Page 1

RIGHT ON TARGET

Teen clay shooters take aim at the state championship

SC TR AV E L S

Saluting citizen soldiers HUMOR ME

JULY 2014

And the pacemaker goes to ‌


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THE MAGAZINE FOR COOPERATIVE MEMBERS Vol. 68 • No. 7 (ISSN 0047-486X, USPS 316-240) Read in more than 470,000 homes and businesses and published monthly except in December by The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. 808 Knox Abbott Drive Cayce, SC 29033

July 2014 • Volume 68, Number 7

Tel:  (803) 926-3 1 75 Fax:  (803) 796-6064 Email: letters@scliving.coop EDITOR

Keith Phillips ASSISTANT EDITOR

Diane Veto Parham FIELD EDITOR

Walter Allread PUBLICATION COORDINATOR

Pam Martin

ART DIRECTOR

Sharri Harris Wolfgang DESIGNER

Susan Collins PRODUCTION

FEATURE

Andrew Chapman

12 Young guns

WEB EDITOR

Van O’Cain COPY EDITOR

Susan Scott Soyars

Follow the girls of the Rocky Creek Clay Dusters as they shoot their way to the state sporting clays championship.

Contributors

Becky Billingsley, Mike Couick, Dik Daso, Tim Hanson, Carrie Hirsch, Carole Howell, Jan A. Igoe, Charles Joyner, Mark Quinn, Brian Sloboda, S. Cory Tanner Publisher

Lou Green Advertising

Mary Watts Tel: (803) 739-5074 Email: ads@scliving.coop National Representation

National Country Market Tel:  (800) NCM-1181

ADDRESS CHANGES: Please send

to your local co-op. Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to Address Change, c/o the address above.

Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, S.C., and additional mailing offices. © COPYRIGHT 201 4. The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Inc. No portion of South Carolina Living may be reproduced without permission of the Editor.

4 CO-OP CONNECTION Cooperative news

6 ON THE AGENDA

Only a goober would miss out on the fun of the South Carolina Peanut Party. Plus: Check out these grilling safety tips before your next cookout.

POWER USER DIALOGUE

10 Thinking outside the fence South Carolina’s electric cooperatives are looking out for members as the EPA proposes costly new rules on power plants.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING is brought to you by your member-owned, taxpaying, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative, wise energy use and the faces and places that identify the Palmetto State. Electric cooperatives are South Carolina’s — and America’s — largest utility network.

RIGHT ON TARGET

Teen clay shooters take aim at the state championship

Saluting citizen soldiers HUMOR ME

For Raymond Cox, executive director of the Volunteers in Medicine clinic on Hilton Head Island, compassionate health care is just what the doctor ordered. TRAVELS

20 Honoring our citizen soldiers The South Carolina Military Museum shares the stories of the men and women who served in uniform. RECIPE

22

22 A taste of the coast

South Carolina crab cakes Crab-stuffed mushrooms Lou Lou’s crab dip Willie’s crab quiche

JULY 2014

Bonnie Wyatt, 16, is all smiles after shooting well at a sporting clays tournament. Wyatt is the daughter of York Electric Cooperative members Rick and Jeannine Wyatt.

24 Backyard water-saving tips

Minimize drought impacts on your landscape with these handy tips and techniques for efficient water management.

jonathan sharpe

And the pacemaker goes to …

Member of the NCM network of publications, reaching more than 7 million homes and businesses

STORIES

19 Good medicine

GARDENER

SC TR AV E LS

Printed on recycled paper

SC LIFE

Leeann White / iStockphoto

Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. If you encounter a difficulty with an advertisement, inform the Editor.

Mic Smith

HUMOR ME

30 Ashes to ashes, or perhaps a dog Jan A. Igoe grapples with the earthly consequences of eternal slumber.

26 MARKETPLACE 28 SC EVENTS

20


On the Agenda For a listing p m co lete s, see of Event 8 page 2

Highlights

TOP PICK FOR KIDS

AUGUST 7–9

South Carolina Peanut Party

NOW THROUGH JANUARY 4

‘Dinosaurs: A Bite Out of Time’

For details, visit museum.state.sc.us or call (803) 898-4921.

Courtesy of the South Carolina State Museum

We don’t know what happened to the dinosaurs millions of years ago, but we know where they are now. Robotic versions of Tyrannosaurus rex, Triceratops and other prehistoric creatures are ready for action in the South Carolina State Museum’s newest exhibit, moving and sounding like they did when they dominated the planet. Digitalized recordings synched with the movements of heads, tails and limbs create a lifelike effect, all controlled by computer-programmed air cylinders.

Pelion is celebrating boiled peanuts—the official state snack food— by cooking up more than 30 bushels of goobers for this year’s South Carolina Peanut Party. The “blessing of the pots” gets things cooking on Friday night. If you’re particularly good at eating peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches, fighting your way into a frozen T-shirt or knocking off cornhole competitors, there’s a contest here for you.

For details, visit scpelionpeanutparty.com or call (803) 785-3272 or (803) 606-9522.

JULY 18–19

Pageland Watermelon Festival

JULY 17–19, 25–26

South Carolina Peach Festival

When you see the Peachoid, get off I-85 and head into downtown Gaffney for two consecutive weekends of peachy fun. First up are the dessert- and peach-eating contests, barbecue cook-offs, professional wrestling exhibitions and concerts by N.C. natives Darrell Harwood and Jason Michael Carroll. The finale weekend gets down and dirty with a mud bog at nearby Lake Whelchel. For details, visit scpeachfestival.net or call (864) 489-5721.

6

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

Hot summer day. Cold, juicy watermelon. Any questions? Pageland, the self-proclaimed Watermelon Capital of the World, will serve up plenty of ripe melon during its annual celebration of the sweet summer treat. Awards await the best seed spitters, as well as those with the best watermelon outfits and those who excel at eating watermelon hands free. Lynches River Electric Cooperative is a sponsor. For details, visit pagelandwatermelonfestival.com or call (843) 672-6400.


