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AU T U M N R I GH TS L I ST FRANK FURT BOOK FA I R 2 013

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The Science Factory

CONTENTS NEW TITLES Flavour by Bob Holmes 1 The Edge of the Sky by Roberto Trotta 2 FORTHCOMING TITLES Maladies of the Self by Anil Ananthaswamy 3 Life’s Greatest Secret by Matthew Cobb 4 Sonic Wonderland by Trevor Cox 5 Rough Magic by Georgina Ferry 6 The Improbability Principle by David Hand 7 Wolves by Simon Ings 8 Heaven’s Bankers by Harris Irfan 9 The Plato Code by Jay Kennedy 10 The Perfect Bet by Adam Kucharski 11 The Great Invention by Ehsan Masood 12 Colliding Worlds by Arthur I. Miller 13 Underlands by Ted Nield 14 Nature’s Nether Regions by Menno Schilthuizen 15 The Gap by Thomas Suddendorf 16 Botched Bodies by Jeremy Taylor 17 Restless Creatures by Matt Wilkinson 18 RECENTLY PUBLISHED Farewell to Reality by Jim Baggott 19 Five Billion Years of Solitude by Lee Billings 20 A Piece of the Sun by Daniel Clery 21 Eleven Days in August by Matthew Cobb 22 The End of Plagues by John Rhodes 23 The Poppy by Nicholas J. Saunders 24 How to Make a Zombie by Frank Swain 25 BACKLIST TITLES The Edge of Physics by Anil Ananthaswamy 26 Atomic by Jim Baggott 27 The Belief Instinct by Jesse Bering 28 The Man Who Ran the Moon by Piers Bizony 29 Wetware by Dennis Bray 30 Brain Bugs by Dean Buonomano 31 The Sun Kings by Stuart Clark 32 The Egg and Sperm Race by Matthew Cobb 33 The Resistance by Matthew Cobb 34 From Cells to Civilizations by Enrico Coen 35

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013


The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

Starman by Jamie Doran & Piers Bizony 36 The Devil’s Derivatives by Nicholas Dunbar 37 How Intelligence Happens by John Duncan 38 Mindfield by Lone Frank 39 My Beautiful Genome by Lone Frank 40 Flat Earth by Christine Garwood 41 What Doesn’t Kill Us by Stephen Joseph 42 The Rise of the Indian Rope Trick by Peter Lamont 43 The First Psychic by Peter Lamont 44 Empire of the Stars by Arthur I. Miller 45 Deciphering the Cosmic Number by Arthur I. Miller 46 Incoming! by Ted Nield 47 Reinventing Discovery by Michael Nielsen 48 The Science of Doctor Who by Paul Parsons 49 Like a Virgin by Aarathi Prasad 50 Massive by Ian Sample 51 Doomsday Men by P. D. Smith 52 Written in Stone by Brian Switek 53 Selected by Mark Van Vugt & Anjana Ahuja 54 The Evolutionary World by Geerat J. Vermeij 55 A Portrait of the Brain by Adam Zeman 56 CLIENTS & PROJECTS* 57–61 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CO-AGENTS 62

For further information about translation rights in all titles in this catalogue, please contact Louisa Pritchard at Table 10M or Peter Tallack at Table 10N in the Literary Agents and Scouts Centre (LitAg) in Hall 6. Louisa Pritchard mobile: +44 (0)7714 721 787 email: louisa@louisapritchard.co.uk Peter Tallack mobile: +44 (0)7900 826 645 email: peter@sciencefactory.co.uk

* Including world rights sales not detailed in the rights list.


The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

NEW TITLE

FLAVOUR A User's Guide to Our Most Neglected Sense BOB HOLMES

Whether you are someone who likes to cook creatively, delve into cutting-edge science or explore the latest ideas about health, diet and nutrition, this book will open your mind – and your palate – to a vast, exciting sensory world. Most of us don't pay much attention to flavour in our day-to-day lives. We might notice that dinner tasted good, but we'd probably struggle to say anything more precise than that. For far too many people, flavour remains a vague, undeveloped experience – elevator music for the palate. In FLAVOUR, Bob Holmes journeys into the surprising science behind our flavour senses. He shows why what we thought we knew about taste is almost certainly wrong, why no two people have exactly the same sense of smell, and how the sense of touch contributes to flavour. He visits the birthplace of flavour in the brain to discover why cake tastes sweetest on a white plate, how wine experts’ eyes can fool their noses, and how even language affects the flavour we find in food. He learns why people like the foods they do, what makes some foods more delicious than others, and how flavour affects our appetite – and, in turn, our health. Moving from the laboratory into the kitchen, he peers over the shoulders of some of the most fascinating food professionals: the food technologists seeking to engineer the perfect snack food or soft drink, the professional chefs looking for new ways to combine flavours into surprising yet delicious dishes, and even the mathematicians searching for the perfect pizza topping and the chemists seeking the ideal pairing of food and wine. He ends by revealing how we can all sharpen our flavour senses, teaching us the skills and techniques that professionals use to name flavours and describe them articulately. BOB HOLMES has been a correspondent for New Scientist magazine for nearly two decades, and has written more than 800 articles for the magazine. He has a PhD in evolutionary biology from the University of Arizona and taught for several years in the science-writing programme at the University of California. A member of Slow Food Canada, he has worked with the taste-education programme of his local chapter and is a passionate home cook. He lives with his wife and teenage son in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. FLAVOUR is his first book. Publisher: Norton (US)/WH Allen (Random House) (UK) (Editors: John Glusman, US; Ed Faulkner, UK) Delivery: Spring 2015 Published: Spring 2016 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 80,000–100,000 words All rights available excluding US & Canada, UK & Commonwealth

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The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

NEW TITLE

THE EDGE OF THE SKY All you need to know about the All-thereis (using only the ten hundred most used words in this tongue) ROBERTO TROTTA

Imagine a short book presenting the latest discoveries and outstanding mysteries in modern cosmology — but written using only the most common thousand words in English, based on ten million works of contemporary fiction... THE EDGE OF THE SKY does just that (the only exceptions being names of people). From the Big Bang to planets in other solar systems, from dark matter to dark energy, from the destiny of the Universe to its fundamental reality, from the work of Hubble to Einstein, it explores the most important cosmological ideas through the eyes of a fictional female scientist hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes on Earth. Written by an acclaimed astrophysicist, THE EDGE OF THE SKY shows that it is possible to explain complex, abstract ideas using only common words that everybody can understand. At the same time, with its necessarily metaphorical, almost poetic style, the book can be enjoyed by novices and experts alike, with readers stimulated to interpret the figurative language, which ranges from the whimsical to the profound. Thus ‘the Universe’ becomes ‘the All-there-is’, a ‘telescope’ becomes ‘BigSeer’, ‘particle collisions’ become ‘matter drops hugging', and so on. Because of its simple building blocks, the book can be understood on a literal level by anyone, but it requires readers to make a conscious imaginative effort to decrypt the symbolism at a deeper level. Scientific detail and technical jargon take a back seat, while the evocative imagery is brought to the fore to illuminate the science in the simplest yet most accurate way possible. The result is a surprising, entertaining and entrancing little book for all – a unique blend of literary experimentation and science popularization that brings science back to the human scale and offers a startling new perspective on the Universe and our place in it. ROBERTO TROTTA is a senior lecturer in astrophysics at Imperial College London. An experienced science communicator, he has given hundreds of public lectures, published dozens of articles in national magazines and appeared several times on radio and television. He also works as a scientific consultant for museums, writers, filmmakers, architects and artists, providing the help and support they need to make their artistic creations scientifically sound. In collaboration with artists and architects, he has created artwork that has been exhibited in prominent international venues, including the Venice Biennale. His outreach work has been recognized by several awards, including the Lord Kelvin Award of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. He is 36 years old and lives in London. For further information see www.robertotrotta.com Publisher: BasicBooks (US/UK) (Editor: T. J. Kelleher) Delivery: December 2013 Published: Autumn 2014 Status: Manuscript Length: 10,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Basic)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

