from lower income households, who otherwise would not have the opportunity of an independent education, to benefit, and schools welcome applications for fee assistance. Boarding in Scotland Scotland’s boarding schools welcome students from all over the UK, Europe and the rest of the world. All 18 boarding schools in Scotland are situated in safe, spacious and idyllic surroundings: from large city boarding schools to smaller rural locations, there www.scottishfield.co.uk

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schools feature is something for everyone. For further information on Scotland’s boarding schools visit www.scotlandsboardingschools.org.uk Admissions Parents are advised to make enquiries early – preferably a year in advance – although schools will be as accommodating as possible. The usual admissions cycle is outlined below, although dates should be checked with individual schools.

September-November

Open Days

November-December

Admission deadlines

January-March

Assessment tests

June

Induction days

Late August (day) Early September (boarding)

Start of school year

Information, advice and guidance about choosing an independent school in Scotland are available from the Scottish Council of Independent Schools (SCIS). Tel: 0131 556 2316, email: info@ scis.org.uk or visit www.scis.org.uk

Belhaven Hill School

B

elhaven Hill has been called the jewel in the Scottish crown of prep schools. Certainly its position overlooking the East Lothian coastline is second to none, and its reputation for providing a first class education goes from strength to strength. Established in 1923, Belhaven Hill prides itself on its all-round approach to education that includes a rigorous academic curriculum, an abundance of art, music and sport and an extensive extra-curricular programme. It is renowned for preparing its children for entry to all the leading senior schools in England and Scotland, with nearly a third of its leavers gaining awards last year. Belhaven welcomes both day and full boarding 7 to 13 year-old boys and girls and has a wide intake of pupils from all over Scotland and the north of England. It operates a bi-weekly exeat system and transport is available for those pupils living en route to Aberdeen, Inverness and Dumfries. A daily minibus picks up pupils from Haddington and East Linton and plans are afoot to extend this daily service to Edinburgh and the Borders. This year has seen the successful introduction of a 7-year-old entry and an outdoor, hands-on, curriculum for the lower years.

contactdetails

To find out more about what Belhaven can offer your child please contact them on 01368 862345 or headmaster@belhavenhill.com

A leading co-educational boarding and day prep school on the beautiful East Lothian coast

Preparing your child for the best BELHAVEN HILL DUNBAR EAST LOTHIAN EH42 1NN Tel: 01368 862785 • Fax: 01368 865225 www.belhavenhill.com • Email: secretary@belhavenhill.com

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independent schools

Loretto

L

oretto is Scotland’s oldest private boarding school. Its ethos promotes enthusiastic participation in all areas of school life, providing a first-class all-round education, and stresses the value of teamwork and community. The School is deliberately small, made up of two parts, the Junior School (3–12) and the Senior School (12–18), allowing a purposeful and caring family atmosphere. Set within 85 acres of beautiful grounds, Loretto is located in the small coastal town of Musselburgh, six miles from the bustling cultural centre of Edinburgh. The school is 40 minutes by car from Edinburgh airport. There is a strong personal tutor system and much emphasis is placed on the highly regarded Sixth Form programme and competitive university entrance seminars. English for speakers of other

languages, and support for stretching gifted and less able pupils are also available. There is a rigorous academic programme and high expectations. GCSEs and A-levels are studied. Over the past five years the school has gone from strength to strength re-structuring the programmes to ensure more choice, more subjects and a greater number of university applications. Last year saw their best A-level results: over 97% of students went to a university of their choice and the students taking A-Levels were shown to have had nearly half a grade added by a Loretto education. Loretto uses the ALIS system to monitor the value added to the boys and girls. Their next Open Day is Saturday 5 October, 10am-2pm.

contactdetails

For further information on means tested bursaries and scholarships or to arrange a visit to the school please contact them on 0131 653 4445 or alternatively email admissions@loretto.com

Independent boarding and day school for boys & girls 3 - 18 years Loretto

A-Level Results 2013

- 16% - A* - 34% - A*-A - 90% - A*-C - 97% of leavers went to their choice of university

Help with fees available. Daily mini buses from the Lothians, Edinburgh and the Borders

Loretto

MIND BODY SPIRIT OSCR Charity No. SC013978

Musselburgh, Near Edinburgh EH21 7RE. T 0131 653 4455 admissions@loretto.com www.loretto.com www.scottishfield.co.uk

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SCHOOLS FEATURE

Strathallan School

C

hoosing the right school for your child is not easy. Every child is unique and they all have their individual needs. The school you choose has to match those needs – making sure their school days are positive and fulfilling, laying firm foundations for the future. At Strathallan, they offer the best of both worlds – a small, caring community combined with top-class facilities. From their very first day, Strathallan gives its children the chance to thrive by creating a strong, supportive environment. It is a world where children find it easy to make friends and where staff deliver exceptional standards of care both within and beyond the classroom. After all, Strathallan is more than a school where children are nurtured, motivated and inspired; it is a home from home where they feel safe and happy. Each pupil’s wellbeing is the number one priority, and as a school community they benefit from access to exceptional

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facilities. These include: a magnificent 153-acre secure campus; a fabulous range of sports and sporting facilities; thriving art, design technology, drama and music departments; an outstanding academic programme; and seemingly endless leisure activities for each individual to explore. All of this enables the children to grow up to be independent, confident, responsible and happy individuals who make the most of their world of opportunity to reach their full potential.

CONTACTDETAILS

The school would be delighted to welcome you to Strathallan so you can see what they have to offer first hand. Please contact Felicity Legge, Admissions Secretary, on 01738 812546 or email admissions@strathallan.co.uk and she would be delighted to send you a prospectus or organise a visit for you. There is also a wealth of information on their website, www.strathallan.co.uk which will give you a small insight into their world of opportunity.

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Experience Strathallan as a Junior Pupil Children experience the very best of both worlds at Riley House â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a small, caring community combined with top class facilities. Both are key to their development and ensure their school days are among the happiest of their lives. Boarding & Day Boys & Girls aged 9-13

For more information please call us or visit our website.

www.strathallan.co.uk Forgandenny, Perth, PH2 9EG T: 01738 812 546 E: admissions@strathallan.co.uk

Registered in Scotland as a charity number SC008903

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schools feature

Merchiston Castle School

M

erchiston is S c o t l a n d ’s only all boys independent boarding school and, as such, it is used to being different. So why have they remained steadfastly boys-only? It is based on their strong conviction that what they are doing works. They have been teaching boys, and only boys, for 175 years and have no intention of changing. They know from experience that a boys-only education has huge advantages. Indeed, there is a growing body of research that shows single-sex education helps young girls and boys perform better than a co-educational approach. Their teachers teach in a way that boys like to learn; and boys are able to compete on a level playing field with their peers. Merchiston’s pupils achieved the highest percentage of A* awards in Scotland at A level in 2013. The teaching at Merchiston really does turn the C student into a B student and the B student into an A student – four consecutive years of value added at A level has been described as ‘significantly very good’ by the University of Durham. We look to find every boy’s Oxford or Cambridge. Despite their achievements, many prospective parents are still

concerned, and ask: ‘Will my son get to meet any girls?’ ‘Of course they do.’ is the answer. They have strong links with three girls’ schools for drama, cultural events, social gatherings and school trips. Just because boys-only applies to their studies, there is no reason why it should apply to co-curricular and social activities. Merchiston make no apology for being different. The question they always consider is ‘What’s best for boys’, which is why their mantra is ‘Boys First’. So, if like them, you believe that your son’s education can shape the rest of his life, and you would like to try something that is 100% focused around the needs of boys, why not come and visit us to find out more?

contactdetails

If you would like to find out more please call Anne or Kay on 0131 312 2204 or visit www.merchiston.co.uk

MERCHISTON STORY IN THE MAKING Listen to some of our pupils talk about their Merchiston journey www.merchiston.co.uk A Boarding and Day School for Boys aged 7-18 INFORMATION MORNING: SATURDAY 15 MARCH 2014, 10AM Applications for means-tested financial assistance welcome Merchiston Castle School, Colinton Road, Edinburgh, EH13 0PU, Scotland Tel. 0131 312 2200. Recognised by the Inland Revenue as a Charity, number SC016580

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23/12/2013 09:03:38


INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Dollar Academy

O

ne of Scotland’s leading independent schools, Dollar Academy welcomes girls and boys aged five to eighteen. With a Prep School, Junior School and Senior School, plus three large boarding houses – all sited within a beautiful campus – Dollar provides an outstanding education all the way through to university. The annual list of leavers’ destinations produced by the school is truly impressive. The recent HMIe report stated that, ‘Dollar Academy provides pupils with a very high standard of educational experience’; the strengths of this school certainly lie in high-quality teaching and the wide range of subject choices on offer. Dollar focuses exclusively on the Scottish curriculum, with all pupils studying for Highers and Advanced Highers, and their academic achievements speak for themselves. Individual talents, interests and ambitions are encouraged and pupils leave very well prepared for life at university and beyond. Dollar offers a jam-packed boarding experience with a superb programme of sport, art, music, drama and activities in the afternoons, evenings and weekends. Involvement in this out-of-classroom programme is central to the school’s philosophy. There is a great deal

of care taken to ensure that every child has the opportunity to shine, and Dollar pupils can talk proudly of their accomplishments in debating halls, auditoriums, music halls, art studios and on the sports field. Their continued successes as Former Pupils are testament to the passion for encouraging a lifetime of enthusiasm, ambition and achievement. This is an excellent school with an astounding range of activities on offer and a genuine sense of community. Dollar pupils and parents really value and enjoy the all-round experience this school offers, and Former Pupils speak fondly of their time growing up here: ‘I loved better’. being at Dollar. I look back and can’t imagine anywhere better

CONTACTDETAILS CONTACT

For more information, please contact Elaine Gallagher on 01259 742511, registrar@dollaracademy.org.uk

Join us at Dollar Academy The Governors of Dollar Academy Trust is a charity registered in Scotland, no. SC009888

Dollar Academy is a full boarding and day school for boys and girls. A welcoming and inspiring environment with an exceptional academic reputation. To arrange a visit, and for the details of our bursary and scholarship awards, please contact our Registrar:

registrar@dollaracademy.org.uk 01259 742 511

Excellence and opportunity Dollar Academy, Clackmannanshire, FK14 7DU

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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SCHOOLS FEATURE

Aberdeen City Music School

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berdeen City Music School is a national specialist music school based at Dyce Academy in Aberdeen. The aim of the music school is to allow talented musicians or musicians with great potential to receive expert tuition and additional time for music study whilst continuing their general education at the highest level. Places are free and boarding accommodation can also be fully funded depending on circumstances. All ACMS pupils are fully integrated into the general curricular and social life of the school. It is an established centre of excellence for music in Scotland – catering for performers of all music genres and encouraging pupils to develop a broad range of musical skills based around performance. Each ACMS pupil receives 2 hours on their first study and ½ hour on their second study per week. In S1/S2 pupils are withdrawn from certain subjects to create practice time while in S3 upwards they fast track their musical education. Each pupil will follow a personally devised curriculum in line with Curriculum for Excellence. Within their musical education, pupils will receive performing, composing and creating opportunities as well as musical history knowledge and sound engineering opportunities.

The school’s facilities are tailor-made and include first-class boarding accommodation, practice rooms, ensemble rooms, recording facilities and a performance space. Pupils may board at the state-of-the-art boarding facility on site, or if they live within a 3-mile radius, travel in on a daily basis. At ACMS they provide regular opportunities for solo, chamber, jazz, orchestral, choral and Scottish traditional work. Tutors come to us from all over the UK to provide an exceptional level of tuition in both solo and ensemble environments. Many of the school’s students go on to study at conservatoires across the UK and Europe and to Cambridge and other universities to study a wide range of subjects.

CONTACTDETAILS

For more information call 01224 774773 email: musicschool@aberdeencity.gov.uk www.aberdeencitymusicschool.com

A NATIONAL SPECIALIST MUSIC SCHOOL s All places are free

s Bursaries for Primary School Children

s Boarding accommodation on site

s Ensemble and solo opportunities and master classes

s Instrument and vocal tuition from top tutors in all musical genres

s Wide range of performance opportunities.