Email COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND Story suggestions TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

A congressman shares his story

Grilling safety

AS A YOUNG MAN GROWING UP IN THE SEGREGATED SOUTH, James Clyburn faced a number of challenges to his dream of becoming a politician. “There were no African-Americans elected to public office back then,” says Clyburn. “No one I could point to and say, ‘I want to be just like that person.’ ” Born in Sumter in 1940, Clyburn grew up under the watchful eye of his parents: a mother who was a civic-minded beautician and his father, who was a fundamentalist minister. That solid Blessed Experiences: family life was an inspiration Genuinely Southern, to Clyburn when he first sat Proudly Black is down to write a memoir— published by the Blessed Experiences: Genuinely University of South Southern, Proudly Black— Carolina Press. For about his rise from Sumter more information, visit to become the third-highest sc.edu/uscpress. ranking Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives. “We are but the sum total of our experiences. No more, no less,” Clyburn says. “My experience was one of a supportive, loving environment, which gave me strength to dream.” Clyburn began his ascent to leadership at the age of 12, when he was elected president of his National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) youth chapter. He later became a leader at South Carolina State University, where he helped break social barriers through peaceful protest. Completed in late 2013, Blessed Experiences took “at least 20 years to write from start to finish,” Clyburn says. He hopes his story will serve as an inspiration to young people growing up in disadvantaged communities. “I hope that some young person growing up in a difficult environment can read my story and realize that with support and motivation, anything is possible.” —mark quinn

Summer days in South Carolina mean lively outdoor parties with plenty of grilled food. Use these barbecue safety tips from Clemson University to ensure that your guests leave the celebration with nothing but happy memories.

Buy it fresh: Select your meats from the back of

the refrigerated case and from the bottom of the stack where it’s coldest. Refrigerate or freeze your meats as soon as you get home.

Defrost carefully: To defrost, transfer your meats to your refrigerator at least 24 hours before you are ready to cook. If you precook meat before transferring it to the fire, be ready to place it on the grill immediately.

Keep it cool: Keep all foods refrigerated until you’re ready to work with them, and marinate in the refrigerator, not on your countertop. If your recipe calls for basting while cooking, reserve a portion of the marinade before For more safe grilling tips, see the it touches any Food Safety & Nutrition section at raw meat. clemson.edu/extension/hgic. No touching:

Don’t add any more raw meat to the grill until you’ve removed all the cooked meat. Place a clean serving platter near the grill, and use a clean spatula or tongs to remove cooked foods.

Serve safe: The best rule of thumb is to serve your hot foods hot and your cold foods cold so bacteria can’t get a toehold. Food should not be left out for more than two hours after cooking. Discard all items left out for more than one hour at temperatures above 90 degrees. —carole howell

energy efficiency tip  

Mark Quinn

U.S. Rep. James Clyburn signs copies of his memoir after delivering a speech to leaders of South Carolina’s electric cooperatives.

Replacing your conventional power strips with advanced power strips (APS) can help reduce the e­ lectricity wasted when electronic devices are idle. These power strips are a ­convenient and low-cost way to save. Source: Department of Energy

scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

7


Email COMMENTS, QUESTIONS AND Story suggestions TO LETTERS@SCLIVING.COOP

On the Agenda O n ly o n

SCLiving.coop

BONUS ARTICLEs Awarding the Medal of Honor: Military historian Dik Daso takes us behind the scenes of the June 19 Medal of Honor Ceremony for retired Marine Kyle Carpenter. Garden grooming: When lush lawns and gardens start to grow a bit wild, tame them with quiet and lightweight electric garden tools. Photographer of the year: Don’t miss our “best of” photo gallery from South Carolina Living contributor Mic Smith, who was recently named Photographer of the Year by the Cooperative Communicators Association.

Our Facebook page celebrates all that’s great about living in South Carolina. Join the conversation and share your photos at facebook.com/SouthCarolinaLiving.

Photos by Mic Smith

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9


Dialogue

Thinking outside the fence Rumors about new Environmental Protection Agency

regulations designed to reduce carbon-dioxide emissions from existing power plants had been swirling around the Washington Beltway for months, and the general fear was that the new rules would hurt electricity consumers—a lot. As with any federal regulatory scheme, things weren’t that simple, of course. When EPA officials announced their proposal on June 2, the true details of the plan were spelled out in 645 pages of fine print. After a ­thorough analysis of that document, I see a classic bad‑news/ good‑news situation for South Carolina. First, the bad news: States will not share the burden of reducing emissions equally. By the EPA’s own estimates, power plants in South Carolina must decrease the ratio of carbon dioxide emitted to electricity produced by 51 percent. Whether you agree or disagree with the policy of reducing emissions, it’s going to cost a lot of money to achieve that goal, and every penny of that cost to cooperatives will ultimately be passed along to you. The good news: The EPA will allow each state to develop its own implementation plan—a process that will allow your electric cooperatives to work collaboratively with state agencies, power generators, investor-owned utilities and environmental groups to find creative, commonsense solutions. The proposed regulations will be released in a final (and perhaps modified) form on June 1, 2015. Between now and then, you’re going to hear a lot about them. Your electric cooperatives are committed to keeping you informed, and we’ll advocate on your behalf at every turn. We’ve been tracking this issue for a long time, and we’re already working with the South Carolina congressional delegation to make sure the president and EPA officials understand how these proposed rules will impact the people of South Carolina. When the EPA begins public hearings on the regula­ tions later this month, South Carolina co-op leaders will be there speaking on your behalf. Our message will not be one of opposition. Why show up with a “just say no” response to an existing federal law? Instead, we will advocate for a plan that fairly impacts all states and is based on practical and achievable goals. We’ve also reached out to state officials, our wholesale power suppliers and other stakeholders with a pledge to do our part in developing a sound state implementation plan when the rules are finalized. It’s vital that co-ops 10

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

have a seat at the table when these decisions are made. Cooperatives are a network of nonprofit, member-owned utilities serving 1.5 million people in all 46 counties. Their bottom line is member satisfaction. If adopted, the EPA rules will allow power producers to choose to make what I call “inside the fence” changes to upgrade power plants, and maybe even build new ones. That’s going to be expensive, but as a large wholesale purchaser of electricity, co-ops will work diligently with suppliers to ensure any plant changes they make are cost effective. Ultimately, South Carolina’s electric cooperatives have an even greater role to play in bringing what I call “outside the fence” solutions to the table—ideas that make sense for consumers regardless of what the power plants do in response to the EPA: XXWhole-house efficiency programs to help families use less electricity and keep bills low XXInnovative programs that allow homes and businesses to voluntarily reduce their power consumption during expensive peak hours XXAppliance upgrade programs that incentivize home­ owners to install more-efficient devices XXOffering consumers the option to purchase “green power” generated from renewable resources XXFinding equitable ways to help homeowners and businesses incorporate distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar panels into the power grid XXExploring new storage and distribution technologies that allow us to deliver reliable electricity at the most affordable rates The even better news: These are just some of the initiatives South Carolina’s electric cooperatives already have in motion. If the EPA regulations announced in June take effect, the energy landscape in America will change dramatically, but one thing that will never change is our commitment to members. We’re on the case, and we’re looking out for you.