MALADIES OF THE SELF From Autism to Out-of-Body Experiences – What Mental Disorders Are Telling Us About Who We Are ANIL ANANTHASWAMY Praise for THE EDGE OF PHYSICS Part history lesson, part travel log, part adventure story… a wonder-steeped page-turner – SEED

An eye-opening look at disorders – from autism to out-of-body experiences, from schizophrenia to epilepsy – that threaten our sense of self while giving us tantalizing glimpses into who we are. From the Buddha to the modern scientist and philosopher, humans have pondered the nature of the self. Is it real or an illusion? Is the self in the brain, and if so where in the brain is it? Neuroscience is telling us that our sense of self seems to be an ephemeral entity created by the brain: that the self is an illusion – nature’s most sophisticated sleight-of-hand. Yet this obfuscates a basic truth: we are our selves. Remove the self and there is no ‘I’ on whom a trick is being played, no one who is the subject of an illusion. What’s more, when the self gets disturbed, the ramifications are so serious that suggesting to the sufferer that the self is an illusion is of little help. In MALADIES OF THE SELF, Anil Ananthaswamy sets out to disentangle the tightly woven threads that form our identity and to provide a new view of the self. In each chapter, he examines the self through the lens of a psychiatric or neurological disorder and reveals some sliver of the self excised by the disorder, often leaving in its wake a devastating illness. In ‘body integrity identity disorder’, for instance, the disturbance causes you to feel that a part of your body is foreign and needs to be amputated; in Alzheimer’s disease, the autobiographical self is fossilized; and in depersonalization disorder and Cotard’s syndrome, sufferers experience deep crises of identity that cause them to question their very existence. From schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy to Alzheimer’s disease and out-of-body experiences, Ananthaswamy introduces readers to the regions of the brain responsible for these and other maladies of the self as well as to the greatest thinkers, philosophers and neuroscientists who have pondered the nature of personal identity. All this is grounded in the author’s first-person accounts of people who suffer from disorders of the self. He meets, for example, an athletic man in perfectly good health, and with no signs of irrationality or psychosis, who submits himself to a voluntary amputation of a leg that he felt did not belong to him. Heartbreaking stories such as this provide strong clues to how the brain constructs our sense of self, and the trauma that ensues when the process goes awry. Together they provide a unique take on that perennial question, ‘Who am I?’ ANIL ANANTHASWAMY is a consultant editor for New Scientist. He has been with the magazine since 2000, including as a staff writer and deputy news editor, and has written more than 400 news and features articles. He has also written for National Geographic News, Discover magazine, The Times Online (UK) and the Independent (UK) and is a columnist for PBS NOVA’s The Nature of Reality blog. The author of THE EDGE OF PHYSICS (Houghton Mifflin, 2010/Duckworth, 2011), he studied electronics, electrical and computer engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and the University of Washington, Seattle, and worked as a software engineer in Silicon Valley before training as a journalist in the University of California Santa Cruz’s science-writing programme. Now a guest lecturer on that programme, he also teaches an annual science journalism workshop at the National Centre for Biological Sciences in Bangalore, India. He lives in Bangalore and California. Publisher: Dutton (Penguin US) (Editor: Stephen Morrow) Delivery: Autumn 2014 Published: Spring 2015 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 75,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Dutton), Germany (Eichborn)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

LIFE’S GREATEST SECRET The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code MATTHEW COBB Praise for Matthew Cobb’s previous books Fabulous... painstakingly researched, even-handed and dripping with poignancy – HERALD Full of arresting material and personalities – Lisa Jardine, SUNDAY TIMES Lively… You can almost smell the formaldehyde on the page – FINANCIAL TIMES

The first popular account of one of the greatest discoveries – and what it holds for the future. The cracking of the genetic code in 1961 was one of the greatest discoveries in human history, with far-reaching consequences for our understanding of ourselves and of our place in the cosmos. It forms the most striking and profound proof of Darwin’s central hypothesis that all organisms are related; holds tremendous promise for radically improving human health and well-being; and shows that organisms are more than just bags of chemicals – those chemicals contain information. Everything that you think about genes, about why you look like your parents, about humanity’s place in the natural world, can be traced back to two decades of discovery in the 1940s and 1950s, when biologists were adopting the words and concepts of computing – codes, information, programs. They showed that genes were made of DNA and then realized that the DNA contains a code that instructs organisms how to grow and behave. Yet, amazingly, few people know about this discovery and the shift in our worldview that it brought about – or the names of most of those involved. LIFE’S GREATEST SECRET is the first popular book to tell the story of the dramatic race to crack the genetic code. It is a story that contains remarkable insights, theoretical dead-ends and ingenious experiments; explores the competition between some of the twentieth-century’s most outstanding and eccentric minds including Erwin Schrödinger, George Gamow, Claude Shannon, Richard Feynman, François Jacob, Jacques Monod, Oswald Avery, Jim Watson and Francis Crick; and unusually spans all the main scientific disciplines – biology, physics, chemistry, computing and mathematics. It also spans the globe, from Cambridge to Paris to Moscow, passing through most of the main research labs in the United States before concluding with Nobel prizes for some of the scientists, but not for others. It is a story not only of how science is done but also of the future discoveries and potential applications opened up by this monumental discovery – from ‘junk DNA’ and genetic determinism to gene therapy and designer babies. MATTHEW COBB is a professor of zoology and an associate dean at the University of Manchester. He is the author of THE EGG AND SPERM RACE (Simon & Schuster, UK/Bloomsbury, US – as GENERATION; 2006), for which he won the London’s Zoological Society’s 2008 Award for Communicating Science. He has a long track-record of popular science writing and blogging (Times Literary Supplement, Daily Telegraph, Nature Reviews Genetics, Journal of Experimental Biology, zletter.com, whyevolutionistrue.com); has given talks and lectures on aspects of LIFE’S GREATEST SECRET to audiences around the world (UK, Canada, US, India, Netherlands), including the general public, students, scientists and historians; and is scientific advisor to Brian Cox’s forthcoming BBC TV series ‘Wonders of Life’ and the accompanying book (HarperCollins, 2013). An award-winning translator of French scientific books, Cobb has a sideline in writing French wartime history, including THE RESISTANCE (Simon & Schuster, 2009), which won the Franco-British Society’s Book Prize, and the forthcoming ELEVEN DAYS IN AUGUST: The Liberation of Paris in 1944 (Simon & Schuster, 2013). Publisher: Profile (Editor: John Davey) Delivery: 31 March 2014 Published: Autumn 2014 Status: Proposal Length: 120,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Profile) 4


The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

SONIC WONDERLAND A Scientific Odyssey of Sound TREVOR COX

A riveting ear-opener, Trevor Cox describes in lyrical detail a range of sonic events and new ways of listening that can only brighten our experience of the acoustic world around us. A must read for sound-lovers of all stripes – Bernie Krause, author of THE GREAT ANIMAL ORCHESTRA

