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Portfolio Avani Sheth

Spring ’01, Kolam, Auroville

1. pg. 01

Fired House

Spring ’01, Kolam, Auroville

2. pg. 05

Town Hall

Spring ’05, I.E.D., Undergrad Thesis

3. pg. 09

Eco Industrial Park

Fall ’08, SCI-Arc, Los Angeles

4. pg. 13

Downtown Densification

Spring ’09, SCI-Arc, Detroit

5. pg. 17

Urban Micro Climates

Summer ’09, SCI-Arc Gallery

6. pg. 23

Styrofoam Lover with (E)motions of Concrete

Summer ’09, SCI-Arc, Beijing

7. pg. 25

Beijing’s Near Futures

Summer ’09, Deegan Day Design

8. pg. 33

Blow x Blow


1 01

Fired House Spring ’01, Kolam, Auroville


The 700 square foot fired house is a residential project for a client who is a ceramicist. This was an experimental building which became a trend setter for others build of its kind. It is a vernacular building which derives from the building traditions of Southern India. It utilizes local designers as well as organic building materials. The bricks are made on situ with the same soil that is excavated for the foundation and the mortar used is raw potter’s clay. After construction, the entire house is fired to strengthen the structure by baking it at very controlled temperatures. The domed and vaulted roofs facilitate the heat flows needed during the firing process.

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03 The building is then filled with ceramic products along with other bricks and fired.

The bricks are arranged so as to fill the entire interior space leaving a hollow core to circulate heat during firing.

After firing, the building is left alone to cool. This helps strengthen the structure. The filled in bricks are then unloaded first.

The superstructure of this building is first built with a combination of sun burnt and unburned bricks.

The temperature is kept under control for the entire firing process and the shed is build above to protect it from unexpected rains.

The structure is coated with clay and set to fire. Openings along the vaulted roof allow for air circulation.


fifriferiedredhdhohouousuese,se,a,auaurourovriovlivlleillele

7 7 7

4 4 4

5 5 5

5 5 5

1 1 1

3 3 3 2 2 2

6 6 6

G.F. Plan

9 9 9 8 8 8

5 5 5

5 5 5 8 8 8

8 8 8

6 6 6

F.F. Plan

8 8 8

8 8 8 Legend Legend 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

8 8 8

Legend Legend

Entrance 1. Entrance Living Room 1. Entrance 2. Entrance Living Room 1. Dining 2. Living Room Kitchen 3. Living Dining Room 2. 3. Dining Toilet 4. Kitchen 3. Dining Bedroom 4. Kitchen 5. Toilet 4. Kitchen Bathroom 5. Toilet 6. Toilet Bedroom Dining Room 5. 6. Bedroom Kitchen 7. Bedroom Bathroom 6. 7. Bathroom Storage

9 9 9

1 0

5 2

0 0 0

8 8 8

S.F. Plan

8. Bathroom Dining Room 7. 8. Dining Room 9. Dining KitchenRoom 8. 9. Kitchen 10.Storage 9. Kitchen 10.Storage 10.Storage N N N N

10 10 10

1 1 1

10 M

2 2 2

5 5 5

10 M 10 M 10 M

Section

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2 05

Town Hall Spring ’01, Kolam, Auroville


Located in Auroville’s administrative zone in the centre of the city, the Town Hall symbolizes Auroville’s growth over the last three decades into an ecologically sustainable international community. The complex has a solid, modern, urban feel. The large, spacious and efficient set-up of the building houses the planning and administrative offices of Centre for Urban Research of the community and is built according to the green principles that constitute the core values of Auroville. The building has a covered surface of 1300 sqm plus 350 sqm of verandas distributed over 3 floors. The roof is designed to collect rainwater which is harvested and reused. An elaborate wastewater treatment plant is also incorporated in the design. The electricity is supplied by the hybrid system that uses solar panels along with the main supply.