President and CEO, The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina Mike Couick


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The Rocky Creek Clay Dusters aim for victory in competitive sporting clays

BY TIM HANSON Photography by mic smith

12

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop


Ignoring the 40-degree temperature on a drizzly, overcast morning, 16-year-old Bonnie Wyatt steps easily into her shooting stance, leaning forward slightly with the stock of her 12-gauge Beretta shotgun pressed tightly into her right shoulder. She swings the gun left and right, ­measuring her field of view, before taking a deep breath. To help her relax, she calls to mind a hymn by Russian composer Pavel Chesnokov—a piece she and her fellow Clover High School Choraliers will perform later that evening. With a calm, determined voice, she calls for her targets. “Pull!” Two bright-orange clay disks erupt from behind a bush and arc into the sky on diverging paths. Wyatt tracks the first clay and fires. As the disk explodes into a cloud of dust, the talented young shooter pivots, finds the second target and fires again with the same result. Two clean breaks—an auspicious start to the shooting season for the ladies senior varsity squad of the Rocky Creek Clay Dusters.

Wyatt lowers her still-smoking shotgun and turns her head to flash a dazzling smile at teammates Maggie Woelffer and Carley Snyder. “Way to go, Bonnie!” Snyder cheers. “Nice job!”

Life lessons

Wyatt, Woelffer and Snyder are among the top shooters in one of South Carolina’s fastest-growing teen sports—competitive sporting clays. Through clubs and tournaments organized by the South Carolina Youth Shooting Foundation (SCYSF), students from the fourth grade and up are developing life skills and learning the values of teamwork Competitive sporting clays is one of the fastest-growing teen sports in South Carolina. Carley Snyder (top left) and Bonnie Wyatt (left) take careful aim at their targets during a tournament organized by the South Carolina Youth Shooting Foundation.

scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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T eddy H utchison A couple of years ago, Rock Hill High School junior Teddy

HOT

shots

S.C. youth Shooting Foundation

­ utchison gave up basketball and track so he could concentrate on H perfecting his skills at sporting clays. That concentration paid off when he beat more than 400 other shooters in all divisions—breaking 98 out of 100 clay targets—to take top honors at the SCYSF State Championship. Coach Hill Muse says the young man has “a knack for under­ standing the game,” adding that Hutchison’s average score over the 2013–14 season never dropped below 90. Hutchison says the secret to his success is pretty simple: lots of practice. He hits the shooting range once a week with his Browning 625, often focusing on one specific scenario until he is able to break the clay five consecutive times before moving on to the next station. “It takes a lot of time and focus,” says the 17-year-old champion, who has been active in the sport since the fourth grade. “When I am shooting, the only things that matter are the targets that fly in front of me.”

C arley S nyder

Breaking 92 of 100

clays at the state championship earned 17-yearold Carley Snyder the title of top female SCYSF shooter for the 2013–14 season. “It was just awesome,” she says. “I beat my personal best by nine targets.” Competitive by nature, the senior at Andrew Jackson High School in Kershaw also has been active in horse barrel racing and golf. “She was good at golf but was never really interested enough to become competitive,” says Larry Snyder, Carley’s father. “I could see that sporting clays was something she really enjoyed. I think it is a combination of the competitiveness of the sport and the fact that she can measure her improvement.” And improve she did. Last year, Snyder shot in the low 60s. But after switching to a better-fitting gun, enlisting the help of shooting instructors and logging hours of practice on the range, her scores sharply improved. “I’m also a lot more patient than I used to be,” she says. “Before, when I missed a target, I would get really upset, and I would keep missing them, because I could not calm down enough to recover. Now, if I miss one, I can block it out, see what I did wrong and apply it to the next target.” Snyder says she’ll be back with her team for another season before graduating high school and heading off to college. The new champion says she eventually plans to become a conservation biologist and—no surprises here—a sporting clays shooting instructor. —tim hanson

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

Safety is a top priority at SCYSF competitions. Orange armbands distributed during pre-match briefings allow officials to make sure coaches are always within arm’s reach of each shooter. The young competitors are schooled in firearms safety, but the coach is required to take control of the gun in the case of a misfire.

and discipline by competing in this challenging variation of traditional skeet and trap shooting, says SCYSF cofounder Donny Roth. “We want to encourage these kids to learn through a shot­gun what it takes to be a great member of society, to become a good adult,” he says. From humble beginnings in 2007, SCYSF has grown to encompass 150 teams across the state, representing public and private schools, 4-H groups, churches and private gun clubs. Tourna­ments routinely draw 1,000 or more shooters, family members and spectators. Donny Roth (right), vice chairman of the South Carolina Youth Shooting Foundation, wants more young people, like 17-year-old Chandler Gray (below), to take up sporting clays. “It’s fun. It’s healthy. It’s something a family can do,” Roth says.


‘All three girls are very outgoing, very ambitious, hard-working and dedicated to being good students. They need a lot of drive, courage and ambition to compete in this sport.’ —Rick Wyatt

For the young shooters, sporting clays is like any other sport—a chance to excel at something they love and make friends doing it. “I enjoy the team atmosphere and the other girls to shoot with. That is really nice about such a competitive sport,” says 18-year-old Woelffer. “We can still be friendly and encourage each other.” For 17-year-old Chandler Gray, a shooter on the Orange­ burg Prep Sporting Clays team, tournaments ­encourage competitive excellence without the petty rivalries that plague other sports, says his father and coach, Allen “Boo” Gray. “He likes competing but doesn’t let it go to his head,” he says. “I’m so proud of my son. He’ll go out there and compete against other shooters and then, as soon as the shoot is over, he’ll be hanging around with all of them.”