For more information contact:

email: musicschool@aberdeencity.gov.uk tel: 01224 774773 web: www.aberdeencitymusicschool.com 144

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INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

St Mary’s School

St Mary’s School Melrose

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t is over a century since John Hamilton founded St Mary’s School, with the clear purpose of providing an education for boys that was robust in its academic aims, rigorous in its pursuit of sporting excellence and committed in its vision for an all-round education. St Mary’s is now in many respects a very different place – not least because it is now a true community of girls as well as boys. But despite all the differences, to those charged with safeguarding the ethos of St Mary’s, John Hamilton’s vision resonates as strongly today as it did in 1895. The school’s aim today is to continue to provide St Mary’s boys and girls with an educational experience as extraordinary as the one John Hamilton envisaged, but as fit for the 21st century and as valuable in our day as was his, over 100 years ago. Situated in the heart of Melrose beneath the Eildon Hills, on the banks of the River Tweed and neighbouring The Greenyards, home of Rugby Sevens, children are immersed in the beauty and culture of the local area. As the only boarding prep school in the south of Scotland, it is in the position of offering youngsters a unique childhood experience. From French to fly fishing, oral maths to outward bound, opportunities are vast. All staff embrace its family ethos; their energy and dynamism help the children discover their future. The school motto is Behalde to Ye Hende (consider your future) – helping each child discover their future through a caring and nurturing approach to education.

CONTACTDETAILS

For more information please contact the school office on 01896 822517 or email office@stmarysmelrose.org.uk www.stmarysmelrose.org.uk

independent education for boys and girls aged 2 - 13 years ** boarding available from 7 years**

helping children discover their future For a prospectus contact: www.stmarysmelrose.org.uk Tel: 01896 822517 WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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SCHOOLS FEATURE

Lathallan School

Morrison’s Academy

t Lathallan School, their focus is, of course, on educational excellence. Its overall size of under 200 pupils, class sizes averaged at 12 pupils, high quality academic staff and unique environment are all contributors to fulfi lling the claim that every child has the opportunity to develop to their own full potential. Small class sizes and confidence from a varied curriculum outside of the classroom really do make a difference. Lathallan School does not have entrance exams; it assesses each child on his or her own merit. It is a place in which challenge, industriousness and maximising individual potential is pivotal in their pupils’ educational development. Every individual is made to feel an integral and special part of the school. The diversity of pupil achievements underpin the Lathallan School ethos that every child deserves to enjoy the success of their individual abilities in whatever field they lie – on the sports field, in the classroom, in the arts, in personal achievement.

o help you in choosing the right environment for your son or daughter, Morrison’s would very much like you to visit the school and see fi rst-hand what they offer. They hope that by reading about Morrison’s Academy and visiting the website you will want to know more. They aim to provide a broad educational experience, so the academic teaching is complemented by a wide range of co-curricular activities designed to build skills, establish confidence and cultivate lifelong interests. They believe education should be ‘inthe-round’ and they want all their young people to emerge with the personal attributes and qualities they need to take their place in adult life and to work anywhere in the world. They know that a Morrison’s Academy education is transformational so, through their means-tested fee assistance scheme, it is available to anyone who has a willingness to learn.

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CONTACTDETAILS

Please come to their open afternoon on Tuesday 21 January 2014. Lathallan School, Brotherton Castle, Johnshaven, Montrose. Tel: 01561 362220, www.lathallan.org.uk

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CONTACTDETAILS

For more information please contact the Admissions Registrar, Mrs Alison Ross (tel: 01764 653885, email: admissions@morrisonsacademy.org) who will be delighted to organise a personal visit at your convenience. They look forward to meeting you soon. www.morrisonsacademy.org

OPEN MORNING Wednesday 22 January From 9.30 – 12.30, last tour at 11.00 We focus on maximising the potential of each pupil through providing a high value, enterprising education. We’re an independent day school for boys and girls aged 3 to 18. Up to 100% fee assistance available. Visit us and find out more about how we develop the whole child. Crèche facilities available. Register by phone, online or on the day. 01764 653 885 | www.morrisonsacademy.org Morrison’s Academy, Crieff PH7 3AN

Scottish Charity Number: SC000458

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independent schools

Ardvreck School

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ocated in the beautiful Perthshire countryside, Ardvreck is Scotland’s only full boarding and day preparatory school for boys and girls aged three to thirteen. They are proud of the ‘all-round’ education on offer: their sporting tradition is strong and in the past three years Ardvreckians have secured over fifty scholarships to leading UK schools. Ardvreck is a family school with a strong sense of community. Children settle quickly into their compassionate and nurturing environment. They are the only Scottish school to introduce a bespoke ‘Individual Programme’ designed to meet each pupil’s needs, talents, interests and aspirations. ‘Little Ardvreck’ (aged three to seven) provides fantastic opportunities for our younger pupils, including Scottish country dancing, French and weekly group violin lessons. Their Montessori Mornings are unique to the Perthshire area. Their qualified Forest School leader encourages learning through nature walks, gardening and storytelling around the campfire. Their Outdoor Pursuits Programme engenders appreciation of and respect for our surroundings. Ardvreckians have a sense of adventure and an indefatigable spirit. There is also a purpose built rifle shooting range and Ardvreck is widely recognised as the leading UK Preparatory School in this field.

From the Pipe Band to the Ceilidh Band, Ardvreckians take full advantage of the Expressive Arts Centre. Their artists have seen recent success with recognition at the Scottish Game and Conservation Trust Art Awards. They nurture creative talent and allow pupils to ‘find their voice’. For Ardvreckians, ‘anything is possible’: their minds are independent and their aspirations are high. Happy, secure and valued, pupils treat each other with kindness and encouragement. Leadership roles are undertaken with an appreciation of service to others and imbued with a strong sense of duty. Attention to detail in the crucial formative years is well worth the measured investment of time and money. Come and visit to see the ‘magic’ of Ardvreck for yourself. Financial assistance is available.

contactdetails

To arrange a visit call 01764 653112 or email admissions@ardvreck.org.uk For further information visit www.ardvreckschool.co.uk

A TR ADITION OF EXCELLENCE SINCE 1883

“patience justice obedience unselfishness“ W E Frost Founder of Ardvreck School

www.ardvreckschool.co.uk Crieff, Perthshire PH7 4EX +44 (0) 1764 653112 admissions@ardvreck.org.uk

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SCHOOLS FEATURE

Beaconhurst

St Leonards

eaconhurst is a thriving allthrough independent school for boys and girls situated in the heart of Bridge of Allan, Stirling. Academic excellence is encouraged and each child is expected to discover and deliver on their potential. ‘Raising the bar’ and ‘thinking outside the box’ are key phrases that resonate with pupils and teachers alike. The school is proud of its core values: recognising and developing the talents and abilities of pupils within a community where friendliness and mutual respect are encouraged. Leadership and citizenship opportunities abound whilst decency and tolerance are upheld throughout. But what really sets them apart is their relationships: with staff, pupils, parents and the local community! Participation for all in sport is an integral part of the school’s ethos and key sports include triathlon, tennis, swimming, golf and hockey. They have unique structured programmes for the development of sport and outdoor education which they believe, along with their introduction to Higher Education courses and tailored academic teaching, prepares Beaconhurst graduates to be confident, capable and effective contributors to the wider community. Discover for yourself why they are so proud of their pupils and their school.

n the heart of St Andrews, St Leonards offers outstanding education for 5-19 yearold boys and girls, combining exceptional teaching and academic results with a friendly atmosphere and a world of opportunity. It is difficult to imagine a more perfect setting for a school and indeed it is often described by parents of pupils as unique. The campus is a superb blend of modern facilities and buildings of historic significance, all bounded by medieval walls. Historic landmarks, beaches and the sea are minutes away. St Leonards is the only school in Scotland to concentrate 100% on the International Baccalaureate Diploma in the sixth form. Its 2013 leavers scored an average of 33 points, significantly higher than the worldwide average of 30 points. Aside from music, art, drama and sport – including golf on the famous St Andrews Links courses – pupils can kayak on the East Neuk, learn Japanese, take part in the Duke of Edinburgh Awards Scheme and more. St Leonards is more than an outstanding school – it’s an internationally recognised qualification for life.

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CONTACTDETAILS

For more information call 01786 832146. Email: secretary@beaconhurst.stirling.sch.uk, www.beaconhurst.com

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CONTACTDETAILS

Open morning: Thursday 6 February. Please contact Registrar, Dr Caroline Routledge. Tel: 01334 472126. Email: registrar@stleonards-fife.org, www.stleonards-fife.org

“St Leonards is a fantastic and forward-looking school that gives children so much more than just academic qualifications.” current parent

Discover yourself at Beaconhurst From 3–18 years. Bridge of Allan, near Stirling. At Beaconhurst we develop the talents and abilities of every individual. We have a unique and friendly community and our relationships with staff, pupils, parents and the wider community are our key strengths. Discover what we can do for your child. Contact us now.

Tel. 01786 832146

www.beaconhurst.com

� Award winning education in the heart of St Andrews for boys and girls aged 5-19 � Full, weekly, flexi boarding and day places � Teaching the world-leading International Baccalaureate Diploma � Close links with St Andrews University � Open Morning Thursday 6th February, 9.30am

St Leonards School, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland KY16 9QJ t: 01334 472126 e: contact@stleonards-fife.org

www.stleonards-fife.org

An HMC and IB World School. Registered Scottish charity SCO10904

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independent schools

Gordonstoun

‘I

chose Gordonstoun for my child not just for its academic achievements but because I felt the staff truly embrace the school’s philosophy with a passion and the students experience a rounded, challenging curriculum which will stay with them for life.’ As this parent recorded it is the unique breadth of curriculum that marks Gordonstoun apart from the rest. Gordonstoun is not an academic education with a built on ‘extras’ curriculum, but a curriculum encompassing academic ambition, a world beating Outdoor Education programme (the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme was based on Gordonstoun Outdoor Ed) and an active engagement in service by all of its pupils. A Gordonstoun pupil will leave the school having been stretched intellectually in the classroom. But beyond this they will have joined one of 11 services such as the Fire Service; they may have been on exchange for a term to a far flung corner of the globe; have done unaccompanied camping expeditions and crewed on an 80 foot yacht; they may have become a Peer Mentor qualified to provide support to fellow students; and will have taken an active part in a wealth of sporting, music or drama opportunities. Gordonstoun students become very adept at time management.

The Principal of Gordonstoun, Simon Reid, said: ‘Our academic programme aims to throw open the doors to life beyond Gordonstoun as widely as possible. But if the last 20 years of technological change have shown us anything, it is that the world is evermore fast changing and unpredictable. My aim is for our students to leave school with a better understanding of working in teams, making decisions and self-awareness than most 18-year-olds could be expected to have.’ The School’s motto Plus est en vous is really true at Gordonstoun; a school which provides a preparation for university and life beyond.

contactdetails

For more information on their unique brand of education please visit www.gordonstoun.org.uk where you can request a brochure. If you would like to arrange a visit please contact the Admissions Department. Tel: 01343 837829 or email: admissions@gordonstoun.org.uk

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schools feature

Glenalmond College

Kilgraston

lenalmond has a welljustified reputation as one of the UK’s top boarding and day schools, with a tradition of excellence and achievement. The academic focus of the school is clear, with a 99.6% A level pass rate, and with 5-10% of leavers every year achieving places at Oxford or Cambridge Universities. All pupils study for GCSEs and A levels, with a curriculum spanning 24 subjects in the Sixth Form, and Glenalmond pupils are encouraged to develop a spirit of enquiry and a love of learning for its own sake as well as to secure good exam grades. As well as developing academic potential, Glenalmond encourages its pupils in other areas too. Over 145 sports, activities, clubs and societies are on offer to the 400 girls and boys aged 12 to 18. The school benefits from dynamic, energetic and committed teaching staff, all of whom live on campus and help create the very tangible sense of community that is evident at Glenalmond, an approach that is central to Glenalmond’s continued success, ensuring that all pupils, both day pupils and boarders, receive the individual attention and support they need to make the most of their talents and abilities.

ilgraston is an award winning and inspiring boarding and day school for girls aged 3 to 18. Offering scholarships to girls across the country, Scotland’s only UK Independent School of the Year is a ‘home from home’ for boarders and day girls alike. Kilgraston Sixth-Former Sarah Anderson holds academic, music and sport scholarships. A talented singer, she performs at both school and in the wider community, and also finds time to raise money for charity – recently completing an epic bike ride around Scotland with her father. Sarah was chosen as their pupil baton bearer for the 2014 Commonwealth Games Relay as a result of her contribution to the community. Kilgraston’s Principal, Frank Thompson said: ‘It is because of girls like Sarah that we’ve decided to introduce a new scholarships for 2014. For the first time we will offer a community scholarship to a local girl who has made an outstanding contribution to the wider community. We also offer academic, art, music, sport and riding scholarships as well as an all-rounder award to girls who have demonstrated excellence in two or more of these areas.’

