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WEST OAKLAND’S NEWSWEEKLY www.spinalcolumnonline.com

12/7/11

WATERFORD • UNION LAKE • WHITE LAKE • HIGHLAND • MILFORD • WIXOM WALLED LAKE • WOLVERINE LAKE • COMMERCE • ORCHARD LAKE • WEST BLOOMFIELD

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SHARING THE LIGHT Chabad Jewish Center to celebrate 10 years of programming - pg. 3

CAR WARS: A NEW HOPE? Ford Wixom plant eyed by Baltimore, MD. lithium battery company - pg. 3

A CASUALTY OF THE TIMES Waterford library closed Fridays indefinitely due to budget strains - pg. 17

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WEST OAKLAND COUNTY

DECEMBER 7, 2011

SHOP LOCAL • THINK LOCAL • LIVE LOCAL

Dobski’s Restaurant, located at 6565 Cooley Lake Road in Waterford Township, has been named metro Detroit’s “Best Polish Restaurant” in the Click on Detroit “4 The Best Contest.” The award was announced during Thanksgiving Day coverage on WDIVChannel 4. Local viewers were asked to vote in different categories for their favorite places. Go to the website at www.clickondetroit.com to view all the winners. For more information about Dobski’s Restaurant, a Union Lake institution for decades, visit the website at www.dobski.com. • Williams Lake Church of the Nazarene is holding a Holiday Market Place ladies shopping event with food, music, and door prizes, from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Dec.16. The church is located at 2840 Airport Road in Waterford Township. Call 248-673-5911 for more information on the event. ❏

That’s what HE said: "People could say we don't like the way he parts his hair and the Michigan Constitution trusts us enough to know that we won't recall somebody on that basis." — State Sen. David Robertson (RWaterford) commenting on the recall process in Michigan following an effort by a pair of state Senate Republicans to get proposed changes to the rules on the Feb. 28, 2012 ballot.

Jewish center celebrating its 10th anniversary By Tim Dmoch editor

The Chabad Jewish Center of Commerce/Walled Lake is celebrating its 10th anniversary with a “Share the Light” dinner on Sunday, Dec. 11, at the Steinway Piano Gallery in Commerce Township, located at 2700 E. West Maple Road. There will be a 5:30 p.m. reception followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. The event includes guest speaker Rabbi Zushe Greenberg and a performance by pianist Cliff Monear. The Celebration of Community will be honoring several couples for their dedication and community work, including Diana and Sy Freilich; Katrina and Arthur Gluzman; Yasmine and Arkan Jonna; Dr. Jay and Renee Kozlowski; Naomi and Vadim Matatov; Rusty and Stephen Rosman; and Sue and Frank Trionfi. The event will help the center raise funds for the coming year, according to Chabad Jewish Center of Commerce/Walled Lake Program Director Estie Greenberg.

Baltimore energy company eyeing Ford Wixom plant By Leslie Shepard

INSIDE Special Report . . . . . . . .8-10 County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Public Safety . . . . . . . . . . .29 Environment . . . . . . . . . .32 State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Lakes Area News . . . . . .7-17 Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-41

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The shuttered Ford Motor Co. assembly plant in Wixom has been a source of frustration over the past few years as state, county and local officials have consistently but unsuccessfully sought to transition the property into the hands of a viable business owner. Now that a pair of renewable energy companies — Xtreme Power and Clairvoyant Energy — have backed out of purchasing the property due to financial challenges, a new lithium battery developer has stepped up efforts to redevelop the property. The potential transaction has merit, according to local officials who are cautiously optimistic since talks are still

Estie (left) and Rabbi Schneor Greenberg of the Chabad Jewish Center of Commerce/Walled Lake are hosting a Dec. 11 dinner to celebrate the center’s 10th anniversary and honor several local couples for their dedication and community work on behalf of the center. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

“We provide programming throughout the year, including children’s programs, Jewish holiday programming, going to old age homes and bringing those people joy, adult education classes, and a Synagogue with services, and the funds we raise at this event will help to cover the cost of these programs,” Greenberg said.

Admission to the dinner is $100 per person or $180 per couple. Cocktail attire is requested. Over the past decade, the Chabad Jewish Center of Commerce/Walled Lake has grown because people increasingly recognize and appreciate its warmth and non-judgmental philosophy.

in the infancy stages. Townsend Energy Solutions, LLC, headquartered in Baltimore, Md., has expressed interest in the Ford property. Founded in 1975, Townsend Energy Solutions invests in real estate, energy, and sporting and manufacturing companies. Their investment holdings topped $1.5 billion in 2008, and the company is currently involved in a joint venture with Dow Kokam to produce batteries for automotive and consumer use. “As a developer they’ve had a lot of home runs and that’s what interested us,” said Wixom Mayor Kevin Hinkley. Now that Xtreme Power and Clairvoyant reneged on their commitment after almost four years, Hinkley said each business that expresses interest in the sprawling Ford property is a contender. “We’re cautious, but still taking every opportunity seriously,” Hinkley said.

In addition to Townsend, Caterpillar has expressed interest in the property. “It’s an open game now that Ford is marketing the property globally,” Hinkley said. However, talks are ensuing with Townsend as the front runner. “Townsend is still in talking stages with Ford Land on whether to lease or buy a portion or all of the property,” said City Manager Mike Dornan. “They are also talking about demolishing the plant and starting new.” To sweeten the deal, the state Senate Economic Development Committee convened on Thursday, Dec. 1 and unanimously supported legislation to amend the state’s battery tax credit available under the Michigan Business Tax Act so the company can move forward and renovate the shuttered property. “We would like to thank state Sen. Mike Kowall (R-Commerce, Highland,

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51st YEAR OF PUBLICATION Waterford • White Lake • Highland • Milford Commerce • Wolverine • Walled Lake • Wixom West Bloomfield • Orchard Lake • Union Lake PUBLISHER / PRESIDENT: Susan Fancy BUSINESS MANAGER: Dennis Boggs EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: Carol Barr EDITOR: Tim Dmoch

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Staff Writers: Angela Niemi, Leslie Shepard, Michael Shelton Contributing Writers: Mike Scott, Mark Stowers Staff Photographer: Amy K. Lockard ADVERTISING SALES: Account Representatives: Cindie Audia, Denise Engelberts, Linda Stickney, Laurie Wasker Sales Assistant/Proofing: Karen Whikehart PHONE SALES MANAGER: Lori Snyder Account Representatives: Rhonda Libkuman, Cindy Stawick, Leslie Timko GRAPHICS: Denise Jungjohan, Marcia Reimer, Stacie Sabady IT MANAGER: Joel Stickney CIRCULATION: Dan Griffin ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE MANAGER: Carolyn Petherbridge Assistant: Mable McCullough PRESS RELEASES: Deadline 10 a.m. Thursday. Mail to P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387-0014. Fax 248.360.1220 or bring to office. After-hours drop box. NEWS TIPS: Post at our website MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: 52 issues - $45 per year.

www.spinalcolumnonline.com OFFICES AT: 7196 Cooley Lake Road, Waterford, MI 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday 248.360.SELL (7355) / 248.360.NEWS (6397) FAX 24/7: 248.360.1220 MAIL ADDRESS: P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387 SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY OAKLAND LAKEFRONT OAKLAND HOMES MONTHLYADVERTISER WEST OAKLAND DIRECTORY Member of National Newspaper Association Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce Waterford Chamber of Commerce

The Spinal Column Newsweekly, all rights are reserved. No portion, whole or part, may be reproduced without prior permission. The names Spinal Column, Newsweekly, SportsWeekly, and West Oakland are protected property. The Spinal Column Newsweekly is co-owned by Steven and Susan Fancy, brother and sister; son and daughter of James Fancy, publisher from 1969-2011.

Gribbell’s O-scale model train is the largest in the world

P

aul Gribbell has been interested in trains since he was a child. With a collection spanning over three decades, Gribbell has built the world’s largest O-scale model railroad in Commerce Township. The exhibit features approximately 9,000 feet of track and somewhere between 60 and 80 trains. Gribbell, a former quality control manager at Ford Motor Co. for over 30 years, has opened his collection to the public as he and volunteers continue to expand the display. The exhibit is open Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located at 8275 Cooley Lake Road in Commerce Township. Please explain what first inspired your interest in trains. When did you start collecting O-scale model trains? How does O-scale model differ from other scale models? Why did you choose O-scale? PG: My interest in trains started when I was a kid. Back in the 1940s, my dad built the Lionel layout in my bedroom. My sister and I shared a bedroom. We had about a 4-by-8 Lionel layout right in our bedroom. And of course back in those days, trains were adventurous. It was how you traveled. They didn’t have commercial airplanes. My grandfather would come visit once or twice a year from California, and he would take me for a ride, and we’d go watch trains somewhere, see trains in the local area. And I rode them of course when we traveled. We went out to California a couple times. We always enjoyed them, and it has always been a part of my life, the trains and model trains. O-scale model trains I started collecting in 1978 when I joined the Detroit Model Railroad Club up in Holly. Prior to that when I was young, I had Lionel trains and then I went to HO (scale trains) for 20 or 25 years. And then I switched to O-scale in 1978. So I’ve been collecting O-scale for 33 years now. Basically, O-scale is one of the original ones, and Lionel started out in 1903 or 1901 — back around in the 1900s. And that was a pretty — “standard” is not the right word. They had a standard gauge that was bigger, but a lot of things were made in O-scale, which is one-quarter inch equals a foot. And then a lot of people didn’t like the three-rail look of the Lionel because it didn’t look realistic. So they had models built with two-rail O, but they had an outside third rail to pick up the other polarity of the

Q

electricity rather than the center rail. Now that made it look more realistic because many subways and electric kinds of elevated trains do use an outside third rail for power to this day. So that looked more realistic. That was way back in the 1930s and the 1940s. And then after the war, people started going to two rail without the third outside rail and wired it more like HO, which one rail is a plus and the other a minus and a DC power rather than an AC power like the previous train. That was a major conversion factor for even the Detroit Model Railroad Club. You have to insulate all the wheels on one side, otherwise it will

NE MINUTE

INTERVIEW

short across the track. And so that is when two-rail O really started developing as it is today and after World War II. Chi-Town Union Station is the world’s largest O-scale layout in the world. Please tell us a bit about Chi-Town Union Station and why you decided to exhibit your collection publicly. PG: I was actually going to have a private railroad at home. And my second wife died of cancer. Instead of building a big house, I decided to keep the house I have on Union Lake, but it was too small for a railroad. Then I decided I needed to find a place to build my railroad. I looked around for some houses that might have a big basement or might have a pole barn or I could build a pole barn to put the trains in. I worked with a real estate lady for a year and looked at lots of places. And

Q

we found this old grocery store that was vacant here in Commerce Township. We made an offer, and it was actually a little more reasonable than some other things I was looking at. So we bought it. At that point, I figured I had such a big place that I should open it to the public because it can help pay for it and, you know, maybe even make a business out of it and make some money. That’s how we did that. Once we got this large building, we chose the name Chi-Town because Chicago is the hub and still is the biggest hub in the country for trains. All the top name passenger trains, or most of them, came to Chicago, so that’s why we chose Chi-Town. In the old days, we have the rich and famous and movie stars that would ride the 20th Century Limited from New York to Chicago and then transfer to the Super Chief to go to Los Angeles. I have both of those trains running right now as we speak. You and a group of volunteers have been working on the exhibit for the past 12 years and have placed around 9,000 feet of track. Yet, the exhibit still has many years until it’s completed. What else do you hope to add to the exhibit and when? PG: You’re never fully done with a layout this size. The first three years I was basically working by myself. I had one friend that would come over from Mount Clemens once or twice a month as long as it wasn’t deer or fishing season. After three years it started to look a more like a model railroad and we had a couple more guys that started helping. It kept growing. Over the years, I’ve probably had about 30 guys help me. A lot of them moved away, but we still have about a dozen guys that come, most on a pretty regular basis. We are almost to 9,000 feet (of track). In the next couple years, I expect to be up to 10,000 feet, which will be basically all the track work, but there’s still more detail work that we will be adding to the scenery. Right now, it’s mostly scenics (left) — about 25 percent needs scenery, and more needs extra detail on the scenery we do have. I figure in probably 6 or 8 years it will be 85 or 90 percent done. But we never want to get done because then we have to tear down and start over. ❏

Q

By Angela Niemi

Read more of this interview at www.spinalcolumnonline.com.


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

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LAKES AREA NEWS

Ford plant ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 3

Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) for taking the charge on this,” Dornan said. If passed by the state Legislature, it would reduce the previous battery credit from $100 million to $50 million while increasing the job creation requirement by 50 percent, from 500 jobs to 750 jobs. “Townsend is a venture capitalist company that helps start-up businesses through connections, and turns over operations once the product is proven,” Dornan said. The legislation, Senate Bill (SB) 855, has also been expanded to allow for credits on battery-related components and equipment. The U.S. Department of Energy recently issued a $161 million incentive to Dow Kokam to develop battery technology. Half of Xtreme Power’s battery credits would be reassigned to Townsend, but they must be secured by Dec. 31, 2011. “If the credits are issued and not used then nothing is lost, but if used we’re talking about a substantial number of jobs,” Dornan said. “That’s what the Legislature must ask — is the venture worth approving? Otherwise, Townsend may not come to Michigan.” Townsend’s proposal calls for moving into more than 400,000 square feet of space that would be constructed between 2012-2013. A $238 million capital investment

Walled Lake nets just over $20,000 in CDBG funding By Leslie Shepard staff writer

The Walled Lake City Council has approved the allocation of federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds for 2012, with the bulk of the grant funds benefiting senior center improvements. In addition, a public hearing was scheduled for yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 after press time, to reprogram a portion of the city’s 2008 CDBG allocation. The federal CDBG program provides funds to benefit low- and

Townsend Energy Solutions, a lithium battery developer, has stepped forward as a leading candidate to occupy the shuttered Ford Motor Co. assembly plant in Wixom (above). Wixom officials have been in talks with the Baltimore, Md.-based company that is looking to move into more than 400,000 square feet of space and injecting a $238 million capital investment to develop and manufacture automotive batteries. The direct result, according to estimates from state Sen. Mike Kowall’s (R-Commerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) office, would be the employment of 875 high-tech workers in addition to the employment of another 5,600 ancillary workers. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

would be made to develop and manufacture automotive batteries. As a direct result, Townsend plans to hire 875 high-tech workers, resulting in a $30 million-plus payroll, according to data from Kowall’s office. Another 5,600 would be hired for ancillary jobs. Total tax collection by the state spanning a 10-year period would be over $66 million.

While many lithium battery manufacturers are suffering losses and market-value declines due primarily to cost and safety issues, Townsend has developed a strategy to produce relevant products to substantially reduce the price of the electric vehicle battery pack by offering up solutions based on existing technologies. The second problem facing lithium

battery manufacturers is low power density, or the measure of how quickly a car can be accelerated. Townsend apparently has improved upon technology to mitigate this concern. “Right now, electric cars are slow to get up to speed and Townsend’s product solves that,” Dornan said. ❏

moderate-income residents, renovate older housing, revitalize neighborhoods, provide human services, and rebuild community infrastructure. Projects beneficial to an individual or family are judge based on income, and projects beneficial to the community in general may only occur in census tracts which meet federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) criteria for low- and moderate-income areas. The city stands to receive $20,113 in CDBG funding for 2012, of which $11,500 will be reserved for public facilities and senior center improvements. The city of Wixom, through its senior center, continues to provide services to Walled Lake senior citizens.

The allocation will off-set the fee for services during the calendar year. On Nov. 14, the City Council appropriated $3,017 of the 2012 CDBG funding for emergency services to assist low-income, disadvantaged residents needing emergency provisions such as food, payment of utility bills, rent or mortgage payments, medical expenses and transportation needs. “We can only allocate up to 15 percent of our 2012 CDBG funds (for such purposes), so we are putting it all toward emergency services,” said Interim Deputy Treasurer Jennifer Stuart. Lastly, $5,596 will be allocated toward stormwater catch basin improvements along Maple Road to maintain the integrity of the

roadway. “HUD is very motivated to see redevelopment and renovations within a community,” Stuart said. “The Maple Road Extension is our responsibility and we thought it best to use the dollars there to mitigate deterioration of the road.” The goal is to replace between five or six Maple Road catch basins. The council was also expected to reprogram approximately $3,803 in 2008 CDBG funds to off-set the expenses for sidewalk improvements along Ladd and Maple roads. ❏

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 13


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

By Leslie Shepard staff writer

SPECIAL REPORT

F

or those curious and adventurous students willing to stretch their wings and fly far from the nest to live in the land of their choosing for a spell, a foreign exchange program is just the ticket. In the world of cultural exchange programs, learning transcends the walls of classrooms. Bilingual students don’t make the trek merely for the academics, but also for the bevy of activities and freedoms for which America is renowned. A foreign exchange adventure is enriching, and by many accounts, one of the hallmark experiences in a student’s life. By becoming immersed in another culture, each foreign exchange student gains a new perspective on life while acquiring a new language, meeting new people, and appreciating multi-cultural diversity. While students enjoy the excitement of a lengthy visit to America, the majority of families who host the foreign exchange students cherish the experience, as well. Host families choose to share their home for as little as three months, a semester or an entire school year. The visiting student is given a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to reside in an American family’s abode and reap the benefits of learning the language, customs and culture. In return, exchange students offer glimpses of their homelands to the host families for a whole new learning experience. Perhaps flying in the face of what many would expect, the number of foreign exchange students coming to the U.S. is quite disproportionate to the number of American students choosing to go abroad. “We’re really trying to boost the profile of the American student overseas,” said Youth For Understanding (YFU) Huron Valley Area Representative Anne Lehker. “There are a lot of scholarship opportunities available and various programs.” YFU provides 4-week, 6-week, and semester-long programs, in addition to gap programs, which are intended for the recently graduated high school student who delays college to spend time overseas. “We’re trying to get the word out for (not only) hosting students but (also) opportunities for our students to travel abroad,” Lehker said.

U.S. student participation in study abroad dwarfed The ASSE-International Student Exchange Program recruits students

Traversing the globe

Foreign exchange programs in W. Oakland French exchange student Laura Fazi (center) is flanked by Ally Fogarasi (left) and Tojo Fogarasi. Fazi is living with the Fogarasi family of West Bloomfield Township during her exchange student experience, which she said teaches her something new every day. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

from Europe, Asia and the Pacific, the Middle East, the Americas and South Africa every year. According to ASSE Eastern Regional Director Sandra Eisenmann, of the 1,300 foreign students who annually bid adieu to their home country to spend time in the U.S. as part of the program, only a fraction of that figure — about 10 percent, or 130 American students — opt to enroll in a foreign exchange program. “There is not as much of a demand to experience the cultural exchange for our American students,” Eisenmann said. “Foreign students want the American school spirit because it’s very different than their home countries. The students want to realize their dreams because they’ve heard so much about life here and want to experience it for themselves.” Foreign student exchange programs are regulated by the U.S. State Department, which establishes the criteria. Each host family and student must go through a rigorous screening process including a face-to-face interview and criminal background check, as well as answering questions pertaining to religious affiliation, hobbies, interests and other personal information. The paperwork can take up to six hours to complete. Students must provide for their own health insurance, expenses, and miscellaneous spending money while

residing with a host family in the United States. Host families, in exchange, are required to provide a room with a bed, three meals per day, and a caring, nurturing environment. Students are placed once a host family selects their profile from the many presented. “They are expected to open their homes and share their life, family, and culture with the student,” Eisenmann said. “Through it, we’ve heard great stories of building international connections and long-lasting friendships.” Host families receive no compensation for their commitment and many are generous. For example, several have bought webcams so visiting students can Skype with their families back home.

YFU leads the way in W. Oakland County Of the different student exchange programs nationwide, only a handful are operated as non-profit organizations. In the lakes area, YFU is the program of choice. YFU Field Director Barb Kilkka oversees between 30 and 35 volunteers, 80 exchange students and their host families. “We are the preferred agency by school districts and are truly a notfor-profit organization,” she said. A foreign exchange program is a

learning experience of a lifetime, according to Kilkka. “Ninety-percent of what these students learn is outside the classroom,” she said. “While language learning is the main goal, that’s just a smidgen of what’s learned, like personal discovery, culture, the similarities of rights and wrongs and cultural differences.” There is a consensus among host families that students change dramatically between the time they arrive and the time they depart. “We often hear the child we get in August is so different than the one we send home in June — there is a growth in confidence,” Kilkka said. “There isn’t anyone who wouldn’t say the program isn’t one their most life-changing experiences.” Most kids stay for the duration of the academic year, arriving in August and departing in June. At times agencies have been challenged to find host families who are willing to commit, so in the interim, a student may stay with a “welcome” family for the first few months. “We’re always looking for more (host) families,” Kilkka said. “A welcome family would house a student initially until we find another placement.”