Golf with a gun

Sporting clays is a variation of trap and skeet shooting in which clay targets are launched from many different directions and locations, offering shooters a greater challenge. While one station might host targets that cross from left to right at more than 40 mph, the next stop could feature a disk that zips across the ground—bouncing crazily over rocks and underbrush. Courses may cover several hundred acres, prompting enthusiasts to dub their pastime “golf with a gun,” and indeed, most use motorized carts to travel from one shooting station to the next. With as many as 20 different stations on a course, it can take more than two hours to complete a shooting circuit. The shotgun, of course, is the first order of business for anyone taking up the sport. Competitors may use 12-gauge

As coach Rick Wyatt looks on, Snyder, Wyatt and Woelffer use their thumbs to gauge the trajectory of a target before actually firing at the disk. At each station, shooting teams get to see a “show pair” of targets before loading their guns and taking aim.

Clay Dusters coach Rick Wyatt, a member of York Electric Cooperative, reminds his team to focus on the anticipated “break point” of the target. “Shoot where the target is going to be—not where it’s at,” he says.

or 20-gauge shotguns in either double-barrel or single-­ barrel automatic configurations. A good entry-level shotgun costs about $300, but at tournaments it is not difficult to find shooters using custom shotguns that top $10,000. Other required gear includes hearing and eye protection. Acceptable ear protection ranges from disposable foam plugs to $1,500, custom-fitted, electronic ear pieces. Shooting glasses, too, range widely in price from just a few dollars to more than $2,000. Wyatt’s father, Rick, who is also her squad’s coach, is quick to note that expensive equipment is not required to compete successfully. “A kid with a $200 shotgun, a 25-cent pair of earplugs and a $2 set of glasses is at no disadvantage to a kid who has the whole arsenal,” he says.

Shooting season

The 2013–14 season began in December at Richburg, where Bonnie Wyatt’s eagle-eyed shooting—she broke scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

15


Rick Wyatt

After competing in their final tournament, graduating high school seniors Taylor Rienzo, Laken Riddle, Bailey Crenshaw, Lauren Williams, Logan Skrabak and Bradley Turcotte each received a $1,500 scholarship from SCYSF. The S.C. Department of Natural Resources also presented six Harry Hampton Scholarships— two for $1,500, two for $1,000 and two for $500— to the top three male shooters and top three female shooters among college-bound seniors.

‘Sporting clays has allowed me and my dad to bond. We both enjoy it. I think that’s why I stuck with it.’ —Bonnie Wyatt

Maggie Woelffer grins after a successful shooting stage. The 18-year-old high school student likes to compete but enjoys the camaraderie of her teammates almost as much. “We can still be friendly and encourage each other,” she says.

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SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

89 of 100 targets, a personal best—set the tone and led her squad to a first-place win in the tournament. A month later, at Live Oaks Shooting Club in Swansea, the team did not fare as well. Winds gusting to 40 mph played havoc with many of the targets, and the team had to settle for a respectable, but disappointing, fourth place. At the next tournament, in Clinton, the girls tied for first in regular competition but were edged out in a shoot-off and ended up taking home the second-place trophy. A month later, at Back Woods Quail Club near Georgetown, the girls faced a series of particularly challenging targets and finished fourth. By the time the state championship returned to Richburg in May, coach Rick Wyatt was worried that his team would be at a disadvantage since the girls’ busy schedules had kept them from practicing as a group. Individually, however, each girl had put in time at the range. More than 400 shooters would compete that day, collectively firing more than 43,000 shells in their pursuit of trophies, medals, scholarships and personal bests. At the last station of the day, a challenging 10-target round, scorekeeper Gene Stewart watches carefully as Snyder takes her turn—a miss and nine hits. Then Woelffer steps up to the station and breaks seven out of 10 clays. And, finally, Wyatt moves into position, calls for the targets, and breaks all 10. When the scores are totaled for the day, Woelffer has broken 70 clays, Wyatt has hit 79 and Snyder has shattered 92 out of 100 targets—enough to make her the top female shooter of the championship tournament. As a light morning breeze sweeps away the last of the gun smoke, Stewart nods his approval. “That was nice shooting, young ladies,” he says. “Very nice shooting indeed.”

Get More Learn more about competitive sporting clays and find a team near you at scysf.org.


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SC Life

Stories

Milton Morris

Good medicine

Caring for patients can mean simply treating them when they’re sick. Dr. Raymond Cox thinks a better approach includes helping them learn how to stay healthy. Cox found an ideal place to carry out his philosophy when he became executive director of Volunteers in Medicine Hilton Head Island one year ago this month. The free clinic was established in 1993 by the much-admired Dr. Jack McConnell to serve the “working poor”—the thousands of uninsured and underinsured laborers who staff the island’s tourism and hospitality industry. “I was so impressed with the clinic’s mission and values,” he says of his first visit to VIM. “It was consistent with my interest in meeting the needs of the underserved.” Cox was chief medical officer at Providence Hospital in Washington, D.C., and chair of OB/GYN at Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, Md., when his wife, Marilyn, a retired nurse practitioner, “informed me we were moving to Hilton Head,” he says with a grin and hearty bass laugh. Not ready to retire himself, Cox was delighted to discover VIM—“the best health care job on the island,” he says. VIM’s culture of caring, where patients are treated as friends and neighbors, impressed Cox, as did the fact that the Hilton Head clinic has been the model for 95 VIM clinics across the U.S., 10 in South Carolina. More than 120 volunteer doctors and dentists treated 33,000 patients at the Hilton Head clinic last year. Cox aims to build on that model, encouraging a focus on chronic disease management and wellness care, helping patients avoid illness. He brags on a group of 60 wellness patients who lost 338 pounds and walked more than 22,000 miles in six months. “The thing that excites me is that there is so much enthusiasm for making this type of change,” Cox says. “I think this is the right living legacy for Dr. Jack.”