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07

This harvested rain water is used for toilet flushing and to irrigate the huge landscaped area around the builing.

This single roof top opening brings natural daylight inside the builing.

The central opening for syklight is like a functional core during construction.

The staircase is also designed to allow in natural light and keep it mantainance free.

Large overhangs for shade were provided to protect the interior from gaining heat in the extreme climate and the glass windows are openable to regulate air-flow.

The construction of the building started in May 2001. In the original design, solar pannels were intended to shade the front facade along with collection & re-usage of rooftop rainwater.


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1 G. F. Plan

Legend 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Entrance Reception Offices Staircase Toilet Back Entry Bridge N

5

1 0

2

25 M 10

Elevation

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3 09

Eco-Industrial Park Spring ’05, I.E.D.,Undergrad Thesis


Auroville is an international community located near Pondicherry in Southern India. The concept for the Eco-industrial park is based on the principle that the manufacturing units can symbiotically function together by using each others by-products and waste. The design combines interdependent industries with living spaces and a primary school to create a self-sustaining work-live-learn environment.

10


11.2.1 Explaining the working of industries in the EIP

Selection of Industries

Solar power plant

Electricity

Windmills

Energy

Energy

Energy

Handicraft industry Cloth

Wood

Raw material

Paper as raw material

Washing/Drying

Collection of raw materials

Summer

Paper

R.M. fed in the loom

Collection of R.M.

Manually operated loom weaving

Sold to carpentry workshops

Processing Making pulp Boiling/Churning

Production of cloth

Autum

Molding into paper Drying

Waste water

Cloth pieces

Waste water

Waste paper

Liquid waste

Shavings/Pieces/Chipping

Solid waste

Treatment plant

Winter

Bio coal

Gardening/Water bodies/Gr.water

Used as fuel for the same industries

Recycled

Selection of Industries

Interdependence of Industries

Sun Path and Shadow Study

By studying the various sun and wind directions the building is oriented to the N-S direction so as to make maximum advantage of the wind coming from N-W to S-E direction.

Processing

Selection of Industries 56

Rainwater harvesting tank Inter Relationship Between Waste, Water and Energy

Borewell Grey water from Housing

Overhead Supply Tank for Industries

Waste Water Management

Inter Relationship of Waste, Water and Energy

Sun Rain

Wind

Average Temperature (c) Wind Tank

Average Rainfall (mm)

11

Working Diagram of the Building

This sloping roof allows in north light and helps in ventillating the interior space of the industry. The rainwater is collected from the sloping roof in the harvesting tank where it is stored to be reused.

Filtration Pond

The grey water is transported to the oxidation pond and then to the filtration plant where the color and odor is removed. Then the treated water is pumped to overhead tank for the reuse.

Oxidation Pond


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10 10

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10 9

1

3 6 Site Plan Legend 9

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Paper Industry Wood Industry Hand loom Industry Handicraft Industry Primary School Canteen Information Office Library and Exhibition Hall 9. Shops 10. Housing

2 4

N 25

5 0

10

50 M

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4 13

Downtown Densification Fall ’08, SCI-Arc, Los Angeles


During the Fall 2008 semester SCI-Arc’s SCIFI program exhaustively analyzed Downtown Los Angeles with the goal of addressing the RFQ issued for Planning Alternatives for the former State Civic Center site at First and Broadway. From studies conducted, it is argued here that downtown Los Angeles does not share the attributes of a traditional North American downtown. In fact, it differs from other Downtowns in terms of its historic growth, demographic patterns, economic development and zoning regulations. Using these findings, provocative statements have been formulated about the future of the city and its downtown in the hope to initiate constructive changes for Los Angeles. As a broader goal, this studio has sought to generate solutions for the current state of Downtown Los Angeles as well as compelling new realities for the development of the City of Los Angeles.

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15

Why do public spaces not function in downtown Los Angeles? Are public spaces disconnecting downtown LA, instead of connecting it?