Opening their homes to exchange students Walled Lake resident Lee Nuznoff said


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

‘I’ve learned how much one can actually love someone else’s kid.’ This year, there are five YFU high

school exchange students attending Walled Lake Consolidated Schools; six attending West Bloomfield Schools; one in Waterford Schools; and five attending Huron Valley Schools. West Bloomfield parent Suzanne Fogarasi has been hosting foreign exchange students for three years now. Her own parents hosted an American teen when she was a child living in Denmark. “As a result, I wanted my kids to have the same experience of having friends around the world,” Fogarasi said. Laura Fazi, the Fogarasi’s exchange student from France, said she is enjoying all the pleasures of living in America. “I discover something new everyday,” Fazi said. She added that people here have been welcoming and kind — more so than in Europe. “Even if they don’t know you, like in a store, they ask how you are doing,” Fazi said. “That’s a big difference from Europe.” She also pointed out that school in America is vastly different from school in France. “There you stay all day at school and here you stay for a shorter period of time and have time for other activities,” Fazi said. The overall experience, Fogarasi said, has been rewarding in a variety of ways. “My daughter has a sister for life and I’ve learned how much one can actually love someone else’s kid,” she said. “I’ve been taken aback by how

much you care about this person. They’re like my family. When you say goodbye it’s like saying it to my own child — that’s what surprised me more than anything.” Fazi was a bit reticent when she first arrived, but has since grown accustomed to her way of life in America. “I miss my family and friends, but I’m not really homesick and want to stay here until the end of the year,” Fazi said. “I wanted to become bilingual and discover America because in the movies it’s such a different place and I wanted to experience that.” Like many host families, Fogarasi said it’s amazing how many similarities there are between teenage girls, no matter what country they are from. “They have so many things in common,” she said. “At first they expect the grandiose of America, but when it comes down to it, teenage girls are teenage girls.” Lundgren echoes her sentiments. “They have the same concerns, joys, and sorrows as Americans — it’s all about boys and clothes at that age,” Lundgren said.

A staunch difference in American, foreign schools Commerce Township resident Kim Markowitz wasn’t ready to host a foreign exchange student this year given her rigorous schedule. “YFU kept calling us and wore us down,” Markowitz said. “At the

PAGE 9

beginning it was a timing issue, but it all came together and it’s been awesome. “ Now she’s one of the program’s greatest advocates. “You get a choice of profiles,” she said.”There were certain countries we weren’t comfortable with (hosting a student from) and we knew we didn’t want a boy because we have daughters. We let my 14-year-old pick out the profile she was most comfortable with.” Once the selection is made and confirmed, the bonding started. “The most exciting thing for these kids is to get matched to a family after waiting a year,” Markowitz said. “Once we were cleared, we received permission to e-mail Anna and within hours she was Facebook friends with our kids.” The Markowitz’s home now includes 15-year-old Anna Widdermann of Germany. “She’s brilliant,” Markowitz gushed. “It’s been great for us.” Markowitz said she had to lay down some ground rules at the onset. “Anna wanted to join every group after school, so I told her I would take her once a day up to the school — otherwise she’d need to carpool,” she said. Still, the Markowitz family has accommodated Anna’s wishes for the most part, introducing her to powderpuff football, French and German clubs, and strings class. PAGE 10 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯

Japanese exchange student Serena Moon (right) poses at the Newport Aquarium during a Thanksgiving break trip with host family members Natalie and Michelle Black of Milford. “I wanted to learn English and felt this was the best way to do so and, secondly, I like to meet many people and like to learn different cultures,” Moon said. (Photo submitted by Susan Black)

SPECIAL REPORT

he and his wife decided to open their home to Jessika Schilling of Germany once it was time for the welcome host family to fade out of the picture. “Jessika was in one of my daughter’s classes so we still had to go through the screening, but it happened a lot faster because they were frantically trying to find someone to house her,” Nuznoff said. The Nuznoffs, like many whose children are fleeing the coop to pursue their own dreams and lives, fill the void in their lives by inviting foreign exchange students into their homes. “The timing was right because (we) are close to being empty nesters now that our two older children left for college and only one is at home,” Nuznoff said. “This is a trial run for us.” Huron Valley Lakeland High School host parent Pam Barckholtz committed to the foreign exchange program for the first time this year. Philipp Schiller, a German exchange student, has helped her expand her own cultural exposure, and at the same time, has realized a dream. “We need to be aware of the global community and I wanted to promote that,” Barckholtz said. Still, she noted that the transition has been difficult for Philipp, a sophomore, in some respects. “He’s a wonderful, studious kid, but the school has not been as welcoming as it could because in many instances, school groups and teams were already formed by the time he arrived,” Barckholtz said. “He didn’t make basketball, and marching band was too expensive, but he’s on the swim and dive team and he’s never done that before.” Barckholtz has been so impressed with the foreign exchange program that she now volunteers for YFU to recruit more host families. “I would host again,” she said. “I raise my grandson also and the two of them are one year apart. They get along very well and refer to each other as brothers. It’s been very positive.” Likewise, a few years ago, West Bloomfield resident Sharon Lundgren stepped up to host a German girl who was in one of her daughter’s classes after the visiting girl’s situation didn’t work out with the initial host family. “Clara was with us for seven months and it was a wonderful experience,” Lundgren said. “It resulted in a long-life friendship — she’s coming back this spring for my daughter’s graduation from college and my daughter spent two summers with Clara’s family off the coast of Denmark. The two also traveled through the Netherlands and France together.”

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

SPECIAL REPORT ‘It takes a big leap of faith to bring someone into your home.’

Exchange students ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 9

Like most host families, reasonable chores are expected. “I have no problem handing out chores and YFU asks you to,” Markowitz said. Widdermann, a senior attending Walled Lake Northern High School, knew she wanted to come to America early on and threw caution out the door to realize her dream. “My cousin did an an exchange program and so I wanted to go,” she said. After a brief period of feeling mildly homesick, Widdermann’s life has been full and happy. “I like school and all the clubs and school spirit,” she said. According to Widdermann, in Germany and many other countries, there are no extracurricular clubs or sporting events tied to school. “After classes you just go home. We have no school clubs or school spirit. I love the football games,” Widdermann said. Some other amenities she appreciates in the U.S. are the “big back yards and the landscaping.” “I’m so happy with my family here,” she said.

YFU recruits host families via word of mouth, school and church announcements, and presentations. Area representatives are integral in making sure the student and host family are on track. “Once the student arrives here, there’s a minimum of monthly contact to make sure all is going well,” said YFU’s Lehker. “It takes a big leap of faith to bring someone into your home for the entire school year. If a problem arises, it may not be anyone’s fault — just not a good fit and we don’t want anyone to be unhappy.” Huron Valley Milford High School Principal Kevin McKenna said the infusion of culture makes for a diverse and interesting learning environment. He notes that the school has received the majority of its recent exchange students from Germany. “We receive between seven and 10 students on average every year from YFU, mostly from Germany as well as parts of Asia, but have had a few from Spain, Vietnam, and China,” he said. The main goal is to integrate the students into American life, so the focus is not specifically on academics.

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“When the students return to their home schools, their credits are not accepted,” McKenna said. “It’s a holistic growth out of culture vs. earning academic credits, per se.” High school principals primarily screen the applications, conduct visits with host families and exchange students before passing the torch onto

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Learn more or host a student Contact the following agencies if you’re interested in a foreign exchange program or hosting a student: • ASSE — 1-800-677-2773; • ISE — 1-800-766-4656; • Nacel Open Door — 248-6266641; or • Youth for Understanding USA — 248-932-0811 or 1-800-8720211, Ext. 242. ❏ high school counselors who design a curriculum and game plan tailored to the student’s needs. “We want to get them involved in something other than just academics,” McKenna said. “Many engage in leadership, yearbook, robotics and sports.” West Bloomfield High School Principal Tom Shelton limits the number of foreign exchange students to six per year. “We control the numbers in the classrooms and keep them at a manageable level,” Shelton said. “Sometime these students require special support, so we don’t want to be stretched too thin on the resources.” Shelton, who said he is a proponent of fostering the program to enrich other students, said “We enjoy each student — they bring a richness to our community.”

YFU isn’t the only player in foreign exchange game Other programs include Nacel International, a global federation of organizations, companies and representatives working together to deliver a culturally-immersive education around the world. Nacel has different programs to meet the varying desires of international students who are interested in exploring the world. For students who want a full year of study in another culture, Nacel offers academic programs in both public and private schools. For those students more inclined to participate in short-term programs, Nacel offers tutorials, home-stays and touring

programs. In addition, International Student Exchange (ISE) is a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing people of the world closer through student exchange and intercultural education. ISE has 44 fully staffed regional offices that are strategically located in the United States and cooperates with over 100 independent foreign agencies in over 45 countries around the world.

Creating global thinkers, open-minded personalities Milford resident Susan Black has opened her home twice to foreign exchange students, once as an enrollee with ISE and the second time with YFU. “Our first student was from Spain,” Black explained. “The experience was different in that there were weekly organized trips with other families and it was great fun.” The overall experience, according to Black, is dependent on the personality of the student. “I’m enjoying Serena,” she said. “She’s very personable, eager to learn the language and culture.” Serena, whose given name is Sawoul Moon, is a high school senior from Japan living with the Black family. “I wanted to learn English and felt this was the best way and, secondly, I like to meet many people and like to learn different cultures,” Moon said. She also noted some contrasts between Tokyo and America, such as modes of transportation and the beauties in nature. “We used trains or the subway, but here we use a car, so that’s a big difference,” she said. “Secondly, nature in Tokyo isn’t really nature because there are so many buildings. Here you see so many trees, greenery, grass and I like the sky — it’s all very beautiful.” Apart from the aesthetics, Moon said the most memorable aspect of American culture is spending quality time with family. “I really like that Americans spend time with their families a lot,” she said. “I go to many places with my host family like Mackinac Island and the movies, and spending that time makes for happy memories.” The Black family continues to host foreign exchange students in part to exemplify tolerance to their own children and others in the community. “I want my kids to be global thinkers and not have prejudices or biases about other nationalities,” Black said. “We can all learn from each other.” ❏


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

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PAGE 13

LAKES AREA NEWS

Seniors to benefit from generosity of area care facility By Leslie Shepard staff writer

While the holidays are a blissful time for many people who long to be wrapped in the warmth of family, there are those who look at this time of year as the loneliest of all. Home Instead Senior Care is hosting its Be a Santa to a Senior program to provide holiday cheer and gift-giving to seniors who are lonely and financially challenged. “We began this charitable program seven years ago,” said Home Instead Senior Care Community Services Liaison Lorraine Janes. “We get the names of seniors from the Oakland County Health Department, senior centers, and different agencies who come into contact with hard-pressed seniors.” A list of names and gifts for the seniors are compiled before Janes solicits businesses in the community to erect giving trees on their premises. Residents come into each business

and select a senior’s name to purchase Christmas gifts specific to that person. Home Instead Senior Care then collects the gifts, wraps them and distributes them close to Christmas. “Sponsor donations have decreased every year because of the expense, but the same thing is happening to other charities who are looking for help,” Janes said. Last year the organization bought gifts for 675 seniors. “Since the program’s inception, we have pulled together 750,000 gifts for seniors,” Janes noted. This year Pixley Funeral Home, St. Joseph Mercy Hospital and Overtime Bar & Grille have donated to the program to ensure every senior is provided for. “Last year I knocked on doors and begged because each and every wish must be fulfilled,” Janes said. All donations must be collected by tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 8. Monetary donations are also gladly accepted. Volunteers will then convene on Wednesday, Dec. 14 for the wrapping party at the Waterford Parks and Recreation Department located at 2303 Crescent Lake Road.

For more information, contact Nancy Wasik at 248-514-2329. ❏

Highland ban on medical pot gets another 3 months By Angela Niemi staff writer

The Highland Township Board of Trustees has decided to extend an existing moratorium on medical marijuana activities in the community for another 90 days. The board passed the resolution at its meeting last month. “Essentially, it allowed us to extend the moratorium in the midst of the state not giving us clear directives on how to move forward,” said Township Supervisor Triscia Pilchowski. “This extension allows us to continue to investigate and attend workshops. Until our (state) Legislature gives us more clarity, I think we are going to continue to see communities floundering or adopting ordinances that are not sufficient.”

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In November 2008, Michigan became the 13th state in the nation to legalize marijuana for medical use, thanks to overwhelming support by state voters. The law enacted following voters’ authorization requires patients to carry identification cards issued by the state, and registered caregivers to grow limited amounts of marijuana for qualifying patients in an enclosed, locked facility. A caregiver can help up to five other patients and may grow 12 marijuana plants per patient. Many communities have established and extended moratoriums on medical marijuana since the law was enacted. Other municipalities have adopted ordinances, some of which have prompted lawsuits. “There’s just not sufficient directive from the state for the community to fulfill the intent of the language that the people voted on,” Pilchowski said. The moratorium is now set to run from today, Wednesday, Dec. 7 through March 5, 2012. ❏

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PAGE 15

LAKES AREA NEWS

POC and full-time firefighters to be sworn in Dec. 13 By Angela Niemi staff writer

Four new paid-on-call firefighters will be sworn in by Commerce Township Clerk Dan Munro on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Commerce Township Board of Trustees meeting. Michael Uyttendaele recently completed his probationary requirements, as did Zack Schwartz, Jason Loomis, and Zachary Muir, after starting training in September 2010, according to Commerce Township Fire Chief Joe Schornack. Paid-on-call personnel, as opposed to full-time firefighters, don’t work on a set schedule. As a paid volunteer, payment is received on a per-call basis and for any extra work a paid-on-call firefighter may provide, such as working during community events. The Commerce Township Fire Department is always accepting applications for new paid-on-call firefighters. Applications are available at any of the township’s fire stations or on the Commerce Township website. Also being sworn in at next week’s meeting are two recently hired full-time firefighters. Kevin Newhouse was hired at the end of October to fill the vacancy left by another firefighter who is now with the Grand Rapids Fire Department. Christopher Tima will join the department on Jan. 1, 2012 to replace Larry Ortwine, who retired on Thursday, Dec. 1 after 25 years of service. Commerce Township currently has four fire stations, 16 full-time fire department employees and 24 paid-on-call firefighters. ❏

Over 1,000 to eat breakfast with jolly ol’ St. Nick Dec. 10 By Leslie Shepard staff writer

The Wixom Association of Professional Firefighters will be putting smiles on the faces of children who are counting the days until Christmas during the 32nd Annual Breakfast with Santa event scheduled for 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday,

The Dec. 11 “Share the Light” dinner being hosted by Estie (left) and Rabbi Schneor Greenberg of the Chabad Jewish Center of Commerce/Walled Lake is being held at the Steinway Piano Gallery in Commerce Township, and will include a performance by pianist Cliff Monear. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Anniversary ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 3

Children are being educated in a lively Jewish environment at Hebrew school, summer day camp and youth programs. Adults are attending Chabad’s classes, lectures, luncheons and personalized study sessions. Families are discovering a new Jewish dimension in their lives through Chabad’s Synagogue and outreach programs. “When we came here and started, we didn’t know anybody,” Greenberg said. “Today there’s a large Jewish community involved in these programs. We now have a

community that we started from nothing and developed. This has become the Jewish center for people in the area. “We are happy to be here and are excited to share this occasion with everybody,” Greenberg added. “The community around us has been wonderful and accepting, and we look forward to another decade and watching this grow.” The center recently purchased a home and is renovating it into a permanent Jewish center in order to ensure continuation and expansion of its programs, and to reach more people. For more information, send an email to estie@jewishcommerce.org. ❏

with Santa event. The fun-filled festivities will take place on Saturday, Dec. 10 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Richardson Community Center located at 1485 Oakley Park Road. An assortment of snacks including cookies, fruit, veggies, and popcorn will be served along with punch. “We try to have healthy snacks, too,” said Parks and Recreation Board Member Lynn Lewis. “It’s a pretty laid back event, but a fun one.” Santa will conduct visits with children. Each child will receive a complementary photo and picture frame. As Christmas music plays in the background, children will enjoy painting the frame and decorating Christmas cookies, courtesy of Dream Cakes. There will also be games for the children to play. Costs are $5 per child and $2 per adult. Pre-registration is encouraged at the village offices, located at 425 Glengary Road, or by calling 248-624-1710. The village is also encouraging participants and the community at large to drop off unwrapped gifts, including toys, hats, scarves and mittens for children. Monetary donations are also accepted. ❏

W. Bloomfield trail extension moves ahead with votes By Michael Shelton staff writer

Dec. 10. The program is intended for children 10-years-old and younger. It will be held at the Wixom Community Center located at 49015 Pontiac Trail. Wixom residents are encouraged to register by Friday, Dec. 9 due to the significant number of attendees every year. “We typically get well over 1,000 children,” said Wixom Fire Chief Jeff Roberts. Breakfast is complementary for Wixom residents and will include pancakes and ham. Orange juice, milk and coffee also will be served. After breakfast, the children will be escorted to visit with Santa. Kids will also get to visit with Mrs. Claus and one of Santa’s elves.

Santa will hand out a genderspecific gift to every girl and boy courtesy of local businesses. To register for the event, call the Wixom Fire Department at 248624-1055. ❏

Wolverine Lake’s Snacks with Santa slated for Dec. 10 By Leslie Shepard staff writer

With the holiday season fast approaching, the village of Wolverine Lake, in conjunction with the Parks and Recreation Board, is getting into the spirit by hosting the community’s traditional Snacks

The West Bloomfield Township Planning Commission and Wetland Review Board met in a joint session on Nov. 22 and approved a series of measures regarding the extension of the West Bloomfield Trail. At the beginning of the meeting, the Wetland Board approved a recommendation to the Planning Commission to extend the trail with certain conditions, including the removal of invasive plants and the stipulation that soil erosion controls be put in place. The Planning Commission then agreed to recommend to the West Bloomfield Township Board of

FOR MORE LAKES AREA NEWS SEE PAGE 16


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LAKES AREA NEWS

Trail extension ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 15

Trustees a zoning map change that would move the trail extension from its current location in the right-ofway/no zoning area to the township’s recreation district. Finally, the Planning Commission approved the site plan for the trail extension. The zoning map change is expected to come before the township board at its meeting scheduled for Monday, Dec. 12. Last December, the township’s Parks and Recreation Commission purchased an abandoned stretch of the Michigan Airline Railway corridor, from Arrowhead Road to Haggerty Road. The total cost of the purchase was $1.725 million, with $1.45 million covered by a grant from the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund and $300,000 covered by a grant from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). When it is completed, the nonmotorized West Bloomfield Trail will stretch out to 6.5 miles. According to a presentation by Wade-Trim representatives to the parks commission, trail extension plans will be submitted to the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for review and approval after being approved by the township board this month. MDOT would then receive the final plans on Dec. 22 and the project’s contract would be awarded on April 3. Construction of the project is scheduled to take place from April to July in 2012. ❏

Village employees to pay 20 percent of insurance costs The Milford Village Council voted Monday, Dec. 5 to approve a cost-sharing plan regarding health insurance for village employees. Under the new plan, the village will contribute 80 percent to an employee’s health coverage while the employee will now be required to contribute 20 percent. This move comes after legislation was signed by Gov. Rick Snyder requiring public employees to pay more for their own health insurance coverage. The law stipulates that public employers can’t pay more than $5,500 a year in health care costs for an individual, $11,000 for a couple, and $15,000 for a family. Instead of a hard and fast monetary figure, public employers can also opt to instead pay no more than 80 percent of the total annual costs for all of the medical benefit plans it offers or contributes to for employees. The new cost-sharing model will go into effect for non-unionized village employees on Jan. 1, while the plan was implemented for public service and wastewater treatment bargaining unit employees on Sept. 1. Village Manager Arthur Shufflebarger said negotiations are still ongoing with the two Milford police bargaining units. Prior to the Village Council’s meeting, itl previously rejected a $641 buyout amount for village employees that choose to obtain coverage on their spouse’s insurance plan. Shufflebarger cited the new law as one of the reasons the council rejected the buyout. Shufflebarger said at the time that the current $300 buyout rate had been set for many years, and that a new rate of $583 was set for the police department during negotiations last year. ❏

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DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 17

LAKES AREA NEWS

Casualty of economic times Waterford library closes on Fridays due to budget woes By Leslie Shepard staff writer

I

n an effort to deal with declining revenues, the Waterford Township Public Library will now be closed on Fridays until further notice. The change took effect Friday, Dec. 2. According to Library Director Joan Rogers, declining property values continue to reduce tax revenues generated by the library’s dedicated millage. Revenues for 2011 were $352,155 less than in 2010, and in 2012 they are expected to decrease by an additional $228,443. “Since 2008 we have lost $645,080 in revenues collected annually — that’s one-quarter of our revenues over this time,” Rogers said. “We’ve been scaling back and have a dedicated millage, but it’s (a) smaller and smaller (revenue) amount because of the property value declines.” Over the past three years, staff has been reduced primarily through attrition. “Two to three years ago we had 47 staff members and now we’re at 32,” Rogers said. By the end of 2011 there will be five vacancies due to retirements and another due to a librarian taking a position at another library, but Rogers said the library’s funding stream isn’t able to replace those people. In addition, there isn’t enough personnel to accommodate a sevenday schedule, and the decision was made to close the library on Fridays. The rest of the library’s hours

Milford asks DNR to hold hearing on Sears Lake motors By Michael Shelton staff writer

The Milford Township Board of Trustees has approved a resolution requesting the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to hold a public hearing regarding the use of electric motors

A loss nearly $650,000 in revenues since 2008 has forced the Waterford Township Public Library (above) to close on Fridays, effective Dec. 2, until further notice in spite of other efforts — including workforce reduction through attrition and the elimination of interlibrary loans from libraries outside of Michigan. Library Director Joan Rogers said Fridays are the slowest days of the week for the library since there are fewer visitors and lower circulation of materials. Although now closed on Fridays, the rest of the library’s school will stay unchanged. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

remain unchanged. “Fridays are the least busy day of the week,” Rogers explained. “There are fewer visitors and fewer circulations.” Rogers added that library patrons have been “regretfully understanding,” for the most part.