A celebration of the science of sound, by a top researcher and broadcaster who has studied why people hate the noise of fingernails scraping on a chalkboard, constructed the world’s largest whoopee cushion and disproved the old saying that a duck’s quack produces no echo. Creaking glaciers, whispering galleries, stalactite organs, musical roads, squeaking beaches, groaning waterwheels, frogs that croak in Mexican waves, Mayan pyramids that produce echoes that chirp like a bird – these are just a sample of the impressive, strange and surprising sounds that the acoustic engineer Trevor Cox has tracked down in his search for the ‘sonic wonders of the world’. In SONIC WONDERLAND, he uses his experiences of visiting sewers, caves, tidal bores, burial mounds, sand dunes, concert halls and more to explore how sound is made and altered by the environment, how our body hears, perceives and reacts to peculiar sounds and how sounds and acoustics have inspired musicians, artists and writers. Ranging across a dizzying array of realms including literature, classical music, history, archaeology, psychology, neuroscience, geology, physics, biology and ecology, the book is an original and compelling tour of the world’s most amazing acoustic phenomena and the sometimes even stranger people behind them – and a passionate plea for a deeper appreciation of and respect for our shared sonic landscapes. TREVOR COX was born in 1967. He is professor of acoustic engineering at Salford University and former president of the Institute of Acoustics. For 15 years, he has been communicating science to the public, ranging from work with schools, through shows at London’s Royal Albert Hall, to media stories about duck quacks. He has presented 15 science documentaries for BBC radio including ‘Save Our Sounds’ (which won a Sony Radio Academy Award), appeared frequently on television and written for New Scientist. He was a co-originator and judge of BBC Radio 4’s ‘So You Want To Be A Scientist?’, a competition to find Britain’s best amateur scientist. Publisher: Bodley Head/Random House (UK)/Norton (US)* (Editor: Kay Peddle, UK/Tom Mayer, US) Published: February 2014 (US)/9 January 2014 (UK) Status: Proofs Length: 304 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US *Published in the US as THE SOUND BOOK: The Science of the Sonic Wonders of the World

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

ROUGH MAGIC Shakespeare’s World of Science GEORGINA FERRY Praise for Georgina Ferry Rapidly turning into one of the most interesting science writers going – GUARDIAN

A narrative account of the Elizabethan scientific world view, informed by the diverse reference to scientific themes in Shakespeare’s plays, ranging from the cosmos to the nature of matter, mathematics and technology to the natural environment, medicine and disease to melancholy, madness and the human mind. Writing on the eve of the scientific revolution, Shakespeare touches on an astonishing range of natural phenomena including bee colonies, gardening, earthquakes, climate change, the vacuum, planetary motion, eclipses, geometry, ballistics, windmills, watchmaking, atomism, venereal disease, mercury poisoning, alchemy, melancholia, nature versus nurture, and much more. Just how much did he really know about the physical and biological world? Was he aware of the work of his contemporaries that would launch the scientific revolution – work that has transformed our understanding of the cosmos, the material world and the living body, and led to today’s high technology? Short and entertaining, ROUGH MAGIC is intended as much for people interested in science as for those interested in Shakespeare. In it, the acclaimed science writer and theatre aficionado Georgina Ferry uses the works of Shakespeare to illustrate our understanding of life and the Universe on the eve of the scientific revolution. It is a book about science, but also about magic and religious belief, common sense and superstition. With Shakespeare’s help, she shows how our view of the material world has been transformed since his time, and asks whether we ourselves have changed, too. The last time anything similar was attempted was Cumberland Clark’s 1929 book Shakespeare and Science, since when there has been a great deal more Shakespeare scholarship, and some fascinating studies of the science of the Elizabethan/Jacobean period. GEORGINA FERRY has impeccable credentials as both a science and a Shakespeare buff. Having established herself as a science journalist through writing for New Scientist and broadcasting on BBC Radio, she is today better known for her popular science books and scientific biographies (DOROTHY HODGKIN: A Life; THE COMMON THREAD: A Story of Science, Politics, Ethics and the Human Genome; A COMPUTER CALLED LEO: Lyons Teashops and the World’s First Office Computer; and MAX PERUTZ AND THE SECRET OF LIFE) and her articles on science and culture in the Guardian and Nature. On the theatre side, she is a founder member of the Abbey Shakespeare Players, who have performed each August for some two decades to sellout audiences in St Dogmaels Abbey, Pembrokeshire. In this capacity she has played roles from Miranda in The Tempest to Cerimon in Pericles, and directed productions of Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing and Henry IV Part I and Part II. She lives in Oxford, and her website is at www.georginaferry.com. Publisher: Bloomsbury (UK) (Editor: Michael Fishwick) Delivery: Autumn 2014 Published: Spring 2015 Status: Revised proposal pending Length: 60,000–80,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Bloomsbury UK)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

THE IMPROBABILITY PRINCIPLE How To Guarantee Winning the Lottery, Why Lightning Does Strike Twice and Why Other Incredibly Unlikely Things Keep Happening DAVID HAND

A penetrating look at why extraordinarily rare events happen so often – at why, in the words of the British mathematician J. E. Littlewood, we should expect to experience miracles 'at the rate of a about one a month'. At first glance, it sounds like a contradiction or paradox. If things are incredibly unlikely, how can they happen often, and why should we expect them to happen? Now, in a highly original work of synthesis aimed squarely at the general public, the eminent statistician David Hand answers these questions by weaving together various strands of probability into a unified explanation that he calls the improbability principle. It is a book that will appeal not only to those who love stories about startling coincidences and extraordinarily rare events, but also to those who are interested in how a single bold idea links areas as diverse as gambling, the weather, airline disasters, creative writing and the origin of life and even the Universe. It's a book that will change your perspective on how the world works – and tell you what the Bible code and Shakespeare have in common, how to win the lottery, why Apple's song shuffling was made less random to seem more random, and why lightning does strike twice. DAVID HAND is an emeritus professor of mathematics and senior research investigator at Imperial College London, a former president of the Royal Statistical Society and chief scientific advisor to Winton Capital Management, Europe’s most successful algorithmic trading hedge fund. He is the author of seven books including two popular titles (THE INFORMATION GENERATION: How Data Rule Our World (Oneworld, 2006) and STATISTICS: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2008)). He is also the coauthor or editor/coeditor of several other academic titles, has published some 300 scientific papers and written popular articles for publications ranging from Mathematics Today to the Guardian. Publisher: Scientific American/Farrar, Straus & Giroux (US)/Transworld (UK) (Editors: Amanda Moon, US; Doug Young, UK) Published: 27 February/March 2014 Status: Manuscript Length: 352 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Brazil (Companhia das Letras), Germany (Beck), Japan (Hayakawa), Netherlands (AmboAnthos), Poland (Foksal), Russia (AST), Taiwan (Locus)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

WOLVES SIMON INGS Praise for Simon Ings’s fiction One of the very few British writers [who is] both contemporary and genuinely challenging – James Flint, GUARDIAN Modern science fiction in full pomp – Christopher Priest