What if all the imp. buildings were not concentrated in one part of the city, but spread out in the periphery. Would they be able to generate a core for downtown LA?

Percentage of zoning density

Zoning in LA has failed to produce integrity of land use. Instead it has segregated the various land uses in downtown L.A.There are no links between each of the land uses.

1930

25

1930

2020

1970

1970

2030

2008

2040

What would happen if the industrial zone shrinks in the downtown? What happens to a city when its manufacturing part is eliminated?

What if zoning and planning in downtown LA was democratic? Is zoning and planning limiting the development of downtown LA instead of promoting it?

The zoning legend diagram is formulated to understand categories of various zones. The outer circle shows four major zones and public facilities which are each color coded.

60%

1930

Zoning Legend

1980

2000

55

50

45

2008

30

Year of zoning

22%

1900 3%

15%

6%

21% 20%

35% 16%

53%

1946 31%

4%

25%

45%

1950

2008 4%

16% 40%

1970 25%

9% 50%

32% 18%

7% 43%

35% 10%

65

60

10%

45%

40 38% 10%

35

17% 35%

20

15 .

10

5

Comparitive Maps Study


Site vicinity area - 101 to the North - 2nd Ave. to the South - Hope street to the West - Los Angeles street to the East Why? -It incorporates the grand ave. project, all civic center buildings and the cultural revival area of downtown LA -It also includes the school and the LAWPD as they lie on the grand ave and the school will effect the day time population of the area. -101 is a natural barrier -Los Angeles street is the end of the civic district.

RFP 4: AUTOMATED PARKING Site Analysis and Proposal

STRENG Site No. of cars Absorbed No. of existing • Lon • Reta cars

Ground space occupied by people Ground space occupied by cars

• • • •

10

250

646 42

36%

2077

Existing

250

350

64%

43%

700

Projected

600

• • • •

Utili Rev Stim ‘Litm own • Solv • Opp

200 200

10 0

57%

70

600 35

370

Positive

1062

1500

1142

OPPOR

Comparison of Ground AreaArea Utilised by Carsby and People Comparision of Ground Utilized Cars and People

Cars Accomodated in the Automated Parking Cars Accomodated in Automated Parking

Incoming traffic Outgoing traffic

Advan

Design a • 40-50% parkin • Pollutio • Safety • Saves parkin • Fewer • Fast co • Expan • People • Can ha • Can be on the • Can b able a • No cha operat

Area in Rate per Land S.F. S.F. Value 1278376 17512 73

76100

45

3424500

55218

64

3533952

19198

160

16836640

97423

250

24355750

2M

84600 24058 140776 128044

Land ValueofofPlots Vacated Plots Land Value Vacated

Ca rd r Pi & op ck up

Ci rc st Pa ula au rk tio ra in nt g n s/O ffi ce s

Re

24 73 60 60

inutes

Adressin • Solve • Makes constr • Gaure • Good locatio • Makes

2030400

5 Minutes

1756234 8446560 7682640

7 Minutes

Walkability from theSite Automated Parking Walkability from

Underground Parking 85 % with Circulation

Onsite Parking with Circulation

6%

Restaurants/ Offices

6%

Toilets Operater Office

Schematic Site Utility

No c No c Opp Gua

Programmatic Diagram of Site Utility

2% 1%

Entries/ Exits to Entries/Exit tosite Site

Site Area = 97423 S.F. Setback on 3 sides = 5 ft Building area 85690 S.F. Circulation for traditional parking = 25% Usable area = 64267.5 S.F. Area per car = 162 S.F. No. of cars per floor = 396 For 3000 cars, floors required = 7 In automated parking: No. of cars is 2.5 time more then traditional parking Therefore the no. of cars 396 X 2.5 = 990 per floor To fit 3000 cars, no. of floors required = 3 The automated parking is more space efficient than the traditional parking by 40%