“There have been very few up in arms over the Friday closing, and they are concerned there may be lots of changes, but we are trying to respond to the situation as incrementally as possible,” Rogers said. Other budget reductions implemented include expenditures on

books, magazines, and audio formats; materials; and eliminating interlibrary loans involving other libraries. “People understand we are trying to live within our means and trying to affect the least amount of patrons as possible,” Rogers said. ❏

on Sears Lake. Currently, Sears Lake is regarded as a “no-motors lake,” but the Sears Lake Community Association has stated that its board has received requests from residents to allow electric motors on the water. “We’ve sent the matter to the DNR, which will then hold a public hearing and give the township the results,” Township Clerk Holly Brandt said. “The DNR would then

either recommend or not recommend a change in our township ordinance regarding Sears Lake.” Brandt added that no date has yet been set for a public hearing with the DNR, but that it would most likely be held in the township offices. The homeowner’s association previously set forth guidelines for a possible amendment to the existing no-motors ordinance, such as capping electric motors at no more

than 45 pounds of thrust and not allowing more than one motor per boat. The association is also requesting that no more than two boats with motors be allowed per dock and that boats with motors must be owned by a Sears Lake resident, who must also be in a boat at all times during operation, with exceptions. The township board’s action came at its Nov. 16 meeting. ❏


PAGE 18

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

EDUCATION

Group nears $1M mark in assistance to WLCSD students

Since its formation in 1981, Legacy Scholarships Funds has given away $992,569. “This year when we give the awards out next May, we will have surpassed the $1 million mark,” Smith said. That’s impressive considering that 30 years ago the organization started with just a single scholarship set up by the Lampe family. “Chris (Lampe) was a (Walled Lake) Central High School student,” said Smith, who was the principal of Walled Lake Western High School at the time. “He was a freshman running the mile in gym class. At the end of the mile, he said he could run it even faster, so he tried it a second time. He collapsed as he finished the second run. Students and people were just devastated. Then the first scholarship was created — the Chris Lampe Memorial Scholarship.” Seth Lampe, who is now chairman emeritus of the organization, was instrumental in setting up the scholarship in memory of his son, according to Smith. Since then, the scholarship program has ballooned to include over 50 scholarships. Some scholarships are in remembrance of former students, while others are in memory of school staff members. Retired staff members have

By Angela Niemi staff writer

College tuition costs keep rising, making it even more important for students and their families to find scholarships to help offset the cost of a higher education. Legacy Scholarship Funds, Inc. is one such place to look for a scholarship. “We jokingly say from time to time that we are the best-kept secret, but we don’t want to be a secret,” said Richard Smith, secretary of the organization. Legacy Scholarship Funds is a nonprofit public charity created to provide scholarships to high school seniors going on to institutions of higher learning. It was formerly known as the Central Scholarship Funds until May 2007. While it primarily features scholarships for Walled Lake Consolidated School District students, there are also awards for students in the Farmington and Oxford districts.

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had scholarships set up in their names, and there are also community scholarships sponsored by businesses and churches. Athletic booster clubs have set up scholarships, as have certain schools and educational groups. “Each year we give away 100 to 125 scholarships,” Smith said. “They range from $250 to $2,500. Some are renewed each year, while some are a single time award.” He said the program continues to grow each year with more scholarships being added. There is a board of directors and an executive board governing the funds, which Smith said will not run out since they only use the interest earnings from the principal investment for the scholarship awards. A list of scholarships and the requirements to qualify for each one can be found at www.wlcsd.org/webpages/scholarships/. The deadline for applications is Thursday, Jan. 12, 2012. “I am so proud of this organization that started with one scholarship and now has lots,” said President Barbara Garbutt. ❏

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use the pool on Tuesday, Dec. 13 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to test its underwater remote operated vehicles (ROVs). The testing is made possible by a national underwater robotics program known as SeaPerch, which trains instructors to teach students how to build an underwater ROV. According to SeaPerch, students build the ROV from a kit comprised of easily accessible parts and follow a curriculum that teaches basic engineering and science concepts with a marine engineering theme. In addition to teaching basic science, engineering concepts and technical procedures, SeaPerch states that building an ROV teaches basic skills in ship and submarine design and encourages students to explore naval architecture and marine and ocean engineering, including careers in those fields. Kettering’s engineering class is taught by Steve Smitka and also participates in the Oakland County Competitive Robotics Association. The students will also participate in Mini Innovative Vehicle Design Racing and First Robotics events. ❏

WBS refinances up to $19.5 million of 2001 bond issue The West Bloomfield Schools Board of Education passed a 2012 refunding bonds resolution on Monday, Nov. 28 that gives the school board the authority to issue bonds not to exceed $19.5 million to refund all or some portions of the district’s outstanding 2001 refunding bonds that were issued on Nov. 1, 2001. Joey Spano, the district’s director of community relations and education, said previously that refunding bonds are fairly routine. She also compared it to refinancing a home mortgage to save on interest costs. ❏

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DECEMBER 7-13 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 19

LOCAL MATTERS

A new place to shop, learn Resale store opens in Waterford to help train disabled adults By Tim Dmoch editor

F

reedom Work Opportunities (FWO) staff, consumers, and supporters gathered on Friday, Dec. 2 to hold a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the grand opening of FWO’s new Freedom Treasures Resale Store at 7570 Cooley Lake Road in Waterford Township. Now one of three FWO stores — one is located on Milford Road in Highland Township and another is in Grand Blanc — the new Freedom Treasures Resale Store offers new and used merchandise at affordable prices, according to FWO Marketing Director Marie Tino. “It offers a media room full of books and DVDs and VHS tapes; a full line of clothing for men, women and children; a large furniture area; a homegoods area; a children’s room; and a seasonal holiday area,” she said. “There’s a large area of framed art, and we have vases, cups, plates, utensils, linens, pillows, lamps, and anything you can find in your home. It has a little bit of everything. “The furniture items are huge sellers,” she added. “As soon as it’s on the floor it’s gone.” According to Tino, all of the merchandise for sale in the store has been donated. “A candle place went out of business and gave us all of their merchandise, so we have a lot of new candle items,” she said. “We get a lot of new clothing that people donate.” FWO is a non-profit 501(c)3 vocational training program serving the needs of adults with disabilities in Oakland, Livingston, and Genesee counties. Founded in 1983, the organization provides realistic training to individuals in a manner that promotes personal growth, dignity, and respect, while under the guidance of trained staff. FWO supports the Person Center/Directed Planning approach to all aspects of operational functions. All individuals are the center of the decision-making process. They are given the right to choose what jobs they work on, where they work, the types of programs that are implemented, and the right to change their job or program. By allowing individuals the

There are currently about 20 disabled adults working at the new Freedom Treasures Resale Store in Waterford, part of the Freedom Work Opportunities (FWO) organization. Founded in 1983, the organization provides realistic training to individuals in a manner that promotes personal growth, dignity, and respect, while under the guidance of trained staff. (Photo submitted by Freedom Work Opportunities)

right to voice their opinions and the right to choose, it’s FWO’s intent to promote their ability to control their own destiny. By encouraging their ability to control their lives, FWO believes that individuals will continue to want to increase their skills and choose a path in life that will fit their own personal needs. According to Tino, there currently are 20 disabled adults working at the new store in Waterford. “They help bring in the donations and unload the vehicles, sort the merchandise, test the electronics, clean the products, and do the pricing,” she said of FWO’s consumers who work or receive training at the store. “There’s a crew on the main floor to put the items out and make sure they’re clean and displayed nicely. We try to make it their store as much as possible.” FWO works with about 200 disabled adults daily, either at the three resale stores or at three workshops. These consumers are first trained and then provided jobs in lawn care, Meals on Wheels delivery, stuffing envelopes for businesses, and partially assembling automotive parts, among other things, according to Tino.

“They are all paid, but they are trained so they can got out and get work elsewhere if they want,” she said. “Some have been working here since 1983. The goal is to improve them, so that once they learn the skills they need, we then place them in the community.” Tino said the resale stores generate enough revenue to keep the stores open and pay the FWO consumers who work there. The Freedom Treasures Resale Store in Waterford will be working in conjunction with other area institutions and relief agencies, such as the Open Door Outreach Center in Waterford. “Once our items are in the store for so long, we send them to another non-profit like Open Door,” Tino said. “Or, if we have an overabundance of clothes, we send it there. Also, Open Door doesn’t take furniture, so they send it our way when people try to donate furniture to their resale store. We’re also holding a canned food drive for Open Door (through Friday, Dec. 16). We want to network like this with the for-profit resale stores and the area’s non-profits.”

The new store offers a 10 percent discount on purchases for senior citizens, military personnel and veterans. Those seeking to donate items to the store can make arrangement for free pickup of tax-deductible donations. “Our schedule is very flexible,” Tino said. “We can pick things up when people need it picked up, or it can be dropped off at our store at anytime.” The new store’s holiday hours will be Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. FWO is always looking for volunteers — including students — to work with the organization’s consumers or help manage social media to spread the word about FWO’s programs and needs. Those interested in volunteering can obtain a volunteer application at FWO’s website (freedomwork.org) under the resources tab, or by calling 248-887-1597. ❏

FOR MORE LOCAL MATTERS SEE PAGE 23


WALLED LAKE

PAGE 20

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 21

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PAGE 22

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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DECEMBER 7-13 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 23

LOCAL MATTERS

Stewards of the community

LaFontaine, Mahers, others take home 2011 HWLBA awards By Angela Niemi staff writer

T

he Highland-White Lake Business Association (HWLBA) doled out honors to its 2011 Community Award winners on Nov. 17. Awards were given out for Business of the Year, Business People of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, and One Step Beyond. Nominations for the awards are submitted and then a committee from the HWLBA chooses the winners while trying not to duplicate the winners in any category two years in a row. According to Heather Marquis, membership and sponsorship director for the HWLBA, the Business of the Year Award honors the business that is involved in a variety of activities in the community and deserves to be recognized for its involvement and recognitions. This year the LaFontaine Automotive Group netted Business of the Year recognition. “They are very supportive of the HWLBA,” Marquis said. “They do a lot of good in the community and with causes that hit close to them, such as cancer benefits. They are very active and supportive of our events, being major sponsors of Sparks in the Park, Women’s Enrichment Day, and other events.” The LaFontaine Automotive Group is also involved in other events and programs in the area, including Milford Memories, parades and Christmas tree lighting events, Community Sharing, the Red Box Food Drive, and the Huron Valley Business Expo, among others. “We like to give back to the community,” said Kelley LaFontaine of her family’s business. “We were ecstatic to win the award,” LaFontaine added. “We’ve been a part of the Highland community for the past 26 years, and this was a proud moment for us. My parents and brother believe in the family business. We lived and grew up in the Highland area, so this award is very special and very meaningful for us.” According to Marquis, last year the LaFontaines also took home the Business People of the Year award, which goes to those people personally involved in community causes. The honor of Business People of the

PAGE 24 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯

The LaFontaine Automotive Group, represented in the top photo by Maureen (second from left), Michael (middle), Kelley (second from right) and Ryan LaFontaine (far right), earned the Highland-White Lake Business Association’s (HWLBA) 2011 Business of the Year Award. Highland Feed owners Deb and Mike Maher (bottom photo, middle and far right) netted the HWLBA’s 2011 Business People of the Year Award. Presenting the awards was David Thurau, president of the HWLBA. (Photos by Chris Wall/White Lake Patch)


PAGE 24

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LOCAL MATTERS

Annual awards ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 23

Year was bestowed this year upon Mike and Deb Maher of Highland Feed, located on Livingston Road in Highland Township. Highland Feed has been a fixture of downtown Highland for the past century and offers a variety of products to feed both animals and lawns. “The Mahers have been really supportive of our events in Highland, including HeyDays,” Marquis said. “They are good people to go and ask to help. They are wonderful.” The Mahers hold a square dance every year to benefit a good cause, and this year was no different when the event supported Project Pink, which provides free mammograms for those who can’t afford them. They also supported the Aicardi Syndrome Foundation, which is a non-profit dedicated to providing information and comfort to those coping with the rare genetic disorder that targets children. “The recognition is great,” said Mike Maher, who is a Highland Downtown Development Authority (HDDA) board member, and along with his wife serves on the Highland Equestrian Conservancy board. “We try to make sure that customers have a great expe-

rience when they come into our store. We’re just making sure our business stays community-centric. We hope that the award shows that we are doing several things very well.” Greg Morris of Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education was presented the One Step Beyond award, which honors a person who “goes above and beyond in the community,” according to Marquis. “He is constantly figuring out (how) he can do things for families, kids, and the schools,” Marquis said. “He is on a lot of different committees.” “Receiving the One Step Beyond award is an honor,” Morris said. “It means a lot to be nominated and to receive an award from business owners in the community. I love working in the Huron Valley area and I hope to continue my work with Huron Valley Recreation and Community Education for a very long time.” Dick Russell earned the Volunteer of the Year Award for his work with Friends of the Highland Recreation Area, the Huron Valley Optimist Club, the Rotary Club, and other endeavors. “Volunteer of the Year (award winners are) somebody in the community that will go and volunteer at any event they can,” Marquis said. “They don’t expect anything in return.” ❏

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DECEMBER 7-13 2011

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LOCAL MATTERS business notes transitions openings ❐ Peter and Nancy Donaghue, owners of the newly remodeled McDonald’s restaurant in Waterford, are pleased to announce a grand re-opening celebration with three days of customer specials held now through Saturday, Dec. 10. In addition to daily menu board promotions, customers can enter to win a new Coca-Cola bicycle. The 24-hour restaurant is located at 5854 Highland Road in Waterford and has recently undergone major architectural renovations, including a modern, contemporary building design that improves natural lighting and indoor air quality. The new dual drive-thru lanes will enhance customer service and convenience. A motorcycle-themed interior includes comfortable, modern furniture with free Wi-Fi access to the Internet, new light fixtures and warm earth tones to create an inviting atmosphere for customers.

benefits ❐ A new group of investors is focusing on helping sellers by buying their luxury homes fast and at a fair price. This service is available through The Luxury Home Buyers, a new metro Detroit area company located in Auburn Hills. They are a group that relocates executives around the world and their goal is to buy houses at a discount so that they can resell at a discount. Luxury Home Buyers acquires three to five luxury homes every month and 10 percent of the net profits goes to charities such as Habitat for Humanity and the Red Cross. For more information, visit www.EasyLuxuryHomeBuyers.com. ❐ The staff at Westlake Health Campus in Commerce granted a wish for two of their residents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete and Wanda D., as part of the campus’ Live a Dream program. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate Westlake’s compassionate commitment to their residents by continually identifying and granting their special wishes and lifelong dreams. The health campus, with assistance from their staff, resident family members, and their parent company (Trilogy Health Services, LLC), helps to fund these wishes for the campus residents. The staff at Westlake was

aware that Wanda and Pete’s 65th wedding anniversary was fast approaching, so they decided to plan a luncheon of fine dining and fun for the couple. On Nov. 9, Allison Sherman (Activities Director at Westlake), along with Nancy Hammond (CENA), escorted the couple to Lucky’s Steakhouse, which was once the couple’s favorite restaurant when they lived in Linden, Mich. Pete and Wanda had a wonderful evening and expressed deep gratitude for Westlake’s thoughtfulness and generosity. Pete said, “I don’t want this day to end!” Westlake Health Campus will offer a full range of personalized senior living services, including assisted living, skilled nursing, long-term care, short-term rehabilitative services, transitional care, respite care, and adult day services. Westlake Health Campus is located at 10735 Bogie Lake Road and can be reached by calling 248-363-9400.

chamber notes ❐ The Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, visit www.huronvcc.com: • Off the Clock Connect, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, Sparkies Bar and Grill, 2868 E. Highland Road, Highland. This is an evening networking opportunity hosted by the Huron Valley Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors. • Ambassadors meeting, 10 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 14, Milford Police Department conference room, 1100 Atlantic Street, Milford. • The Coffee Club, 8 to 9 a.m. Friday, Dec. 16, Petrillo GroupRaymond James, 2753 S. Milford Road, Highland. Take a moment out of the holiday hustle and bustle and join us for this free morning mixer. Great networking and holiday cheer are on the agenda. • HVRN Wednesday Group, 8 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 21, Comeback Inn, 1451 South Milford Road, Highland. • HVRN Tuesday Group, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 27, Milford Fire Station, 325 W. Huron, Milford. ❐ The Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce (LACC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-624-2826 or visit www.lakesareachamber.com:

son, Table of eight is $360. For more information or to RSVP today, visit http://bit.ly/sOrK8I

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Support yourself and your community – shop locally! The choices that you make about where to shop are powerful statements to your community. By choosing locally owned & operated businesses, you support: Schools • Police and Fire • Libraries • Parks & Recreation • Roads Invest in our future – buy local, live local, and volunteer local too.

❐ The Greater West Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-626-3636 or visit www.westbloomfieldchamber.com. • The chamber’s annual meeting and installation of new board members will be held at the Jewish Community Center in the Greenberg suite beginning at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012. There will be a breakfast buffet and networking from 7:30 until 8 a.m. with Judge Kimberly Small installing new board members beginning at 8 a.m. Tickets are $25 and advance registration is required. Register at westbloomfieldchamber.com or call 248626-3636.

You have a choice! Spend it here. Keep it here. • Spotlight Lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 13, Twins Coney, 8374 Richardson, Commerce. Informal networking over an enjoyable lunch. • Studio Artiza Holiday Open House, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15, 1224 West Maple, Walled Lake. Join the festivities for refreshments, prize drawings and discounts. ❐ The Waterford Area Chamber of Commerce (WACC) is holding the following events in the coming days. For a complete calender of chamber events, call 248-666-8600 or visit www.waterfordchamber.org: • Business After Hours Mixer, 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 15, The Fountain Golf Course, 6060 Maybee Road, Clarkston. $10 for members; $15 for non-members. • WBAG, 8 to 9 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 20, Clarkston State Bank, 6600 Highland Road, Waterford. • WBAG, 8 to 9 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 3, 17 and 31, Clarkston State Bank, 6600 Highland Road, Waterford. • WACC’s 13th Annual Meeting and Awards Dinner, 5:30 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12, White Lake Oaks, 991 N. Williams Lake Road, Waterford. Join us for a fantastic evening as we roll out the red carpet for the Grammys! Cost: $48 per per-

National jazz star Alexander Zonjic is bringing his Pipers’ Holiday Concert to a new and unique venue, Henry’s Café at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital, 6777 W. Maple in West Bloomfield Township, on Sunday, Dec. 11 from noon to 2 p.m. The festive free concert will present an exciting blend of blues, holiday classics and all that jazz, featuring Zonjic and his award-winning band, Detroit blues diva Thornetta Davis (above) and the 30 member Barbara Ogar Flute Choir, in a thrilling performance for the whole family. Henry’s Café serves fresh, healthful gourmet selections and concert-goers will be able to purchase brunch and other refreshments during the free concert. Alexander Zonjic’s Pipers’ Holiday Concert is part of the Healing Arts Program of Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital. Free parking is available at the Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital, and Henry’s is easily accessible. Call 248-3251000 for concert information or go to www.zonjic.com.