A defining novel about augmented reality by one of the UK’s leading novelists. At school, Connie and Micky were best friends. Together they cooked up all the ways the world could end. Years later, Michel imagines apocalypses for a living, and lives inside fantasies of the Fall. Conrad works in advertising, spinning aspirational dreams out of imaginary light. Their reunion promises to reveal who killed Conrad’s mother. It’s also going to make them a lot of money, wreck Michel’s marriage and maybe – just maybe – bring about the collapse of Western civilization. Based on research in the booming field of augmented reality, WOLVES is a surreal whodunnit about what happens when unhappy men get their hands on powerful media. Part crime novel, part comingof-age tale and part intellectual thriller, it should appeal to readers of Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood and Michel Faber’s Under the Skin – an informed, atmospheric cutting-edge tale of the near future. Augmented reality is an appropriate and timely topic for Simon Ings because he was recently appointed the inaugural editor of Arc, a new science fiction magazine from the New Scientist stable. He was also among the first UK writers to report on the technology, interviewing in the 1990s one of its pioneers for the UK edition of Wired. Now, Ings claims, augmented reality’s time has come – you can hear him talking with Nick Harkaway and others about its role in the digital future on BBC Radio 4’s ‘Start the Week’ (http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/radio4/stw/stw_20120507-1030a.mp3). SIMON INGS is a novelist and science writer living in London. He was educated at King’s College London and Birkbeck College, London. He has written a number of novels, the most recent of which are THE WEIGHT OF NUMBERS (Atlantic, 2006) and DEAD WATER (Corvus/Atlantic, 2010), short prose and articles for national newspapers. His first nonfiction book, THE EYE: A Natural History (Bloomsbury, 2007), delved into the science of vision, exploring the chemistry, physics and biology of the eye. He is now working on a history of Soviet science under Stalin (due from Faber in 2014). Publisher: Gollancz (Editor: Simon Spanton) Published: Spring 2014 Status: Manuscript Length: 75,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Gollancz)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

HEAVEN’S BANKERS Inside the Hidden World of Islamic Finance HARRIS IRFAN

The first book aimed at a general audience to tell the story of the development of the Islamic finance industry from the perspective of someone deeply embedded in it. Islamic finance today is a trillion-dollar industry. It is fast becoming the main way in which large projects get funded globally (such as buildings, aircraft, shipping) and many financial analysts expect Islamic banking assets worldwide to double within five years. This is because the system is seen as equitable to all parties and has built-in transparency – so it’s much in demand despite today’s gloomy global economic climate. Harris Irfan has been at the centre of this world for around 15 years. In HEAVEN’S BANKERS, he provides an authoritative yet entertaining account of how a system of finance invented in the seventh-century Middle East is fast taking over the world of modern banking. The book draws on his firsthand relationships with some of the world’s leading bankers, scholars and lawyers, many of whom attend a single mosque in Dubai, the Masjid Al-Samad, the epicentre of today’s Islamic finance revolution. An ‘Al-Samadi’ himself, he provides a warts-and-all description of the industry; debunks some myths about Islamic finance – such as its perceived relationship with the financing of terrorist activity or its incompatibility with Western values; and asks whether today’s Islamic finance industry is true to the fundamental principles of a faith committed to social justice. Was for example the recent Islamic bond issued by Goldman Sachs to fund its conventional trading activities a legitimate use of Islamic investors’ funds or a cynical exercise in preying on people’s religious insecurities by offering a conventional, interest-bearing bond by another name? In issuing fatwas, or edicts, on Sharia-compliant financial products, were the religious scholars complicit in this alleged subterfuge or were they duped by the bankers of Goldman Sachs? Has the industry forgotten its basic premise of ethical finance and learnt instead how to replicate the excesses of the conventional banking industry? As the managing partner of a leading Islamic finance advisory firm and the former global desk head of one of the world’s leading financial institutions, Irfan is in an ideal position to explain to the nonexpert reader the mechanics of the most complex and innovative financial products. With his strong yet informed opinions about the ethical practices and direction of the industry, this is a book that should appeal not only to people who normally buy business and finance books but also to those with a more general interest in moral philosophy, politics and religion. HARRIS IRFAN is one of the world’s leading Islamic finance bankers. He is the founder and managing partner of Cordoba Capital, an independent Islamic finance advisory firm, and was formerly global head of Islamic finance at the Barclays Group. Before working at Barclays, he was a cofounder of Deutsche Bank’s world-leading Islamic finance team. He has represented various institutions to media organizations such as the BBC, CNBC, Bloomberg, Reuters and the Financial Times. Born in 1972 to parents of Pakistani origin, he was brought up in the UK and has a BA and MA in physics from the University of Oxford. He lives in Dubai. Publisher: Constable (Editor: Andreas Campomar) Published: 20 March 2014 Length: 352 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Constable) 9


The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

THE PLATO CODE The Secret Life Behind the Ancient World’s Greatest Mystery JAY KENNEDY The results he’s come up with look too neat to be accidental… quite startling – Andrew Barker, Emeritus Professor of Classics, University of Birmingham, author of GREEK MUSICAL WRITINGS and THE SCIENCE OF HARMONY IN CLASSICAL GREECE

A revolutionary discovery in the history of ancient science that promises to rank in importance with the discoveries of the Archimedes palimpsest and the Antikythera mechanism. Plato, the great philosopher-scientist of classical Athens, was generally believed – from antiquity through the Renaissance – to be a Pythagorean who in the brilliant conversations portrayed in his books used symbols to conceal his real philosophy. This view has been rejected by modern scholars. They say that Pythagoras is hardly mentioned by Plato and that there is no evidence of symbolism in Plato’s writings. Yet Jay Kennedy, a specialist in the history and philosophy of science at the University of Manchester, has long been convinced that secrets lie within Plato’s work. Drawing on modern techniques of literary analysis and computation, he has now finally cracked the code that has remained undetected for millennia, revealing a system of embedded musical and mathematical patterns and messages that Plato had inherited from Pythagoras a century before. In THE PLATO CODE, Kennedy provides a popular revisionist biography of the ancient world’s greatest philosopher set against the backdrop of this revolutionary discovery. Now that we know Plato was a Pythagorean, we must completely change our view of him. The Pythagoreans were the terrorists, communists and leading secret society of the classical era. In this new account of Plato’s life and times we learn of the Pythagoreans’ persecution, their violent rise to power in Italy, Plato’s visits to and friendship with their leaders, and the great battle where they defeated Sparta. Plato is radically transformed from genteel don to fellow traveller and activist. We also see Plato as the surprising initiator of Western mysticism as well as the mathematical and scientific traditions. For behind his code are his true beliefs about the nature of the Universe. His cryptic philosophy anticipates the scientific revolution by some 2,000 years and even suggests a novel way in which science and religion may be reconciled. What Plato left in his code was his greatest untold legacy. What other radical ideas has he left for us to uncover? It may take some time to assess the code in the thousands upon thousands of pages of his works and evaluate all the implications, but the findings are already beginning to transform our thoughts about the origins of Western civilization. As THE PLATO CODE shows, modern philosophy may well continue to be a series of footnotes to Plato. JAY KENNEDY holds degrees in mathematics and computing from Princeton and in philosophy from Stanford. An American by birth, he has held academic positions at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Cambridge, and now teaches at the University of Manchester in the UK. His personal biography provides a first-person detective-story angle to the book: among other things, for example, he worked in Baghdad training Saddam Hussein’s army and in Tokyo on advanced computers. Further information about his work on Plato can be found in links on his university webpage at www.chstm.manchester.ac.uk. Publisher: Simon & Schuster (UK) (Editor: Mike Jones) Delivery: 31 October 2013 Published: Autumn 2014 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 80,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Simon & Schuster, UK), Italy (Rizzoli), Japan (Hayakawa), Netherlands (Nieuw Amsterdam), Portugal (Bertrand/Temas e Debates) 10


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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