Dr. Raymond Cox 65, with no plans to retire soon Philadelphia Academics: Bachelor’s degree from Howard University; medical degree from University of Pennsylvania; MBA in medical management from Johns Hopkins University Other key roles: Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; government affairs and public policy committee, March of Dimes; board chair-elect for National Perinatal Information Center; co-chair of the OB Partners Leadership Group for Ascension Health. Hobby: “We play tennis. A lot.” Age:

Originally from:

Get More Learn more about VIM at https://vimclinic.org/ or visit SCLiving.coop for the article “The doctor will see you now” from the May 2011 issue.

scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

19


SCTravels

BY Dik Daso And Keith Phillips

Maj. Matthew Delk of the S.C. National

Guard’s 122nd Engineering Battalion is a little reluctant to talk about his display at the South Carolina Military Museum, but if it helps people understand the sacrifices his fellow citizen soldiers make to defend the state and the nation, then so be it. Inside a glass case in the museum’s newly opened wing, a mannequin displays the bullet-riddled uniform thenLt. Delk wore on April 20, 2004, when his Humvee convoy came under attack near Mosul, Iraq. A massive IED explosion rocked Delk’s vehicle and threw him into the street but trapped two soldiers from a Maine National Guard unit inside the burning wreckage. The blast was followed by the chatter of AK-47 rifles as insurgents fired on the injured Americans. “When I woke up, I was moving and had my weapon up,” he recalls. “I was able to get over to the vehicle and get the other two soldiers out. At some point, I took three rounds that went

through the rear of this uniform ... but barely touched me.” Delk also suffered painful burns on his hands and face. When an Army nurse tried to cut away his desert camouflage jacket and pants to begin treating him, he stopped her cold. “I don’t know what was going through my head at the time, but I would not let them cut my uniform,” Delk says. “I remember screaming, ‘I’m signed for all this stuff!’ To ease my upset condition, she put those shears away.” Delk’s uniform, saved from disposal and later donated to the museum, is one of hundreds of artifacts that showcase the service of citizen soldiers who have drilled, fought, bled and died to defend their fellow South Carolinians. The museum covers Palmetto State military history from the earliest militia units formed to protect colonial Charles Town in 1670, to the partisan fighters of the Revolutionary War, to the highly trained National Guard units that have served in every war America has fought, including ongoing operations

jonathan sharpe

20

Maj. Matthew Delk of the S.C. National Guard stands next to the bullet-riddled uniform he wore in Mosul, Iraq, when his Humvee convoy was ambushed by insurgents.

The museum’s newest wing opened in June, featuring vintage military vehicles and an Apache helicopter cockpit trainer.

GetThere

Museum director Buddy Sturgis and a team of volunteers proudly maintain 19,000 square feet of exhibit space, including the new wing filled with vintage military vehicles.

Keith Phillips

Honoring our citizen soldiers

The South Carolina Military Museum is located at 1225 Bluff Road (behind the S.C. National Guard Headquarters) in Columbia. Hours: Monday–Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed on Sundays, state holidays and on USC home football game days. Admission: Free Contact: (803) 299-4440; scmilitarymuseum.com

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

around the globe. Housed in a former repair depot behind the S.C. National Guard headquarters in Columbia, the museum showcases a remarkable collection of military hardware and weapons curated by director Buddy Sturgis and his volunteer staff. Personal artifacts tell the human side of military service— including a bugle blown on Sept. 13, 1846, when the flag of the Palmetto Regiment was raised over Mexico City during the Mexican-American War, and a chaplain’s cloak worn during World War I. The museum’s newest wing opened in June, featuring an open-­floor exhibit filled with vintage military vehicles and an Apache helicopter cockpit trainer. Sturgis says more exhibits are in the works to fulfill the museum’s mission. “We want to honor the South Carolina citizen soldier and this state’s martial tradition,” he says.


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21


Recipe

EDITED BY CArrie Hirsch

A taste of the coast SOUTH CAROLINA CRAB CAKES SERVES 2

1 egg, beaten I cup breadcrumbs G cup mayonnaise 1 teaspoon grated onion I teaspoon fresh parsley, minced H teaspoon Worcestershire sauce J teaspoon ground mustard Dash hot pepper sauce Dash black pepper 1 6-ounce can crabmeat, drained, flaked and cartilage removed 1 tablespoon olive oil

Mustard sauce 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 2 tablespoons sour cream 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard H teaspoon lemon juice H teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

Karen Wiesner / iStockphoto

In a small bowl, combine the first 9 ingredients. Fold in crabmeat. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Shape into 4 patties. Heat olive oil in a medium skillet over medium-low heat, and fry patties on one side for 3–4 minutes or until browned. Carefully flip and fry the other side for an additional 3–4 minutes or until browned. To make the mustard sauce, stir together mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard, lemon juice and Worcestershire sauce in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Serve crab cakes warm with mustard sauce. MARY WILLIS, SPARTANBURG

W h at Õ s C oo k i n g i n

SCRecipe

November/December: Swapping cookies

Making holiday cookies is a fun way to celebrate the season in the kitchen, and the fresh-baked results are great gifts for friends and neighbors. Got recipes? Share the ones you like to bake and swap this time of year. Deadline: Aug. 1

Turn your original recipes into cash! For each one of your recipes we publish, we’ll send you a $10 BI-LO gift card. Send us your original recipes—appetizers, salads, main courses, side dishes, desserts and beverages— almost anything goes. Be sure to specify ingredient measurements. Instead of “one can” or “two packages,” specify “one 12-ounce can” or “two 8-ounce packages.” Note the number of servings or yield. Entries must be original, and they must include your name, mailing address and phone number. • online at SCLiving.coop • email to recipe@scliving.coop • mail to Recipe, 808 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce, SC 29033

Submit

22

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop


CRAB-STUFFED MUSHROOMS MAKES 24 OR 36

8 ounces fresh crab pieces, chopped fine 8 ounces spinach-artichoke dip (available in refrigerated deli or dairy cases) 4 ounces finely grated Parmesan, Romano or Asiago cheese 24 large or 36 medium button mushrooms, stems removed

Carrie Miller / iStock

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine crab, spinach-artichoke dip and cheese. Fill mushroom caps with crab mixture. Place filled mushrooms on a lipped cookie sheet (this will contain the water that will bake out of the mushrooms), and bake for 30 minutes. Serve warm. BARBARA CASSARA, BLUFFTON

LOU LOU’S CRAB DIP YIELDS 1½ CUPS

1 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened 2–3 tablespoons picante sauce 1–2 tablespoons prepared horseradish 1 6-ounce can crabmeat, drained, flaked and cartilage removed Celery sticks, carrots or favorite raw veggies

Leeann White / iStockphoto

In a mixing bowl, beat cream cheese, picante sauce and horseradish well. Stir in the crabmeat. Serve with raw veggies. Cover and refrigerate any unused portion. LOUISE SMITH, ROCK HILL

WILLIE’S CRAB QUICHE SERVES 12

4 eggs, beaten 2  H cups milk Salt and pepper to taste 1 tablespoon butter I cup white button mushrooms, chopped

N cup onion, finely chopped 1 teaspoon salt 1 6-ounce can crabmeat, drained, flaked and cartilage removed 1 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded 2 9-inch pie crusts, unbaked

WILLIE GARRET, GREENVILLE

William P. Edwards / iStock

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk eggs and milk together, then add salt and pepper to taste. In a medium skillet, heat butter, and sauté mushrooms and onion over medium heat until soft, stirring often, about 5–8 minutes. Stir in crabmeat. Pour crab mixture over bottom of pie crusts. Sprinkle cheese over the top. Pour egg mixture over the cheese, and bake 40–50 minutes or until lightly golden brown on the top. Allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving.

scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

23


SCGardener

BY S. CORY TANNER

SCT

Backyard water-saving tips

Native shrubs, such as American beautyberry (left), adapt better to extremes of wet and dry than non‑native plants. Rain barrels, purchased or home-built, collect rainwater for the garden from rerouted downspouts.