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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Obituaries BELL, MURRAY F., a resident of Milford since 1976, died on November 27, 2011 after suffering a heart attack at his home. CASWELL, DAVID E., age 82, a longtime resident of Highland, went to be with the Lord November 23, 2011. FOSTER, TERRY "SPEED", of Milford, November 26, 2011, age 71. Wife of the late J. "King" Foster (d. 2006). KAY, RICHARD ALTON, a longtime resident of Milford and Caseville, Michigan died on November 24, 2011, at the age of 82. MILES, JEAN E. of Novi was born December 30, 1925 in Detroit, Michigan and died November 26, 2011 at age 85. PHILLIPS, JOSEPH DAVID, a long time resident of Milford and a former resident of Detroit, died on November 22, 2011 at the age of 85. PICKENS, MARY "BETTY", of Walled Lake was born on February 19, 1931 in Arbroath, Scotland and died November 27, 2011 at the age of 80. RUMPZ, CARL SYLVESTER, a resident of Wixom, died at his home on November 27, 2011 at the age of 77. He is survived by his wife Evelyn. SCHALDENBRAND, LILLIAN, resident of West Bloomfield, passed away December 3, 2011. She was 91. SERRATONI, MARGARET V., resident of West Acres in West Bloomfield passed away December 3, 2011 at the age of 95. SHOLLENBERGER, HEATHER J., a resident of Milford, fell asleep in death on November 24, 2011 at the age of 42. To place an obituary in the Spinal Column Newsweekly please call the Classified Department at 248-360-7355 or email: lorisnyder@thescngroup.com

www.spinalcolumnonline.com FAX: 248.360.5308/248.360.5309


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PAGE 29

PUBLIC SAFETY Fenton man, 38, killed in Waterford car crash By Leslie Shepard staff writer

Waterford Township police continue to investigate a fatal accident that occurred on Dixie Highway near Shoreline Drive on Saturday, Dec. 3. At 12:16 p.m., Waterford police and fire personnel responded to the scene. An initial investigation revealed a 1993 GMC 1500 pickup truck was traveling northbound on Dixie Highway when it crossed over all southbound lanes of traffic and was struck by a 2008 Cadillac Escalade traveling southbound in the right lane. After the collision, the GMC pickup truck veered off the roadway and struck a utility pole. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene. Police identified the victim as 38year-old Douglas Shawn King of Fenton. The driver of the Escalade, a 59year-old Clarkston woman, was not injured. Both drivers were wearing seat-

Douglas Shawn King, 38, of Fenton, was fatally injured Saturday, Dec. 3 when his 1993 GMC 1500 pickup truck crossed over into the southbound lanes of Dixie Highway in Waterford Township and was struck by a southbound vehicle. After the collision, King’s truck veered off the roadway and struck a utility pole. (Photo submitted by the Waterford Police Department) belts and there were no passengers in It’s still unclear what caused the ing the accident, or you witnessed GMC pickup truck to cross the lanes either vehicle. Alcohol does not appear it, contact Sergeant Dolehanty at into oncoming traffic. to be a factor in the accident, accord248-618-6057 or Sergeant Kazyak If you have any information regarding to Waterford police. at 248-618-6073. ❏

Dec. 2 car fire began in the passenger seat

Pot plants for medical use grown in apartment

Commerce Township Firefighters responded to a vehicle fire at 2:58 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 2 in the 8100 block of Cooley Lake Road. According to the homeowner, the vehicle had not been driven for over a week. Firefighters determined that the fire started in the vehicle’s passenger seat. The blaze is being further investigated. ❏

Walled Lake police confiscated a half-dozen marijuana plants from the Lighthouse Landing apartment complex last month. The complex, located at 42880 W. 14 Mile Road, was reportedly the site of a medical marijuana growing operation. A tenant who resides in the complex sent police a video showing the marijuana plants and equipment. Police asked the landlord to show them the apartment in question. He produced a medical certificate application for a woman who was renting the unit to grow the plants. Police advised the man that marijuana could not be grown in this setting. Police found six plants between 12to 14-inches-tall, along with lighting and exhaust supplies. The plants were destroyed. The landlord was given until late last month to remove the equipment or else he would be cited for violating city ordinance provisions. ❏

No injuries reported in Commerce garage fire Commerce Township firefighters arrived at a residence in the 1800 block of Marella Lane to find an attached garage engulfed in flames at 7:28 a.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 30. The garage was attached to a trilevel home. The fire was brought under control within 20 minutes with assistance from the Walled Lake Fire Department. Damage was confined to the garage area, and the cause of the fire is under investigation. No residents or firefighters were injured during the blaze. ❏

Walled Lake house fire still under investigation A house fire was extinguished quickly on Tuesday, Nov. 29 thanks to the efforts of first responders from

Walled Lake and Commerce Township. Walled Lake police were dispatched to the scene at 1804 Payson at 1:36 a.m. to assist firefighters. The fire began in the rear corner of the roof, and smoke and flames were visible from the skyline. Police found the property owner and another woman inside the home at the time of the blaze, and asked them to exit the building. Fire department personnel were able to control the fire quickly. Police discovered the woman at the scene was named in two bench warrants out of Farmington Hills. She was handed over to Farmington Hills law enforcement personnel. The fire is remains under investigation. ❏

Homeowner cited for excessive noise at party A loud party in the 3000 block of Ward’s Point on Friday, Dec. 2 brought Orchard Lake police to the scene and resulted in a number of citations for attendees. Various complaints about the noise and parking constraints were called into police. Just before 11 p.m., officers arrived on the scene and spoke with the property owner, who was issued a disorderly conduct citation for

excessive noise. Police then issued citations to cars that were parked on both sides of the neighborhood streets. ❏

Milford man caught with heroin, other drugs Milford police last week arrested a 29-year-old Milford man for possession of heroin after receiving a call about a suspicious vehicle. The incident took place on Thursday, Nov. 24 at 5:26 a.m. at a residence on Pleasure Street, after a caller reported an occupied vehicle sitting in front of his residence with the engine and vehicle lights off. When the resident turned on the porch lights, the car drove across the street to another residence. Officers visited the residence across the street and spoke with the homeowner, who called down his roommate. A search of the roommate turned up an orange-capped syringe and metal spoon with residue in a plastic bag sticking out of his pants pocket. The man was arrested and it was discovered that prescription bottles he had contained heroin and other drugs, including Oxycontin. The man will be charged with possession of heroin, possession of synthetic drugs and possession of drug paraphernalia. ❏


PAGE 30

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

TRANSPORTATION

50 YEARS AGO Dec. 7, 1961 This month's Boy of the Month is 17year-old Larry Methner of 9255 Sandyside in Union Lake. He received this award on Monday, Nov. 27 a week earlier than it is usually presented because he joined the service on Friday, Dec. 1. He was presented with his trophy by Mrs. L.C. Ostrander, the vice president on the Women's Auxiliary in Union Lake. Larry has the unique distinction of being the second boy ever to join the Boys Club in 1956 when it was first organized. Larry has joined the Air Corps and plans to make it his career. 40 YEARS AGO Dec. 8, 1971 With an attitude of "we'll do it until we're told it's illegal," the Waterford School Board has authorized placement of pocket-size Gideon Bibles (New Testament) in its elementary schools. In a unanimous vote last Thursday, the board authorized placement, but now must face the problem of how to distribute them. Members of the board are concerned with constitutional problems of separation of church and state and are uncertain whether their action is legal. 30 YEARS AGO Dec. 9, 1981 The late-year drawdown of Pontiac Lake will cause serious safety hazards, according to lake board members. At the board's request, Oakland County Drain Commissioner George Kuhn has asked state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Director Howard Tanner to close down the lake, if he has the authority. Normally, restrictions on recreational use could be obtained by proceeding through the various steps outlined in the state marine safety act. But the process involves a wait of several moths so public hearings can be conducted. Since the drawdown is proceeding at this time, lake board members are seeking some way to immediately close down the lake to all access. Lake board member and Waterford Township Treasurer Dennis Ritter said the primary dangers from the drawdown are weak ice, exposed stumps and patches of open water from the bubbling action of underwater aerators. 20 YEARS AGO Dec. 4, 1991 The Commerce Township Area

Historical Society is trying to save a Walled Lake home that was once part of the Underground Railroad from being demolished for commercial development. The Banks-Bradley-Foster home at 666 N. Pontiac Trail was recommended by Martha Bigelow, former director of the Michigan State Bureau of History, to be considered for nomination to the National Historic Register, according to society president Ruth Tuttle. Tuttle said the society is asking for community support to persuade the present owners of the house not to demolish it for commercial development. She said Roy Mercer, at one time an owner of the home, wished to have developers maintain the home as a focal point in the development. 10 YEARS AGO Dec. 5, 2001 Two Waterford Kettering High School students have been expelled after pleading guilty to making a false anthrax threat. During an appearance before Probate Judge Eugene Arthur Moore, the 16- and 14-year-old brothers pleaded guilty Tuesday, Nov. 27, to possession or use of an intimidation-harmful substance. The two students were suspended, ordered to perform community service and undergo psychological examinations. In court, the 16-year-old admitted to putting flour in an envelope and the 14year-old acknowledged that he spread it on a hallway floor in the school last month. The two brothers, whose names were withheld due to their juvenile status, reportedly wanted to get out of school for a day and conceived of a false anthrax scare on Tuesday, Oct. 30.

Headlines of the Past

– A special feature of the Spinal Column Newsweekly –

BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION/I-96 BETWEEN MILFORD AND KENT LAKE ROADS (Milford Area) • Closure: Single lane closure on I-96 in each direction between Milford and Kent Lake roads on weekends and weekdays during non-peak hours. • Completion date: By mid-December • Cost: $15.5 million.


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

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PAGE 31

TRANSPORTATION

Running on (almost) empty Funding woes to hamper RCOC’s winter maintenance By Leslie Shepard staff writer

T

he Road Commission for Oakland County (RCOC) is in the midst of reviewing its procedures to ensure its efforts during inclement weather will be up to par this winter. The RCOC expects to spend approximately $12 million on winter road maintenance this year alone, including approximately $4.4 million to maintain state trunklines for the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT). Despite the RCOC’s extensive preparations, the road commission warns motorists to be extra careful while navigating the roads this winter. Budget cuts in recent years have left the RCOC with fewer employees to drive and maintain an aging fleet of snow plows and salt trucks. “Our primary source of operating funds — the state gas tax and vehicle registration fees — fell for the last five years in a row,” said Board of Road Commissioners Member Ron Fowkes. “Those five years of decline follow nearly 10 years of virtually flat revenues. We’ll receive less funding in the current fiscal year than we received in 2000.” This winter, there are 50 fewer employees to drive snow plows and salt trucks than the RCOC employed in 2007. “Because of the reduced level of service we will be able to provide this winter, it’s critical that motorists be aware of the road conditions and drive appropriately for those conditions,” said Board of Road Commissioners Vice Chairman Greg Jamian. “We simply can’t salt or plow the roads as we have in the past.” The RCOC typically uses the services of 106 snowplows and salt trucks on the road to battle a major snow or ice storm. Drivers during the initial part of a major storm can stay on the road for up to 16 hours before they must rest, RCOC rules stipulate. In the past, the RCOC was able to replace the initial 106 drivers with up to 84 drivers for a second 16-hour shift to continue fighting a storm or to clean up after a storm. For the second year in a row, the agency will have less than 40 drivers available for a second shift during the pending win-

Budget cuts in recent years have left the Road Commission for Oakland County (RCOC) with fewer employees to drive and maintain an aging fleet of snow plows and salt trucks. This winter, there will be 50 fewer employees to drive snow plows and salt trucks than the RCOC employed in 2007. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy Lockard)

ter season. “That’s a substantial reduction in our ability to fight a prolonged storm, or even a series of small storms, or to clean up after a storm,” Jamian said. The road commission has had to defer the needed replacement of its aging fleet of snow plows and salt trucks due to declining revenues, meaning many will be out of service for repairs more frequently this winter. “We are not happy about this situation,” said Board of Road Commissioners Chairman Eric Wilson. “Safety is the RCOC’s No. 1 priority, and it pains us greatly to have to reduce the level of service we can provide.” A single new RCOC snow plow or salt truck costs approximately $200,000. Currently the RCOC has approximately 135 snow plows and salt trucks, though the trucks are never used at the same time since

some are “spares” used when others break down. The RCOC also employs 19 “road graders” that are used to plow heavy snow. The RCOC keeps salt trucks loaded and ready to go 24 hours a day, seven days a week. However, it may take RCOC snow plows and salt trucks longer to get into subdivisions following snow storms this year due to the reduced number of drivers. “Safety dictates that we focus our reduced resources on the roads that carry the most traffic at the highest speeds,” Fowkes said. “Only when those are sufficiently clear will we move to the slower, less-traveled subdivision streets.” The RCOC uses an average of 83,000 tons of salt per winter and divides all the miles of paved primary roadway it maintains (including county roads and state highways) into 106 salt “routes.” The road commission expects to spend approximately

$4 million this winter on salt alone at a cost of $46.51 per ton. The RCOC typically doesn’t use sand on paved roads because it doesn’t melt ice and can clog storm drains. Sand is used on gravel roads where typically there are no storm drains, and where salt is less effective. The RCOC maintains jurisdiction over 2,700 miles of county roads (including subdivision and gravel roads), as well as 230 miles of mostly multi-lane state highways on behalf of MDOT, including I-75, I-696, I-96, M59, and Telegraph Road. Road commission crews maintain state and county roads in Oakland County based on a priority system. “Critical priority” roads are those handling traffic of more than 10,000 vehicles per day per lane. “Priority 1” roads are those with 2,500 to 10,000 vehicles per day per lane, while priority 2 and 3 roads have less traffic. ❏


PAGE 32

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Due to concerns about the use of hydraulic fracturing as a means of extracting natural gas deposits found deep underground, Michigan lawmakers have proposed legislation to regulate the use of groundwater in fracturing activities and to stop the process while it’s being studied in other states. Hydraulic fracturing, more commonly known as “fracking,” is a well stimulation process used to extract underground resources, including oil, natural gas, geothermal energy, or water. It is used by gas producers to stimulate wells and recover natural gas from sources such as coal beds and shale gas formations, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The process uses thousands of gallons of water, mixed with chemicals and sand, to create fissures in rock formations to release oil and natural gas. A study conducted by the EPA in 2004 concluded that there was littleto-no risk of fracturing fluid contaminating underground sources of drinking water. In 2005, Congress exempted hydraulic fracturing from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. Since then, however, there have been complaints of water contamination following the use of fracking in several states, including Wyoming and Pennsylvania. According to Dave Davis with the state Department of Equality’s (DEQ) Office of Oil, Gas and Minerals, western Oakland County has 186 wells that are permitted in the area, including in Milford and Highland townships.

The potential threat has led to a package of bills — House Bills (HBs) 5149, 5150 and 5151 — being introduced by state Reps. Jeff Irwin (D-Ann Arbor), Mark Meadows (D-East Lansing), and Brandon Dillon (D-Grand Rapids). State Rep. Lisa Brown (D-West Bloomfield, Commerce, Wolverine Lake) is also a co-sponsor of the bills. According to Irwin, the bill he is sponsoring — HB 5149 — requires oil and gas companies to follow the same rules as all other citizens with respect to water use. “The law says that if you use more than a certain threshold of water, then you need a permit for use and to make sure that you’re not negatively affecting your neighbors or the surrounding waters,” Irwin said. “Some of the chemicals they are pumping in at high pressure (during fracking) may be toxic and poisonous, and the pipe goes far and wide through the water table and other properties. There is the potential for error and harm.” The other two bills in the package go together. One requires a one-year study to be conducted in order to look at the best practices of hydraulic fracturing in other states around the country. The other requires a one-year moratorium on fracking while that study is being conducted. Irwin hopes this will ensure that Michigan’s regulations concerning hydraulic fracturing meet the best practices to protect the state’s water resources. “I’m supporting the entire package because the water resources in Michigan are of tremendous import to the state,” Irwin said. “We want to make sure that as people are drilling and mining and engaging in this type of activity, that it is safe for the other residents as well as the other nearby streams, and rivers, and lakes that are so important.” ❏

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PAGE 33

COUNTY

McDonald’s backs out of purchase of county building By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

It appears as though plans for the Walled Lake McDonald’s restaurant to relocate to the former West Oakland Office Building (above) at 1010 E. West Maple Road in Walled Lake have been scrapped now that the fast food chain has let a purchase agreement for the Oakland County-owned site, which was vacated earlier this year, expire, according to the county. The Board of Commissioners Planning and Building Committee was expected to consider placing the property on the market yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 after press time. (Spinal Column Newsweekly photo/Amy K. Lockard)

Technology communication hub. Local and county officials have also pointed to the fact that the West Oakland Office Building, since it is expected to be placed in the hands of a private company, will also be added to the local tax rolls, meaning additional revenue for the city of Walled Lake and other taxing authorities. The Oakland County Board of Commissioners Planning and Building Committee was expected yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 to consider a request “It was my from the Facilities Management understanding that it Department to put the property up for sale to the public. If approved, the was the local county would get fresh appraisals and negotiate a purchase agreement with McDonald’s franchise another buyer, in addition to working with the Walled Lake Downtown owner who was Development Authority (DDA) and real interested in moving estate firms to market the property. The county may also explore possitheir location closer to ble temporary uses for the building, such as use by non-profit organizations Pontiac Trail.” or other governmental entities. Residents looking for Health Department services can receive those capital improvements that were expected at one of two locations — the North Oakland Health Center, located at 1200 at the Walled Lake building that was once home to staff of the county Health N. Telegraph, Building 36 East in Pontiac; and the South Oakland Health Department, the Probation Department Center, located at 27725 Greenfield of the Probate Court, the Circuit Court Road in Southfield. ❏ Family Division, and the Information

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The Walled Lake McDonald’s restaurant will not be relocating to a new location within the city at a county office building that was slated to go to the fast food Goliath in a move expected to save the county over $100,000 annually. The McDonald’s Corporation, which was slated to purchase the West Oakland Office Building located at 1010 E. West Maple Road in Walled Lake, let its purchase agreement for the property expire, essentially nullifying the original offer of $675,000 it reportedly made for the 17,000-square-foot, single-story building situated on 1.64 acres near Pontiac Trail, according to county documents. “We were working with an intermediary real estate representative and I never dealt directly with their client (McDonald’s),” said Art Holdsworth, director of the county’s Facilities Management Department. “It was my understanding that it was the local McDonald’s franchise owner who was interested in moving their location closer to Pontiac Trail.” Holdsworth said the purchase agreement expired in November. The county expects to reap a $135,000 annual savings by relocating services formerly housed at the Walled Lake building to other locations, and realize the ability to forego $500,000 in

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

STATE

Sens. to schools: Have defibrillators in each building By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

State Sen. Mike Kowall (RCommerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) is teaming up with colleagues in the state Senate in an effort that would mandate that each public school have on hand a defibrillator accessible to staff, students, volunteers and guests. Wes Leonard, a 16-year-old basketball star for Fennville — a west Michigan community located in lead sponsor state Sen. Rick Jones’ (R-Grand Ledge) district — Kowall collapsed and died from complications of an enlarged heart earlier this year after making a game-winning shot during the state basketball play-

offs, capping off what was at the time the team’s 20-0 season. “There was no defibrillator machine available,” said Kowall, a former White Lake Township supervisor. “We know it’s a mandate, but you know, it’s got everything to do with health, safety and welfare, and that’s what government does. We put (defibrillators) at White Lake Township (Hall) when I was there (using grant Robertson money).” Senate Bill (SB) 801, which features Kowall as a co-sponsor, among others, has been referred to the state Senate Education Committee. Staff in Jones’ office said “the majority” of schools already have defibrillators. It’s unclear, at this point, how much it would cost overall to implement the legislation. The bill would give schools one year to comply with its requirements, which also include that when students are present, there be at least one person who is satisfactorily trained in basic first aid, basic car-

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diopulmonary resuscitation, and the use of the automated external defibrillator as determined by the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association, or another equivalent organization that has been approved by the governing body of the school. “It seems like a noble effort to want that,” said state Sen. David Robertson (R-Waterford), adding that he hasn’t spoken with local school officials in his district, which includes much of northern Oakland County and Genesee County. Kowall added that he believes that another state lawmaker is working on legislation stating that if someone was hurt after using a defibrillator, the operator couldn’t be sued for damages. “I think certainly there’s good reason to consider that for the same reason that we have the good Samaritan law,” Robertson said. “People should be free to act upon the best angels of their nature.” ❏

GOP Senate brass proposes altering recall election law By Kirk Pinho assistant editor

Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville (R-Frenchtown) and state Sen. Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) are proposing an amendment to the Michigan Constitution of 1963 following a rash of recall efforts against lawmakers from both parties. Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) S, which was introduced last week and referred to the Senate Government Operations Committee, would put before Michigan voters a proposal to ban recall efforts triggered by “the discretionary performance of a lawful act or of a prescribed duty by an elective officer.” Under the proposal, an elected official could only be recalled in the event that he or she is convicted of a felony, a misdemeanor involving the breach of public trust, the misappropriation of public resources, or any other official misconduct by that officer. If approved by two-thirds of the state Senate and House of Representatives, the measure would go before the electorate on Feb. 28, 2012. This comes after a slew of state lawmakers — including two from

west Oakland County — have looked down the barrel of recall efforts across Michigan targeting both Democrats and Republicans. State Reps. Gail Haines (RWaterford, West Bloomfield) and Lisa Brown (D-West Bloomfield, Commerce, Wolverine Lake) are both facing efforts by constituents to boot them from office. Neil Billington, who challenged Haines in the 2010 Republican primary election, is looking to recall the second-term lawmaker from Lake Angelus, while Brown is challenging the legality of David Rohtbart’s recall petition language approved by the Oakland County Elections Commission earlier this year. Both recall efforts were spurred by the lawmakers’ votes on a controversial issue pushed by Republican leadership in the state capitol — expanded powers for state-appointed emergency financial managers. Haines voted for the measure, while Brown voted against it. A second recall petition is also being circulated against Brown for her vote against the repeal of the pension tax exemption many retirees across the state enjoyed, another effort spearheaded by Gov. Rick Snyder and Republican legislative leadership. An Oakland County Circuit Court judge is scheduled to take the Brown challenge up today. The state Supreme Court last month upheld that a significant majority of the pension tax is constitutional following a request by Snyder for an informal opinion by the high court. State Sen. David Robertson (RWaterford), who is a former state representative, said previous attempts to narrow the reasons for which an elected official can be recalled have been thwarted by the courts, but called a joint resolution “the appropriate legislative mechanism” for altering the state’s recall rules. “People could say we don’t like the way he parts his hair and the Michigan Constitution trusts us enough to know that we won’t recall somebody on that basis,” he said. State Sen. Mike Kowall (RCommerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) could not be reached for comment on this story prior to press time. ❏


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 35

IN OUR OPINION

State’s voters should weigh in Recall reform a measure best decided by the electorate