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contactdetails

Tel: 01738 842056 or email: registrar@glenalmondcollege.co.uk www.glenalmondcollege.co.uk

Discover Discover Glenalmond College, a school with an unsurpassed tradition of helping each pupil make the most of their personal journey. A school which encourages each child to reach their academic potential while nurturing excellence in the classroom and beyond.

t Full boarding environment benefits day pupils and boarders alike t Girls and boys aged 12-18

www.glenalmondcollege.co.uk inspiring learning

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contactdetails

For more information on scholarships at Kilgraston and how to apply, please contact headoffice@kilgraston.com or call 01738815512.

Kilgraston Scholarship Examinations Academic, Art, Music & Sport Saturday 1st February 2014, 9am

t Fee assistance available (up to 100%) t 300 acre countryside campus 8 miles from Perth

T: 01738 842056 E: registrar@glenalmondcollege.co.uk Scottish Charity SC006123

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INDEPENDENT BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

For further information visit www.kilgraston.com RUHPDLOKHDGRI¿FH#NLOJUDVWRQFRP (01738) 812257

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independent schools

Craigclowan School

Fettes College

raigclowan provides a warm and nurturing environment for boys and girls aged 3-13. The school has a distinguished history and a reputation for the very highest standards and expectations, along with an impressive record of academic achievement and extra-curricular success. This dynamic and supportive learning environment delivers a modern and distinctive education within a framework of proven traditional values, effectively balancing the best of old and new in education. Every pupil is encouraged to achieve their all-round potential, both academically and in extra-curricular activities. These range from skiing, on the school’s own dry ski slope, to judo, art clubs and street dance. There really is something for everyone. This personalised approach lies at the heart of a Craigclowan education, along with the recognition that it is equally important that pupils develop essential life skills. Life is made considerably easier for parents with after school care available until 6pm and holiday clubs for our younger pupils in the summer, Christmas and Easter holidays.

ettes College has over 5,000 Old Fettesians who remain in touch for one very compelling reason: being educated at Fettes was one of the most important and beneficial aspects of their lives. Fettes is where their confidence was built, horizons broadened, talents nurtured and lifelong friendships made. It is also where they achieved exam success, broke sporting records, were inspired by teachers and learnt the skills which equipped them for later life. To this day, a Fettes education is an incredible start to life. The mission at Fettes is to develop broadly-educated, confident and thoughtful individuals who are prepared for life after Fettes and all the opportunities and challenges it will bring. Small class sizes, dedicated staff and superb facilities help to unlock hidden talents and develop existing ones. Fettesians have access to over 20 sports and over 40 extra-curricular activities. Fettes pupils achieve superb academic results at IB, A Level and GCSE. They are not an academic hothouse but they do believe that with expert tuition and encouragement, every student can maximise their academic potential.

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contactdetails

If you would like to arrange a visit, please contact Jennifer Trueland on 01738 626310. www.craigclowan-school.co.uk

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contactdetails

Please call our Registrar on 0131 311 6744, admissions@fettes.com www.fettes.com

A top quality day school education for boys and girls aged 3 - 13

Craigclowan

open morning Tuesday 18 February 9 am - noon. All Welcome

Come and see what the school and pre-school have to offer to your family No appointment necessary Edinburgh Road, Perth, PH2 8PS www.craigclowan-school.co.uk Registered Scottish Charity SC010817

Assistance with fees available

A strong foundation for the future, a family for life A full-boarding school which accepts day pupils in the heart of Edinburgh Co-educational 7-18 • Excellent IB, A Level and GCSE results Superb pastoral care • Strong sporting tradition Bursaries, Scholarships & Awards available Please call our Registrar on 0131 311 6744 admissions@fettes.com www.fettes.com

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The

Wedding planner From choosing the venue and catering to hiring cars and the photographer, organising the most important time of your life can be a daunting prospect. That is why we have dedicated the following twenty four pages to all things bridal, to guarantee that you have the perfect day.

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wedding feature

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wedded bliss

Wedded bliss The charming story of how one Scottish couple started out their life together images Tommy Cairns

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othing lifts the spirits and brings people together like a good wedding. However, for the bride and groom, planning the big day can be a rollercoaster ride of emotions. For those of you who are in the midst of organising your nuptials or who have just got engaged – congratulations – we hope your road to the altar is smooth and stress-free. Everyone has a different idea of what makes the perfect wedding. 2013 saw three members of the Scottish Field team tie the knot; one in a garden, one in a school and one in a distillery. Hearing other couples’ wedding stories is a great way to get inspiration for your own, so we hope you enjoy the real life wedding story of Lisa McCreadie (41) and John Archibald Ferguson (49), who got married at 2pm on 28 September 2013 at Alloway Kirk, Alloway, Ayrshire. ‘John and I met at a Clydesdale Bank lunch in February 2010, where I worked at the time and John was a customer’, recalls Lisa. ‘He proposed over a romantic dinner that he had prepared on Valentines Day 2012. John and I planned the whole thing ourselves. ‘One of the most difficult aspects of planning our day was that we wanted to cut the cake outside, in the evening, with fireworks going off in the background. This gave the photographer the difficult task of trying to capture the moment, which I believe was tricky, but he rose to the occasion, as he did with all the photographs.’

Left: Brian Ferguson, John’s brother and Best Man; John; Lisa; Lisa’s three nieces, Hannah, Jessica and Beth McCreadie, with John’s daughter, Jennifer Ferguson. In front, John and Lisa’s daughter Leah and her cousin, Lucie McCreadie.

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WEDDING FEATURE

‘John is from Morar in the Highlands and I am from Kirkoswald and we are both very pariotic. We also had guests from England and as far afield as Australia, so we wanted to show everyone some real Scottish hospitality. We opted for a traditional Scottish theme from the kilts, Kirk and venue the flowers, locally sourced produce for our menu, ceilidh band and our spectacular stags head cake. ‘I was perfectly chilled before the ceremony, knowing a whole lot of organisation had gone into making the day come together beforehand, but must admit to a few wee butterflies the night before! John on the other hand doesn’t do stress – he was cool as a cucumber!

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‘We decided to have a Church of Scotland traditional ceremony conducted by the Minister from Kirkoswald Parish, Jim Guthrie, who I had grown up with. He came out of retirement especially to conduct the ceremony and made the day all the more special with his personal words. We didn’t write our own vows and chose to say the traditional Church of Scotland vows. ‘Our fi rst dance was Rod Stewart’s I only have eyes for you, to which we danced a Social Foxtrot, which we had rehearsed beforehand – although we hadn’t bargained on my dress being quite so long; it got in the way a wee bit but we still managed!

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WEDDED BLISS Left: The new Mr and Mrs Ferguson with their family and friends. Below: The happy couple.

‘One of my highlights of the day was travelling to the church in a vintage Rolls Royce, given to us for the day as a gift by one of our friends, who also drove it. I felt like a princess. Another highlight was the Secret Opera Singers, who entertained us during the meal – there wasn’t a dry eye in the house. The speeches were fantastic too – the Groom sang during his! ‘One of the difficulties that I found in planning the wedding was finding a dress. Many of the shops that I tried only seemed to stock very glitzy, embellished dresses for younger brides, but Christie Couture in Clarkston – where I found ‘the one’ – has some very elegant pieces. ‘If I had to give one piece of advice to anyone planning their wedding, I would say go for as small a number of guests as possible. The day fl ies past and you don’t get time so spend with everyone if there are too many, which is a real shame.’

FIELDFACTS Photographer: Tommy Cairns www.tomcairnsphotography.com Flowers: Roots, Fruits and Flowers, Glasgow Cake: Guilty Pleasures Cake Company, Glasgow Cars: Ivory Choice Wedding Cars Hair: Jennifer at Ryde hairdressing, Muirend Make-up: Jamie Genevieive at Illamasqua

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life & style

Pictured: CELINE Dazzling wedding gown in lace, sequins and tulle with pleated overdress in georgette, embellished with crystal beading.

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Special collections

Special collections Stunning wedding dresses, outfits for the mother of the bride/groom and contemporary tartan and Harris Tweed designs from Joyce Young at By Storm

Pictured: PEGGY SUE Cute fifties style ankle length wedding dress in polka dot tulle over satin waist, cinched with satin belt and flat bow.

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LIFE & STYLE Mother of the Bride /Groom. All Joyce Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outfits for special occasions are individually made to measure in your choice of colour and fabric. Visit the website to see the extensive choice of styles that can be made to your individual requirements. All of the designs on the website are also available in the shop in Glasgow to see and try. Left: Sand washed silk coat and dress with exclusive embroidered and beaded cotton lace bodice. Choice of colours, made to measure. Below: French Chantilly lace coat over silk dress. Choice of various laces and colours of silk available, made to measure.

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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Left: Sand washed silk dress with French Chantilly beaded lace cropped top. Choice of colours, made to measure.

Left: Dress with full circle pleated satin skirt and over top in embroidered beaded tulle. Choice of colours, made to measure.

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life & style

Tartan Spirit by Joyce Young is a contemporary fashion collection inspired by the colours of the Scottish landscape and made in fine wool tartan and Harris Tweed. Each piece is made to measure in your choice of tartan and colour of tweed. Left: Harris Tweed coat over Holyrood tartan kilt with matching cap and scarf. Kiltie bag in combination of Harris Tweed, tartan and alcantara. Above: Harris Tweed jacket with toning alcantara trim matching tweed kilt and cap.

Joyce Young at By Storm, 156 Milngavie Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 3EA Glasgow tel: 0141 942 8900 London tel: 020 7224 7888 www.joyceyoungcollections.co.uk and www.tartanspirit.com 162

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Legendary experiences

Ballathie as unique as Scotland itself… B

allathie has an enviable reputation as an unique country house wedding venue along with a glorious stunning backdrop on the banks of the River Tay offering an imitate and elegant choice for your special day. Not forgetting the individually styled bedrooms and the award winning food, choose to take exclusive use of the house or for larger celebrations we will put a marquee in the grounds for you.