12 12 12 12 12 12 12

5

Roof

4

F.F Parking

3

F.F. Parking

2

F.F. Parking

1

F.F. Parking

0 G.F. Parking -1 U.G. Parking Floor -2 U.G. Parking Floor

Comparison between Traditional Pa

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5 17

Urban Micro Climates Spring ’09, SCI-Arc, Detroit


Empty density is not a midpoint in the process of densification, but is instead a strategy that embraces both possible outcomes (emptiness and density) and aims to instill each with a sense of the other. The intensification of urban micro climates is a catalyst for this process. Duality between form [solid] and atmosphere [void]: The empty density of Detroit offers a feeling of spatial fullness with small physical or structural density. Surplus of open and empty space, yet density of presence atmosphere of density, physical emptiness.

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Bath/Community pool

Program possibility

Nested programs

Working model

Model + Program

Working Model

Model + Program

Spa + Bog Bog Bog

Pond Pond

Fishing Fishing

Bath Bath

Snorkelling Snorkelling

Mashroom Mushroom Farm farm

Berry Plantation Berry plantation

Program Possibilies

Nested Programs (Spa + Bog)

Program Details of the Humid Microclimate Cell

Working Model of the Himid Microclimate Cell

Section of the Humid Microclimate Cell

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Site Plan Legend 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Microclimates Museum Residential Retail Recreational

N

32’ 16’

64’ 128’

Elevation

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21

The exterior of the buildings also allow a view to the inside due to its facade treatments.

Each individual block is unique from the other with respect to its exterior and interior.

The effect of empty density is created with a block within a block, both with see through skin conditions.

The model was lit from the bottom to enhance the structureal quality of each builing.

Interior view of the block looking outside through the perforated skin.

The final model was made by lazer cutting mill board and connecting surfaces of each individual building.


Detroit City Model with Site Inset

Project on Display

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6 23

Styrofoam Lover with (E)motions of Concrete Summer ’09, SCI-Arc Gallery


Styrofoam Lover with (E)motions of Concrete, was a site-specific installation where I got a chance to work closely with Vienna-based architect Susanne Zottl. The installation proposes a new program that at once asks for a transformation of existing spaces and structures, as well as an improvement of the energy efficiency of existing buildings. Walls in this exhibition bend and undulate: they push into space; space pushes into them. They gain their shapes by using casting, coupled with a flexible textile membrane, as its mode of creation. The definition of the wall is expanded, making the hard-divider into a shapely constituent, not limited to the language of flatness. In addition to testing our relationship to space, this experimental installation sees this opportunity and these materials as a subtle push towards energy efficiency and sustainability.

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The pieces were cleaned and arranged as per the model made eariler.

The final pieces were ready to be displayed for the reception.

The objects were arranged and then the molds were removed.

Rebars were added and then the styrofoam and concrete mix was poured.

The molds were then put together with a Latex frame in between.

The first agenda was to build the molds out of plywood and then water proof it from inside.


SUSANNE SUSANNE ZOTTL SUSANNE ZOTTL ZOTTL SCI-ARC SCI-ARC GALLERY SCI-ARC GALLERY GALLERY A STYROFOAM A STYROFOAM LOVER A STYROFOAM WITH LOVER (E)MOTIONS WITH LOVER(E)MOTIONS WITH OF (E)MOTIONS CONRETE OF CONRETE OF CONRETE MOULDS AND MOULDS VOLUMES MOULDS AND VOLUMES AND VOLUMES 1:1 1:1 1:1 NOV.21, NOV.21, 2008 NOV.21, 2008 2008

4-1 1/2

7 3/4

1-1 3/4

S2

9-3/4

S1

S2

3/4 48 3/4

S2

3-3 1/4 1-7 3/4

7 3/4

1-5 3/4

7 3/4

4-0

MOULD B2MOULD SECTION B2 SECTION S2 S2

SUSANNE SUSANNE ZOTTL ZOTTL SCI-ARC SCI-ARC GALLERY GALLERY A STYROFOAM A STYROFOAM LOVER WITH LOVER (E)MOTIONS WITH (E)MOTIONS OF CONRETE OF CONRETE MOULDS AND MOULDS VOLUMES AND VOLUMES 1:1 1:1 NOV.21, NOV.21, 2008 2008