I

t comes as little surprise to us that some in Lansing are calling for substantial reform of the provisions under which an elected official can be recalled from office, following a spate of attempts to oust state lawmakers has cropped up in recent months, including against two members — one Democrat, one Republican — of the lakes area’s delegation to the state House of Representatives. Without weighing in on the merits of the details of a Senate Joint Resolution floated by Republican leadership in the state Senate, it would be wise of lawmakers to let the Michigan electorate decide on a constitutional amendment narrowing the reasons why a legislator can face the wrath of the voters in a recall effort. Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville (RFrenchtown) and state Sen. Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) put forth Senate Joint Resolution (SJR) S last week, calling for Michigan voters to decide in the Feb. 28, 2012 election whether to amend the Michigan Constitution of 1963 to ban recall efforts triggered by “the discretionary performance of a lawful act or of a prescribed duty by an elective officer.” Under the proposal, an elected official could only be recalled in the event that he or she is convicted of a felony, a misdemeanor involving the breach of public trust, the misappropriation of public resources, or any other official misconduct by that officer. But hold your horses. Rightfully so, the state Legislature putting a constitutional amendment on the ballot requires support from a two-thirds majority of both chambers of the state Legislature, the state Senate and the state House of Representatives, both of which are controlled by the GOP. Drumming up that

much support for something, particularly an effort as serious as this, is going to take gusto and, in all likelihood, some serious arm-wrangling, so don’t bet on voting on the matter in February. Current state law provides that, with the exception of judges, every elected official in the state is subject to a recall election by the voters of the district or community in which they are elected. However, a recall petition cannot be filed against the official “until (he or she) has actually performed the duties of the office to which they were elected” for six months during that current term, and a petition cannot be filed against the official during the last six months of their term. The petition for recall currently is required to clearly state each reason for recall, which “shall be based upon the officer’s conduct during his or her current term of office.” And that legal leeway — the only stipulation is that the recall is based on “the officer’s conduct during his or her current term of office” — is the guise under which the two recalls targeting a pair of lakes area state lawmakers, state Rep. Gail Haines (RWaterford, West Bloomfield) and state Rep. Lisa Brown (D-West Bloomfield, Commerce, Wolverine Lake), have been propagated by Waterford’s Neil Billington and West Bloomfield’s David Rohtbart, respectively. State Sen. David Robertson (R-Waterford) accurately, although perhaps glibly, put it as accurately as can be when he said that, theoretically, a lawmaker could be recalled for the way he parts his hair. However, Robertson said, “The Michigan Constitution

trusts us enough to know that we won’t recall somebody on that basis.” He’s right — to an extent. We’ve said before and we’ll say it again: The efforts targeting Haines and Brown — who is challenging the clarity of the recall petition language targeting her in court today, Wednesday, Dec. 7 — are frivolous, based purely on grinding political axes and not misfeasance or malfeasance in office, and voters in their respective districts shouldn’t sign petitions targeting them for recall. Last time we checked, voting your conscience wasn’t against the law — in fact, it’s what Haines and Brown were elected to do. But beyond voters in Haines’ 43rd House District and Brown’s 39th House District doing nothing vis-avis the recall efforts, here’s what also can be done: Let the voters decide the merits of recall election reform, something Robertson said has been tried before legislatively but has always been smacked down by the courts, leery of hamstringing the public’s right to recall elected officials. And we can understand that skittishness, particularly in an era of people still bandaging wounds inflicted by Kwame Kilpatrick and Monica Conyers and others, but there comes a point when enough is enough and the electorate has to chime in on the matter — which is exactly what SJR S allows for. While not backing or opposing the aims of the resolution as it’s currently worded — the legislative process could certainly allow it to get butchered in committee or on the floors of either the state Senate or House — we do support giving Michigan voters a real voice in recall election reform where it matters, which is at the ballot box. ❏

State should pay for AEDs A

new state Senate bill requiring all public schools to be equipped with an automated external defibrillator (AED) and to have at least one person in the school that is trained in AED use will be well worth approval so long as Lansing comes up with money to purchase the devices and train school personnel. State Sen. Mike Kowall (R-Commerce, Highland, Milford, Walled Lake, Wixom, Wolverine Lake, White Lake, Orchard Lake, West Bloomfield) is teaming up with colleagues to sponsor a bill mandating that each public school have a defibrillator accessible to staff, students, volunteers and guests. Senate Bill (SB) 801, which features Kowall as a co-sponsor, gives schools a year to comply with its requirements, which also include that when students are present, there be at least one person at the school who is satisfactorily trained in basic first aid, basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and the use of

an AED as determined by the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association, or another equivalent organization. The bill was motivated, in part, by the case of a west Michigan prep basketball player who collapsed and died from complications of an enlarged heart earlier this year during the state playoffs. There was no defibrillator available at the site when the player collapsed. There’s no question that AEDs save lives, as can the appropriate administration of first aid and CPR. For that reason, we agree that every public school should be equipped with an AED and have trained personnel. Staff in Jones’ Lansing office stated most public schools already have an AED, a statement that implies not all have one. In addition, it’s unknown how many public schools have personnel trained in first aid, CPR

and AED use. Such training through the American Heart Association costs up to $135 per person; and AEDs can run from $1,200 to $2,500 apiece. The ability to save lives is well worth the expenditures necessary to ensure all schools have an AED and trained staff. But SB 801’s requirements will be costly, perhaps more so than the schools can easily accommodate given the recent reductions in state funding for schools. If lawmakers consider saving lives a high priority — and we’re betting they do — they need to ascertain how many public schools need an AED and how much it will cost to train multiple people at each school in basic first aid, CPR and AED use before they enact the bill. Once that’s accomplished, lawmakers may have to make budget cuts elsewhere to come up with the money to pay for these new, but potentially life-saving requirements. ❏


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How Long Have You Been Married? The Spinal Column Newsweekly is looking for west Oakland's longest married couples for recognition in our Seniors Today special section, which will be published on Jan. 18, 2012. Send us a copy of your wedding or engagement photo, along with information about the wedding, by Wed., Jan. 4, 2012. We will feature the area's longest married couples in an article and photo layout that tells their story.

The Longest Married Couple will receive a Gift Certificate for a romantic dinner at a local restaurant. Send your photos and information to Editor Tim Dmoch P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387-0014; or via e-mail to timdmoch@thescngroup.com.

WEST OAKLAND’S

NEWSWEEKLY

IS NOW ON AND The Spinal Column Newsweekly is proud to announce our new Facebook page! There, you can receive breaking news directly from staff writers, discuss matters important to fellow lakes area residents and stay at the forefront of western Oakland County news. Simply search for “Spinal Column Newsweekly” on Facebook and add our page to participate.

We’ve joined Twitter too! Stay connected to the Spinal Column Newsweekly, the premiere lakes area news source for over 50 years, at home or on the go. Follow @scnewsweekly to get breaking news from western Oakland County, as well as updates about stories you’ve read in the Spinal Column Newsweekly.

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

MAIL BAG

Furlough day vote From West Bloomfield Township Trustee Lawrence Brown: I am writing you to address the article that appeared in the (Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011 edition of the Spinal Column Newsweekly) headed “Board eliminates furlough days in township budget.” This article appeared on pages 16 and 17 in reference to our board meeting in West Bloomfield on Nov. 28. It is my concern that this article is misleading by implying that the board unanimously passed the elimination of the furlough days, when in fact (Clerk) Cathy Shaughnessy and (I) voted against such action. My reason for voting against such an action is in essence giving the township employees a type of raise which was not the purpose of having had the public safety millage increase pass. When the board evaluated how large the additional millage needed to be, our projections included the furlough days being left in place for the years 2012 and 2013. It’s not that I believe the township office staff doesn’t deserve to have these days reinstated, it is my opinion that we first see how all of the instituted decreases in costs affect our

Mail Bag provides a forum to express your thoughts. Please limit to 275 words or less. Please type and double space. We reserve the right to edit or not publish any letter. Deadline Friday at 12 noon. Include name, address and phone number for verification, only your name and community will be published. Letters without names will not be considered. Mail to Spinal Column Newsweekly, P.O. Box 14, Union Lake, MI 48387 or fax 24/7 to Editor 248-360-1220.

AROUND THE LAKES AREA

budgets going forward before making such a decision. It is presumptuous on the other members of the board to place an increase in our costs before knowing the long-term impact on our fund balance. The furlough days might have been able to be eliminated later next year once we have a better handle on the revenue side exclusive of the new millage money. It is interesting to read the Commerce board article (“Commerce board split on budget over wage issue,” Nov. 30, 2011 Spinal Column Newsweekly) where your staff writer at least reported the split vote and included the reasons why from the minority. Why didn’t we get that same coverage? ❏

Who pays the bills? From Kelly Beman, Commerce Township: I opened the most recent (Spinal Column Newsweekly) to an article about a dispute involving the Commerce Township budget. Still deep in a severe recession, Supervisor Tom Zoner wants to reinstitute employee pay that was cut in recent years. Using the (Spinal Column) figures, the township will have a surplus of over $700,000 in 2012. The township is also on the hook for a $1.2 million bond payment because the DDA will run out of money in 2012. I ask you Mr. Zoner, who pays the bills in the township? Residents recently passed a 10 year Headlee (RIP, wish you were here to see this) Amendment override for police and fire (services). I may be missing something, but a surplus tells me that somewhere taxes are higher than need be. Wouldn’t it make more sense to put the excess in a rainy day fund in case home values don’t recover or, better yet, give a small tax cut to the people (taxpayers) who pay the bills? I feel for the township employees but many residents have lost jobs, taken pay cuts or had no raises. ❏ A special feature of the Spinal Column Newsweekly

WE’RE ASKING… Do you prefer a real or "fake" Christmas tree? "I prefer a fake tree. It's easy to decorate. It has to be pre-lit. I like the smell of a real tree, so I get a vine for my fireplace so I can still smell it." — Emily Asher, White Lake

"I prefer a real tree. I used to have a real blue spruce every year, and decorate it with my antique Christmas ornament collection." — Con Shaw, White Lake

"I like fake. It's not messy. I like the smell of a real tree, but the sap is annoying."

— Matt Pauls, owner of Blazing Bagels, Commerce

"I prefer fake because I don't like dealing with the needles."

— Jordan Spitsbergen, Waterford


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 37

COMMUNITY CALENDAR ■ Huron Valley Council of the Arts: Highland Festival of Trees Artist Market, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays; and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays now through Friday, Dec. 23, 205 W. Livingston Road, Highland. 248-889-8660. ■ Jewish Ensemble Theatre: “God of Carnage,” Tony Award-winning comedy for Best Play 2009, Dec. 7 to Jan. 1, 2012, 6600 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield. 248-788-2900 or visit www.jettheatre.com. ■ Desert Angel Miracle Box Packing Party: 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, 4770 Waterford Road, Clarkston. 248623-0444 or ocsclub.org. ■ Holy Spirit Lutheran Church: Free community Christmas caroling with light refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9, 4800 Orchard Lake Road located across from West Bloomfield High School. ■ Walled Lake Central Ski Team: Ski swap and coat/jacket donation, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 1600 Oakley Park Road, Walled Lake. 248956-5448 or e-mail TimothyMcbride@wlcsd.org. ■ Jackson Chorale: Annual Christmas concert, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, Central United Methodist Church, 3882 Highland Road, Waterford. Tickets available at the door. 248-651-3085 or 248-682-4992. ■ Goodrich High School: Craft Show, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 8029 S. Gale at the corner of Hegel Road, Goodrich. 810-658-8080 or 810-658-0440. ■ Village of Wolverine Lake: Snacks With Santa and crafts, 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, Richardson Community Center, 1485 Oakley Park Road, Commerce. $5 per child and $2 per adult. Registration. 248-624-1710. ■ Friends of Byers: A Visit with Santa! With hot cocoa and other goodies, noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, Byers Homestead aka “The Duck Farm,” 213 Commerce Road, Commerce. www.byershomestead.org or 248-363-2592.

■ Church of the Holy Spirit: 50-plus Singles Christmas Dance — DJ Terry Barr, beer, wine, snacks, Friday, Dec. 16, 3700 Harvey Lake Road, Highland. $10 in advance, $15 at the door. 248887-6933, 248-343-4551 or 248872-7140.

SUPPORT GROUPS ❐ Celebrate Recovery: Alcohol, drugs, gambling, sexual addition recovery meetings, 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Life Point Christian Church, 501 Scott Lake Road, Waterford. 248-682-1747.

■ Williams Lake Church of the Nazarene: Holiday Market Place — ladies shopping event with food, music, and door prizes, 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16, 2840 Airport Road, Waterford. 248-673-5911.

❐ Divorce Care: Support group meeting for adults and children, 6:30 p.m. Sundays, Brightmoor Christian Church, 40800 W. 13 Mile, Novi. 248-7559533.

■ Lakes Area Rotary Club: Meeting, noon, Tuesdays, Bayside Grill, 142 E. Walled Lake Drive, Walled Lake. 248770-2707.

❐ Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous: Meeting, 6 p.m. Fridays, Crossroads Presbyterian Church, 1445 Welch Road, Commerce. 248-807-8667 or foodaddicts.org.

■ Rotary of West Bloomfield: Meeting, 7:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Henry Ford Medical Center, second floor, southwest corner of Farmington and Maple roads. 248-520-0095.

❐ Over-Eaters Anonymous: Recovery from compulsive eating, 12-step program, meeting, 6 p.m. Tuesdays, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 5301 Hatchery Road, Waterford.

■ Waterford Rotary Club: Meeting, noon, Tuesdays, The Shark Club on M59, Waterford. 248-625-4897. ■ Huron Valley Council for the Arts: Knitters circle, 10 a.m. Wednesdays, Highland Station House, Highland. 248-685-9015. ■ (Breakfast) Optimist Club of Waterford: Meeting, 7:15 a.m. Thursdays, Big Boy Restaurant, M-59 and Airport Road, Waterford. 248-6733493. ■ Multi-Lakes Conservation Association: All-you-can-eat fish fry, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fridays, 3860 Newton Road, Commerce. 248-3639109. ■ Grace Hospice: Volunteers with reliable transportation needed to visit terminally-ill patients and family members in our communities. Free training and classes are now forming. 1-888-9374390. ■ Catholic Social Services of Oakland County: Senior companion volunteers needed to support adults with developmental disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, chronic mental illness, as well as the physically frail and homebound. 248-559-1147, ext. 3434.

SENIOR ACTIVITIES ❐ Calvary Lutheran Church: In conjunction with St. Joseph Mercy Oakland, “Senior Fit,” free exercise program for ages 55 and up, 11 a.m. to noon, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 9101 Highland Road, White Lake. Registration. 1-800-372-6094 or 248625-3288. ❐ Dublin Senior Center: Lunch, Bingo and cards, 11:30 a.m. Mondays and Fridays, 685 Union Lake Road, White Lake. Registration. 248-698-2394. ❐ Foster Grandparent Program of Oakland County: Volunteers needed ages 55 and older to provide tutoring, mentoring and nurturing youth with special needs. Volunteers receive a nontaxable stipend, mileage reimbursement, a meal or meal reimbursement, training. 248-559-1147, ext. 3424. ❐ Highland Adult Activity Center: Bingo, noon, Mondays and Wednesdays; Sit’N’Stitch, 10 a.m., and movie with popcorn, noon, Fridays, 209 N. John Street, Highland. 248-887-1707. ❐ Richardson Community Senior Center: Knitting and crochet group, 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays, 1485 E. Oakley Park, Commerce. Registration. 248926-0063 or commercetwp.com.

❐ Sylvan Lake Lutheran Church: Senior Stretch and Tone, 11 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30 a.m. Fridays, 2399 Figa Avenue, West Bloomfield. 248-682-0770. ❐ Waterford Senior Center: Physician-led educational seminar about post-shingles nerve pain, 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8, 3621 Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford. Registration. 248-682-9450 or visit www.postshinglesnervepainseminar.com. ❐ West Bloomfield Parks and Recreation Senior Programs: Line dancing, 11 a.m. Fridays at the Corners, 4640 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Registration. 248451-1900. ❐ Wixom Senior Center: Senior Christmas Party, 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 15; Meals on Wheels, first and third Monday of the month (must pre-register by the Thursday before), 49015 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. 248-624-0870 or wixomgov.org.

PARKS ❐ Indian Springs Environmental Discovery Center: “Snacks ‘n’ Crafts with Santa,” 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, Indian Springs Metropark, White Lake. Registration. 248-625-6640. ❐ Kensington Farm Center: Snacks with Santa, Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 10 and 11, Kensington Metropark, Milford. Registration. 248-684-8632. ❐ Kensington Nature Center: Winter Wildlife Survival, 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10; Winter Nature Detectives for Children, 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, Kensington Metropark, Milford. Registration. 248-685-1561 or 1800-477-3178.

LIBRARY EVENTS ❐ Commerce Township Community Library: Gingerbread houses, Saturday, Dec. 10, 2860 N. Pontiac Trail, Commerce. 248-669-8108 or commercelibrary.info. ❐ Highland Township Public Library:

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Continued ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 37

LIBRARY EVENTS Teen Movie Night —”The Zookeeper,” Monday, Dec. 12, 444 Beach Farm Circle, Highland. Registration. 248-8872218. ❐ Milford Public Library: American Girls 25th Anniversary, 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 330 Family Drive, Milford. Registration. 248-684-0845. ❐ Walled Lake City Library: Afternoon Book Discussion Group, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 20, 1499 E. West Maple, Walled Lake. Registration. 248-6243772. ❐ Waterford Township Public Library: Saturday Special — Gingerbread Houses, ages 6-8, 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 5168 Civic Center Drive, Waterford. Registration. 248-6724831. ❐ West Bloomfield Public Library:Adult

Program — Director’s Cut — Steven Spielberg: A Film Discussion Series, 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12, 4600 Walnut Lake Road, West Bloomfield. Registration. 248-851-0463 or www.wblib.org/friends. ❐ White Lake Township Library: Movie Matinee, 2 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8; Fit Fridays — New adult Wii bowling program, 10:30 a.m. Friday, Dec. 9; Visit with Santa, 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 7527 E. Highland Road, White Lake. Registration. 248-698-4942. ❐ Wixom Public Library: Holiday Workshop: Present Making, ages 2-10, 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 49015 Pontiac Trail, Wixom. Registration. 248624-2512.

RELIGIOUS ❐ Waterford Community Church:”Walk Through Bethlehem,” 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 9 through 18, 3900 Airport Road, Waterford. Free admission. 248-6231340 or www.waterfordwired.org.

DIA Ticket Give Away THANK YOU TO ALL OUR READERS WHO ENTERED TO WIN! Congratulatio ns to CARRIE from Milford and MARK from White Lake Last Week’s Winne of 4 Free Tick rs ets


SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Hansard

Howell

Mayrand

Pyles

Schultz

Scott

The All-Area Volleyball Team Spinal Column Newsweekly honors this year’s best players By Michael Shelton staff writer

The Spinal Column Newsweekly is proud to present its fourth annual AllArea Volleyball Team, made up of the best lakes area varsity volleyball players during the 2011 season. Team selections were not only based upon players’ statistics, but also on nominations from area coaches; other honors a player has received, such as conference awards; and players’ contributions to their teams. The selection process was tough considering the abundance of talent on display this season. Huron Valley Lakeland’s incredible streak of excellence continued this season as the Eagles won their fourth straight Kensington Lakes Activities Association (KLAA) North Division and Lakes Conference championships before claiming their third consecutive district championship, thanks in part to two All-Area First Team members. But, Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes was the surprise of the season, as the Lakers won the Catholic League East Division title before winning a district championship and advancing

all the way to a Class D regional final with its All-Area First Team setter leading the way. Not to be outdone, Walled Lake Northern fought tooth and nail with its Bogie Lake rival, Lakeland, to earn a share of the KLAA North crown for the second time in three seasons. The Knights are represented by two All-Area First Team members. Also included is West Bloomfield’s version of Miss Volleyball, who closed out her high school career with a strong senior season as she prepares to continue playing in college out west. ALL-AREA FIRST TEAM Ciara Schultz Senior Setter Huron Valley Lakeland Making her third straight appearance on the All-Area First Team, Schultz racked up numerous honors in her senior season, as she was awarded an AllState Class A Honorable Mention from the Michigan Interscholastic Volleyball Coaches Association (MIVCA). She also earned All-KLAA Lakes Conference honors and was the American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA)/MaxPreps Player of the Week for

Michigan on Oct. 17. Schultz finished the 2011 season with 985 assists, 304 kills, 329 digs and 67 aces. She won’t have to travel far to continue her career, as she has committed to Oakland University. Brooke Mayrand Senior Setter Walled Lake Northern Making her first appearance on the All-Area First Team, Mayrand played for four years on the Knights’ varsity team and was a starter in the last three and a captain in the last two. “Brooke has led our offense for three years and is the best setter we have had at Northern,” said Head Coach Renee Miller. “She is a great leader for us on the court during matches and every day during practices.” Mayrand had 765 assists in 2176 attempts for a 7.15 assist per game average while leading the Knights in serving with a .961 average and serving 62 aces. She also had a .397 hitting average with 134 kills as a setter in the front row, while also garnering 65 blocks. For her efforts, Mayrand was

rewarded with both All-KLAA Lakes Conference and MIVCA All-Region honors for the third straight season. Lindsey Hansard Senior Libero Huron Valley Lakeland Averaging 4.5 digs a game and finishing the season with 541 digs and 28 aces, Hansard filled the shoes of the departed libero Rose Deren admirably, as she served as a team captain for the Eagles and earned her first appearance on the All-Area First Team. Hansard was also a member of the Michigan Elite Volleyball Academy this year. Courtney Scott Senior Outside Hitter Walled Lake Northern Making her first All-Area First Team appearance, Scott showed why she was awarded a volleyball scholarship to Northwood University this season as she led the Knights with 354 kills and a .354 hitting percentage. She also had 88 blocks and was second on the team in serve receive

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VOLLEYBALL

All-Area Team ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 39

attempts with 483 and boasted a .894 receive percentage. Scott earned MIVCA All-Region honors. “Courtney had worked extremely hard to improve her overall game and it really showed this season when she not only was a force at the net, but also one of our top defensive players,” Miller said. Haley Howell Junior Setter Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes Helping lead the Lakers to both a Catholic League East crown and a district championship, Howell finished 2011 with 80 aces, 127 kills, 515 assists, 126 digs, and 26 blocks. Howell was awarded All-Catholic honors by the Detroit Catholic High School League for her play and is making her first appearance on the All-Area First Team. Jackie Pyles Senior Outside Attacker West Bloomfield Making her second straight Spinal Column First Team appearance, Pyles shined in her final season for the Lakers — her fourth as a varsity starter — as

she finished with 342 kills, 51 aces and 640 digs for the season. Pyles helped the Lakers finish 6-1 in the competitive Oakland Activities Association (OAA) White Division. “Jackie continually pushes herself to be the best volleyballer that she can be and motivates those around her. She always brings an eagerness to learn and to compete to the court,” said Lakers Head Coach Julian Wargo. Pyles was named an MIVCA All-State Honorable Mention in addition to earning MIVCA All-Region and All-OAA honors for the third straight season. She was also named the AVCA/MaxPreps Player of the Week for the state of Michigan on Oct. 3, and was awarded individual state AllAcademic honors. Pyles will next take her game out west as she has committed to play volleyball at Boise State University. ALL-AREA SECOND TEAM • Brittany Leonard, senior middle blocker, Huron Valley Lakeland; • Kelly Meehan, junior libero, Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes; • Meghan Conrad, senior right-side hitter, Walled Lake Northern; • Brittany Guldan, junior setter/right-side hitter, Walled Lake Central; • Erin Winn, senior right-side hitter, Huron Valley Milford; and • Dagny Stark, senior outside hitter/middle-blocker, Huron Valley Milford. HONORABLE MENTION Catelyn Girard, Walled Lake Central; Colleen Starrs, Walled Lake Central; Mikaela Beck, Walled Lake Central; Nicole Morgan, Walled Lake Western; Missy Christenson, West Bloomfield; Julie D’Angelo, West Bloomfield; Lexie Robak, Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes; Kristina Krupiak, Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes; Maddie Longville, Walled Lake Western; Mary Armstrong, Huron Valley Lakeland; Madison Harris, Huron Valley Lakeland; Rachel Kopf, Huron Valley Milford; Jordan Brisson, Waterford Kettering; Kim Jayson, Waterford Kettering; Robyn Marks, Waterford Mott; Breanne Rudolph, Waterford Kettering.