Ackergill Tower Highlands of Scotland

UNIQUELY PLACED FOR small intimate gatherings to larger celebrations of up to 200 guests

Kinnettles Castle North of Dundee

Carberry Tower East of Edinburgh

Ballathie House Hotel, Kinclaven, Stanley, Perthshire, PH1 4QN t: 01250 883268 www.ballathiehousehotel.com e: Sfield@ballathiehousehotel.com

Truly AmaZing Venues If you’re looking for an AmaZing Scottish Venue for a special occasion that’s...Luxurious...Magical... Historical...Breath-taking... ...and has that all-important ‘wow’ factor ...then we should be top of your list! If you want to hold that occasion of the year, our venues are just for you... X Romantic Weddings X Unforgettable Celebrations X Sophisticated Corporate Events X Dazzling Themed Events

Call the AmaZing team on 0330 333 7 222 or email us at: hello@amazingvenues.co.uk

legendary experiences...spectacular locations Weddings X Celebrations X Corporate X Themed Events

amazingvenues.co.uk

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EMPORIUM

Going out in style Stunning outfits and accessories for the big day

GRAHAM STEWART Exquisite handcrafted jewellery and gifts for the special wedding day from the workshop of respected designer, gold and silversmith, Graham Stewart. Tel: 01786 825244 www.grahamstewartsilversmith.co.uk

KUDOS COUTURE For the bride who wants something a little different, here is Flora, from the wonderful Charlotte Balbier collection at Kudos, Edinburgh. For an appointment to view the collection tel: 0131 447 8800, www.kudoscouture.co.uk

RUBAN ROUGE Be on top of the best dressed list this wedding season with this elegant off white and navy suit by Nissa – available from February at Ruban Rouge. Tel: 01786 834074 www.rubanrouge.co.uk

WTG HENDERSON A selection of handcrafted wedding rings, kilt pins and gifts for that very special day. 5 North Methven St, Perth. Tel: 01738 624836 www.jewellers-perth.co.uk

JAMIESON & CARRY Celebrating 15 years of success, the elegantly timeless Patek Philippe ladies Twenty~4 is the ideal watch for a special occasion. The smart, steel exterior is adorned with 36 flawless diamonds and a midnight blue dial, £8,780. A range of Patek Philippe watches are available at Jamieson & Carry. tel: 01224 641 219 www.jamieson-carry.com

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EMPORIUM

OPUS OCCASIONS Leading designer collections, excellent customer service and expert staff whose priority is to make you feel comfortable and confident for your special event. 28 Ritchie Street, West Kilbride, Ayrshire. Tel: 01294 829264 www.opusoccasions.com

LAING EDINBURGH Omega De Ville Prestige Co-Axial 39.5mm watch, price £2280. Tel: 0131 225 4513 www.laingedinburgh.com

NUMBER FIVE Impress with this delightfully classic engagement and wedding ring set by British Jewellers’ Association ‘Designer of the Year’ 2013, Andrew Geoghegan. Fission cluster engagement ring with crescent wedding band in platinum. Tel: 01334 657784, www.numberfivegoldsmiths.co.uk

MACDONALD KILTMAKERS Kiltmakers for 68 years making only the finest hand sewn kilts, suppliers of full highland dress outfits and kilt hire for all occasions. Why not pay them a visit and check out their new range of Harris Tweeds. Tel: 01506 872678 www.macdonaldkiltmakers.co.uk

COUNTRY PURSUITS Stand out from every other wedding guest in a bespoke and made to measure outfit by Kilgour & Donald. Designed and made in Scotland using 100% Scottish tweeds and knitted fabrics, you are guaranteed to avoid an outfit clash. Available exclusively through Country Pursuits, Bridge of Allan. Tel: 01786 834495 www.countrypursuits.co

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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A DAY TO REMEMBER

A day to remember

Everything you need for a perfect day

JILL CHERRY PORTER PHOTOGRAPHY Creative fine art wedding photography in Scotland and abroad. With an unobtrusive approach, using natural light and a creative eye, Jill provides a collection of elegant and timeless photographs, which tell the story of your day in a natural, detailed and emotive way. Please get in touch for a bespoke 2014/2015 information brochure. Tel: 07813 608896 www.jillcherryporterphotography.com FRASER SUITES Relax and unwind after your big day in one of their beautiful bespoke suites, fit for a king and queen, or a newly married couple. With panoramic views of Edinburgh on your own private balcony, you can be sure to continue the magical feeling of your wedding day. Enjoy room service accompanied by Champagne and you’ll not want to leave your room. Tel: 0131 221 7200, edinburgh.frasershospitality.com

PICCOLO PRESS Voted Social Stationery Printer of the Year, Piccolo is one of Britain’s finest stationers. Established 30 years ago, their business continues to grow around personal recommendations. Piccolo are masters of engraving, diestamping, thermography, letterpress, blind embossing and foil blocking. All bespoke stationery requirements can be achieved by their in-house team. Visit the website to view some of Piccolo’s wedding and personal stationery collections. Tel: 01667 454508, www.piccolopress.co.uk

JOYCE YOUNG FOR BY STORM It’s time to start planning for your spring and summer special occasions. At By Storm they design and make your perfect outfit to your measurements, to ensure you will truly have a Day to Remember. Dresses for brides, mothers and all special occasions. And as three times winner of the VOWS Industry Award, you are in good hands. Tel: 0141 942 8900 www.joyceyoungcollections.co.uk

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Continue your fairytale at Fraser Suites... Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just had the biggest day of your life, so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to continue the feeling of happiness and excitement for as long as possible. Fraser Suites Edinburgh offers seclusion in salubrious surroundings, in a fabulous location. Experience plush, luxurious suites with views over Princes Street Gardens and beyond or enjoy a glass of Champagne on your very own private balcony. Relax in style and let your happy ever after start at Fraser Suites. For details of our beautiful bespoke suites call 0131 221 7200 or email reservations.edinburgh@frasershospitality.com and a member of our team will be delighted to help.

12-26 St. Giles Street, Edinburgh EH1 1PT Tel: +44 (0)131 221 7200 Email: sales.edinburgh@frasershospitality.com View the collection at www.frasershospitality.com

T: 01307 840393 E: enquiries@glamis-castle.co.uk www.glamis-castle.co.uk 168

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A DAY TO REMEMBER SHEILA FLEET Sheila Fleet has designed this stunning ring and earrings as part of the Secret Hearts collection. Hearts of silver and gold are reversible and can be worn either way, depending on which side the wearer wishes to reveal. All Sheila Fleet jewellery is designed and made in Orkney. Visit the website to view all of the collections. Orkney workshop, tel: 01856 861203. www.sheilafleet.com

McCALLS With an extensive range of Highlandwear and service perfected over 125 years, McCalls ensure that the groom and his party look their best. The six branches throughout Scotland provide Highlandwear hire, made to measure tailoring and coordinated accessories. The exclusive Pride of Scotland range can be viewed online, with an outfit designer tool to plan and share ideas. For more information or to arrange an appointment tel: 01224 405300 www.mccalls.co.uk

FOUKOU Foukou Charcoal Barbeque is a family run business, with 10 years’ experience producing excellent meat and fish dishes, cooked over charcoal on rotating spits, as part of a total service for any celebration. Their canapé dishes are particularly moreish and make for an excellent starter at any wedding reception or party. The main courses are unique to Foukou – such as locally sourced rolled rib of beef with a delicious béarnaise sauce – are always a big hit with the guests and all of the indulgent desserts are homemade. Visit the website for information and a personalised quotation. www.foukou.com

WHISPER LINGERIE Every bride wants to look and feel fantastic on her wedding day. Visit Whisper for perfectly fitted stunning underwear for beneath your gorgeous dress. 109 High Street, Auchterarder. Tel: 01764 663322, www.whisperlingerie.co.uk WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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3 DB for &B 2 Steeped in history Bunchrew House Hotel is a 17th century Scottish mansion, offering excellent hotel accommodation and award-winning cuisine. Whether it is a romantic break or a base near Inverness to explore the Highlands Bunchrew is the perfect location.

www.bunchrew-inverness.co.uk Bunchrew House Hotel, Inverness IV3 8TA T: +44 (0)1463 234 917 F: +44 (0)1463 710 620 E: welcome@bunchrewhousehotel.com

THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL St Fillans, Perthshire 01764 685333

info@thefourseasonshotel.co.uk www.thefourseasonshotel.co.uk

NEWTON HOTEL

Quality jewellery and silver with excellent customer service. At W.T.G. Henderson’s much of our stock is handmade in our very own onsite workshop, meaning we can cater for everybody’s needs. 5 North Methven Street, Perth PH1 5PN

01738 624 836 www.jewellers-perth.co.uk @perthjeweller

W.T.G. Henderson Jewellers

Your other best men

call for more details 01667 459001 sales.newton@bespokehotels.com The Newton Hotel Inverness Road, Nairn, IV12 4RX

FOUKOU BARBECUE CATERING We specialise in Weddings and private parties for up to 300 guests

“A restaurant in your garden”

www.foukou.com 01786 880578

www.arcmarquees.com

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Middlestead Selkirk TD7 5EY Tel 01750 722 677 Mobile 07951 262 204 Email charles@foukou.com

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EMPORIUM

UBIQUITOUS CHIP Create your perfect day at the Ubiquitous Chip in the bohemian West End of Glasgow. The leafy, cobbled courtyard will be sure to give the romance of your wedding its due setting, whether for a ceremony, meal or a whole-day event. Tel: 0141 334 5007, www.ubiquitouschip.co.uk

FOUKOU As specialist outdoor caterers for over 10 years, Foukou create a unique and delicious BBQ wedding buffet tailored perfectly to the tastes of you and your guests. Excellent meat and fish dishes are cooked over charcoal on rotating spits. So leave all the hard work to Foukou and toast the roast with your family and friends. Tel: 01750 722677, www.foukou.com

Weddingcaterers Let someone else deal with the stress of feeding your guests

APPETITE DIRECT Multi award-winning event catering company that specialises in creating the perfect wedding day. With years of experience its dedicated wedding team are on hand to guide you through every element of your big day. Tel: 0131 225 3711, www.appetitedirect.com

GILL ORDE IN CATERING Gill Orde In Catering Ltd, a company on the up, has added to its strong team with Christian Orde joining his brother Justin as a director. They’re the Border’s best kept secret in event catering. Christian says: ‘Society weddings, brand launches and catering for some amazing people in 2013 has been a blast! Roll on 2014.’ Tel: 01573 229150, www.gillordeincatering.co.uk For more information find them on Facebook.com/gillordeincatering WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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SCOTTISH FIELD SELECT

Newton Hotel Inverness Road, Nairn Tel: 01667 459001 www.bespokehotels.com/ newtonhotel

Ballathie Country House Hotel & Estate Tel: 01250 883268 www.ballathiehousehotel.com Ballathie was voted Best Country House Wedding Venue in 2011. Situated on the banks of the River Tay and offering an intimate and elegant choice for starting married life in style, the hotel can accommodate up to 110 guests for your wedding breakfast and 80 for a ceremony. For larger parties, a marquee can be set up in their stunning grounds. The National Trust for Scotland Various locations www.nts.org.uk/Hire-a-Venue

The Newton Hotel provides a beautiful setting for your special day. From smaller, more intimate ceremonies held in its wonderful chapel to larger weddings held in the Highland Suite. You can be assured, that your day will be will be tailored according to your wishes by their experienced and dedicated team who will be honoured to provide assistance and advice to ensure your planning is relaxing, stress free and enjoyable.

Fairytale castles, beautiful country houses and royal hunting lodges â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the National Trust for Scotland has an incomparable collection of venues, steeped in history with exquisite interiors and manicured gardens. Work with friendly, knowledgeable staff and specially selected suppliers to create your own bespoke wedding day.

Wedding venues Find the perfect location for your marriage, reception or honeymoon

Bunchrew House Hotel Inverness Tel: 01463 234917 www.bunchrew-inverness.co.uk

Airth Castle Hotel & Spa Airth, Stirlingshire Tel: 01324 831411 www.airthcastlehotel.com

Bunchrew is a house for all seasons, be it a winter wedding, when crackling log fires and candlelight add to the romantic atmosphere, or a summer wedding, taking advantage of the fabulous gardens, beautiful trees and lawns rolling right down to the sea. Bunchrew is the perfect venue for a Highland wedding; whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small, intimate affair or a lavish, exclusive use event.

Nestled in beautiful, secluded parkland and gardens, 14th century Airth Castle features 125 luxurious rooms, spa and extensive leisure facilities. The magnificent Dunmore Suite, with its vaulted ceiling and unique octagonal shape, is perfect for large parties, the Bruce or Castle Suites suit more intimate gatherings, whilst the exquisite Wallace Suite offers a romantic setting for exchanging vows. Imagine the perfect Scottish castle wedding in beautiful surroundings. Everything a girl could wish for.

Macdonald Hotels & Resorts Various locations www.MacdonaldHotels.co.uk/ Weddings From the Highlands to the Borders, each of our Scottish hotels has its own individual charm and character. Licensed for civil ceremonies and can cater for anything from intimate celebrations to grand occasions, with packages tailored to suit all budgets. Hold your wedding at Macdonald Hotels & Resorts and experience impeccable service, the highest quality food and a romantic back drop for your special day.