Rainfall seems to be either feast

or famine in South Carolina. Some years we are blessed with an over­ abundance, but the next drought is almost certainly around the corner. Fortunately, efficient gardeners can make use of numerous techniques for minimizing drought impacts and ­maximizing water use in their backyard gardens. Plant natives. Native plants are often

Divide your landscape into water-use zones. Gardeners often use the areas

closest to their homes to make a big impact with colorful plantings of flowering annuals, bold foliage and lawns. These will usually be high-water-use zones. You can save water by minimizing water-guzzling plantings. As the landscape moves ­farther away from the home, the water requirements

GetMore Need advice on installing an efficient watering system? Visit SCLiving.coop for the article “Do-it-yourself drip irrigation,” from the November/December 2011 issue. Learn more about landscaping with native plants and access the new plant database at the Carolina Yards website from Clemson Extension, clemson.edu/cy.

24

istockphoto

better adapted to our cycles of wet and dry than plants from faraway lands. As a general rule, a landscape composed of mostly natives, with a few exotics mixed in for interest, will stand up better to drought and need less supplemental water. The best choices for your landscape depend on your region and your garden conditions, including location, soil and sun exposure. American beautyberry, lady fern and swamp azalea are a few that do well in various parts of our state.

should lessen to medium- and lowwater-use zones. At the edges of your landscape, plants should be able to survive without any supplemental water, except in extreme drought situations. The new Carolina Yards plant database can help you select suitable plants for your landscape. Conserve water with efficient irrigation.

Sprinkler irrigation is notoriously inefficient. Much of the water sprayed into the air is lost to evaporation, and some of it lands where it’s not needed. Sprinklers should be limited to lawn areas, if possible, and run only as needed, not on a regular schedule. Hand watering for smaller plantings and drip irrigation systems for larger perennial and shrub beds are much more efficient, applying water only where it’s needed—at the root zone. Add soil improvements and mulch.

One of the benefits of adding organic matter to soil is that it improves water retention. In new flower beds, lightly till a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost or soil conditioner into the

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

soil before planting. Tree and shrub plantings are usually best planted in unamended, native soil, but they will benefit from a good 2- to 3-inch layer of organic mulch after planting. Mulches conserve moisture by reducing evaporation from the soil. They also prevent weeds, which compete with plants for valuable moisture, and they break down into organic matter that enriches the soil beneath. Capture rainwater. Rainwater is great

for watering plants, plus it’s free! Collecting and storing rainwater is a centuries-old practice that is still used today. While you may not want to leap headfirst into an elaborate cistern system, rain barrels are a great way to start catching water from the next thunderstorm. Plenty of ready-made systems are available for purchase, but you can find building plans and workshops if you prefer to do it yourself. To learn more about ways to create water-friendly landscapes, explore Clemson Extension’s Carolina Yards program. Carolina Yards offers education on conserving and protecting water resources through gardening, including an online course, demonstration sites, and an online plant database to help you select the best plants for your backyard. Using the techniques above, you can be well on your way to a certified Carolina Yard. is an area horticulture agent and Master Gardener c­ oordinator for Clemson Extension based in Green­ville County. Contact him at shannt@clemson.edu.

S. CORY TANNER


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Note: Co-op members should already receive this magazine as a membership benefit. Please make check payable to South Carolina Living and mail to P.O. Box 100270, Columbia, SC 29202-3270. Please allow 4–8 weeks. Call 1-803-926-3175 for more information. Sorry, credit card orders not accepted.

scliving.coop   | July 2014   |  SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING

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Calendar  of Events Go to SCLiving.coop for more information and for guidelines on submitting your event. Please confirm information before attending events.

UPSTATE JULY

10–Aug. 2 • “Shout! The Mod Musical,” Centre Stage, Greenville. (864) 233-6733. 10–Aug. 3 • Upstate Shakespeare Festival, Falls Park on the Reedy, Greenville. (864) 787-4016. 11–20 • “Lily’s Purple Plastic Purse,” South Carolina Children’s Theatre, Greenville. (864) 235-2885. 14–18 • Camp Courage, Spartanburg Regional History Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 596-3501. 17–19 and 25–26 • South Carolina Peach Festival, downtown, Gaffney. (864) 489-5721. 19 • Itchy and the Chiggers, Pickens Amphitheater, Pickens. (864) 878-0105. 19 • Colonial Toys, Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, Clinton. (864) 938-0100. 19 • Glow in the Park, Heritage Park, Simpsonville. (313) 304-0903. 19 • Bowl Making for Soup Day, Spartanburg Art Museum School, Spartanburg. (864) 621-2768. 19 • Living History Saturday, Ninety Six National Historic Site, Ninety Six. (864) 543-4068. 24–27 • Summer on Augusta, Augusta Road, Greenville. (864) 325-6534. 26 • Mushroom Mountain Farm Tour, 200 Finley Road, Easley. (864) 855-2469. 27 • SAW it @ SAM, Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 582-7616. 28–Aug. 1 • American Girl Camp, Spartanburg Regional History Museum, Spartanburg. (864) 596-3501. AUGUST