HOCKEY

Central triumphs over Northern, 5-4, in division action By Michael Shelton staff writer

Walled Lake Central picked up two wins this past week, including one against a division rival. The Vikings defeated Walled Lake Northern, 2-1, on Wednesday, Nov. 30 at

Lakeland Ice Arena. The game was scoreless after the first period before Kyle Belevender scored for Central (4-2 overall, 1-0 in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association North Division) with just over 10 minutes left in the second after Connor Jeffries forced a turnover. Zach Schneider tied the game for Northern (4-1, 1-1) in the third period off an assist from Justin Fishback. But, Jarett Lazare scored the gamewinner for Central off an assist from Eric Rosteck. Sam Woznicki stopped 32 of 33 shots in net for the Vikings, who won despite being outshot by the Knights, 33-17. Central then followed up with a 3-1 victory over Fenton on Saturday, Dec. 3 at Lakeland Ice Arena. The Vikings jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first off two goals from Drew Kocoves, with two assists from Riley Dunning and an assist from Adam Dennis. Kevin Berry scored unassisted for Fenton on a power play to cut Central’s lead to one in the third, but Dennis would later score an insurance goal off an assist by Kocoves. Northern bounced back on Dec. 3 with a 5-4 victory over Pinckney. Central will host Milford on Friday, Dec. 9 while Northern will travel to face Walled Lake Western on Saturday, Dec. 10.

Eaglets in second in MIHL following pair of wins, loss By Michael Shelton staff writer

Orchard Lake St. Mary’s went 2-1 this past week in games against league opponents. The Eaglets defeated Bloomfield Hills Brother Rice on the road, 5-4, on Wednesday, Nov. 30. The Warriors led 1-0 after the first period before the Eaglets (4-2, 3-2; 6 points, Michigan Interscholastic Hockey League) scored 4 goals in the second to take a 4-3 lead. Stephan Beauvais scored in the third for St. Mary’s to seal the win. Luke Rogers scored a pair of goals for the Eaglets while Alex Fasan also scored. Cody Milan also had 4 assists. The Eaglets then fell at home to Novi Detroit Catholic Central, 4-2, on Friday, Dec. 2, marking the second time this season that the Shamrocks have defeated the Eaglets. The score was tied at 1-1 at the end of the first period and at 2-2 in the second period before Danny Middleton scored in the second and Carson Gatt

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

scored in the third for Catholic Central. David Muth and Daniel Cody each scored for St. Mary’s, which trails the Shamrocks by 4 points for first-place in the MIHL. The Eaglets then bounced back with a 5-2 victory at home over Trenton on Saturday, Dec. 3. Rogers had two goals for St. Mary’s, while Mitchell Vanderburg and Deion Muller each had a goal and Cooper Anslett had 2 assists. Williams Ulrich picked up the win in net for St. Mary’s, which will host Cranbrook on Saturday, Dec. 10.

Mott improves to 2-1-1; Western tops Lakeland, 3-2 Waterford Mott picked up a draw and a win this past week. The Corsairs started the week with a 2-2 tie against South Lyon. Scott Cuthrell and Christian Corona each scored for Mott (2-1-1 overall, 1-0 in the Kensington Lakes Activities Association North Division), while Jon Furton had 59 saves in net. Mott then picked up a 4-3 victory over Pinckney on Friday, Dec. 2. Cuthrell had 2 goals and an assist while Austin Sereno had a goal and an assist. Corona also had a goal for Mott, who will host Grand Blanc tonight, Wednesday, Dec. 7 at Lakeland Ice Arena before playing rival Waterford Kettering on Saturday, Dec. 10. • Walled Lake Western defeated Huron Valley Lakeland, 3-2, on Wednesday, Nov. 30. Western (3-4 overall, 1-3 in the KLAA West) then fell to Bay City Central, 4-3, on Friday, Dec. 2, while Lakeland (1-4, 02 KLAA North) fell to Hartland, 3-1, on Saturday, Dec. 3.

GIRLS BASKETBALL

Poor shooting not enough to thwart Lakers in victory By Michael Shelton staff writer

Waterford Our Lady of the Lakes won its season opener on the road, 55-45, over Burton Bendle on Tuesday, Nov. 29. Carlee Cottrell had 17 points, 4 rebounds, 3 assists and 5 steals for the Lakers (1-0), while Anna Robb had 12 points, 9 rebounds and 2 steals. Ava Doetsch also had 10 points, 7 rebounds, 4 assists and 5 steals, while PAGE 41 ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯


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GIRLS BASKETBALL

Our Lady Lakers ❯ ❯ ❯ ❯ PAGE 40

Lexie Robak chipped in with 9 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists and 3 steals. “For the first game, we were pleased with much of the game,” said Our Lady Head Coach Steve Robak. “However, we shot very poorly from 3 point range (018) and the free-throw line (7-16) and we’ll be working to improve those numbers dramatically. “We did have 26 offensive rebounds for the game, partly because we did shoot so poorly,” he added. “It’s early yet, but I think the team is beginning to come together and fill the roles we need to fill from last year’s team.” The Lakers will next play their home opener on Thursday, Dec. 15 against Lenawee Christian.

Birrell’s 26 points propel Central to rout over Pinckney Walled Lake Central opened its season with a 62-41 win at home over Pinckney on Tuesday, Nov. 29. Last Tuesday also marked the first victory for Central’s first-year head coach, Michelle Fortier. Senior Kara Birrell led the Vikings (10) with 26 points while Brianna Krus had 13 points. Caitlin Starrs added 8 points for Central, while Ciara Sims pitched in with 7 points, as the Vikings shot 14-for-17 from the free-throw line. Central played at Novi yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 after press time and will host Northville on Friday, Dec. 9.

Walled Lake Northern High School’s Corrina Rotondo (seated at center) has officially signed her letter of intent to play softball for Concordia University. Last season, Rotondo struck out 107 batters and had an earned run average of 1.34 for the Knights. She also plays summer travel softball for the Queens of Diamonds 18u softball team. Rotondo, a member of the Spinal Column All-Area Second Team last season, is expected to be the Knights’ ace when softball season starts up again in the spring. Concordia University is located in Ann Arbor and is a private liberal arts university affiliated with the Lutheran Church. (Photo submitted by Kristen Socha)

quarter and Hung scored 16 points for Mott while Banchiu had 7 points, 12 rebounds and 3 steals and Claudia Crake had 7 points. Mott played at Berkley yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 after press time and will host Huron Valley Milford on Tuesday, Dec. 13.

Corsairs up-ended by South Lyon, Mavs fall short in then thrash Shrine season opener Waterford Mott split two games last against Holly week to open the 2011-12 season. The Corsairs (1-1) opened the season with at 45-42 loss at South Lyon East on Tuesday, Nov. 29. Mott trailed by 9 points in the fourth quarter before cutting the Cougars’ lead to one. But South Lyon East hit two free-throws and Mott missed a last-ditch 3-pointer at the end. Lauren Hung led Mott with 15 points, while Carly Banchiu had 9 points, 11 rebounds and 4 steals. Mott bounced back with a 60-23 thrashing of Royal Oak Shrine on Friday, Dec. 2. The Corsairs led 24-1 in the first

Huron Valley Milford dropped its season opener at home to Holly, 38-33, on Tuesday, Nov. 29. Milford (0-1) trailed 17-12 at halftime before Holly went on a 10-5 run in the third quarter and led 27-17 at the end of the third. The Mavericks bounced back to take a 28-27 lead in the fourth, but fell just short in the end. “It was somewhere in the second quarter when we finally got the firstgame jitters out of the way. We settled in and started to gain some consistency to our game,” said Milford Head Coach

Jennifer VanGoethem. “We battled the entire game and never gave up.” Milford was led by Claire Slaughter with 13 points, 10 rebounds, 4 steals and 2 assists. Lane Andrews had 6 points, 5 rebounds and 3 steals. The Mavs played at Fenton yesterday, Tuesday, Dec. 6 after press time and will host Waterford Mott on Tuesday, Dec. 13.

Davis, Brown lead W. Bloomfield to win over Groves West Bloomfield won its season opener on the road, 57-42, over Birmingham Groves on Tuesday, Nov. 29. The Lakers jumped out to a 36-18 halftime advantage and led by as many as 23 before Groves cut the lead to 12 in the fourth quarter. But, West Bloomfield would not falter and would head home with a victory. “We returned 3 of our top 4 scorers from last year but learning how to close

out a game is something that takes time,” said West Bloomfield Head Coach Steve Larkin. Junior guard Sydni Davis led the Lakers (1-0) with 17 points and 6 assists, while sophomore forward Kasey Brown had 16 points and 9 rebounds and junior guard Kheri Motely had 11 points and 9 rebounds. “The advantage we had was with our athleticism at the guard position, which allowed us to play an up-tempo pace and pressure their guards throughout the game,” Larkin said. “It was also a surprise advantage to get the production out of first-year varsity player, Kasey Brown. “Overall, for our first game I thought we did OK, but after looking at film there are numerous areas that we need to improve on if we want to compete in the (Oakland Activities Association) Red Division with the likes of Clarkston, Lathrup, Pontiac, North Farmington and Troy,” he added. The Lakers will next travel to Howell to face the Highlanders tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 8 before opening up OAA Red Division play on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at home against North Farmington.


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Notice of Posting

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF COMMERCE

for Charter Township of West Bloomfield Township Board

2009 TOWNSHIP DRIVE Commerce Township, MI 48390

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the Township Board of the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan, will meet at a Regular Board meeting on the 13th day of December, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., at the Township Hall, located at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390, to determine if the following Special Assessment District will be established and to receive PUBLIC COMMENTS, if any, regarding creation of the following Special Assessment District: Special Projects No. 33 The proposed Special Assessment District involves the following property located in the Charter Township of Commerce, Oakland County, Michigan: Parcel Nos. Water Sewer 17-25-101-029 17-08-154-004 17-08-117-007 17-11-340-015 17-12-351-016 Plans showing the improvement, the location, and the legal description are on file with the Township Clerk for public examination. In order to appeal the amount of any special assessment, affected owners or parties with an interest must protest the proposed assessment. This may be done by appearing in person at the hearing or having an agent appear at the hearing on behalf of an owner or party in interest, or in writing by filing a letter of protest before the hearing, addressed to the Township Clerk at 2009 Township Drive, Commerce Township, Michigan 48390. An owner or party having an interest in the real property affected by the special assessment may file a written appeal of the special assessment with the Michigan Tax Tribunal within 30 days after the confirmation of the special assessment roll if the special assessment is protested at the hearing held for the purpose of confirming the special assessment roll. Please direct any questions you may have to the Charter Township of Commerce Building Department at (248) 960-7060.

Daniel Munro, Clerk Charter Township of Commerce

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

SC: 11/30/11; 12/7/11

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The West Bloomfield Township Wetland Review Board will hold a public hearing at the Township Board Room, 4550 Walnut Lake Road on Wednesday December 14, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. to consider the following Wetland/Floodplain Permit Applications: CASE #PWT11-1814 KABOT Parcel: Lot 16, Supervisor’s Plat No. 9 Sidwell #18-13-126-014 Location: 2626 W Long Lake Request: A request to remove three (3) existing trees and landscape beds, undertake extensive grading and drainage improvements (new structures), install new stone stairs and install native plantings within the 25 foot environmental features setback to Pine Lake. Applicant: G. Michael Kabot CASE #PWT11-1818 KABOT Parcel: Lot 17, Supervisor’s Plat No. 9 Sidwell #18-13-126-013 Location: 2638 W Long Lake Request: A request to remove one (1) tree, undertake extensive grading and drainage improvements (3 structures with one direct discharge), install bio-swale/rain garden with perforated drain pipe, construct boulder seawall and retaining wall and install native plantings within the 25 foot environmental features setback to Pine Lake. Applicant: G. Michael Kabot CASE #PWT11-1815 SWIDER/ZAMORANO Parcel: Lot 5, Pine Lake Manor Sidwell # 18-12-253-013 Location: 2369 Pine Lake Request: A request to remove a Willow tree, temporary construction impacts and to cantilever a portion of upper levels of the home to and over the 25 foot environmental features setback to Pine Lake. Applicant: Susan Swider & Lucia Zamorano Detailed plans are available for inspection at the West Bloomfield Township Environmental Department, 4550 Walnut Lake Road, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A staff report, as prepared for the Wetland Review Board, will be available for review the Friday prior to the meeting. If you have any questions on this matter, contact the Environmental Department at (248) 451-4818.

Marshall Labadie, Development Services Director S.C.12-7-11 The Township will provide necessary, reasonable auxiliary aids and services to individuals with disabilities at a public meeting upon two weeks notice in writing or by calling the Township Clerk or Environmental Director at (248) 451-4800.

1. Synopsis of the Special Budget Meeting held on: Monday, November 28, 2011 The above synopsis shall be posted (in its entirety) at the following locations: (1) Office of the Township Clerk 4550 Walnut Lake Road (2) Main Township Library 4600 Walnut Lake Road (3) Township’s website: Catherine Shaughnessy Township Clerk

S.C. 12-7-11

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CITY OF WALLED LAKE 2011 December Board of Review Please take NOTICE that the City of Walled Lake’s December Board of Review is called into session to hear appeals and to correct both the assessment and tax rolls for the following reasons: Changes in Taxable value due to a newly recognized Ownership Transfer as provided for under General Property Tax Act as amended by PA 415 of 1994 and PA 476 of 1996 which are treated as clerical errors. Clerical Errors or Mutual Mistakes of Fact as provided under original MCL 211.53b(1). Appeals for “homestead” or “qualified agricultural property” by an owner of property which qualified on May 1 may appeal, for the current year and the immediately preceding year if the exemption was not on the tax roll, as provided for under MCL sections 211.7cc and 211.7ee as amended by PA 237 of 1994. Appeals for Poverty Exemption for the current year, if the exemption was not denied by the previous March or July Board of Review, as provided for under MCL section 211.7u and as amended by PA 74 of 1995. The Board of Review will meet in the Walled Lake City Council Chambers, 1499 E. West Maple Road, Walled Lake, from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon on Tuesday, December 13, 2011. This notice is posted in compliance with the State of Michigan’s Open Meetings Act, Public Act 267 of 1976, as amended, and MCL 41.72a (2) (3). Tamara Williams Deputy Clerk STATE OF MICHIGAN PROBATE COURT COUNTY OF OAKLAND

SC: 12-7-11 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Decedent’s Estate

Estate of James W. Fancy, Deceased Date of Birth: September 27, 1933 TO ALL CREDITORS: NOTICE TO CREDITORS: The decedent, James W. Fancy, Deceased, who lived at 6227 Upper Straits Boulevard, West Bloomfield, Michigan, died on July 7, 2011. Creditors of the decedent are notified that all claims against the estate will be forever barred unless presented to Dennis J. Pheney, named personal representative or proposed personal representative, or to both the probate court at 1200 N. Telegraph Dept. 457 Pontiac, MI 48347-0457 and the named/proposed personal representative within 4 months after the date of publication of this notice. Dated: 11-16-2011 McElroy & Pheney (P18863) Dennis J. Pheney, Personal Representative Dennis J. Pheney 26050 Orchard Lake Road, Suite #300 26050 Orchard Lake Road, Suite #300 Farmington Hills, MI 48334-4419 Farmington Hills, MI 48334-4419 (248) 553-2300 S.C. 12-7-11 (248) 553-2300


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FARMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL Class of 1967, looking for classmates for 45th Reunion on July 21, 2012. Contact Susan (Himmelspach) Whittaker @ s_whittaker@comcast.net REDFORD UNION High School Class of 1962, looking for classmates for 50th Reunion on October 13, 2012. contact Madeline (Rice) Smith: paddoinmadeline@gmail.com or Linda (Horning) Tracy: Lindatracy100@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Houses For Sale

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Looking to purchase or sell your home? Contact Arlene at Keller Williams 248-912-4628 mihome4u.com Highland

LET IT SNOW! Well maintained like new 1.5 story home w/2500 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms & 3 1/2 baths. Many fine details, fireplace in great room & dining room with lots of windows, library, formal dining, finished walk-out lower level with family/game room. Private 4.14 acre setting. $375,000.

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Charming 3 bedroom ranch w/ privileges to Carroll Lake. Many updates. Partial basement & 24x24 garage. Walled Lake Schools. Now only $74,900.

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RELOCATE TODAY!! Beautiful 55+ community! We'll pay up to $4,000.00 to relocate your manufactured home to beautiful Cranberry Lake. Rent from $516/month!

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Waterford Condo - close to OCC 2 Bedroom, 2.5 baths, all appliances, nice deck, basement, 1 car garage, no smokers, pets negotiable. $1300.00/mo, 1/2 month security deposit, $100.00 cleaning fee.

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Mobile Homes for Rent

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

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olivermich@mac.com 248-755-5073

WHITE LAKE

3 Bedroom Ranch $750 per month 248-568-8900 WATERFORD Duplex 3 bedrooms, unfurnished, all appliances. $800 a month plus security.

248-343-1666 WALLED LAKE HILLSIDE MANOR APTS 360 ROSEBUD Special Half off Security Dep. 2 Bedrooms- $650 per month plus electric 1 Bedroom- $500 per month

(248)335-8988

Apartments For Rent SPECIAL 1 or 2 bedroom apartments. Heat and water paid. No pets. In City of Milford.

(248)477-9192

Apartments

COME SEE US NOW WIXOM * MOVE IN SPECIAL* 2 BEDROOM ONLY, $595 Will Move You In !

•Playground/Pool •Free Heat & City Water

Town & Country Apartments •48200 W. Pontiac Trail

•Between Beck & Wixom Rd.

CALL US TODAY !

(248)624-3194 Rooms/Share Quarters

December Classes Available $ Class only

99

With a prepaid voucher Contact Mary Nicole 248-684-1065 MaryNicole@RealEstateOne.com •Are you looking for a new career? •Would you like to own your own business? We’re Michigan’s largest real estate broker and last year we sold over 17,000 properties. We expect to surpass that in the coming year.

Join us as we grow Michigan.

57

BUSINESS WOMAN looking to share 2 bedroom apartment in Novi, with female. $400 plus utilities. Call for information. 248-787-2059 SHARE MY House: Kids & pets, ok. Lake access, $600 plus half utilities. 248-3638131 FURNISHED SLEEPING room for rent. Waterford area, $100 /week. 810-355-8097

HELP WANTED General/ Help Wanted

65

OFFICE CLEANING EVENING HOURS 6:30PM-11:30PM MONDAY - FRIDAY NOVI AREA

CORPORATE CLEANING GROUP 248-313-9880

BUYER/PLANNER NEEDED

Pre-Licensing Class

56

MAC Valves, Inc. is a worldwide manufacturer of pneumatic solenoid valves. We are looking for some one to fill an opening position in our purchasing department. They must be a reliable, self motivated person and be able to work in a customer focused team. We are a people oriented technology based company and operate in a group system environment where people are given responsibility to learn and advance. Purchasing experience is preferred and Excel experience is a must. Apply in person or mail resume to: Donna Shopp MAC Valves, Inc 30569 Beck Road • Wixom, MI 48393


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011 LD FIE OM O L B ST WE

www.spinalcolumnonline.com LD FIE OM O L B ST WE

ITE WH

. WP ET L AK

. WP ET RC E MM CO

$549,900

$598,000

UPPER STRAITS LAKEFRONT INVESTMENT SPECIAL •4 bed, 3.5 bath, 2,746 sq. ft. + fin. walkout •1st flr. mstr., 2nd buildable lakefront lot #211104723 EXT. #245 •KEY #260513

STUNNING 90 FT. OF MAIN LAKEFRONT ALL-SPORTS CASS LAKE •2,778 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2 fireplaces •2+ car, 3 decks, dock, seawall, shed #211063900 EXT. #231 •KEY #248358

P. TW RD FO R TE WA

2900 Union Lake, Suite 210 Commerce, MI 48382

Lakes Area’s #1 Team! Zillow - Preferred Agent

$219,900

$124,900

HOME BACKS TO SUB PARK & WALKING PATH •1,438 sq. ft. + fin. lower level, 3 bedroom •Great rm, dining w/doorwall to deck, 2 car #211089004 EXT. #247 •KEY #256965

P. TW RD O F TER WA

Janet Direct: Steve Direct: 248-755-7600 248-755-7500

janet@TheStocktonTeam.com

$119,900

55 FT. OF FRONTAGE TO ALL-SPORTS CRESCENT LAKE •1,572 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2.5 bath, new kitchen •Ceramic, hardwood, 2 car, seawall, deck, porch #211114249 EXT. #210 •KEY #266255

We are full time professionals... • Meeting Client’s Needs Since 1977 • 4 Dedicated Listing & Buyer’s Agents • 150+ Negotiated/Closed “Short Sales” • 121 Closed Sales, January-October 2011 Including 28 Waterfront Properties

Our performance speaks for itself!