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WEDDING VENUES Hilton Dunkeld House Dunkeld, Perthshire Tel: 01350 728336 www.hiltondunkeld.com/ weddings

The Royal Scots Club 30 Abercromby Place, Edinburgh Tel: 0131 556 4270 www.royalscotsclub.com Situated in one of Edinburgh’s finest Georgian Streets in the heart of the city, and overlooking Queen Street Gardens, The Royal Scots Club is perfect for capturing those special memories. Having recently undergone major re-development, it is now one of the finest clubs in the country – with traditional values and a friendly and helpful team offering a first-class service. The club also encourages prospective clients to come and discover this beautiful and historic building.

Enjoy the perfect Scottish wedding at Hilton Dunkeld House, in the heart of Perthshire. With its picturesque setting overlooking the River Tay, this 4-star country house hotel is the perfect location in central Scotland. Imagine an intimate wedding in the Drawing Room overlooking the river, or an extravagant gathering in their elegant marquee, with a string quartet playing on the lawns. With wedding packages for 40 guests from just £2014, this year you can have a dream wedding at a dream price – on selected dates in 2014.

The Pierhouse Hotel Port Appin, Argyll Tel: 01631 730302 www.pierhousehotel.co.uk The Pierhouse Hotel, winner of Small Country Hotel of the Year 2013, is nestled on the shores of Loch Linnhe in Port Appin. With breathtaking loch views, it’s an idyllic venue for your wedding celebration – with exclusive wedding party use available from November to February. Twelve, individually styled bedrooms, cosy wood-burning fires, delicious freshly prepared seafood and game along with a friendly, relaxed atmosphere, will make it the perfect, intimate wedding.

The Four Seasons Hotel St Fillans, Perthshire Tel: 01764 685333 www.thefourseasonshotel. co.uk

Dalhousie Castle Bonnyrigg, Edinburgh Tel: 01875 820153 www.dalhousiecastle.co.uk Dalhousie is a 13th-century Scottish Castle on the edge of Edinburgh, where wedding fairytales really do come true. With its own private chapel overlooking parkland and the South River Esk, a superb spa and award winning cuisine, Dalhousie Castle is a unique location for the most memorable of wedding ceremonies, which includes an owl ring delivery. Dalhousie offers you an unrivalled wedding castle experience; a day that you will never forget.

The Four Seasons Hotel is one of the most romantic wedding venues in Scotland, situated on the lochside and ideal for wedding photographs. They cater for large, small and civil weddings, accommodating up to 70 guests with an additional 25/30 adjoining the main restaurant. They source Scottish produce whilst considering both the adventurous and traditional diner, with a reputation for serving some of the finest food and wine available.

Archerfield Dirleton, North Berwick Tel: 01620 897050 www.archerfieldgolfclub.com Archerfield’s stunning waterfront venue offers a unique and beautiful venue for your special day. The team will work with you to put together an exuberant celebration, a unique expression of who you are. Every detail will be perfect, supported by discreet and friendly service. And because Archerfield exudes a rare atmosphere, which is both luxurious and relaxing, it’s somewhere you can feel completely at home and have the time of your lives. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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50 U % p of to fB &B

Kinnaird Estate Guesthouse and Sporting Estate

A special place to

Hotel & seafood restaurant Port Appin • Argyll 01631 730302 www.pierhousehotel.co.uk

like a

hold

secret

Share our secret this winter. Treat yourself to our stunning lochside bedrooms and fresh local produce cooked to perfection. Up to 50% off B&B or 3 nights for 2 winter offers.

Bridgend Hotel Isle of Islay PA44 7PB 01496 810212 info@bridgend-hotel.com

Set in the heart of Perthshire we are the Perfect place for a short getaway or Romantic Wedding. See Website for our latest offers T: 01796 482440 Visit our website at www.kinnairdestate.com

Whether it be a traditional Highland wedding, getting married on a beautiful island beach, or at your favourite whisky distillery, it would be our pleasure to host your wedding reception here at Bridgend Hotel. 11 en-suite individually appointed bedrooms, Lounge Bar, and a stunning Dining room seating up to 50 persons. You can trust us with your wedding.

The ROYAL SCOTS CLUB The Ubiquitous Chip, established in 1971, is an iconic institution in the heart of Glasgow’s West End. Imagine your tailor made wedding day in this beautiful setting, just moments from the Botanic Gardens. The romance of the candlelit, spectacularly green and vinous courtyard with a trickling pool and intimate traditional dining room is hard to compare. It could be your own private garden style wedding. We can provide the perfect backdrop for your ceremony and reception.

The Ubiquitious Chip 8-12 Ashton Lane Glasgow G12 8SJ Chip reservations +44 (0)141 334 5007 events@ubiquitouschip.co.uk www.ubiquitouschip.co.uk

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COURTESY OF GRAHAM BELL PHOTOGRAPHY

TIME FOR THAT SPECIAL DAY

With country-house charm in the heart of Edinburgh’s Georgian New Town, The Royal Scots Club is a beautiful venue with elegant rooms. Ideal for small exclusive weddings, and larger receptions for up to 200 guests. We offer a wide range of packages, superior overnight accommodation, and access to Queen Street Gardens for your photographs. Our experienced organisers will work with you to help create the perfect wedding day. The Royal Scots Club - Time is precious, spend it wisely.

0131 556 4270

web: royalscotsclub.com email: info@royalscotsclub.com T H E R OYA L S C OT S C LU B 2 9 - 3 0 A B E R C R O M B Y P L AC E E D I N B U R G H E H 3 6 Q E

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WEDDING VENUES Kinnaird Estate By Dunkeld Tel: 01796 482440 www.kinnairdestate.com

Glamis Castle Angus Tel:01307 840393 www.glamis-castle.co.uk

Surrounded by its beautiful gardens and grounds, the sumptuous rooms and magnificent setting overlooking the River Tay makes Kinnaird Estate Guesthouse the perfect venue for your wedding. We offer accommodation and breakfast for 16-18 people in the main house, with more accommodation available in the cottages. A marquee is required for weddings of more than 60 people. Located in the heart of Perthshire contact reservations@kinnairdestate.com or visit the website for details.

Mains of Taymouth Perthshire Tel: 01887 830226 www.taymouth.co.uk Are you are looking for something special and intimate for your wedding? Celebrate with family and friends at Mains of Taymouth Country Estate, with stunning 4 & 5-star self-catering accommodation for 214 guests, from the large family house with hot tub to a stunning 1 bedroom with 4-poster bed and spa bathroom sauna. Also an ideal honeymoon destination.

This fairytale castle, with its soaring turrets, atmospheric rooms and remarkable gardens is a beautiful wedding location. As you drive down the mile-long avenue to reach the castle, the sense of occasion will be immense. The castle and surrounding grounds provide the most stunning backdrop for wedding photographs.

Nira Caledonia 10 Gloucester Place, Edinburgh Tel: 0131 225 2720 www.niracaledonia.com

Dunglass Estate Cockburnspath, Berwickshire Tel: 01368 830868 www.dunglassestate.com Surrounded by beautiful parkland and with stunning ocean views, Dunglass Estate is an unrivalled romantic setting. With its own church, onsite marquee with seating for up to 200 guests (larger numbers can be accommodated) and PA system with sound engineer, every aspect of your special day is covered. The marquee is also fully carpeted with a bar area and a dance floor and can be decorated to your requirements.

Hidden away in the exclusive New Town district of Scotland’s vibrant capital, Edinburgh, the boutique Nira Caledonia is somewhere that newly-weds can treat themselves to a fabulous romantic short break. The hotel provides its guests with their own secret world of romance only a short distance from Princes Street and other city centre attractions. Nira Caledonia’s Romance Package includes Champagne on ice and red roses on arrival, from £211 per room per night on a bed & breakfast basis.

The White Tower of Taymouth Castle Kenmore, Perthshire Tel: 01887 830216 www.thewhitetower.co.uk The White Tower of Taymouth Castle is one of the most romantic and breathtaking Highland retreats imaginable. This perfect hideaway is set in eight acres of exceptional peace and beauty and is the perfect honeymoon retreat – not least because of its very romantic history as the 16th-century lookout tower for Taymouth Castle, where Queen Victoria and Prince Albert spent their honeymoon. If your choice is for an intimate wedding, in completely private surroundings, then choose The White Tower of Taymouth Castle for your perfect day. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Graham Stewart DESIGNER GOLDSMITH AND SILVERSMITH 91-95 HIGH STREET, DUNBLANE FK15 0ER TEL: 01786 825244

www.grahamstewartsilversmith.co.uk

THE LOCH LOMOND ARMS HOTEL

Traditional hospitality in Scotlandテ不 loveliest village

Perfect The

Gretna

THE PERFECT START TO EVERLASTING MEMORIES

Green wedding

Your ceremony, reception and accommodation in one beautiful location.

Whether you are looking for a small, intimate dinner or a larger occasion, The Loch Lomond Arms Hotel in Luss will provide a uniquely tailored wedding package in one of the most romantic and memorable locations in Scotland.

Prices start from ツ」350 Loch Lomond Arms Hotel, Main Road, Luss, Argyll, G83 8NY Telephone: 01436 860 420 Website: www.lochlomondarmshotel.com Email: enquiries@lochlomondarmshotel.com

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Our team are available to help you plan your wedding from 9.00am - 8.00pm, 7 days a week

www.themill.co.uk

Tel: 01461 800344 | Email: info@themill.co.uk

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the wedding planner

Weddingdirectory Marquee Hire

Food

Arc Marquees Tel: 01786 880 578 www.arcmarquees.com

Foukou Tel: 01750 722677 www.foukou.com

Wedding Venues

Appetite Direct Tel: 0131 225 3711 www.appetitedirect.com

Amazing Venues Tel: 0330 333 7 222 www.amazingvenues.co.uk Aurora Hotel Collection Tel: 0844 800 4000 www.aurorahotelcollection.co.uk Glamis Castle Tel: 01307 840393 www.glamis-castle.co.uk

Gill Orde in Catering Tel: 07974 655351 www.gillordeincatering.co.uk Ubiquitous Chip Tel: 0141 334 5007 www.ubiquitouschip.co.uk

Jewellery

Kinnaird Estate Tel: 01796 482400 www.kinnairdestate.com

Jamieson & Carry Tel: 01224 641219 www.jamieson-carry.com

Macdonald Hotels Tel: 0844 879 9028 www.macdonaldhotels.co.uk

WTG Henderson Tel: 01738 624836 www.jewellers-perth.co.uk

The Newton Hotel Tel: 0843 178 7133 www.bespokehotels.com/newtonhotel

Sheila Fleet Tel: 01856 861203 www.sheilafleet.com

The Loch Lomond Arms Hotel Tel:01436 860420 www.lochlomondarmshotel.com

Number Five Goldsmiths Tel: 01334 657784 www.numberfivegoldsmiths.co.uk

Fraser Suites Edinburgh Tel: 0131 221 7200 www.frasershospitality.com

Laing Edinburgh Tel: 0131 225 4513 www.laingthejeweller.com

Hilton Dunkeld Tel: 01350 728333 www.hiltondunkeld.com

Graham Stewart Silversmiths Tel: 01786 825244 www.grahamstewartsilversmith.co.uk

Royal Scots Club Tel: 0131 556 4270 www.royalscotsclub.com

Fashion

Bunchrew House Hotel Tel: 01463 234917 www.bunchrew-inverness.co.uk Ballathie House Hotel Tel: 01250 883268 www.ballathiehousehotel.com

McCalls Tel: 01224 405300 www.mccalls.co.uk

Cee Geeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 28 Ritchie Street, West Kilbride Tel: 01764 650022 Opus Occasions Tel: 01294 829264 www.opusoccasions.co.uk Photographer Jill Cherry Porter Photography Tel: 07813 608896 www.jillcherryporterphotography.com

Stationary Piccolo Press 01667 454 508 www.piccolopress.co.uk

By Storm Tel: 0141 942 8900 www.joyceyoungcollections.co.uk

Four Seasons Hotel Tel: 01764 685 333 www.thefourseasonshotel.co.uk

Kudos Couture Tel: 0131 447 8800 www.kudoscouture.co.uk

The Pierhouse Hotel Tel: 01631 730302 www.pierhousehotel.co.uk

MacDonald Kiltmakers Tel: 01506 872678 www.macdonaldkiltmakers.co.uk www.scottishfield.co.uk

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FASHION, JEWELLERY, HEALTH & BEAUTY

directory

ROS Ad (Ninth Page) PRINT.pdf

25/10/13

Kilgour & Donald Bristish Style, Made in Scotland

C

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Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

exclusively at Boutique

rubanrouge.co.uk Elegant clothing and accessories from European Fashion brands

Henderson Street, Bridge of Allan www.countrypursuits.co 01786 834495

Flora, by Charlotte Balbier

Fabulous outfits for every special occasion

66 Morningside Road, Edinburgh EH10 4BZ Tel: 0131 447 8800

www.kudoscouture.co.uk www.facebook.com/kudoscouture Soft and comfy, lightweight alpaca socks, made in the UK from our own alpaca fibre. Buy 3 pairs or more and get 10% off! simply call and quote “SF1”, £12.00.

www.alpacaannie.com 01303 870527

JOANNA THOMSON JEWELLERY Commissions & bespoke pieces. Be inspired by our range of designs and fantastic choice of gemstones. Or recycle your old gold and diamonds into something new and stunning.