72-6 3/4

1-3 3/4

MOULD A1MOULD ELEVATION A1 ELEVATION

1-3 3/4

4-1 1/2

MOULD A1MOULD SECTION A1 SECTION S1 S1

4-1 1/2

1-3 3/4

7 3/4

1/2

6

6

6 11 3/4 6

4-1 1/2

11 3/4

S2

9-3/4

9-3/4

S2

2-9

2-9

1-5 3/4

1-5 3/4

1-11 1/2 2-1 1/2 2-7 1/2

1-3 3/4

1-1 3/4

1-1 3/4

2-5 1/2

2-5 1/2

7 3/4

7 3/4

1-7 3/4 4-0

1-11 1/2

4-0

S1

S1

3/4 1-3

1-3

1-11 1/2

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3/4

3/4 1-3

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S1

1-7 3/4

4-0

S1

S1

3/4

1-3

7 3/4 3/4

7 3/4 3/4

4-0

1-5 3/4

2-1 1/2 1-9 3/4 1-3

2-1 1/2 1-9 3/4 1-3

9 3/4

4-0

S1

S1

3/4 1-3

2-6

3/43/46 1-5

6

1-393/4 3/4

9 3/4

9 3/4 11 3/4

7 3/4

7 3/4

7 3/4

7 3/4

1-11 1/2 2-1 1/2 2-7 1/2

1-11 1/2

2-3 1/2

11 3/4

3-3 1/2

S1

S2

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4 7-2 1/2

S2

7-2 1/2

9-3/4

9-3/4

9-3/4 9-3/4

9-3/4 5-11 3/4

9-3/4

5-11 3/4

9-3/4

3-3 1/2 2-6

1-3

3/4

3/4

1-5 103/4

3-1 3/4

S2

4-0

2

1-5 3/4

1-3 3/4 7 3/4

S2

4-0 4-0

3/4

1-3 3/4 7 1-1 3/4 3/4

S2

1-11 1/2

2

3-1 3/4

3-7 1/4

3-7 1/4 S2

2-3 1/2

3/4

1-1 3/4

1-5 3/4

1-5 3/4 S2

S2

S2

MOULD A2MOULD SECTION A2 SECTION S1 S1 7 3/4

5-9

S2

5-9

S2

S2

4-1 1/2 7 3/4

1-10 1/4

S2

S2

2-11 1/2

1-1 3/4

1-1 3/4

1/2

1-10 1/4

MOULD A2MOULD ELEVATION A2 ELEVATION

1-3 3/4 2-11 1/2

7 3/4

S1

MOULD C2 SECTION MOULD C2 S1SECTION S1

S1

4-1 1/2 2-11 1/2

S1

4-1 1/2 2-11 1/2

10 1/4

6

10 1/4

6

S1

MOULD C2 ELEVATION MOULD C2 ELEVATION

1-3 3/4

6

9 1/2

1-3 3/4 1-9 6 3/4

S1

MOULD C1 SECTION MOULD C1 S1SECTION S1

4-1 1/2 1-9 3/4

9 1/2

9 1/2

4-1 1/2 9 1/2

S1

S1

MOULD C1 ELEVATION MOULD C1 ELEVATION

S1

72-6 3/4

3/4 1-3

3/4

MOULD B1MOULD SECTION B1 SECTION S2 S2

SUSANNE ZOTTL SUSANNE ZOTTL SCI-ARC GALLERY SCI-ARC GALLERY A STYROFOAM A STYROFOAM LOVER WITHLOVER (E)MOTIONS WITH (E)MOTIONS OF CONRETEOF CONRETE MOULDS ANDMOULDS VOLUMES AND VOLUMES 1:1 1:1 NOV.21, 2008 NOV.21, 2008