E AK

$224,900

$224,900

GORGEOUS HILLSIDE HOME ON ALL-SPORTS SILVER LAKE •1,718 sq. ft., 3 bed, 3 bath + fin. walkout •2 story great room, loft, family room, patio #211112589 EXT. #266 • KEY #266253

$209,900/ LEASE $1,395/MO.

219 FT. FRONTAGE TO ALL-SPORTS WILLIAMS LAKE •3 bedroom, 2 bath, Florida rm, deck •Great rm w/fireplace, deck/dock, shed #211089314 EXT. #248•KEY #256951

$364,900

ALL-SPORTS OXBOW LAKEFRONT 1.19 TREED ACRE LOT •3,271 sq. ft. + fin. walkout, contemporary •4 bed, 3.5 bath, multi-decks, 3+ car #211075518 EXT. #271 •KEY #248363 EL RIN LVE O W

P. TW RD FO R TE WA

. WP DT OR F TER WA

M XO WI

HILLS OF BOGIE LAKE SUB CLUBHOUSE & POOL!! •3,303 sq. ft. + finished daylight basement •5 bed, 4.5 bath, ff laundry, 3 car garage, deck #211116381 EXT. #255 •KEY #267493

$299,900

ALL-SPORTS LOWER STRAITS LAKEFRONT SPECIAL •2 houses @ price of 1 - Remod 3 bed, 1 ba, garage •Lake house 1,768 sq. ft., 4 bd, 2 ba, needs TLC #211073682 EXT. #232 •KEY #248367 P. TW RD FO R TE WA

GORGEOUS GERUNDEGUT BAY ALL-SPORTS CASS LAKE •Remodeled ranch, stone fireplace, dining rm •Corian counter kitchen, tile, crown molding #211027050 EXT. #280 •KEY #248373

. WP ET AK L ITE WH

$399,900

248-366-7200

P. TW CE ER M M CO

$329,900 BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED CEDAR ISLAND LAKEFRONT •2,302 sq. ft., 4 bed, 3 bath, LC terms, 2 car •Granite kitchen & baths, fireplace, ceramic #211089671 EXT. #246•KEY #257017

PAGE 45

steve@TheStocktonTeam.com

800-396-5204 + Ext. # for recorded message Text Key # to 90210 for text message

With property inventory down, mortgage rates remain low and home pricing on the rise...

There’s No Better Time To Sell! Call Us and Ask About Our

HOLIDAY LISTING INCENTIVE!

WOLVERINE LAKEFRONT RANCH WITH FINISHED WALKOUT •3 bed, 2.5 bath, 85 ft. of sandy shoreline •Family rm w/fireplace, deck, dock, 2 car, shed #211105596 EXT. #267 •KEY #261788 P. TW CE ER M M CO

$189,900 $189,900 170 FEET OF FRONTAGE TO PERGOLA & HUGE DECK ALL-SPORTS WILLIAMS LAKE! OVERLOOKING NICELY TREED YARD •3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, fin. daylight basement •1,922 sq. ft., 4 bed, 2.5 ba, side entry garage •Huge mtr., jet tub, deck, garage, shed, dock •Cathedral mstr., full bsmnt, Walled Lk. Schools #211109029 EXT. #214 •KEY #263461 #211122204 EXT. #282 •KEY #271596 . WP DT OR F TER WA

. WP ET AK L ITE WH

$99,900

PLEASANT LAKE BEACH PRIVILEGES •1,870 sq. ft., sq. ft., 3 bed, 1.5 bath, fireplace •Walkout, fenced yard, attached garage, patio #211118494 EXT. #250 •KEY #268869

$99,900 2000 BUILT HOME BACKS TO RIVER AND TREES •2,046 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2.5 bath, master suite •12’ family rm, fireplace, 2 car, shed, 2 decks #211118696 EXT. #297 •KEY #268870

Our Marketing Plan for all listings includes: • Virtual Tour • Home Features Brochure • 24 Hour Recorded Information Hotline • 24 Hour Text Information Hotline • 30+ Real Estate Websites Advertising • All Area Printed Publications • Weekly Email Updates

www.TheStocktonTeam.com


PAGE 46

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AGE VILL LK. E N RI LVE WO

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

LD FIE OM O L B W.

CE ER MM CO

211121116 - $119,900

211079746 - $259,900

211121248 - $169,000

211113805 - $185,000

211104416 - $400,000

211108317 - $124,900

SPACIOUS RANCH 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, brick fireplace, large master, deck overlooking large fended yard

SUPERB COMMERCE HOME 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, first floor master with bath, close to M-5

GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, fireplace, vaulted ceilings, finished basement

CEDAR ISLAND LAKEFRONT 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, 100 ft. of frontage, 2 fireplaces

PRIVATE, CUL-DE-SAC, WOODS 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, spacious, 2-way fireplace, walkout basement

GROUND LEVEL UNIT 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, large kitchen and master suite. Private wooded views.

D IEL MF LOO B W.

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RD FO TER A W

211104716 - $389,000

211108753 - $162,900

211056180 - $124,900

211068047 - $189,900

211120853 - $152,900

211091695 - $185,500

FABULOUS GREEN LAKEFRONT HOME 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, Pella windows, hardwood flooring, lower level walkout, 2 fireplaces

NEW CONSTRUCTION 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, kitchen, recess lighting, 1st floor laundry, daylight basement

GORGEOUS SETTING 2.2 ACRES 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room with fireplace, master 2 closets, barn/shed

FAIRWAY ESTATES STUNNING 2 bedrooms, 3 bath, granite, new carpet, tile overlooking 16th hole

GOLF FRONTAGE Corner unit condo, 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, finished basement, fireplace

WILLIAMS LAKE DEEDED CANALFRONT 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, spacious kitchen, open floor plan

W.

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LD FIE OM O L B W.

TURED HOME A FE OF THE WEEK

K OA YAL RO

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211095071 - $245,000

211119935 - $80,000

211103967 - $149,500

211114594 - $724,900

A PIECE OF PARADISE 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, open floor plan, quality decking

PRISTINE COND., READY TO MOVE IN 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, newer roof, upgraded bathroom, 4 car garage, large fenced yard

ARTS & CRAFTS BUNGALOW 4 bedrooms, 1.1 baths, updated, cove ceilings, new roof/furnace/central air

MIDDLE STRAITS WATERFRONT 4 bedrooms, 3.2 baths, kitchen newly remodeled, master suite, theater room, many extras

RD FO MIL

CE ER MM O C

TE OIN STP A E

VI NO

211053983 - $87,000

211119870 - $28,500

211121712 - $179,000

211047575 - $400,000

BRICK RANCH 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large lot, central air

MOVE IN CONDITION 3 bedrooms, 1 baths, first floor laundry, living room with bay window

COME ON OUT TO THE COUNTRY!! 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, woodstove, almost 2 acres, 3 car garage

COMMERCE LAKEFRONT 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, almost 3/4 acre, finished walkout

D AN STL WE

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211113169 - $85,000 L ITE WH

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211112861 - $135,000

211121503 - $289,000

211091929 - $795,000

211112421 - $180,000

211101276 - $250,000

211048408 - $100,000

MOVE IN TOTALLY REMODELED 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, ceramic floors, maple cabinets, 2 car garage, finished basement

PROFESSIONALLY LANDSCAPED 5 bedrooms, 2.2 baths, master suite with jacuzzi, lower level walkout, brick patio

WHITE LAKE FRONT 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, totally remodeled, finished walkout

WELL MAINTAINED RANCH 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, kitchen and dining open to family room, deck, patio and large yard

IMPECCABLY MAINTAINED HOME 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, great room, island kitchen, finished walkout basement

ADDITIONAL LOT 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, brick, vinyl ranch, 2 car garage

RD FO TER WA

RD FO OX

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ALE ND FER

211115899 - $265,000

211104235 - $110,000

211115490 - $249,000

211099179 - $233,000

211074688 - $110,000

211108984 - $165,000

LAKEFRONT GEM 83 FT. ON WOODALL LK. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, huge master with bath, doorwall to deck walkout with 2nd kitchen

PICTURE PERFECT 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, open floor plan, cathedral ceilings

CUSTOM RANCH END OF CUL-DE-SAC 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, maple kitchen, hardwood floors, finished walkout, wet bar and full bath

TRANQUIL SETTING ON CROSS LAKE 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, up-north feeling, beautiful clean interior

CHARMING RANCH 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, hardwood floors, vaulted ceiling

CLASSIC TUDOR 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, new windows, hardwood floors, third floor, finished attic

Denotes a Real Estate One Virtual Tour

Lakes Area (248) 363-8300

ŠReal Estate One, Inc., 2011


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 47

AUDREY STOREY

CHERYL YEAGER

MEET THE POWER TEAM

248-363-8300 Ext. 233 248-496-1846

248-310-8077

Diane & Mary strive to make your transaction seamless from start to finish. Let our TEAM guide you through the process.

cherylyeager.com cherylyeager@yahoo.com

audreystorey@yahoo.com

Vacation at Home!

DIANE BUCHANAN

SELLING REAL ESTATE SINCE 1980

Cell 248-921-8152 www.realestateone.com/dianeb

MARY SHIELDS

Cell 248-245-6090 realestateone.com/mshields

LAKEFRONT LIVING

CT TRA ON ABLE C L D I L AN AVA

Acreage, pool, barn, ranch with full basement. Kitchen featuring granite countertops and ceramic floors. Master bedroom featuring hardwood floors and gas fireplace. Huron Valley Schools AS3170M $234,900

RESIDENTIAL AND WATERFRONT SPECIALISTS

AY ND SU N E OP

WHITE LAKE RANCH Desirable Whispering Meadows Sub, cul-de-sac setting, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, hardwood floors, first floor laundry, maple kitchen, vaulted great room with natural fireplace, skylights, Andersen windows, 4 door walls, vaulted master suite, spa tub, awesome finished walkout lower level, huge wet bar, well landscaped, sprinkling system. $249,000 (cy1047T) ING

PM 1-4

Gorgeous all-sports lakefront. 2 master suites, theater Spectacular all-sports lakefront. Furnished optional. room. $724,900 $795,000

CONDO LIVING

ND

PE

View of White Lake Lake and boat privileges on White Lake. Old world charm comes with this 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home with coved ceilings. Remodeled kitchen and appliances stay. Full basement, triple lot. AS3761C $149,900

GO LIONS! BEAT VIKINGS!

OXBOW LAKEFRONT Private all-sports, 105 ft. of main lakefront, estate size lot offering loads of potential, home will require some work, 2 garages, great storage, 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, natural fireplace, quiet peninsula street. $178,000 (CY10188L)

BECKY KATZMAN McCARTHY 248-790-9915

Just Reduced! 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 2 car, attached Beautiful!! Home has been totally remodeled. 3 full bahts, walkout lower level. $189,900 garage, finished basement. $152,900

SUSI GOLLINGER Associate Broker - A.B.R.

Lakes Area Specialist

(248) 310-9002

rmccarthy@RealEstateOne.com

susigollinger@hotmail.com

TOP PRODUCER

100 FT. OF LAKE FRONTAGE!!

0 ,10 $1 E S LEA

D L O S

PICTURE PERFECT HOUSE NESTLED ON 1 ACRE LOT!!

House features, approx. 1,800 sq. ft., open floor plan, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, oak hardwood floors throughout, eat-in kitchen includes all appliances, cozy fireplace in living room, master bed with private bath and jacuzzi tub, 2.5 car garage, pole barn, sprinkler system, fenced backyard, privileges to Stony/Squaw Lakes. $110,000. Call Becky for details!

N

EW

Lakefront on all-sports Cedar Island Lake!! Cozy ranch on almost half acre, features spacious kitchen and family room, 3 bedrooms, 1.1 baths, 2 fireplaces, located in family room and living room, built-ins and plenty of storage, lakeside brick patio, sandy beach area for swimming, sprinklers, neighborhood park nearby, great opportunity to update all of this space to fit your needs. 40 ft. of dock included. $185,000. Call Becky for details!

G

TIN

LIS

Denotes a Real Estate One Virtual Tour

NEW ON MARKET - $164,900 - COMMERCE 100 feet Canalfront leading to private, all-sports Commerce Lake, 3 bedroom well maintained ranch on quiet dead-end road. Open floor plan, all appliances, fireplace, deck, seawall, boat lift. Beach area and boat launch. (SG. 3385 B)

FOR ALL SHOWINGS CALL SUSI Lakes Area (248) 363-8300 • 8430 Richardson

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2011


PAGE 48

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SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Visit us at 560 N. Milford Rd., Milford ER WAT

NT FRO

ER WAT

NT FRO

$1,500,000 ON PRIVATE DOWNEY LAKE! •5,552 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms, 4.1 baths, basement, 5 car garage •13 beautiful acres •Mahogany kitchen •Generator, elevator •211088932

2A

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RO ERF WAT

$749,999 SPECTACULAR CUSTOM BUILT! •3,300 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, basement, 3 car attached garage •Gourmet Brazilian cherry kitchen •Granite counter tops •211022713

N LA U LR. 1ST F

DRY

$69,000

NT F RO

$309,900

$248,300 BEAUTIFUL QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD! •1,680 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, basement •1 car attached garage •Kitchen with island •Finished lower level •211114550

WS V IE E K LA

E CR

$129,900

$214,900 BEAUTIFUL HOME ON 1/4 ACRE! •2,566 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •Island kitchen opens to family room with cathedral ceiling •Finished basement with wet bar •211091132

D ATE UPD

WONDERFUL WHITE LAKE VIEWS! •1,700 sq, ft., 2 bedrooms, 2.1 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •On quiet bay to main lake •Maple and granite kitchen •211122345

EN ITCH

$555,000

$444,500

BAY

$345,000 CONTEMPORARY WATERFRONT HOME! •2,780 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2 car garage •Remodeled and updated •Granite kitchen and all baths •2nd floor laundry •211001443

K ND ISLA

ALL-SPORTS LAKE SHERWOOD! •3,845 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 car attached garage •Open floor plan •Huge foyer open to great room •First floor master suite •211116287

A 1/4

ALL-SPORTS LAKE SHERWOOD! •2,478 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, basement, 3 car attached garage •Finished walkout •First floor master •Large island kitchen •211110654

ET QUI

ALL-SPORTS WHITE LAKE! •1,702 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car detached garage •2nd floor master suite with jet tub •First floor laundry •211064566

NT

NT F RO

$149,000

ER WAT

ALL-SPORTS TAGGETT LAKE! •4,114 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 5.1 baths, basement, 5 car attached garages •Generous 1 acre lot on cul-de-sac •First floor master with office •211115821

$159,999 GREAT FAMILY SUB! •1,800 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 1.2 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •Open floor plan •Great room with natural fireplace •Walk to downtown •211043331

ER WAT

TOTALLY REMODELED! •1,616 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, basement •2 car attached garage •Situated on over 1/2 acre •211118570

$669,000

$2,100,000 ON PRIVATE DOWNEY LAKE! •5,552 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms, 4.1 baths, basement, 5 car garage •24 beautiful acres •Mahogany kitchen •Generator, elevator •211088015

E

$132,000

E ACR 1/2 R OVE

ON WHITE LAKE! •2,215 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •Drive in boat house •Beautiful hardwood entry •Formal dining room •211111348

CR 1A

C PL A FIRE

CHARMING WIXOM RANCH! •1,388 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths •Hardwood floors •Patio with private yard with lake privileges •210132913

$393,000

$239,300

C 24 A

S LEGE

$27,000 LAKEFRONT CO-OP CONDO LIVING! •780 sq. ft., 1 bedroom, 1 bath, basement •Kitchen and bath updated •Large sunroom •211083873

ER WAT

PRIVATE 2 ACRE LOT! •2,168 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2.2 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •Family room with natural fireplace and oak mantle •Andersen windows •Finished lower level •211098339

VI PRI LAKE

WHITE LAKE LAKEVIEW! •2,100 sq. ft., 5 bedrooms, 3 baths, basement, 4 car garage •Hardwood floors on entry level •Large open kitchen with granite and eating area •211091388

ER WAT

$249,900 UPDATED HISTORIC HOME! •1,980 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, basement, 2 car detached garage •Open entry level floor plan •Granite kitchen •Great backyard •210111484

Serving Milford & Surrounding Areas - 248.684.1065

NT FRO

$157,000 ON LAKE GEORGE! •1,721 sq, ft., 3 bedrooms, 3.1 baths, basement, 2 car attached garage •Open floor plan •Finished walkout basement •First floor laundry •211097045 ©Real Estate One, Inc., 2011


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PAGE 49

– BLOOMFIELD – ON ALL-SPORTS UPPER LONG LAKE WITH 1.4 ACRES 211095246 $1,299,900 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – GRAND, CUSTOM WALNUT LAKE VIEWS, BLOOMFIELD SCHOOL! 29005020 $1,194,999 248-851-4100

– COMMERCE – LARGE 5 BEDROOM BRICK RANCH ON ALMOST 4 ACRES! 211118321 $589,900 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – THIS HOME IS EVERYTHING YOU COULD HOPE FOR 211058336 $575,000 248-851-4100

– ORCHARD LAKE – CONTEMPORARY HOME WITH WOODED VIEWS! 211074978 $499,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – CUSTOM 3,800 SQ. FT. LAKEFRONT HOME. GREAT VIEWS 210061488 $449,900 248-851-4100

– COMMERCE – COMPLETELY UPDATED HOME ON COMMERCE LAKE! 211098509 $435,000 248-851-4100

– COMMERCE – ALL-SPORTS COMMERCE LAKE CANALFRONT 211104379 $430,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – SPRAWLING RANCH HOME ON ALMOST 1/2 ACRE 211110396 $330,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – 4,400+ SQ. FT., RANCH HOME, FULLY FURNISHED! 29147684 $325,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – BEACH PRIVILEGES, FIN. BASEMENT, STONE FRONT AND NEW ROOF 211067596 $219,000 248-851-4100

– COMMERCE. – CUSTOM BUILT 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH END UNIT RANCH CONDO 211033381 $209,900 248-851-4100

– FARMINGTON HILLS – WELL CARED FOR COLONIAL WITH LARGE SUNROOM 211118356 $209,000 248-851-4100

– FARMINGTON HILLS – SPRAWLING RANCH WITH UPDATED KITCHEN ON .5 ACRE 211093882 $185,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – HUGE EAT IN KITCHEN, FAMILY ROOM WITH DOORWALL TO YARD 2110114195 $184,900 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – BEAUTIFUL DETACHED CONDO IN GATED COMMUNITY 211083859 $175,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – OPEN FLOOR PLAN WITH HARDWOOD FLOOR AND NEWER CARPET 211060384 $169,900 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – DETACHED 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH CONDO IN GATED COMMUNITY 211021641 $141,750 248-851-4100

– WATERFORD – SPECTACULAR 3 BEDROOM RANCH, ON OVER .5 ACRE LOT! 211055951 $134,500 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – END UNIT TOWNHOUSE WITH GAS FIREPLACE & NEWER AIR CONDITIONING! 211102429 $112,500 248-851-4100

– FARMINGTON HILLS – LOVELY PRIVATE YARD, PATIO AND LOTS OF UPDATES 211087799 $99,900 248-851-4100

– BLOOMFIELD – UPDATED 5 BEDROOM HOME ON CUL-DE-SAC WITH FINISHED BASEMENT 211120203 $1,250,000 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – FABULOUS COLONIAL WITH SOFT CONTEMPORARY FLAIR 211114181 $325,000 248-851-4100

– NOVI – LUXURY RESORT STYLE LIVING IN ISLAND LAKE 211112188 $269,900 248-851-4100

– WEST BLOOMFIELD – GREAT HOME WITH NATURAL FIREPLACE, FINISHED BASEMENT & DECK 211122390 $179,000 248-851-4100

Far mington Hills 851-4100 Farmington Hills/West Bloomfield • (248)(248) 851-4100 • (248) 851-1900 32961 Middlebelt 6960 Orchard Lake Rd. • Ste. 150 • West Bloomfield • 48322 A

®

®

denotes denotes virtual virtual tour tour

©Real Estate One, Inc., 2011

DECEMBER 7-13, 2011


PAGE 50 General/ Help Wanted

www.spinalcolumnonline.com 65

MAINTENANCE PERSON Needed for apartment community. Good salary & benefits for qualified applicants.