Studio open any time by arrangement. Call or email: Tel: 01721 722 936 Mob: 0777 357 8341 joannathomson@btconnect.com

www.jewellery-scotland.com Mail-Order catalogue available

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11:29:38


FASHIONnews

The latest from the world of fashion and beauty IN THE BLACK

A fair for fashion

Gullane-based baby, children and ladies’ designer clothing boutique, the merrygoround, offers its fabulous ranges – which includes toys, gifts and accessories. Brands include Joules, Mayoral, Lilly + Sid and Weekend a la Mer for children, and Joules, B Young and Hatley of Canada for ladies. A new linen range from French company, La Naturelle is arriving for summer 2014. Quote ‘Scottish Field Feb14’ for a 10% discount in-store. www.themerrygoround.co.uk

Prestigious Perth-based family-run Scottish knitwear company, Robertsons of Scotland, offers a unique range of luxurious cashmere, lambswool and Harris tweed products, 100% made in Scotland and only available in black. As well as exporting their products all over the world, you can now purchase them securely online at www.robertsonsofscotland.com

Bum deal

Denzil, Skinner and Partners offer a personalised ‘tattooing’ service for these Kilt and Bottom silver cufflinks, price £145 (plus P&P) – available for initials, approximately £15 for four letters. In addition, they create traditional silver and gold cufflinks, engraved with family crests, and gold seal engraved signet rings. Tel: 0131 538 4224, www.denzilskinner.co.uk

HIGH FIVE

Andrew Geoghegan is the British Jewellers’ Association Designer of the Year 2013. His work has long been admired within Number Five in Cupar, who are delighted that he had now received the recognition he so richly deserves. Come and see his mesmerising designs at Number Five, 56 Bonnygate, Cupar. Tel: 01334 657784 www.numberfivegoldsmiths.co.uk

NORTHERN STAR

Since establishing Aurora Jewellery over fifteen years ago, master craftsman Steven Cooper has adhered rigidly to traditional methods of jewellery making, drawing on Orkney’s windblown landscapes and rich heritage for inspiration. Aurora has launched two brand new collections: Barley and Pentland, both designed by Emma Thompson. The former is inspired by the grain synonymous with Orkney, the latter by the Pentland Firth, which separates Orkney from Caithness. www.aurora-jewellery.co.uk WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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TRAVEL & LEISURE

&Breaks

Hotels

A selection of Scotlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nest hotels and getaways TO ADVERTISE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOTELS & BREAKS ADVERTISING CALL SHONA OR ASHLEY ON 0131 551 1000 OR EMAIL ADVERTS@SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Who: Bunchrew House Hotel Where: Inverness Why: Stunning views from the banks of the Beauly Firth. Bunchrew is a House for all seasons, be it a winter break, when crackling log ďŹ res and candlelight add to the relaxing atmosphere, or a summer get away, when you can take full advantage of the fabulous gardens, beautiful trees and lawns rolling right down to the sea! Bunchrew is also the perfect venue for a beautiful Highland wedding - be it a small intimate affair or a lavish event involving exclusive use. Winter Warmer Offer: 4 course Dinner, Bed & Full Highland Breakfast for 2 people from ÂŁ150.00 per couple Offer valid until March 31st 2014

Hotel of the month

Bunchrew House Hotel, Inverness IV3 8TA 01463 234 917 welcome@bunchrewhousehotel.com www.bunchrew-inverness.co.uk 3

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What a glorious prospect

Wardside House

a welcoming home for the elderly. t 1VSQPTFCVJMUDBSFIPNF t &BTZSFBDIPGCPUI(MBTHPXBOE&EJOCVSHI t 4FUJOUIFIFBSUPGBEFMJHIUGVMDPOTFSWBUJPOWJMMBHF   TVSSPVOEFECZCFBVUJGVM1FSUITIJSFDPVOUSZTJEF t +PJOBMJLFNJOEFEDPNNVOJUZ t 'SFTIMZQSFQBSFENFBMTNBEFVTJOH E& RESPITT  UIFĂśOFTUMPDBMQSPEVDF R O H S S t )PVSDBSFBOEIPUFMTUZMFTFSWJDF BREAKABLE IL A AV Visit www.wardsidehouse.com or come and see it for yourself.

$BMM.BSKPSJF#VSUPO01764 681 275, FNBJMcare@wardsidehouse.comPSXSJUFUP Wardside House, Muthill, Crieff, Perthshire PH5 2AS.

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20/12/2013 10:57:31


HOTELS & BREAKS

Station Hotel Portsoy

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The warmest of welcomes awaits you!

Great Location on the Moray Firth Coast Ideal for walking, golfing, whisky trail Great Value Short Breaks always available A 3 Star Visit Scotland Hotel Tel: 01261 842327 www.stationhotelportsoy.co.uk

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Relax in the comfort & luxury of The Royal…

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Loch Lomond Premier Self Catering

• enjoy splendid food & fine wines • just over an hours drive from Edinburgh and Glasgow

• Selection of 8 cottages • Hot tubs & sauna • Wood burning stoves • Short breaks • Dogs welcome • Mention Scottish Field for 20% discount

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR LATEST OFFERS - JOIN OUR EMAIL NEWSLETTER

Follow us on Facebook

Call 01389 710000

The Royal Hotel – Comrie, Perthshire Telephone 01764 679200 www.royalhotel.co.uk 8

www.loch-lomond-accommodation.co.uk 9

The Parklands Hotel This Winter enjoy Perfect Perth with a stay at the award winning Parklands Hotel a contemporary hotel in town with great food and personal service. Enjoy a Winter break from just £72.50 per night, for Dinner, Bed and Breakfast.

Based on 2 people sharing for a minimum of 2 nights. Quote Scottish Field when booking.

2 St Leonard’s Bank, Perth Tel: 01738 622 451

Tel: 01738 622451 www.theparklandshotel.com

THE BEST ACCOMMODATION, GOOD FOOD AND UNOBTRUSIVE FRIENDLY SERVICE The Inn at John O’Groats now open for a stunning holiday in the North Highlands

Choose with confidence from 96 of Scotland’s Best 4&5 Star B&Bs. For brochure:

Brilliant opening offers available – check now: +44(0)845 163 9177 www.naturalretreats.com – info@naturalretreats.com

01835 870281 (UK only) outdoor@scotlandsbest.co.uk www.outdoor.scotlandsbest.com WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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02 EDINBURGH ZOO CENTENARY GALA DINNER held at the National Museum of Scotland, in the presence of The Princess Royal. 01 Gillian Wishart, Gillian de Felice (holding Delores the bearded dragon), George and Carol Brechin 02 Roger Wheater, Linda Mitchell, Christine Patch, Kevin Patch, Tom Mitchell 03 Elaine and Steve Cotton, Marge and Ken Dalton 04 Diane West, Rt Hon Donald Wilson, Lord Provost of the City of Edinburgh, Elaine Brand, the Lady Provost 05 Chris West, Barbara Smith 06 Rt Hon Donald Wilson with The Princess Royal 07 Colin and Moira Galbraith, Jeremy Peat IMAGES IVON BARTHOLOMEW

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23/12/2013 16:30:50


01

02 ABERFELDY BALL held at Blair Castle 01 Allie and Dave McLean dancing the Foursome Reel 02 Calum and Nicky McDiarmid, Krista and Bruce Strickland, Mary-Ann and Ali Irvine, Mike and Kate McDiarmid 03 Helen Abram, Willie and Barbara Biggart, John and Kate Coaton 04 Dancing 05 Colin and Iona Smith, Mike Abram, Allie and Dave McLean 06 Dancing the Circassian Circle 07 Piping in the dancers IMAGES ANGUS BLACKBURN

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CHARITY FASHION SHOW IN AID OF POPPY SCOTLAND held at the Royal Scots Club, Edinburgh 01 Christina Sives, Linda Sives, Flora MacDonald 02 Alison Michell, Karen Bartlett, Susannah Harvey 03 Jean Smith, Wendy Petrie, Kate Clegg, Jill Russell 04 Kirsty Bailey, Alix Davis 05 Ayesha Lonley, Susan Reid, Janet Grant, Lcpl James, Lpcl Chapman Allan, Lcpl Lothian, Cpl MacDonald 06 Anne Jeffrey, Mary Young 07 Moira Barrie, Judy Hutchison, Shirley Burnett, Gayle Bruce IMAGES ANGUS BLACKBURN

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23/12/2013 16:32:23


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02 71ST ANNUAL DINNER OF THE CONSULAR CORPS IN EDINBURGH AND LEITH held in the Playfair Library, Old College, University of Edinburgh 01 Mona Shea, Hans Waltl 02 Robin Harper, Louise Gardiner, Ian Gardiner 03 Consul-General Dr Paul Millar, James Hall 04 Sir Timothy Noble, Consul Ian Wittet 05 Paola Bassotti, Consul-General Mauro Carfagnini 06 David Leslie, Lady Noble 07 Dr Stephen Watt, Karen Watt, Julie and Stuart Boulton

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THE SCOTTISH FIELD WHISKY AWARDS 2013 were presented to all the winners 01 Neal Corbett, Distillery Manager and Julian Holder, Aberlour 02 Flora Grant and Marion MacKinnon from the Ardshiel Hotel with Janice Johnston, Scottish Field Whisky Project Manager 03 Alison Hope and Belen Catalan from Deanston 04 Douglas Wood, Woodwinters Wines and Whiskies 05 Katie Megson, Maxxium 06 Jan-Willem Damen, Operations Manager, SMWS Venues UK 07 Alison Milne, GlenDronach and Alan McConnochie, Distillery Manager 08 Mark Connelly, Whisky Judge of the Year

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23/12/2013 16:33:57


01

02 LONDON SCOTTISH FC ST ANDREWS DAY DINNER held at the Savoy, London

03 BREL held a re-launch party at their premises in Glasgow

01 Francis Kennedy-Clark Junior, Hannah Heerema, Francis Clark 02 Judy Murray, Kelly Cates, Sophie Kennedy-Clark 03 Fiona Kennedy, Alex McLeish, Kenny Baillie 04 Sir David Reid, Elizabeth Offord

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IMAGES RAY WILLMOTT

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01 Carrie McLintock, Oliver Meiling, Katie Renton 02 Gordon and Fionnuala Clellend, Lorna and Ian McArthur 03 Dave Paterson, Nicole Wilson, Ally Mackay, Blair McTague 04 Claire Hillix, Simon Cameron, Aileen Brown

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cover TOcover WORDS MORAG BOOTLAND