THE PERFECT BET How Science is Taking the Luck out of Gambling ADAM KUCHARSKI

An original and revealing guide to how science is taming chance and transforming gambling. In the past few years, there has been a revolution in the gambling industry. From the statisticians forecasting sports scores to the intelligent algorithms beating human poker players, people are finding new ways to take on casinos and bookmakers. And as methods and technologies improve, these individuals are attempting to do something that has eluded gamblers for centuries: they are using science to hunt for the perfect bet. In THE PERFECT BET, Adam Kucharski brings together ideas from mathematics, psychology, economics and physics to dissect the perfect bet. Who are these people turning hard science into hard cash? How are they managing to beat the house? Where did their approaches come from? And what do these wagers tell us about how we view luck? Covering exploits and ideas from across the globe, he meets teams behind the betting equivalent of hedge funds, and explains how these PhD-level pundits are using methods originally developed for the US nuclear programme to predict sports results. He shows exactly how a group of University of California students in the 1970s famously managed to predict roulette spins with a shoe computer; fearing a casino clampdown, the group never revealed their methods, until mathematicians in Hong Kong solved the 40-year-old mystery in 2012 – the techniques are now being used in real casinos. He reveals why winning at chess depends on luck but – thanks to a discovery in 2007 – victory in checkers does not. And he explains what caused a US stockbroker to lose $400 million in the summer of 2012 and why poker is one of the ultimate challenges for artificial intelligence. We are entering an era where chaos theory blends with psychology, game theory mixes with intelligent bots, and big data compete with traditional statistics and probability. As THE PERFECT BET demonstrates, wagers are our window onto the world of chance and randomness. They show us how to balance risk against reward, and why we value things differently as our circumstances change. They help us unravel how we make decisions and what we can do to control fluke – or avoid it altogether. ADAM KUCHARSKI is a research fellow in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and an award-winning science writer. Born in 1986, he studied at the University of Warwick before completing a PhD in mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He has published papers on topics ranging from evolutionary biology to the social structure of epidemics, and in 2013 was awarded a research fellowship by the UK Medical Research Council to investigate disease emergence in Southeast Asia. Winner of the 2012 Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize, he has contributed popular science articles to the Observer, BBC Focus and Plus Magazine. He lives in London. Publisher: BasicBooks (US/UK) (Editor: Tisse Takagi) Delivery: December 2014 Published: Autumn 2015 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 70,000–80,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Basic), Japan (Soshisha), Korea (Business Books)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

THE GREAT INVENTION The Story of GDP and the Making and Unmaking of the Modern World EHSAN MASOOD

The biography of one of the twentieth-century's most influential and dangerously addictive ideas, told through the lives of those who invented it. The world’s principal measure of the health of economies is gross domestic product, or GDP: the sum of what all of us spend every day, from the contents of our weekly shopping to large capital spending by businesses. GDP also includes the myriad things that our governments pay for, from libraries and road-line painting to naval dockyards and nuclear weapons. In 2011, America’s GDP was about $14 trillion. Britain’s was a more modest £1.5 trillion. THE GREAT INVENTION reveals how in just a few decades GDP became the world’s most powerful formula: how six algebraic symbols forged in the fires of the 1930s economic crisis helped Europe and America prosper, how the remedy now risks killing the patient it once saved and how this fundamentally flawed metric is creating the illusion of global prosperity and why many world leaders want to be able to ignore it but so far remain powerless to do so. Drawing on interviews, firsthand accounts and previously neglected source materials, THE GREAT INVENTION takes readers on a journey from Capitol Hill in Washington to Whitehall in London, on the trail of theories made in Cambridge, tested in Karachi and designed for global application, and into the minds of unworldly geniuses seduced by the allure of power and the demands of politics. EHSAN MASOOD is a science writer, journalist and broadcaster. Formerly on the editorial staff of Nature and New Scientist, he is currently the editor of Research Fortnight and Research Europe and teaches international science policy at Imperial College London. As well as writing for Prospect magazine, The Times, Guardian and Le Monde, he is a frequent presenter for BBC Radio and the author of SCIENCE AND ISLAM: A History (Icon, 2009) and coauthor of DRY: Life Without Water (Harvard University Press, 2006). Born in 1967, he lives in London. Publisher: Westbourne Press (Editor: Lynn Gaspard) Delivery: Spring 2014 Published: Autumn 2014 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 80,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Westbourne Press), China (People’s Oriental Publishing & Media Co – simplified Chinese characters)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

COLLIDING WORLDS How Cutting-Edge Science is Redefining Contemporary Art ARTHUR I. MILLER Arthur I. Miller is a master at capturing the intersection of creativity and intelligence – Walter Isaacson, author of EINSTEIN: His Life and Universe

An acknowledged authority on creativity in art and science and a distinguished biographer and historian of science tells the parallel stories of modern art and science. In recent decades, an exciting new art movement has emerged in which artists illuminate the latest advances in science. Some of their provocative creations – a live rabbit implanted with the fluorescent gene of a jellyfish, a gigantic glass-and-chrome sculpture of the Big Bang itself – can be seen in traditional art museums and magazines, while others are being made by leading designers at Pixar, Google’s Creative Lab and the MIT Media Lab. The author of several celebrated books on popular science and creativity, Arthur I. Miller takes readers on a wild journey to explore this new frontier. From the movement’s origins a century ago – when Einstein shaped Cubism and X rays affected fine photography – to the latest discoveries of biotechnology, cosmology and quantum physics, Miller shows how today’s artists and designers are producing work at the cutting edge of science. ARTHUR I. MILLER is emeritus professor of history and philosophy of science at University College London. He has published many critically acclaimed books, including EINSTEIN, PICASSO, EMPIRE OF THE STARS and DECIPHERING THE COSMIC NUMBER, and writes for publications such as New Scientist and The New York Times. An experienced broadcaster, lecturer and biographer, he is particularly interested in the relationship between science and creativity and noted for writing engagingly about complex social and intellectual dramas, weaving the personal with the scientific to produce page-turners that read like novels. His website is at www.arthurimiller.com. Publisher: Norton (Editors: Angela von der Lippe (acquiring editor); Matt Weiland) Publication: 16 June 2014 Status: Manuscript Length: 352 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Norton), Korea (Munhakdongne)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

UNDERLANDS A Personal Journey Through Britain’s Lost Landscape TED NIELD Nield is a geologist with a sense of history and humour – THE TIMES Nield has a gift for bringing the science alive – BBC FOCUS The go-to guy for the unravelling of geology’s most fascinating mysteries – Simon Winchester, author of THE MAP THAT CHANGED THE WORLD and ATLANTIC

An acclaimed geology writer reflects on the man-made holes, scars and spoil-heaps that litter our environment while seeking to restore our respect for the planet’s past and its accumulated wealth. Journeying across the British Isles, the geologist and science writer Ted Nield unearths the myriad ways in which the rocks beneath our feet shape our lives. At one time, our roads, our buildings, our gravestones and our monuments were all built from rock mined locally, our cities powered by coal from Welsh mines, and our lamps lit with paraffin from Scottish shale. Today our mines are gone, our buildings are no longer local, and the flow of stone now travels from East to West. Nield journeys across Britain’s buried landscape – from the small Welsh village of his ancestors to Swansea, Aberdeen, Surrey and Dorset – unearthing the ties between stone and place and what their loss might mean for us today. TED NIELD holds a doctorate in geology and works for the Geological Society of London as editor of the monthly magazine Geoscientist. A former chair of the Association of British Science Writers, he is a fellow of the Geological Society and a member of the Meteoritical Society. His previous books are SUPERCONTINENT (Granta/Harvard University Press, 2007) and INCOMING! (Granta/Lyons, 2011). He lives in London. Publisher: Granta (Editor: Bella Lacey) Publication: 20 May 2014 Status: Manuscript Length: 288 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Granta)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

NATURE’S NETHER REGIONS What the Sex Lives of Bugs, Birds and Beasts Tell Us About Evolution, Biodiversity and Ourselves MENNO SCHILTHUIZEN