4-0

3/4

1-3

3/4

3/4

1-3

1-3

3/4

3/4

S1

1-5 3/4 2-7 1/2 4-0

S1

2-7 1/2

S1

4 3/4

3/4

S1

3-3 1/4 1-7 3/4

SECTIONS SECTIONS S2 SECTIONS S2 S2 MOULD C1+C2 MOULD C1+C2 MOULD C1+C2

1-11 1/2

S2

4-0

SECTIONS SECTIONS S2 SECTIONS S2 S2 MOULD B1+B2 MOULD B1+B2 MOULD B1+B2

11

7 3/4

5-3

7 3/4

5-3 S2

4 3/4

SECTIONS SECTIONS S2 SECTIONS S2 S2 MOULD A1+A2 MOULD A1+A2 MOULD A1+A2

4

4 3/4

1-11 1/2

S2

1-3 3/4 11 3/4

S2

11 8 3/4

4

9-3/4

S2

9-3/4

9-3/4

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2-9 1/2

9-3/4

9-3/4

1-3 3/4 1-3 11 3/43/4

1-3 3/4

9-3/4

1-7 3/4 1-1 3/4 11

MOULD B2MOULD SECTION B2 SECTION S1 S1 1-7 3/4 8

3-7

1-7 3/4 1-1 3/4 11

4

3-7

1-9 1/2 4

4-1 1/2 1-7 3/4 8 4

4

3-1/4 2-8 1/4

1-9 1/2

MOULD B2MOULD ELEVATION B2 ELEVATION

1-3 3/4

7 3/4

1-1 3/4

1-3 3/4

S1

MOULD B1MOULD SECTION B1 SECTION S1 S1

2-1 1/2

3-1/4 2-8 1/4

4-1 1/2 2-1 1/2

1-9 3/4

4-1 1/2

S1

MOULD B1MOULD ELEVATION B1 ELEVATION

SECTIONS SECTIONS S1 SECTIONS S1 S1 MOULD C1+C2 MOULD C1+C2 MOULD C1+C2

S1

SECTIONS SECTIONS S1 SECTIONS S1 S1 MOULD B1+B2 MOULD B1+B2 MOULD B1+B2

1-9 3/4

SECTIONS SECTIONS S1 SECTIONS S1 S1 MOULD A1+A2 MOULD A1+A2 MOULD A1+A2

SUSANNE SUSANNE ZOTTL ZOTTL SCI-ARC SCI-ARC GALLERY GALLERY A STYROFOAM A STYROFOAM LOVER WITH LOVER (E)MOTIONS WITH (E)MOTIONS OF CONRETE OF CONRETE MOULDS AND MOULDS VOLUMES AND VOLUMES 1:1 1:1 NOV.21, NOV.21, 2008 2008

10

MOULD C2 SECTION MOULD C2 S2SECTION S2 MOULD C1 SECTION MOULD C1 S2SECTION S2

MOULD A1MOULD SECTION A1 SECTION S2 S2

MOULD A2MOULD SECTION A2 SECTION S2 S2

Mould Detail Drawings

Gallery Exhibition Opening and Discussion

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7

Beijing’s Near Futures Summer ’09, SCI-Arc, Beijing

27


The goal of the thesis studio was to gain an understanding of Beijing from the point of view of its particular mode of regulation and accumulation. Gaps were identifed between the rhetoric of urban development promulgated by the state and the reality of the built environment. Once these potential contradictions were explored, the research mainly focused on the possible future implications of the existing system of urban development as latent existing challenges were extrapolated out into the intermediate and long term futures. Beijing has a fetish for iconic architecture. But at the same time, the repetitive nature of development dominates the city. Beijing acknowledges its tendency to follow and copy from other sources to transform itself into a modern city. The Copy – Paste proposal turns this repetitive tendency to Beijing’s advantage. The Olympic City’s icons are mutated and repeated to fill in surplus vacant space in the Olympic City. This proposal understands Beijing on its own terms and puts its logic into practice.