Blossom: What Scotland Needs to Flourish BY LESLEY RIDDOCH LUATH PRESS, PAPERBACK £11.99

 Had I paid for this book, it would have been the best £11.99 I had ever spent. It seems that everywhere you go, the referendum debate looms large. Making a decision that will have such a significant effect on the future of the country that you live in and love is a daunting prospect and for many, the weight that this vote carries is a huge responsibility. Lesley Riddoch is an experienced and award-winning journalist and writer. She has been living in, observing and writing about Scotland for many years and her knowledge and passion for the country is certainly evident here. The beauty of this book is the range of subjects that Riddoch covers. Rather

‘Throughout Blossom, Riddoch’s love of and belief in the Scottish people, from the inner cities to the most wild and rural areas shines bright through the narrative’ than focusing on a purely political perspective, she looks at the geography, class structure, psychology, land-ownership, health, housing and language of Scotland in order to draw some amazingly accurate insights into the Scots people and their character and culture. The key theme of this work is that in order to be a truly free country, the Scots need to take responsibility and rise to the challenge that independence would set, or indeed the problems that they should address if Scotland remains part of the Union. Riddoch sets out the case that independence is the only way that Scotland can indeed blossom as a nation. Although the referendum will certainly be a milestone in the history of Scotland, it is almost irrelevant if the Scots people don’t take up the reins and get involved in their own future. The examples of community spirit and local heroes that Riddoch has not only researched, but in some cases experienced first-hand are inspiring. Particularly the chapter on the Isle of Eigg Trust, where the islanders came together to move away from the substandard governance that blighted their community. Throughout Blossom, Riddoch’s love of and belief in the Scottish people, from the povertystricken inner cities to the most wild and rural areas shines bright through the narrative. As much as the content is thought-provoking for some, there will be those who are unhappy with its bold assertions. The inequalities faced by the average Scot, the country’s long-term and exceedingly poor health record as well as the age-old question of why so much of Scotland is owned by so few are always contentious issues, but when tackled with such aplomb it would be difficult to find an argument that would stand up. The beauty of this book is that not only does it flag up the problems with Scotland as a country, it also lays out what we the people need to do to solve them. It is a call to arms and all the encouragement that we should need to, in the words of JFK, ‘ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country.’

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SCOTTISH HISTORY IN VERSE BY LOUIS STOTT MAINSTREAM, HARDBACK

£14.99

 An anthology of poetry charting Scotland’s journey through the high and low points of its history using the medium of verse. This unique poetic saunter through the centuries also includes a useful little explanation of the background and the events that led to the penning of each poem. This book is the perfect way to engage anyone who prefers to spend time perusing the creative talent of years gone by than trawling through the hard and at times downright dull facts that make up your average history book.

A SONG FOR THE DYING BY STUART MACBRIDE HARPER COLLINS, PAPERBACK

£16.99



Firstly, if you suffer from a delicate or nervous disposition, this is certainly not the book for you. MacBride is a renowned writer of crime fiction and this is the second book starring Detective Inspector Ash Henderson. Fans of tartan noir will devour this fast-paced and in places shocking criminal thriller, but it’s graphic and sometimes gory descriptions of the terrible crimes committed are sure to be a step too far for many and often seem unnecessary to the plot. That said, this is still a great story with some well thought out plot lines and really well-developed characters .

FIELDONLINE

TO COMMENT VISIT THE LINK TO FACEBOOK OR TWITTER AT WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

23/12/2013 17:39:41


A Scottish perspective on the world of publishing, plus brilliant books for you to buy SHOT THROUGH THE HEART BY ED JAMES SELF PUBLISHED, PAPERBACK £8.99



GATHERING STORM BY MAGGIE CRAIG ALLIGIN BOOKS, PAPERBACK £7.99

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I have always been a fan of the vampire genre, but this is a first for me. A tale of blood sucking horror set in the Highlands of Scotland. Despite the odd juxtaposition of genres, this is an enjoyable tale that I found difficult to put down. The lead character, Mark Campbell is well developed and believably flawed while the story line is suitably spooky.

I was put off by the jacket of this book, but in this case the old adage rings true. What may at first glance appear to be a romantic novel is actually a tale full of crime, politics and intrigue, set against the backdrop of Edinburgh in the 1740s. Yes, there is a romantic element but the story will hold the interest of anyone with an interest in Jacobite history or old Edinburgh.

NOR WILL HE SLEEP BY DAVID ASHTON POLYGON, PAPERBACK £7.99

THE BEST OF ENEMIES: GERMANS AGAINST JACOBITES, 1746 BY CHRISTOPHER DUFFY BITTER BOOKS, HARDBACK

 The fourth instalment of the Inspector McLevy series, adapted from the BBC Radio 4 series. This is an accomplished murder mystery which effortlessly paints a vivid picture of the dark and often savage streets of Edinburgh in 1887. This story buzzes with a fascinating array of dastardly and heroic characters. COUNTRY HOUSE CAMERAS BY CHRISTOPHER SIMON SYKES STACEY INTERNATIONAL, HARDBACK

£29.99

 A stunning glimpse into how the other half used to live. This collection of photographs taken at some of Britain’s grandest houses provides a fascinating insight into the advent of family photography. They are highly personal and revealing of a long gone but never to be forgotten way of life.

£18



A new perspective on Culloden detailing The Hessians role in the battle. This book focuses on the interesting characters leading both sides, providing information on the men themselves as well as events on the run up to the battle and its aftermath. A refreshingly new take on a well documented subject. PORTOBELLO AND THE GREAT WAR BY ARCHIE FOLEY & MARGARET MUNRO AMBERLEY, PAPERBACK

£12.99

 A charming book packed with letters, photographs and first-hand diary accounts of the residents of Portobello during the great war. The area is most famous for being the capital’s seaside resort and this new perspective on the town is sure to be of interest to anyone who enjoyed holidaying there.

The Great Tapestry of Scotland

BY ALISTAIR MOFFAT BIRLINN, HARDBACK £30



This attractive book celebrates the creation of The Great Tapestry of Scotland, an outstanding piece of art bringing together over a thousand stitchers from across the country. The tapestry itself is the longest in the world, consisting of 165 panels, each illustrating a momentous event in the history of the nation. The beauty of this guidebook lies in the ample space devoted to illustrating each panel of the tapestry, allowing the reader to study the detail in the crafting of each story at their leisure. Each panel comes with a concise but informative explanation of the events that inspired it. A fantastic addition to a viewing of the tapestry or equally a great way to view this fascinating work for those who can’t make it along to see the real thing.

For the best Scottish books buy

We have teamed up with the Watermill Book Shop in Aberfeldy to launch the Scottish Field Book Club. By simply calling 01887 822896 readers can now order any of the books that appear this month in Cover to Cover, plus many of the most popular books that have been reviewed here over the years. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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PUZZLEpages WIN A HAMPER FROM Across INVERAWE SMOKEHOUSES

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Welcome to 1ourSurly Scottish which will really artField cultcrossword about fabrication (12) test your brain power and general knowledge. 10 Greed of a very small one hundred in age So set pen to paper, fill in the blanks back (7) and be in with a chance of winning11 a fabulous Later today negative backing in constricted ‘Taste of the Smokery’ (7) to the value of 12prize, Written work in notes, say (5) £50 for 1st £30 for 2nd 13 prize Likeand a gush, tho different (2,6) £20 for 3rd prize.

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CROSSWORD NO 2 Mr/Mrs/Miss ___________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Postcode _________________Tel __________________________ To enter: Send your completed crossword to Scottish Field, Crossword No 2, Fettes Park, 496 Ferry Road, Edinburgh EH5 2DL, to reach us no later than 28 FEBRUARY 2014.

ANSWERS TO DECEMBER CROSSWORD (NO 12) Across: 7 Yugoslav, 9 Exotic, 10 Okay, 11 Tachometer, 12 Tomato, 14 Once-over, 15 Self-assertion, 17 Beriberi, 19 Goggle, 21 Mechanical, 22 Have, 23 Camera, 24 Entirely. Down: 1 Cuckoo, 2 Holy, 3 Plethora, 4 Heroic, 5 Homecoming, 6 Nineteen, 8 Vicious circle, 13 All-nighter, 15 Skeletal, 16 Regulate, 18 Ennead, 20 Lively, 22 Hart.

8 Tease DECEMBER CROSSWORD WINNERS out (eke) thick meaty chop (4,3,6) 1ST: FIONA SAMSON, EDINBURGH 2ND: ALISON REDPATH, ABERDEEN 3RD: PADDY MORRIS, EAST LOTHIAN

9 Nevertheless do it together (2,3,4,4)

14 Funny guy has short operation some time, this story has a happy ending (5,5)

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tonics change (8) Shetland, is This tiny island,Silver lying half-way between skeptic Orkney and famous for 19 birds, knitwear and historic Browning light (7) shipwrecks. The islanders mostly live in the low-lying southern part of the island. The northern 21 rough Not in shed,and is rocky rejected (7) rising to the 217 part is largely grazing moorland, metre Ward23 Hill. Copious enlarger the French said (5) 25 Way off Anglo-French aside (4)

ANSWER: FAIR ISLE

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Put your feet up, grab a cup of coffee and pit your wits against our puzzles and quizzes

What year is it?

General knowledge

USE THE CLUES AND PICTURES TO HELP GUESS THE YEAR.

1. Edinburgh was the first city in the world with its own fire

brigade, true or false?

1. This year marked the

Queen’s Silver Jubilee.

2. When was the Bank of Scotland founded?

2. Countryfile and The

3. In what year did the Forth Railway Bridge open?

One Show presenter Matt Baker is born.

4. If you are described as Sonsie, what are you? 5. Who won the 200m and 400m Freestyle swimming at the

3. Groucho Marx dies at

2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne?

the age of 86. 4. Red Rum wins a record

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6. How many Corbetts are there in Scotland?

third Grand National at Aintree Racecourse.

7. How old was Robert Louis Stevenson when he died? 8. Who is the founder of modern Geology?

5. Wings held the

9. Who won the 2013 Scottish Grand National?

Christmas No.1 slot with Mull of Kintyre.

10. What is the shortest river in Scotland?

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ANSWER: 1977

ENTER DIGITS FROM 1 TO 9 INTO THE BLANK SPACES. EVERY ROW MUST CONTAIN ONE OF EACH DIGIT. SO MUST EVERY COLUMN, AS MUST EVERY 3X3 SQUARE. LAST MONTH’S SOLUTION IS SHOWN RIGHT.