A popular account of the biology of genitalia, illustrating their remarkable variation in size, shape and skills and what this eye-opening sexual cornucopia reveals about animal behaviour. The penis has been reinvented more often than the wheel, and some of the reinventions are pretty quirky: for example, a typical damselfly penis has a balloon – an inflatable bulb – and two horns at the tip, plus long bristles down the sides. This great diversity in sexual organs illustrates one of the few rules of biology: that if species are very similar in appearance, but there is only one good way to tell them apart, that difference is almost invariably in the shape of the genitalia. In the past two decades biologists have discovered that genitals – as tools for passing on genes to future generations – are at the forefront of evolution. Now, in NATURE’S NETHER REGIONS, Menno Schilthuizen describes this revolutionary work and the important new perspectives that it opens up on evolution, development and behaviour. He shows us how the amazing diversity of form and function in female and male genitalia – including human ones – is the result of the unexpected twists of evolution; why, in sex more than anything else, humans are the newbies where outlandish shapes and bizarre behaviours are concerned; and what this eye-popping sexual cornucopia reveals about human nature. MENNO SCHILTHUIZEN was born in 1965 and is an evolutionary biologist based at the Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity ‘Naturalist’ in Leiden. The institution has a public museum visited by 300,000 people annually and a 37-million-specimen collection (the fifth largest in the world). He obtained a PhD from Leiden University and two postdoctoral fellowships at Wageningen University, and worked for seven years as an associate professor at the Institute for Tropical Biology and Conservation in Malaysia. In addition to his research science (which concentrates on the evolution of land snails and beetles), he has written regularly for New Scientist, Natural History, Science and ScienceNOW, as well as for Dutch and Malaysian national newspapers, and published two books (FROGS, FLIES AND DANDELIONS: The Making of Species, Oxford University Press, 2001; THE LOOM OF LIFE: Unravelling Ecosystems, Springer, 2008). His homepage is at science.naturalis.nl/schilthuizen. Publisher: Viking (Penguin US) (Editors: Wendy Wolf/Melanie Tortoroli) Published: Autumn 2013 Status: Manuscript Length: 70,000–80,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Penguin US), Germany (DTV), Italy (Bollati Boringhieri/ Mauri Spagnol), Netherlands (Atlas Contact)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

THE GAP The Science Of What Separates Us From Other Animals THOMAS SUDDENDORF

One of PUBLISHERS WEEKLY’s Top 10 Fall 2013 titles in the ‘Science’ category Beautifully written, well researched and thought provoking – Jane Goodall Brilliantly combines scholarship with accessibility... This is popular science at its best – erudite, entertaining and wonderfully informative – Michael Corballis, Professor of Psychology, University of Auckland, and author of THE RECURSIVE MIND Deep, illuminating... expertly reviews the evidence and arrives at provocative conclusions. A must read – Stanislas Dehaene, author of READING IN THE BRAIN Sweeping, sharply argued and exceptionally entertaining, it tells a story... that may turn out to be one of the great scientific discoveries of the century... a veritable eye-opener – Endel Tulving, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Toronto, and author of ELEMENTS OF EPISODIC MEMORY

The definitive account of what we do and what we don’t know about the differences between animal and human minds. It has been said that every psychologist must at some point fill in the following sentence: ‘The human being is the only animal that _____.’ Yet despite the many claims for human uniqueness, there is seemingly little consensus about what sets our minds apart from those of other animals. In THE GAP, Thomas Suddendorf puts the record straight by providing the first complete account of exactly what makes human minds different from any others, and how this difference arose. Drawing on two decades of research on apes, children and human evolution, he surveys all the main areas often cited as uniquely human (language, intelligence, morality, culture, ‘theory of mind’ and ‘mental time travel’); proposes that just two innovations account for why our minds appear so distinct in all these areas – our open-ended ability to imagine and reflect on different situations and our insatiable drive to link our minds together; and argues that this gap is becoming wider not just because we are becoming smarter but also because we are making ourselves appear more special by reducing the capacities of our closest living relatives – by causing their extinction. Weaving together the latest findings in animal behaviour, child development, anthropology, psychology, physiology, genetics, neuroscience and more, THE GAP is an original, provocative and authoritative book that will change the way we think about our place in nature. It is essential reading for anyone interested in what we really are, where we come from and where we are going – and our continuing relationship with the rest of the animal kingdom. THOMAS SUDDENDORF was born in 1967 in Germany and is a full professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland, Australia. He has received awards for his research and teaching, including from the Australian Academy of Social Sciences, the Australian Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. His 1997 paper on mental time travel is one of the most cited articles in psychology. He is regularly invited to give talks, keynote addresses and public lectures, and his work has been covered in media around the world. Publisher: BasicBooks (Editors: T. J. Kelleher/Tisse Takagi) Published: 28 November 2013 Status: Proofs Length: 352 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Basic), Germany (Berlin), Japan (Hakuyosha), Spain (Ediciones Destino)

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FORTHCOMING TITLE

BOTCHED BODIES How Evolution Shapes Our Health and is Revolutionizing Medicine JEREMY TAYLOR From the author of NOT A CHIMP A LIBRARY JOURNAL Best Sci-Tech Book of 2010

An authoritative yet accessible account of the renaissance in Darwinian medicine – and the first book to explore the medicine of the future in a coherent way. Why do so many of us suffer from autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease? Why are so many people dogged by allergies such as eczema and asthma? Why are there epidemics of heart disease, diabetes and cancer that you cannot observe in any other animal species? Why are our eyes so peculiarly vulnerable to detached retinas and macular degeneration? Why are we plagued with backaches, hernias, slipped discs, dodgy hip joints, appendicitis, menstrual problems and preeclampsia? Why is mental illness so prevalent? And why, unique in the animal kingdom, do so many of us descend into the mental twilight world of Alzheimer’s disease later in life? As the distinguished documentary science filmmaker and science writer Jeremy Taylor shows in BOTCHED BODIES, we are machines that have been designed by millions of years of blind evolution and part of the answer to our peculiar human susceptibility to disease and disrepair lies in the fact that evolution can never go back to the drawing board. Evolution has to make do with what is already in front of it, and our bodies are littered with the compromises it has been forced to make. In this Darwinian view of medicine, bad backs are the price we pay for walking on two legs; the worldwide epidemic of coronary artery disease is the price we pay for the strong compact musculature of our hearts; and dementia is the price we pay for maintaining such powerful and greedy brains. Founded some two decades ago, the field of Darwinian medicine has, however, only recently come of age. BOTCHED BODIES is the first book to piece together for a popular audience the latest ideas, discoveries and applications that have made this renaissance possible. Drawing on fascinating scientific curiosities from the natural world and compelling human-interest stories of people suffering from a range of ailments, Taylor shows how the latest evolutionary theories are being applied to understanding human health and disease and why our hearts, immune systems, reproductive organs and many other body parts are built the way they are. Along the way, he reveals how these profound insights into the human medical condition are leading to dramatic new therapies to mend sick bodies and even to replace worn-out body parts with ‘grow your own’ alternatives – the personalized medicine of the future. JEREMY TAYLOR has spent most of his professional life inside the science documentary television industry, with evolutionary biology his first true love. Until 1992 he was a senior producer and director for BBC Television, where he contributed many films to the BBC’s long-running flagship science series ‘Horizon’ (including two landmark programmes presented by Richard Dawkins, ‘Nice Guys Finish First’ and ‘The Blind Watchmaker’). His first book, NOT A CHIMP (‘A provocative book that should be read by anyone interested in the debate about similarities and differences between humans and chimpanzees’, Dan Agin, Huffington Post) was published by Oxford University Press in 2009. Publisher: University of Chicago Press (Editor: Christie Henry) Delivery: 31 December 2013 Published: Autumn 2014 Status: Proposal and sample chapters Length: 80,000–100,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Chicago University Press), Japan (Kawadeshobo) 17


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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

