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WHO WE ARE We are a community of lifelong learning leaders from the vintners, education, business, philanthropic, nonprofit, civic, and grassroots communities.

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We believe in the importance of education and the power of working together to transition traditional systems of education into ones that are innovative and meet the needs of today’s students.

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We are guided by a transformational vision for the future of education that is learner-led.


21st CENTURY LEARNER

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LANDSCAPE OF FUTURE WORK CHARACTERISTICS MARKET-DRIVEN AND USER-CENTERED:

GROUNDED IN RELATING:

To gain market advantage, a workforce will need to be nimble for work that will be highly problemdriven,ambiguous, and volatile.

Relationships will help determine success and will frame how work is conducted. Cultivating productive relationships will continue to be an essential component of work in many contexts.

REORGANIZED AND MODULARIZED:

INTERWOVEN WITH LEARNING:

Modularization will require thought-ful design of work flow and compo-nent pieces, along with extensive coordination and synthesis to meet high-level goals.

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Constant learning will blur the lines between our personal and professional lives driving some employees to take on passion-based projects to learn more.


WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM PREDICTS:

54% 1

of existing employees will require significant re-skilling and up-skilling

million jobs will be displaced by 2022

84%

of US Governors cite workforce development as their top priority in 2019

25%

of fortune 100 leaders expect to hire wholly new permanent staff already possessing skills relevant to new technologies, rather than retrain.

Ginni Rometty, Tim Cook and the leaders of many of America's top companies are now actively participating on the White House National Council For the American Worker board to foster three things: Lifelong learning (think adaptive learning, communities and continuous engagement); Skills-based training (assessment, role based, verified skills with the credentials to show it); Demand-driven approach to  workforce development (labor market insights, connections between employers and the talent they need, internally and externally) 5


BENEFICIARY 1 FOR THE SILICON VALLEY WINE AUCTION

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In practice


The US teacher shortage crisis is: Large.

100

Thousand

100%

teacher vacancies in the US right now. 1

of states posted shortages in 2016–17. 2

Growing.

1.5

Million

35%

new teachers will be required over the next 5 years. 3

lower enrollment in education programs than five years ago.4

Expensive.

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$20

$2.2

the average school cost of finding a new teacher. 5

spent by US public schools each year on recruitment. 6

Thousand

Billion


Alternative certification pathways provide a necessary but insufficient supplement to teacher supply.

43%

Residency / GYO models offer a promising solution for unmet need, but they struggle to reach rural communities.

Share of US student population:9

Traditional Certification

BA or MA degrees from traditional schools of education: 1,466 programs produce 128,000 new teachers each year.7

Urban

29%

Rural

7%

24%

Number of schools with vacancies:10 Urban

72%

Rural

Alternative Certification

Quick entry, residency, growyour-own (GYO) teaching credential pathways: 658 programs produce 20,000 new teachers each year.8

UNMET NEED

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Share of teachers developed via residencies:11 Urban Rural

Total annual demand: 300,000 teachers

73%

92% 8%


Section I • The Need

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To address teacher shortages in our nation’s most remote rural schools

The Oxford Teachers Academy offers An accredited, tech-enabled BA + teaching credential program that trains local after school and child care workers to become high quality credentialed teachers through an extended residency pathway.

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OTA has made three key changes to the traditional teacher residency model so as to more effectively met the needs of rural schools.

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Key Differences

Resulting Benefits

Impact on Rural Viability

Extended residency A five-year option that allows aspiring teachers to earn their Bachelors (BA) Degree as well as their teaching credential.

1. Who we serve People who do not yet have a college degree can become residents, and can continue to earn a salary while getting a free BA.

1. Community accessibility In the most remote rural communities, college completion rates are below 10%. Extended residency allows high-potential local adults to become teachers without leaving their home to earn a BA.

2. After-school partnerships This allows public schools to share the cost of resident stipends and expand training opportunities.

2. How we’re funded After-school programs and K-12 schools pay for mentor and apprentice services that at scale, we are completely funded through earned income.

2. Affordability An earned income model allows rural communities with limited financial resources to develop teachers without ongoing philanthropy or government grants.

3. The Tutorial method Tutorials which re-orient learning from traditional lectures to small-group discussions and debates.

3. Online transferability Tutorials can occur remotely without loss in quality, and by using existing classroom technology.

3. Networking Small, isolated rural schools can share teachers with the specific subject expertise that they could not support on their own.


Apprentices receive real-time feedback and evaluation around their application of learning theory.

ac

v er

Accredited OTA BA + Teaching Credential

Su p

Benefit # 1: Real-Time Feedback

T

Apprentices earn credit towards their degree for work they do in their classroom.

r he

/Hybrid Cours e line OT A y b f a c ult s On aught y

Benefit # 2: Practicum Credit

oom Apprentice r s as y OTA mento shi Cl ised b rt p e

Classroom experience serves as the practicum component to creditbearing courses that allow apprentices to earn an accredited degree from the Oxford Teachers Academy.