28


Traditional Infill attempts to merge traditional and modern architecture in a non-disruptive manner. This will give Beijing the opportunity to preserve its existing iconic architecture and bring back its traditional housing.

Beijing has ‘The Nest’ (Olympic stadium) and ‘The Egg’ (National Centre for the Performing Arts), but where is the bird? The idea is to build another iconic piece of architecture in the Olympic zone that will attract more tourists. Sell The Bird’s Nest

Where is the Bird?

Traditional Infill

29 Vastness = Power

Beijing has larger problems to solve than taking care of the Bird’s Nest. The Nest was built for a purpose and it has fulfilled its role. An option is to sell and transport the Bird’s Nest off-site, freeing up the land for new development.


Copy, Paste, Alter takes the simple act of repeating a form to the next level by altering, transforming and merging the form into varied combinations. This proposal enables the site to reach its full potential as a vibrant urban hub by adding mix use developments. Copy-Paste

Site Model

30

Opposite page : Five Unauthorised Future Proposals. Adjecent: Successful building types are excessively repeated in Beijing. The logic of this copy - paste urbanism is applied to the iconic architecture of the Olympic City.


Individual Form Diagram Mix and Match Option 4

High density New York

M

M

Mid Density Georgia Tech

M

Low density Florida

Density Repersentation

High Rise Development

Low Rise Development

Detailed Block Diagram

Mid Rise Development

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Cluster Diagrams

Activity Diagram

Stacking Diagram

Beijing is an example of a mix urban density, however, the transition from one to the next happens as a result of rapid, uncoordinated urban growth. The mix and match diagrams attempt to explore this transition from one urban density to another. In plan, a strong edge is seen between one density and the next, but in vertical density, the transition is smoother and more gradual. The Olympic City is in all cases much larger, which means that programming and occupying the site will be much harder and require more than just the public element. Public and semi-private / semi-public spaces will need to be introduced to diversify the site and avoid large, unused public spaces.

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8

Blow x Blow Summer ’09, Deegan Day Design


Blow x Blow displays two trends in exhibition: the claiming of gallery space by architects, and the ceding of that space to the ambient possibilities of new media. To chart this collision, techniques of cinematic projection and scripting are repurposed to spur new orders of spatial and structural sequencing, and new environments for communing with new art. The installation derives first from the filmic, rather than architectural, relationship between script and projection - the former usually serving as the template or pretext for filmmaking, and the latter its (increasingly historical) mode of delivery and final fruition. The title Blow x Blow alludes to a few ‘blown’ opportunities, including Antonini’s Blow Up (1966) and Gordon Matta-Clark’s Blow Out of 1976. The choreography of freedom and constraint in the design of Blow x Blow also keys to its inaugural programming, PRI/MUS: Architectures for Art and Crime, a study of prisons, museums and their complementary roles in contemporary high design and US urban renewal.

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35

The spanning surfaces of the vector paths create a ‘grey room’ condition in which viewers may see each other, but projected images are shaded from clerestory exposure.

Projection precedes script in our equation, with the parameters of the projected image ‘cast’ in roles of formal generation.

Within this matrix, a vector path was developed. Each third vector point was triangulated back to its origin to create a facetted surface.

The final product is seen in relation to the gallery space and its ceiling.

The fabrication was done at the gallery using Ocapane as the builing material. The screens were made from Nida Core.

First, the space of the gallery was reconceived as a 6’x7’x8’ gridded frame, the proportions of which allow a 4:3 televisual image on one face, and a 9:16 cinematic aspect ration on the diagonal.


Plan

Section B

Section A

36


Avani Portfolio 2009  

this is a portfolio of my past works and studio work at sciarc.

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