Fax resume to: 248-960-7656 COOK POSITION Experienced in volume food preparation and specialty foods for catering. Must be able to merchandise foods in school lunch program. Safe Serv Certification and knowledge of HACCP required. Apply online: www.bloomfield.org to job 11-FS-08

CARE GIVER AFC Third shift, must be experienced with Alzheimers and can cook. White Lake. 248-866-3984 JANITORIAL HELP Cleaning specialists wanted, part time, evening shifts available to clean office buildings and banks placed within ten mile radius of home. Hiring immediately for Bloomfield Hills & Birmingham

(586) 759-3700 CUSTOMER SERVICE Seeking motivated and dependable employee for part time front desk position at local fitness club. Job description includes customer service and light cleaning. Apply in person at:

Balance Fitness 686 N. Pontiac Trail Walled Lake 48390

MAIDS Residential cleaning company in Waterford seeking energetic part time employee 15 to 20 hours, Monday through Friday, No evenings or weekends, car required, experience a plus but will train.

248-674-5800

General/ Help Wanted

65

Medical/ Dental

Caring Drivers Wanted

CALL TO FIND OUT How to potentially earn

Transpor t people to prescheduled medical appointments in Oakland County area and beyond. Must have reliable 4 door vehicle, cell phone, email or fax access. Great way to supplement your social security, pension, or disability income.

$700 to $1,200 per week. Incredible opportunity! Will train. Commerce area.

(413) 297-5980

989-738-8671 Sales Positions

TAXI & AIRPORT

71

Real Estate Career

DRIVERS WANTED Full or Part time Day or Night

248-666-2110 LOOKING FOR PART TIME

We're doubling our staff! •Do you like working with new people and new situations? •Do you have good problem solving skills? •Do you have a "Sky is the limit mentality"? If you said, "Yes", call me. Kathy Solan 248-363-8300 248-348-6430 Real Estate One

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

COUNTER HELP Responsible hard worker needed. Must be personable and customer friendly. 20-25 hours per week.

248-887-3114 Medical/ Dental

Absolutely Free 67

67

DIRECT CARE Both full time and part time. Up to $9.03 per hour to start, with Benefits. Small group home setting. Must be Patient & Reliable. South Lyon, Farmington Hills, Highland, Oxford, Rochester Hills, & Waterford areas

248-486-5368

C.N.A.s PART TIME ALL SHIFTS APPLY IN PERSON

Used/Wanted

89

SCRAP METAL Aluminum .30-.60¢/lb. Copper $2.00-$2.60/lb. Brass .80¢- 1.50/lb. Auto Rads. .80¢-1.10/lb. 1011 Decker, Walled Lk

Mann Metals Corp. (248)960-1200

FREE (2) KITTENS 9 weeks old. To good home, Walled Lake area, 248-894-7037 FULL SIZE Upright piano. Good condition, needs tuning, no bench. You pick up. 248363-5110

Collectibles

89

SEA-DOO JET Skis wanted dead or dying. 1995 on ups. $200- $1400. Top $ for XP's & 947/951 or larger motors. Call Steve at 231-943-4152

Absolutely Free

90

Items must be FREE to respondents, ad free to you. Restricted to residential. The publishing group accepts no responsibility for actions between individuals. Sorry, we do not accept ads for free dogs.

West Hickory Haven

AREA RUG, 10'x12'. Beige w/ green border. You pick up. 248-669-2432

3310 West Commerce Rd.

FREE hot tub, Calspa, heater needs work, you haul. 248360-8923

93

LIONEL "O-27" Gauge Christmas train set up/ layout, free standing/ 6ftx10ft, animated toy gadgets- ferris wheel, antique trains, etc. $2,000 OBO. 248-366-7044

Cemetery Plots

100

CHAPEL MAUSOLEUM, chapel crypts 5 through 10. Oakland Hills Memorial Gardens, Novi. 2/$10,000 248474-7827

Auction/Estate Sales101

PUBLIC AUCTION "Mini Storage Depot will sell at public auction, contents of Units Numbered (F452, Kelsie Miller: household goods, furniture, boxes, toys, tools), (J8046, Tequilla Garrett: furniture, boxes), (K911, April Lewis: household goods, furniture), (M1114, James Eller III: furniture), on Friday, December 30th, 2011 at 2pm, for back storage fees owed. The auction will take place at Mini Storage Depot - 46550 Pontiac Trail, Walled Lake, Michigan 48390. We reserve the right to reject any and all bids."

Auction/Estate Sales101 ESTATE SALE Dec. 10-11, 10am-4pm. 774 Bonita Drive. White Lake. All must go. Lots of furniture, lumber, plywood, wood shop accessories, cabinets.

Garage Sales Used/Wanted

90

103

COMMERCE

1/2 PRICE SALE 2990 Welch Rd Commerce New Life DayCare & GRAND ESTATE SALE Thurs., Fri., Sat., 117p.m. Month of December Toys, games, & materials. School & office furniture household furnishings, antiques, fine art work, therapeutic electric bed. Gifts for everyone.

Building Materials 105 CONCRETE SEALER/ finish. Johnson Wax brand. 5 gallons. $24.50 248-360-8485 FLUSH DOOR- 24inch interior, used, $12. 248-698-4168

Pets/Supplies

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY 115

MICHIGAN WILD Bird seed. (No Filler.) 25 lbs. $15. 248736-0254

Clothing/Apparel

119

GENTLY USED Jeans- two pair, size 14. $10 each. 248666-9444

Furniture/Rugs

125

BAKER'S RACK- Brass & green enamel, $25. 248-6669444 FOUR OAK Dining room chairs, cane backs, good $24 248-698-9469 NEUTRAL COUCH and dark green over-sized chair w/ ottoman. Very good condition. $240 firm. Call between noon and 5:30pm. 248-860-4530 SAUDER COMPUTER Desk with hutch, holds everything $25 248-360-1648

Household Items

129

WHIRLPOOL SIDE by side refrigerator, $300. GE electric smooth top range, $300. Paint ball equipment, $400. Two TV's, 21" and 27", $15 and $20. Toshiba satellite laptop (hard drive removed) $50. Emachine PC (hard drive removed) $50. 248-790-0659

Home Care Equipment 130 NEBULIZER BY Health dyne model 323 compressor driven $24.50 248-425-1004

Stuff/Kids

133

DOLL HOUSE with accessories $24.99 248-360-2589

KIDS CHRISTMAS PARTY 14 and younger DECEMBER 17th 1pm-3pm VFW POST #4156 321 UNION LAKE ROAD Please R.S.V.P. by DECEMBER 12th 248-303-9157 A canned good or non-perishable item, appreciated. Odds N Ends

138

HAND TRUCK- 2 wheel, heavy duty, steel, $24.99. 248-360-2911 SHARP VCR works great, $7 248-960-7285 TALL CERAMIC milk bottles $14.99 248-360-2589

Odds N Ends

138

MARY KAY Rochelle Koloff Independent Beauty Consultant 1-248-568-1750 Twin5801@aol.com marykay.com/rkoloff

BOATS/ OUTDOOR Wanted Boats/ Jet Skis/Parts

162

Cars

187

SALES GUARANTEE Autos, Vans, Trucks See First Want Ad Page CHEVROLET IMPALA SS 1996, 93,000 miles, leather seats, CD changer, always garaged- excellent condition, $10,000 OBO. 248-363-1210 FORD FUSION 2008, V6, 24,500 miles. Wixom, $16,500. (586) 206-3222

Cars

187

JEEP LIBERTY 2007, 4x4, chrome addition, 37k, excellent, $12,500 248-770-3828 FORD FUSION Sel 2010. Fully loaded, all the bells & whistles. $17,000. 33,500 miles. 248210-9936 or 248-924-7412 BUICK LESABRE, 2005, 85K, $7,000.Very good condition. 248-363-3457 SATURN SC-2 Hatchback 2001, good condition, 5 speed, one owner, 240,000 miles. $2,900. 248-363-5133 TOYOTA SOLARA 1999, leather, sun roof, 85k, one owner. 248-884-7200.

SEA-DOO JET SKIS WANTED DEAD OR DYING. 1995 on ups. $200$1400. Top $ for XP's & 947/951 or larger motors. Call Steve 231-943-4152

CARS/TRUCKS MOTORCYCLES Wanted Parts/ Salvage

181

UNWANTED AUTOS LLC TOP $ Paid For Any: • Junk • Non Running • Wrecked Cars $275 & Up

(248)467-0396 Unwanted Autos any year $150 to $2,000

RC Towing 248-770-3333 CAMPBELL'S TOWING AUTOS, CARS & TRUCKS

$200 AND UP

248-698-1062 Motorcycles

183

 2004 YAMAHA R1- 1000 motorcycle. Many extras, must see. $4,500. (248)9789246

MOTORCYCLEGUARANTEE See First Want Ad Page

Buying a Home? Let us

Look Before You Leap!

Afford

able Home Inspections

Up to 170 components inspected in a typical three bedroom home. Computer-generated, comprehensive, easy-tounderstand report summary. High resolution, color pictures provide a visual reference of problem areas. Reports are emailed to you and your Real Estate Agent. After inspection questions are always answered, even after you move into your home.

248-881-3478 Licensed Insured

4075 Echo Drive West Bloomfield


DECEMBER 7-13, 2011

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

PAGE 51

LAKES AREA SERVICES (248) 360-7355

www.SpinalColumnOnline.com

Fax (248) 360-5308

IN PRINT and ON-LINE 24/7

Personal • Business • Maintenance • Improvements • Repair PERSONAL/ SERVICES Disc Jockeys/ Music

332

LMS PRODUCTIONS "Music For The Holidays" •Holiday Favorites •Oldies/ Classic Rock Perfect for small to medium gatherings- Hire radio personality for your next event!

LARRY MATTHEWS 248-505-8792

REPAIR/ IMPROVEMENT Appliance Repair

502



(248)360-0213 (248)698-8819 513

BOB'S CARPET Has the best buys on all brand named carpet. Pad 1/2 8 lb $3 yd. Installation guaranteed. Lots of remnants $4 per yard

Call Bob (248)681-5771

MB QUALITY FLOOR COVERING •New Carpet & Pad Sales •Installation, Repairs, & Restretches •28 years experience •Free estimates WE WORK FOR YOU

248-561-5667

515

Drywall

526

Elegant Woodworking

R&D DRYWALL

•Mantels •Fireplace Surrounds •Furniture •Entertainment Center •Custom Cabinets •Crown Molding •Kitchen Cabinets •Custom Bars Harold Canfield

•Hang & Finished •Small Repair •Texture Repair •Plaster Repair •Wet Sand

(248)363-3804 elegant-woodworking.com

Carpentry

516

Ron (248)673-7665 Electricians

YAM CONTRACTING •Carpentry •Deck Repair •Int. & Ext. Painting •Custom Woodwork •Powerwashing •To Do Lists •Unfinished Projects

(248)709-6631 anthyam@att.net Cement/Concrete

TONY'S APPLIANCE SERVICE Servicing all Major Appliances. •Hot water tank

Carpet Installation

Cabinetry

517

C & G CEMENT Quality Workmanship Residential-Commercial Over 30 years Experience STAMPED CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS FOOTINGS GARAGE FLOORS BLOCK WORK FREE ESTIMATES Michael (248)363-4783 MILFORD LOCATION

(248)684-5928 Doors

524

THE DOOR STOP Since 1980 Garage door springs and door openers repaired and/or replaced.

Call Anytime 248-624-4042 (cell) 248-640-6298 CERTIFIED OVERHEAD DOOR SERVICE •Garage Doors •Repaired/ Services •New Doors/ Openers •Installed at Factory Pricing •Emergency Service Available

248-624-3161

528

 Insured & State Licensed, 25 years experience. Prompt, courteous service. FREE ESTIMATES. ALL TYPES OF WORK. Competitive Prices

(248)683-7985 529

J.J.M BACKHOE SERVICE LLC Backhoe service & landscaping. 38 Years Experience. Small or Large Jobs. Fully insured. Free estimates.

(248)624-6458 AFFORDABLE DEMOLITION & SERVICES "Division of Rae Excavating" • BUILDING REMOVAL• • Sewer and Water • Storm Sewers • Trucking & Grading Licensed & Insured

248-624-4473 Flooring

545

DU-IT-ALL HOME CARE IMPROVEMENTS Specials: •Ceramic Tile •Formica Tops & Kitchens •Exterior/Interior Painting Also, we do complete basements and all other interior work, including electric, plumbing, etc. Call today. Cell #

(248)891-7072 Licensed and Insured

D & S HOME REPAIRS REMODELING

MASTER ELECTRICIAN

Excavating

Handy Person

536

EDWARD'S FLOOR COVERING •Linoleum •Ceramic Tile •Hardwood Floors •Laminate Wood 27 Years Exp. Free Est.

(248)684-5983

•Additions •Garages •Drywall •Painting •Plumbing •Electrical •Tile •Marble •Kitchens •Baths •Basements •Decks 33 Years ... Licensed

248-684-4175 810-714-3058

TOTAL HOME SERVICE 35 Years Licensed PLUMBING • HEATING CARPENTRY • DRYWALL ELECTRICAL NEW SERVICE KITCHENS BATHS CERAMIC TILE

"The job your husband will do tomorrow." (248)887-2366 Heating/Duct Work 546

THOMASON HEATING & COOLING • Furnaces • Boilers • Air Cleaners •Air Conditioners •Humidifiers Service & Replacements

FREE ESTIMATES ON INSTALLATION

248-363-1615

Heating/Duct Work 546 HURON VALLEY HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING •Repair •Replace •Inspections •Humidifiers •Water Heaters •Night service available

(248)887-3666 Mitch's Mechanical 248-302-1808 Specializing in Total Home Comfort. Home of the $50 service call and $50 furnace or a/c, clean and check. 24 hours emergence service Home Improvement 547 SHERMAN BLDG CO. •Additions •Garages •Decks •Rough & Trim Carpentry •Wood Siding •Basements •Kitchens •All outside wood repairs

248-682-1393 248-802-6554 Home Inspection

548

Buying A Home? Let Us Look Before You Leap! AFFORDABLE HOME INSPECTIONS Licensed Insured STERLING HOME SERVICES

248-881-3478 Lawn/Garden Services

553

A R T Outdoor Services, LLC Fall Clean-ups • Snow Plowing • Landscaping • Lawn Service • Gutter Cleaning • Insured Residential & Commercial www.artoutdoorservices.com

(248)625-5719

Painting/ Decorating

Roofing 562



FARR'S PAINTING Exterior & Interior Wood Repairs • Caulking Staining • Wallpaper Removal • Drywall repairs • Water repairs Free Power Washing w/paint. farrshomeimprovements.com

(248) 477-7764 (248) 345-3308

Plumbing

567

•Repairs •Re-Roofs •Chimney Repair •Metal Work •Flat Roofs •Complete Roof Packages. •Siding •Gutters

FREE Estimates

25 years experience •Tree trimming •Tree & stump removal •70ft bucket lift •Free estimates •Insured •Firewood

30 Years Experience

248-921-9097

248-459-7894

Waterproofing 577

I.D.C.

Home Service Siding, Trim & Soffitt Guaranteed Professional Installation. Lic./ Ins. References available.

Bob: 248-363-0589 idchomeservice.com

Tile

585

Premier Plumbing

J.M. TILE & MARBLE CUSTOM WORK

New Construction & Remodel Commercial & Residential

•Remodeling •Quality Service •New Construction • Repairs •Grout Sealing • Licensed and Insured

Licensed & Insured Complete Plumbing Service

248-363-5864 Roofing

571

D & D GUTTERS * Snow Plowing* • Leaf Guards • Siding • Windows •Insulation special: Avg. $1500 per house Doug Dible

248-431-6243

ROOF LEAKS & WATER DAMAGE REPAIRS MAHER RESTORATION www.goMaher.com "Maher Makes It Happen"

248-926-6631 ROOF REPAIRS Missing shingles replaced, Chimney flashing resealed, Leaks stopped, Vent stack flashing replaced, Complete roof inspection service, Guaranteed work. 30 yrs exp.

Call Doug Miller 248-360-0344

587

KODIAK TREE SERVICE

VS PAINTING FALL SPECIAL

248-894-3239

Tree Service

PRICE IS RIGHT ROOFING

Siding

Save 20% this season on exterior/ interior painting, drywall repair, & wallpaper removal on small or big jobs. 25 years experience. licensed and insured. Same day free estimates.

571

John Miller (248)505-8865 jmtileandmarble.com

Trash/Debris Removal

Specializing in: •Appliances •Furniture •Debris Removal

Call anytime for estimates & great service

248-887-4892 Tree Service

587

LOUIE'S TREE SERVICE Tree Removal •Stump Grinding Firewood • Free Estimates 20 Yrs. Exp. • Fully Insured "Will Beat All Competitors" Residential • Commercial

248-240-6143 248-240-6142 248-366-1325

Dry Basements, LLC We Repair: •Poured Walls/ Concrete Block •Waterproofing •Cracked or Bowed Walls •Foundation Repaired Replaced •Underpinning •Crawl Space and Encapsulation •Licensed & Insured •Ron Heck, Builder (248)420-0116

Wells

603

McPherson WELL SERVICE PUMPS •TANKS WELL REPAIR 2, 4, & 5 INCH

Emergency Service 7 days a week

586

Progressive Transportation

599

248-

363-6464

aquawells.com All credit cards accepted

BOB WYCKOFF WELL DRILLING "If you have questions, we have answers!" •PUMPS •TANKS • WELL REPAIR

(248)310-0917

Emergency Service EASY PAYMENT PLANS No Credit Check Visa & MasterCard


PAGE 52

www.spinalcolumnonline.com

SPINAL COLUMN NEWSWEEKLY

Union Lake Rd.

2199 HAGGERTY RD. At Pontiac Trail across from Lakes Professional Building

Commerce Rd.

.

morrismotorsmi.com Ric d hard son R

Oakley Park

248-624-4500

WALMART

morrismotorsmi.com

Haggerty Rd.

11 9-20

Maple Rd. M-5

1 96

RIGHT HERE Where You Need Us!

Benstein Rd.

Celebrating

42 YEARS

Trail tiac Pon

14 Mile Rd.

2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA

2008 SATURN AURA

#P2024

#P2033

15,995

12,995**

$

FEATURING

13,995**

$

14,995

$

$

2008 PONTIAC G6 #P2042

Was $15,995

Now

2007 JEEP WRANGLER

13,995

$

#P1945

21,995

$

18,995

$

2008 SATURN VUE #P2035

15,995

$

**

14,995**

$

**

2005 GMC YUKON DENALI

2007 CHEVROLET CUBE VAN

#P2046

#P2044

19,995

18,995**

$

17,995**

$

19,995

$

$

2008 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ #P2025

2010 FORD FUSION SE #P2018

15,995**

$

19,995

$

18,995

$

17,995**

$ Find us on Facebook

Morris Complete Inventory At: www.morrismotorsmi.com Motors Michigan For Peace of Mind: most of our vehicles have warranty or service contracts available.

**For purchase with qualified credit approval. Prices are plus tax, title, license & doc fee. Call dealer for more details. Offer good thru 12/14/11. Subject to prior sale.

FREE

Must present coupon when order is written. Cannot be combined with any other offers. GM vehicles only. Plus tax and shop supplies. Expires 12/21/11.

25 Off $ 15 Off

$

LIMITED TIME ONLY

SC

Any Service Over $175.00 Any Service Over $90.00

Any Make or Model One coupon per customer. Coupons may not be combined with any other offer. Expires 12/21/11. Excludes oil changes, brake promotion, tires and SRTA’S. Valid only in our service department. Must present coupon when order is written. SC

•Pressurized system leak test •Check belts and hoses •Check heater output $ Was99 129 •Flush cooling system

OIL CHANGE

99 19

$

95 $

Plus tax and disposal. Most GM cars and trucks. All coupons must be presented at time of write up. Offers cannot be applied with any other offers. Chemical cleaning extra. Expires 12/21/11.

morrismotorsmi.com

Your Hometown Car & Truck Service and Maintenance Center for over 42 Years

Service Special ~ COUPON ~

OUR FACTORY-TRAINED TECHNICIANS WILL PERFORM THE FOLLOWING:

248-624-4500 *Diagnosis extra, brake inspection extra

Flush

SC

95*

M

We will perform a complete ACT NOW computer scan BEFORE OFFER and external EXPIRES diagnosis. If your vehicle displays a “Check Engine” or “Service Soon” bring this coupon in for diagnosis.

~CHILD FRIENDLY CUSTOMER LOUNGE~

O I OTOR L

SALES HOURS: Mon. & Thurs.: 8:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Tues., Wed., Fri.: 8:30 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. Check Engine Light Special or any BG’s Cooling System WILD CARD SPECIAL Warning Light (ABS/Airbag) ~ COUPON ~

+tax & dep. fee with coupon

*Includes up to 5 quarts of oil and oil filter. Excludes synthetic oil and diesel engines. Most vehicles–see service advisor for exceptions. With this coupon. Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 12/21/11. SC

We Service All Makes and Models of GM Vehicles and most Domestic and Import models as well

WE OFFER: NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY Most Repairs Completed Same Day

Enjoy your complimentary coffee while you wait • Work With Most Insurance Companies • Expert Mechanics and Technicians • Full Paint or Touch-Ups • Expert Color Matching • We Handle Large or Small Jobs

SERVICE, PARTS & BODY SHOP HOURS:

Mon. & Thurs.: 7 a.m.-8 p.m. • Tues., Wed. & Fri.: 7 a.m.-6 p.m.

FREE Estimates on Collision Repairs!

SCN-12.7.11  

We’ve Gone DIGITAL!! WATERFORD •UNION LAKE •WHITE LAKE •HIGHLAND•MILFORD•WIXOM WALLED LAKE •WOLVERINE LAKE •COMMERCE•ORCHARD LAKE •WEST BLOO...