Benefit # 3: Remote Access Apprentices in remote rural communities receive highquality, university-level training from OTA professors without traveling to distant campuses.

Benefit # 4: Tailored Support OTA faculty regularly collaborate with mentors to adapt coursework to apprentice performance in their K-12 classroom.

Benefit # 5: Immediate Vacancy Relief The apprentice + mentor team provides schools an immediate solution to classroom vacancies, with the pathway for apprentices to become long-term classroom teachers. 12


Apprentices, mentors, and OTA faculty ensure quality learning by implementing deeper learning practices through a modiďŹ ed version of the Oxford Tutorial system. Key Features of Deeper Learning:13

How Tutorials Work:

2. Develop Position Students refine knowledge into a position paper and/or problem set. Mastery of rigorous academic content

Eective oral and written communication

Development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills

Learning how to learn/meta-cognition

The ability to work collaboratively

Developing an academic mindset

1. Learn Collaboratively

3. Debate With Teacher (Tutorial)

Students use digital content to learn about a topic independently and in small groups.

Students debate their opinion with a teacher and 2–3 peers. The teacher pushes and assesses student thinking.

4. Identify Next Topic Teacher and students use tutorial data to jointly identify the next learning topic.

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By re-allocating the staffing expenses already incurred by after-school providers and schools, OTA becomes entirely sustained on earned income with 250 or more filled classrooms. Initial Philanthropy

Earned Income

One-time expenses Cost Neutral:

After-School Providers: $12K/apprentice BA course design and development

This covers: 40% of apprentice wage Mentor and apprentice training

Initial BA accreditation

Admin and overhead

Mentor and apprentice wages

$12K

22K

10K

60% of apprentice wage

Mentor wage

Course fees and admin

Full-time mentor (supporting 3–4 classrooms) earns $65 – $85K 85K

30K 22K

Full-time childcare worker

This covers: 60% of apprentice wage Mentor wage BA and overhead fees

18K

Apprentice earns $30K + a free BA degree.

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$50K/classroom filled

$50K

40% of apprentice wage

100% covered by earned income at scale (with > 250 apprentices).

School Partners:

Fees cover average costs already typical for each partner and schools pay no headhunting fees.

65K 50K

Full-time OTA apprentice

Average teacher

Veteran mentor (4 classes)

New mentor (3 classes)


OTA will scale meaningful impact through three stages of development. This trajectory will require $1 million of philanthropy in the first 2 years, and another $10 million in the 5 years thereafter.

Stage 1 Formalize Training

Stage 2 Expand Community Partnerships

Stage 3 Build Hub Network

• Continue pilot at Oxford Day Academy and surrounding community schools.

• Launch pilot with 3–5 after-school providers serving 10–20 rural schools.

• Establish multi-regional partnerships with national after-school providers.

• Secure accreditation for BA degree.

• Codify online/remote components of training program and materials.

• Build localized supports for training and implementation.

• Synthesize training program and materials.

• Build infrastructure for geographic decentralization.

• 50 apprentices trained

• 200 apprentices trained

• 3,500 apprentices trained annually

• 1,500 students reached in 1 region

• 6,000 students reached in 5 region

• 100,000 students served, saturating vacancies in 50 rural regions

Bythe theend endofofthe Stage 3, OTA will By startup phase, be completely self-sufficient OTA will be completely self- on earned income. sufficient on earned income.

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This is the same size as Teach for America, but with a focus on: • Local talent development • Rural vacancy saturation


By focusing on recruitment and retention, OTA will play a significant role in closing the teacher shortage gap.

Annual Rural Teacher Supply and Demand

High turnover requires ~75K new rural teachers each year. 75K

Retained OTA Alumni OTA lowers demand for new teachers as it fights churn and promotes retention amongst two key segments:

Unfilled Demand

1. Early Career (1–5 Yrs) Sourcing people from the local community and thoroughly preparing them will lower burnout amongst new teachers.

Supply from OTA Supply from Alternative Certification Supply from Traditional Certification

A 35% decline in traditional certification enrollment will significantly lower the supply of rural teachers. 16

29K 25K 21K

2. Mid Career (7–12 Yrs) Mentor teaching roles create the flexibility growth trajectory, and compensation to keep high-quality, mid-career veterans in the classroom.


BENEFICIARY 2 FOR THE SILICON VALLEY WINE AUCTION

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In California, 68%* of high school seniors are not prepared for college math.

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Source:

Only 40% of California’s high school graduates are eligible for CSU admission, and 14% for UC.


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4th

3rd

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5th


4,000

students served

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★ ★

★ ★

★ ★

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Profile for Santa Cruz Mountains Wine Growers Association

2019 SCMWEF Prospectus  

2019 SCMWEF Prospectus  

Profile for scmwa4
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