FORTHCOMING TITLE

RESTLESS CREATURES The Story of Life in Ten Movements MATT WILKINSON

A book that opens up an astonishing new perspective: that nothing in life makes sense except in the context of movement. How living things move from place to place is often taken for granted. Yet, not only are the ways in which creatures get about dazzlingly sophisticated, but the need for motility has also shaped the very essence of life on Earth: brains, sex, predation, photosynthesis, the evolution of complexity, the invasion of land and the rise of humanity all arose from improvements in getting from A to B. In RESTLESS CREATURES, the acclaimed biologist and science writer Matt Wilkinson shows how the story of movement offers a uniquely powerful way to explain why life is the way it is. Tracing the evolution of locomotion from the lowliest bacteria to Olympic athletes, he reveals that many of evolution's greatest hits, including almost everything that makes us human from opposable thumbs to the way we think and feel, owe their existence to the evolution of motility. And this in turn rests on surprisingly simple foundations: how life has responded to the physical challenges posed by Newton's laws of motion and other mechanical rules. Along the way we learn why there are no flying monkeys or biological wheels; how dinosaurs started to fly and how headless chickens run around; how juvenile spiders can manage to reach the stratosphere; why the left and right sides of most animals are mirror images; why insects have six legs and humans have five fingers; why the lives of plants are still dominated by movement even though they're rooted to the spot; why it's better to run barefoot; why roller coasters are so much fun; and what life's movement machinery has in common with growing mushrooms and military tanks. MATT WILKINSON is a zoologist and science communicator at the University of Cambridge. His work has been covered in the Telegraph, Metro, New Scientist and Nature and led to many appearances on national radio in the UK and Canada. In 2004 he was a runner-up in the Daily Telegraph/BASF science writer competition, and in 2005 reached second place in the first FameLab competition. Since then he has spoken at several science festivals, science cafes and other public events, and in 2008 and 2009 was invited to Hong Kong, Xi’an and Dongguan by the British Council to give lectures and workshops for the Darwin bicentenary. In 2007 he left full-time research and went to drama school for a year, a move that resulted in the writing of a play about T. H. Huxley that was premiered at the 2009 Darwin Festival in Cambridge. He now teaches biology as a freelance for the Department of Zoology at the University of Cambridge, and is a course director at the university’s Institute of Continuing Education. As well as being an occasional professional actor, he is an experienced audio book narrator, having recorded eight titles since 2010. RESTLESS CREATURES is his first book. Born in 1975, he lives in Cambridge, UK. Publisher: BasicBooks (Editor: Tisse Takagi) Delivery: 1 July 2014 Published: Spring 2015 Status: Proposal and sample chapter Length: 90,000–100,000 words All rights available excluding World English Language (Basic), Japan (Soshisha), Russia (AST)

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FAREWELL TO REALITY How Fairy-Tale Physics Has Betrayed the Search for Scientific Truth JIM BAGGOTT Certain to broaden and intensify the debate over what counts as science – Bryce Christensen, starred review, BOOKLIST A good story, often told, but rarely as gracefully as it is here... In all of this, there’s uncommon respect for the lay reader – David Kordahl, LOS ANGELES REVIEW OF BOOKS In consistently accessible and intelligent prose, Baggott sympathetically captures the frustrations of physicists while laying out a provocative – and very convincing – plea for a reality check in a field that he feels is now too ‘meta’ for its own good – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, starred review His fierce and refreshing polemic does a fine job of helping readers understand some of the knottiest ideas in contemporary physics. This is all the more remarkable as he eschews analogies, arguing that they tend to confuse rather than illuminate the counterintuitive ideas and phenomena he describes – THE ECONOMIST

Stephen Hawking recently remarked, ‘There is no heaven; it’s a fairy story’. But might the same be said of modern theoretical physics? Although we know a lot more about the nature of reality, there is a sense in which we understand less. So far there is no observational or experimental evidence for many of the ideas of modern theoretical physics such as super-symmetric particles, superstrings, the multiverse, the holographic principle or the anthropic cosmological principle. For some of the wilder speculations of theorists such as Hawking there can by definition never be any such evidence. This stuff is not only not true, it is not even science. It is fairy-tale physics: fantastical, bizarre and often outrageous – borderline confidence-trickery, even, claims Jim Baggott. With FAREWELL TO REALITY, Baggott provides a much-needed antidote. Informed, comprehensive and balanced, the book offers lay readers an up-to-date summary of the latest thinking about the nature of physical reality while clearly distinguishing between fact and fantasy. With its engaging portraits of many central figures of modern physics, including Paul Davies, John Barrow, Brian Greene, Stephen Hawking, Leonard Susskind and other ‘high priests of fairy-tale physics’, it promises to be essential reading for all readers interested in what we do and don’t know about the Universe – and in the future of science itself. JIM BAGGOTT was born in Southampton, England, in 1957. He graduated in chemistry from the University of Manchester in 1978. After completing his doctorate in physical chemistry at the University of Oxford, he worked as a postgraduate research fellow at Oxford and at Stanford University in California. He has been studying and writing about science, philosophy and science history for some two decades, and has won awards for both scientific research and science writing. His widely acclaimed books include THE QUANTUM STORY, ATOMIC, A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO REALITY and BEYOND MEASURE. Publisher: Constable (UK)/Pegasus (US) (Editor: Andreas Campomar, UK) Published: 16 May 2013 (UK)/1 August 2013 (US) Length: 352 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Poland (Proszysnki)

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FIVE BILLION YEARS OF SOLITUDE The Search for Life Among the Stars LEE BILLINGS

In this elegant book, Billings writes with energy and brilliance about a big question, possibly the biggest of all: are we all alone in the Universe or are there other forms of life out there somewhere? His portraits of the scientists in pursuit of answers to this timeless question are realized through the sharpest lens – Richard Preston, author of THE HOT ZONE and THE WILD TREES FIVE BILLION YEARS OF SOLITUDE doesn’t just give us a history of the search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence. It doesn’t just give us the latest science of exoplanet hunting. It does those things with admirable, engaging clarity, but Billings gives us more, imbuing the quest for other Earths and other technological civilizations with an intimate immediacy that makes our planet and our lives seem all the more precious. From unruly telescopes to political machinations, from environmental degradation to broken friendships, Billings has seamlessly crafted a portrait that is not only about our looking to the stars but also about the place from which we gaze – Christopher Cokinos, author of THE FALLEN SKY and HOPE IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS ‘Awesome’ in that term's strictest sense. This mind-blowing book has ideas like a greenhouse has orchids. Yet, at its somber core, this is an engaged meditation on intelligence in the Universe – not just our intelligence, but anybody's, anywhere, at any time – Bruce Sterling, Professor of Internet Studies, European Graduate School, author of TOMORROW NOW and VISIONARY IN RESIDENCE To fully appreciate the quest to discover other Earths, you have to learn to understand this one afresh – not only its magnificent almost-five-billion-year history, but also its bureaucratic muddles, its petty rivalries, its personal triumphs and tragedies and its endless potential for poetry. Lee Billings does all that, brilliantly – Oliver Morton, author of MAPPING MARS and EATING THE SUN Lee Billings has done something remarkable. He has not just written a deeply researched account of the search for life elsewhere in the Universe. He’s also captured the spirit of the search – the science-fiction-fuelled dreams, the joy of discovering planets around other suns, the melancholy realization that our species may not have the longrange focus to complete this mission. The result is a beautiful, richly detailed study of what it means to be alone – for now – in the Universe – Carl Zimmer, author of A PLANET OF VIRUSES and EVOLUTION