1 • First Fridays Art Gallery Crawl, multiple locations, Greenville. (864) 467-3132. 2 • The Folsom Prison Gang and Cruise-In, Pickens Amphitheater and downtown, Pickens. (864) 878-0105. 2 • Frontier Encampment, Oconee Station State Historic Site, Walhalla. (864) 638-0079. 2 • Music on the Mountain, Table Rock State Park, Pickens. (864) 878-9813. 3 • Hunt Cabin: Harvesting Our Heritage—King Corn, S.C. Botanical Garden, Clemson. (864) 656-3311. 7 • “Come Dance with Me” by the Greenville Jazz Ensemble, Lakeside Amphitheater, Furman University. (864) 294-2086. 13 • Yappy Hour, NOMA Square, Greenville. (864) 235-1234. ONGOING

Weekdays through mid-August • Summer Day Camps, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

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Mondays through Aug. 11 • Summer Shag Lessons with Ballet Spartanburg, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg. (803) 583-0339. Tuesdays through Saturdays, through Aug. 14 • Exhibits by Michael Brodeur and Keith Spencer, Pickens County Museum, Pickens. (864) 898-5963. Tuesdays through Saturdays, through October • Walnut Grove Plantation Public Tours, Walnut Grove Plantation, Roebuck. (864) 576-6546. Wednesdays through Saturdays, through Sept. 21 • “The Content of Our Character: From States Rights to Civil Rights,” Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville. (864) 271-7570. Wednesdays through Sundays • Carolina Foothills Artisan Center Landrum Inaugural Season, 214 Rutherford St., Landrum. (864) 461-3050. Fridays • Bluegrass Jam Session, 5301 Dacusville Highway, Pumpkintown. (864) 637-9217. Fridays through Sept. 26 • Heritage Main Street Fridays, NOMA Square, Greenville. (864) 467-5741. Third Saturdays • Music in the Mountains, Hagood Mill Historic Site and Folklife Center, Pickens. (864) 898-2936. Sundays • Sundays Unplugged, Zimmerli Plaza, Spartanburg. (864) 542-2787.

MIDLANDS JULY

12–13 • Battle of Huck’s Defeat, Historic Brattonsville, McConnells. (803) 684-2327. 17–19 • Friends of the York County Library Book Sale, Main Library, Rock Hill. (803) 981-5837. 17–19 and 24–26 • “Evil Dead, the Musical,” Trustus Theatre, Columbia. (803) 254-9732. 18 • Scavenger Hunt Program, Harvin Clarendon Library, Manning. (803) 435-8633. 19 • Palmetto Tasty Tomato Festival, City Roots Farm, Columbia. (803) 254-2302. 26 • Ultimate Mud Run Challenge Night Ops, The Leatherneck, Gaston. (803) 451-1197. 28–Aug. 1 • British Soccer Camp, J.C. Britton Park, Manning. (800) 878-2167, ext. 239. 31 • Swim for the Duck Invitational, Aquatics Center, Sumter. (803) 774-3998. AUGUST

1 • Brew at the Zoo, Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens, Columbia. (803) 779-8717. 2 • Giant Garage Sale, J.C. Britton Park, Manning. (803) 473-3543. 2 • DORA Saturday Night Showcase, Stevenson Auditorium, Orangeburg. (803) 531-6186.

19 • Paddling on the Edisto River, Colleton State Park, Walterboro. (843) 538-8206. 24 • Stingray Shuffle, Myrtle Beach State Park Fishing Pier, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-0874. 26 • Fight for Air Climb, North Charleston Coliseum, North Charleston. (843) 556-8451. AUGUST

Scary Fun “Evil Dead: The Musical,” a Canadian rock musical based on the cult classic film series, roars into the Trustus Theatre in Columbia July 17–19 and 24–26.

7 • First Thursday on Main, Main Street, Columbia. (803) 988-1065. 8 • Movies at the Opera House: “Divergent,” Sumter Opera House, Sumter. (803) 436-2616. 8 • Wynonna & The Big Noise, Old Town Amphitheater, Rock Hill. (803) 329-8756. 8–10 and 14–16 • “The Velvet Weapon,” Trustus Theatre, Columbia. (803) 254-9732. 9 • Dancing with the Clarendon Stars, Matric Center, Manning. (843) 687-7774. 9 • Southeastern Toy Soldier Show, South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4952. 10 • Crafty Kids Club, Whole Foods Market Columbia, Columbia. (803) 509-6700. 14 • Moonlight Cemetery & Secrets from the Grave Tour, Elmwood Cemetery & Gardens, Columbia. (803) 252-1770, ext. 23. ONGOING

Daily through Labor Day • “The Life and Art of Addie Sims: A Look into Her World” Virtual Exhibition, scmuseum. org/addiesims/addiesims.html, S.C. State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4942. Daily through Sept. 14 • “Dinosaurs: Land of Fire and Ice,” EdVenture Children’s Museum, Columbia. (803) 779-3100. Daily • Self-guided Rose Garden Walks, Edisto Memorial Gardens, Orangeburg. (800) 545-6153. Mondays through Saturdays, through Aug. 30 • “Hidden Treasures: Rediscovering McKissick Museum’s Natural History Collection,” McKissick Museum, Columbia. (803) 777-7251. Tuesdays through Sundays, through Aug. 31 • “Daryl Triveri’s Fantastic Animals: Selections from the Vogel Collection,” Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia. (803) 799-2810.

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

Tuesdays through Sundays • Expanded Civil War Exhibit, South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Tuesdays through Sundays • “Dinosaurs: A Bite Out of Time,” South Carolina State Museum, Columbia. (803) 898-4921. Thursdays through Aug. 14 (except Aug. 7) • Playcation Day Camps, Main Street Children’s Museum, Rock Hill. (803) 327-6400.

LOWCOUNTRY JULY

15–17 • Summer KidsArt: Photography from A to Z, Franklin G. BurroughsSimeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-2910. 15–19 • Mustang Week, multiple locations, Myrtle Beach. (910) 894-3592. 15–20 • Junior Shag Association dance events, multiple locations, North Myrtle Beach. (919) 682-4266. 17 • Thursday Night Boogie, Mount Pleasant Pier, Mount Pleasant. (843) 762-8089. 18 • May River Shrimp Festival, Oyster Factory Park, Bluffton. (843) 757-8520. 18 • Sounds of Summer Concert, McLean Park, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. 18 • Basic Paddling with a Ranger, Cheraw State Park, Cheraw. (843) 537-9656. 18–19 • Pageland Watermelon Festival, downtown, Pageland. (843) 672-6400. 18–27 • Beaufort Water Festival, Waterfront Park, Beaufort. (843) 524-0600. 19 • Mission Project Golf Tournament, Wedgefield Plantation Golf Club, Georgetown. (843) 546-4898.