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WORD SEARCH: PENINSULA How many English words can you make from the word above? We can find 232. Try to find as many as possible. Words must be at least three letters. 100 WORDS: GOOD, 150 WORDS: EXCELLENT, 200 WORDS OR MORE: YOU ARE A GENIUS

TERMS & CONDITIONS

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ANSWERS 1. True, in 1824 2. 1695 3. 1890 4. attractively plump and comely 5. Robbie Renwick 6. 221 7. 44 8. James Hutton 9. Godsmejudge 10. River Morar (500m)

SUDOKU DIFFICULTY: HARD

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Your attention is drawn to the following terms and conditions which relate to the placing of advertisements in all publications owned by Wyvex Media Ltd. Parties to this agreement are the Publisher, Wyvex Media Ltd. on the one part and the Advertiser on the other part. The Publisher publishes newspapers, magazines, books and provides advertising space therein or provides for the delivery of advertising materials to the public within these publications. 01 Advertising copy shall be legal, decent, honest and truthful and comply with the British Code of Advertising Practice and all other codes. 02 The Publisher does not guarantee the insertion of any particular advertisement. 03 The Publisher reserves the right to cancel or alter the advertisement by giving reasonable notice. 04 An order for an advertisement shall be deemed to be made on acceptance of the advertisers’ order by the Publisher whether placed by telephone, mail, fax, email or in person. 05 Cancellations or postponements of orders must be notified in writing and cannot be accepted later than 30 days prior to the scheduled publication date. Cancellations not in accordance with these terms will be subject to payment of the full cost of the advert. Advertisments that are part of an agreed discounted campaign or series and have appeared prior to cancellation will be re-charged at full rate. 6 The parties submit to the jurisdiction of the Scottish Courts and Scots Law. In the event of any dispute or action by the Publisher to recover payment from an advertiser, it is agreed that matters will be settled in the Oban, Argyll Sheriff Court or such other Court as the Publisher may choose. 07 The Publisher shall not be liable for any loss or damage occasioned by any total or partial failure (however caused) of publication or distribution of any newspaper or edition in which any advertisement is scheduled to appear. In the event of any error, misprint or omission in the printing of an advertisement or part of an advertisement, the Publisher will either re-insert the advertisement or relevant part of the advertisement, as the case may be, or make reasonable refund or adjustment to the cost. No re-insertion, refund or adjustment will be made where the error, misprint or omission does not materially detract from the advertisement. 08 Errors must be notified to the Publisher in writing within fourteen days of publication. In no circumstances shall the total liability of the Publisher for any error, misprint or omission exceed the amount of a full refund of any price paid to the Publisher for the particular advertisement in connection with which liability arose or the cost of a further or corrective advertisement of a type and standard reasonably comparable to that in connection with which liability arose. 09 The Advertiser/Advertising Agency agrees to indemnify the Publisher in respect of all costs, damages or other charges falling upon the publication as the result of legal actions or threatened legal actions arising from the publication of the advertisement in any one or more of a series of advertisements published in accordance with copy instructions supplied to the publication in pursuance of the Advertiser/ Advertising Agency order. 10 Adverts under the value of £75 must be paid on acceptance of order by the Publisher. All advertising on a credit basis must be agreed with the Publisher in advance. 11 Payment of any invoice raised by the Publisher will be due 15 days from the date of invoice or as otherwise directed on the invoice. In the event of non-payment the Publisher may charge late payment interest at a rate of 2% and this is chargeable on a daily basis from the due date until the bill is paid. In addition the Publisher may charge a late payment levy of £10 as an administration fee. In the event of late payment the Publisher reserves the right to disallow any discounts given and to raise an additional invoice for the discount which will be treated as though it has been raised with the original invoice. 12 A request to insert an advertisement assumes acceptance of our conditions. Photographs etc. must be accompanied by a SAE. Although every care will be taken, Scottish Field is not responsible for loss, damage or any other injury as to material provided.

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Classifieds

TO ADVERTISE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING CALL 0131 551 1000 OR EMAIL ADVERTS@SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK FOR THE HOME

Ian Merriman AFFORDABLE

Hand painted kitchens and furniture

Interiors & lifestyle

WOOD BURNING STOVES

• Trading online since 2002 • Specialising in woodburning Stoves • Multi Fuel Stoves • Fireplace & Hearth products • Online discount distribution delivered anywhere in the UK

Don’t worry about the inconvenience or expense of replacing your old kitchen units when you can have them handpainted in a colour mixed especially for you or with a special paint effect. You could have a beautiful new look to your kitchen with very little disruption. The same applies to bedrooms and freestanding furniture. For a free no obligation quote contact Ian on 0131 478 7339 Website: www.kitchenspainted.com

WANTED

Woodburning Stoves Ltd, Waterlands, Fenwick Road KA3 5JE T. 01560 483 966

ACCOMMODATION

www.woodburningstoveslimited.com

WEIROCH LODGE SPEYSIDE

ANTIQUES AND RESTORATION

Perry-Hall Antiques

We offer for sale a fine selection of Antique, Estate, Vintage and preowned Diamonds, Gold and Silver Jewellery, and small Silver collectables.

Antique 15ct Gold Pink Tourmaline & Seed Pearls Brooch

GARDENS

POTTERY

Wonderful gift for the person who has everything; 6,7,8 May, August, October 2014, fun and interactive. Make your house special- buy an antique this Christmas! A wonderful antique can transform a room, there has never been a better time to buy. Visit our showroom or www.gowantiques.com 01307 465 342

CLASSIC CARS

Stunning Highland retreat, sleeps 6-8 Fully inclusive or self/catering Sporting breaks arranged · Ideal family gatherings

www.weiroch.co.uk 01807 500797

�N���U�S & C�U�S�S

ELECTRIC BIKES

East Market Street, Lauder TD2 6SX 07534175091 powdergrey@btinternet.com www.powdergrey.blogspot.co.uk

FASHION SEFTOR FURS

FOLLOW SCOTTISH FIELD ON

FACEBOOK & TWITTER

RETIRING JANUARY 2015 Cleaning, repairing, remodelling, storing and making to order. A retiral sale is now on of good quality, second-hand jackets, gilets, hats etc. 17 Thirlestane Lane, Edinburgh EH9 1AJ Tel: 0131 447 6040 (for appointment)

CHAUFFEUR SERVICE www.easygoebikes.com Mill Place Business Units, Linlithgow, EH49 7TL

01506 237 162

info@easygoebikes.com

To advertise IN THE CLASSIFIED SECTION OF SCOTTISH FIELD CALL 0131 551 1000 OR EMAIL

ADVERTS@SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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Classic and prestige cars for appreciation and use. Viewing in East Lothian by appointment 077309 21769/077635 89680 www.a1classiccars.co.uk

WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

20/12/2013 15:50:48


OFFERS&competitions

To enter, send separate entries (in the same envelope) with your name, address, telephone number and email address to Scottish Field Competitions, Fettes Park, 496 Ferry Road, Edinburgh EH5 2DL or enter at www.scottishfield.co.uk Closing date, unless otherwise stated, is 28 February 2014.

WIN

A FABULOUS 2 NIGHT BREAK AT NIRA CALEDONIA, WORTH £670

Located on the cobbled streets of Edinburgh’s New Town, this romantic boutique property combines the luxury of a top fivestar hotel with the intimacy and peace of a cosy townhouse. Amid the plush pelmets, rich textures and original cornices you’ll find flat-screen televisions, Nespresso coffee machines, complimentary Wi-Fi and iPod docking stations. You’ll find warm, heartfelt service and a cool, quirky style. In Blackwood’s Bar &

Grill, the Josper chargrill oven cooks at ultra-high temperatures to retain food’s natural moisture and flavour. Steaks are charred and crusty on the outside yet juicily tender inside and with over 25 Scotch whisky blends and single malts, the bar also focuses on local flavours. The prize includes 2 nights accommodation in an executive double room, full Scottish breakfast each morning plus 3-course dinner on one night in Blackwood’s Restaurant.

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN, just answer the following question: what is the name of the restaurant at Nira Caledonia? Terms & conditions: Prize based on two adults sharing a double room and includes 2 nights’ bed and full Scottish breakfast. Dinner on one night from our 3-course set menu in Blackwood’s Bar & Grill. Any drinks with dinner or additional spend should be settled on departure. Accommodation is offered subject to availability and prize must be taken before 20 July 2014. Prize is non-transferable and valid for new bookings only. No cash alternative will be offered.

READER OFFER

7 DAYS IN SCOTLAND: ROE DEER AND RECIPES This superb book recalls seven days spent deer stalking in the Scottish highlands and lowlands, and features mouth-watering roe deer recipes and stunning photography. Scottish Field readers can order a copy of this beautiful book up until 28 February for just £15 plus P&P (normally £25 + P&P).

TO ORDER YOUR COPY COPY, TELEPHONE 01382 827088 AND QUOTE ‘SCOTTISH FIELD’ Entrants must be 18 or over. Employees of Scottish Field, the competition promoters, and their direct families are ineligible to enter. No purchase necessary. The winner will be first correct entry drawn after closing date. No cash alternative is available. The winner will be informed by telephone or email. Promoter reserves the right to request post publicity. Usual Scottish Field rules apply. WWW.SCOTTISHFIELD.CO.UK

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23/12/2013 17:51:54


A LADY AT LEISURE

A lady at leisure When your dog starts eating his way through your wardrobe, taking nibbles out of all your best clothes, it’s time for drastic action: point him towards your husband’s jumpers instead words fiona armstrong illustration bob dewar

‘He met his match when he once tried to cram a

hedgehog

between his jaws, but most things are fair game for this canine crook’

I

have to admit it, Barra has taste. First it was my furry slippers. Then it was my velvet hat – my favourite, of course. And now it’s the luxury cashmere top I’d just treated myself to for Christmas. Having nice things isn’t always appreciated by the chief ’s dog. Barra, a cocker spaniel, is black and white and adorable-looking, but he likes to carry things around in his mouth. And once they’re in there, well, you’ve just got to have a chew, haven’t you? As a puppy he made swift work of destroying things, including my mother’s best woollined boots. On one visit, after waxing lyrical about how cosy they were in winter, and how she’d never known a better pair, she made the mistake of leaving them on the kitchen floor. We returned from the garden to find the place looking like someone had been shearing sheep. Try explaining to a non-doggie person that he didn’t really mean it. As the years went by we thought he’d grow out of it. He didn’t, despite our trying all sorts of wheezes to wean him off his horrible habit. Buying soft toys does help a bit, but they last two minutes frankly, and can cost almost as much as the cashmere. Actually this lift­ing, licking, chewing lark is getting worse: he’s now pulling clothes from

coat hangers and leaping up to see what can be snaffled from worktops. It might be a tea towel, a cushion or a pair of gloves. He has even been spotted with my leather-clad kindle in his slobbery chops. He met his match when he once tried to cram a hedgehog between his jaws, but most things are fair game for this canine crook. And so I enter the kitchen at breakfast time in a fury: ‘Just look what your dog has done to my lovely new jersey!’ The chief barely looks up from his porridge and paper. He mutters some­ thing mildly unsympathetic about not leaving it on a chair, and looks down again. ‘Well, you’ll just have to buy me a new one!’ I say crossly, and stomp out, feeling like a harridan. It reminds me of the joke that was told as I prepared to speak at the annual dinner of the male-only Dundee Angling Club. As from last October I have had the honour of being the only woman ever to address them in their 151year history, and the president introduced me thus: ‘Gentlemen, please welcome broadcaster and writer Fiona Armstrong. Fiona travels all over the world in her job and has just returned from making a film in America. ‘While she was there, she visited an Indian reserve, where she met a handsome Indian chief in buffalo hide and feathers. By his side was the most beautiful Indian squaw, with long bronzed limbs and dark plaited hair. “Oh, who is that lovely lady?” Fiona enquired of her host. “That lady is my wife,” the chief said proudly. She’s delightful, Fiona thought, and wondered what she was called. The chief must have been reading her mind, because he laughed and said. “Oh, she has a very good name. My wife, she is called Three Horses.” I’ve never heard that one before, thought Fiona, I wonder where that comes from. “She gets that name,” the chief continued, because she always goes ‘nag, nag, nag”.’ So my New Year resolution is to stop carping. Live and let live. But with the MacGregor’s ancient and much-loved Aran jersey the latest Barra casualty, I think there may be a tightening up of dog monitoring in this house.

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23/12/2013 17:26:17


GOES WHERE YOU GET

5 BARS ON

GATES.

NOT MOBILES.

5 YEAR

WARRANTY †

THE ALL NEW FORESTER.

Out here, the fun starts where the road ends. That’s why you need a car that’s at home in the countryside, not just visiting. The all new Subaru Forester was built for rural life. Symmetrical all-wheel drive sticks to the road, even where there isn’t one. And increased space means it handles luggage just as easily. For a car that gets the best reception in the countryside, visit Subaru.co.uk

Official fuel consumption figures for the new Subaru Forester range in mpg (l/100km): Urban from 25.2 (11.2) to 40.4 (7.0). Extra Urban from 40.4 (7.0) to 57.6 (4.9). Combined from 33.2 (8.5) to 49.6 (5.7). Official CO2 emissions from 197 to 150 (g/km). MPG figures are official EU test figures for comparative purposes and may not reflect real driving results. †For built-in peace of mind, every vehicle marketed by Subaru (UK) Ltd is covered by a 5 Year/100,000 mile (whichever is sooner) Limited Warranty.

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06/01/2014 09:21:49 16/10/2013 09:44


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06/01/2014 09:22:31

Scottish Field magazine February 2014  
Scottish Field magazine February 2014  
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