1–3 • Craftsmen’s Summer Classic Art & Craft Festival, Myrtle Beach Convention Center, Myrtle Beach. (336) 282-5550. 4–8 • Summer Art Camp for Children, Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston. (843) 722-2706, ext. 41. 6 • “The Alchemy of Ansel Adams’ Darkroom,” Franklin G. BurroughsSimeon B. Chapin Art Museum, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-2910. 8–9 • Hooked on Life Fishing Tournament, Charleston Maritime Center, Charleston. (800) 462-0755. 9 • Movie Night, Wannamaker County Park, North Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 10 • Charleston Sprint Triathlon Series, James Island County Park, Charleston. (843) 795-4386. 13 • Coastal Birding, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 237-4440. 15 • Dog Days of Summer Sunset Party, Oyster Factory Park, Bluffton. (843) 757-8520. ONGOING

Daily • Behind-the-Scenes Tour of the Sea Turtle Hospital, South Carolina Aquarium, Charleston. (843) 577-3474. Daily through Aug. 3 • “Kent Ullberg: A Retrospective,” Brookgreen Gardens, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-6000. Daily through December • “Finding Freedom’s Home: Archaeology at Mitchelville,” Coastal Discovery Museum, Hilton Head Island. (843) 689-6767. Mondays through October • Coastal Kayaking, Huntington Beach State Park, Murrells Inlet. (843) 235-8755. Mondays through Saturdays • “The Henrietta: Largest Wooden Sailing Ship Built in South Carolina,” South Carolina Maritime Museum, Georgetown. (843) 520-0111. Tuesdays and Fridays, through Aug. 19 • Fireworks, Broadway at the Beach, Myrtle Beach. (843) 444-3200. First and fourth Thursdays through September • Music on Main, Main Street and Horseshoe, North Myrtle Beach. (843) 280-5570. Thursdays through Aug. 28 • Seinesational Fun! Myrtle Beach State Park Fishing Pier, Myrtle Beach. (843) 238-0874. Saturdays • History, Nature and Music Programs, Horry County Museum, Conway. (843) 915-5320.


SCHumorMe

By Jan A. Igoe

Ashes to ashes, or perhaps a dog There’s nothing worse than saying

goodbye to a family member, but at least my relatives usually leave a humor column behind. When we lost Aunt Faye, I was just a little kid, but I remember the family having a hard time getting my grandmother in the funeral mood. Gram’s hobby was collecting fresh, young husbands and doing creative subtraction on her age. If you were smart, you just smiled and agreed that she had her first child at 4. (Stranger things have happened in our clan.) But Aunt Faye would whip out her calculator and offer to call Guinness with the new world record, so Gram never really liked her. The day of the service, my other aunts all wore long, dark skirts, but not Gram. She picked out a festive red strap­less for the occasion, sending the aunts scurrying for fashionable ways to disguise her. Gram only stood about 4-foot-10, not counting her hair, which resembled a hairy Tower of Pisa. She was very hard to hide. Buried under piles of platinum tresses—all ­swirling skyward in a beehive last seen heading northwest—Gram had enough hair to clog every drain from here to Idaho. Compared to Gram, Dolly Parton was bald. And that’s hardly where the comparisons end. “Did you bring anything else to wear?” Aunt Harriet asked as she tried 30

to fashion an emergency shawl from a blanket. “What’s wrong with this?” Gram demanded. “It’s a little too happy,” Aunt Barb whispered. “I am happy. I’m not dead,” Gram said, spraying her hive in place.

Years later, when we lost my mom, nobody had to worry about the dress code. Mom just wanted to be cremated and displayed on her daughters’ mantels. My mother’s rationale for what we called “Roast in Peace” was based on her deep spiritual conviction that nagging her kids to clean shouldn’t stop just because death did us part. She liked knowing we’d get to dust her in the afterlife. But the cremation process was full of surprises, like when the funeral

SOUTH CAROLINA LIVING  |   July 2014  |  scliving.coop

director told us Mom’s pacemaker would have to come out or she would explode. As the family sobbed uncontrollably, the mortician—a man with all the emotion of Sheetrock— consoled us by promising he’d give the device to a dog. Veterinary hospitals can’t afford pacemakers unless they’re donated, he said. Although I don’t recall ever making the acquaintance of a dog with a pacemaker, we took his word for it. Mom would have liked that. And we liked knowing she wouldn’t detonate. When it’s my turn, there should be lots of non-­ combustible options. Like everything else, funerals are going green. Give or take a few titanium replacement parts, let’s face it: we’re all recyclable. Instead of grilling, maybe they’ll freeze-dry me with liquid nitrogen. Then, using intense sound waves to shatter my remains (anything on the kids’ iPods should work), they can use me as fertilizer. It’s all very eco-friendly. Best of all, nobody has to dust me.  Jan A. Igoe is a writer and illustrator from Horry County whose mom was a huge fan of art and laughter. Jan’s housekeeping is another story. Say hello at HumorMe@SCLiving.coop.


STEM Workshop for K-8 Teachers

Energyandthe Environment

A FREE half-day session for K-8 teachers featuring lessons and activities aligned to state education standards and ready for use with your students Fall 2014 Workshops

September 13

Aiken Electric

Aiken, SC

Fairfield Electric Blythewood, SC

September 20

Pee Dee Electric

Darlington, SC

Santee Electric Kingstree, SC

September 27 October 11

Horry Electric

Conway, SC

Newberry Electric

Newberry, SC

Palmetto Electric Hardeeville, SC

October 18 Workshop attendees will receive ✷ 4 credit renewal points ✷ Access to grade-

appropriate lessons and activities ✷ Lunch

Berkeley Electric

Moncks Corner, SC

For more details or to register, visit the “Upcoming Events” section of

www.enlightensc.org


RECYCLE YOUR MONOFILAMENT. Help PalmettoPride and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources keep our waterways clean and free from debris and keep our wildlife safe. Discarded monofilament fishing line is harmful to wildlife and a nuisance to boaters. Recycling helps keep it out of our water systems and landfills. To adopt a monofilament recycling bin at your local boat landing or dock, contact PalmettoPride or visit our website.

2700 Middleburg Drive, Suite 216 | Columbia SC 29204 | 800-725-7733 | PalmettoPride.org

South Carolina Living - July 2014  
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