An intimate history of Earth and the quest for life beyond the solar system. Since its formation nearly five billion years ago, our planet has been the sole living world in a vast and silent universe. Now, Earth’s isolation is coming to an end. Over the past two decades, astronomers have discovered thousands of ‘exoplanets’ orbiting other stars, including some that could be similar to our own world. Studying those distant planets for signs of life will be crucial to understanding life’s intricate mysteries right here on Earth. In a firsthand account of this unfolding revolution, Lee Billings draws on interviews with top researchers. He reveals how the search for other Earth-like planets is not only a scientific pursuit, but also a reflection of our culture’s timeless hopes, dreams and fears. This is a compelling story of the pioneers seeking the meaning of life in the infinite depths of space. LEE BILLINGS is a science journalist. His articles on the science and policy behind breakthrough work in astronomy, planetary science, astrophysics and cosmology have appeared in publications such as Nature, New Scientist, Popular Mechanics and Seed magazine. Born in 1981, he lives in New York City. Publisher: Current (Penguin US) (Editors: Courtney Young (acquiring editor)/Emily Angell) Published: 3 October 2013 Length: 304 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Penguin US), Turkey (Alfa Group) 20


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A PIECE OF THE SUN The Quest for Fusion Energy DANIEL CLERY A solid no-nonsense primer for those interested in fusion’s history – SCIENCE NEWS An essential book for anyone interested in fusion or who is involved in the politics of how we generate our electricity – Brian Clegg, PopularScience.co.uk Dan Clery beautifully captures the excitement and frustrations of the quest for fusion energy – Steve Cowley, Director, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy Explains cutting-edge science with remarkable lucidity... A timely perspective on truly urgent science – Bryce Christensen, BOOKLIST A surprisingly sprightly tour d’horizon of the pursuit of fusion energy... Clery negotiates the hard science with aplomb... A compelling case for continued, even increased, fusion research – KIRKUS REVIEWS

New realms of chemistry and physics. Nuclear tests without nukes. Power generation on a gigantic scale... Nuclear fusion is what powers our sun and other stars. If perfected, controlled fusion should generate a hundred times more energy than is used to spark the nuclear reactions. It’s not only powerful but clean and green as well: it doesn’t produce long-lasting nuclear waste, and it’s potentially carbon free. And although fossil fuels, such as oil and coal, and nuclear fission fuels, such as uranium, are limited resources, there’s enough nuclear fusion fuel around us to power the Earth longer than the lifetime of the Sun. In A PIECE OF THE SUN, Daniel Clery recounts the epic tale of how fusion works, its history and its promise for the future. It’s a story of science, politics, diplomacy and historical serendipity, peopled by the legions of scientists who have spent their whole careers in pursuit of burning plasma. We are now entering a decade where it’s imperative that we make fusion happen, he says. Scientists and engineers are closer than ever to triggering nuclear fusion in a controlled setting and confirming that fusion energy is real. With nations collaborating on massive scientific facilities, the main strands of fusion research are beginning to get noticed: as well as Europe’s programme, which has produced the best fusion reactor so far, there is the US effort and also newcomers in the East – Japan, China, South Korea and India. If, in the next few years, their giant machines make the expected breakthrough in achieving ignition, fusion will be catapulted onto front pages across the globe. A PIECE OF THE SUN aims to be the first book to tell the whole story for people wanting to read more. DANIEL CLERY is a graduate in theoretical physics who has for more than 20 years worked as a writer and editor on some of the world’s top science magazines, including Physics World, New Scientist and Science. Appointed as Science’s news editor in Europe in 1993, he has covered many of the big science news stories of the past two decades, and has become one of the magazine’s foremost writers on energy research, addressing topics including fission and fusion energy, wind and solar power and tidal barrages. Publisher: Duckworth (UK)/Overlook (US) (Editor: Jon Jackson) Published: 27 June 2013 Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US

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ELEVEN DAYS IN AUGUST The Liberation of Paris in 1944 MATTHEW COBB The final days of the German occupation of the French capital are vividly captured in this fine account of death and deliverance – Max Hastings If you’re a Francophile, or interested in WW2, or both, ELEVEN DAYS IN AUGUST is unmissable: gripping, moving, definitive – TOM HOLLAND The fullest account imaginable of the Battle for Paris. Cobb’s narrative... hurtles along, illuminated by blazing details. Admirable... epic – NEW STATESMAN

The story of a momentous point in twentieth-century history – a history that still lives in the streets. In August 1944, in a tiny Belgian village, 12-year-old Henri Baiverlin looked on in amazement as his father heard of the liberation of Paris: ‘He just sat there, tears streaming down his face, saying over and over again, Paris is a beautiful city, a great city.’ All over the world, reactions were the same. From Manchester to New York, from Quebec to London, bells were rung, people rejoiced, tears were shed and hope sprang anew. As the British government publication Cadran put it: ‘All the war news fades when faced with the liberation of Paris. For the whole world, Paris is a symbol of civilization and of liberty: the first echo of victory could be heard in the bells of Notre Dame... By liberating themselves, the Parisians showed the world that the soul of a people is invincible, stronger than the most powerful war machine.’ The liberation of Paris was a momentous point in twentieth-century history, yet it is now largely forgotten outside France. ELEVEN DAYS IN AUGUST is a pulsating hour-by-hour reconstruction of these tumultuous events that shaped both the end of the Second World War and the whole future of France, told with the pace of a thriller. Full of the atmosphere and spirit of the French capital, it shows how, in 11 dramatic days, people lived, fought and died in the most beautiful city in the world. As well as describing the drama, it examines the conflicting national and international interests that played out in the bloody street fighting. The tense, heart-wrenching story is told from conflicting points of view, using eyewitness and diary accounts and unpublished archive material from ordinary Parisians, Resistance fighters, the Free French, the Allied High Command, Allied and French spies, the German High Command, rank-and-file German soldiers and French collaborators. Each of these groups of people experienced these August days in very different ways, praying for different outcomes, fighting for different futures. Hundreds of civilians and soldiers died, some leaving their names on fading plaques on Parisian buildings, but most are now forgotten by history. This book brings their stories back to life, capturing the emotion, the excitement and the terror of insurrection and fighting, and revealing the history that lives in the streets. MATTHEW COBB is a professor of zoology and an associate dean at the University of Manchester. He has translated five books from French into English, and spent most of his adult life as a researcher in Paris, before returning to the UK in 2002. Author of THE EGG AND SPERM RACE (Simon & Schuster/ Bloomsbury, 2006) and THE RESISTANCE (Simon and Schuster, 2009), he is a frequent contributor to the Times Literary Supplement and Journal of Experimental Biology. Publisher: Simon & Schuster (UK/US) (Editor: Mike Jones) Published: 11 April 2013 Length: 544 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Simon & Schuster UK)

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RECENTLY PUBLISHED

THE END OF PLAGUES The Global Battle Against Infectious Disease JOHN RHODES Engaging and accessible... this highly recommended work offers valuable, nuanced information to readers interested in public health policies and individual health decisions – Mary Chitty, LIBRARY JOURNAL A wonderful account of the end of smallpox and the man who deserves full credit for devising one of the safest and most effective means of prevention – KIRKUS REVIEWS

An eminent immunologist vividly chronicles the discovery of vaccination, the tortuous path leading to the eradication of smallpox, the challenge of aids, the dawn of a new war on parasitic diseases such as malaria, and the imminent defeat of polio. One of the greatest stories in science is about to reach a dramatic climax. Yet this is a story that until now has never been told. In the next few years, the World Health Organization and its partners will announce the global eradication of polio, the second human disease to be eliminated from the world. Two mysteries are intimately entwined throughout this remarkable story: the true nature of ‘germs’ and how the body fights them – the nature of immunity. Spanning more than three centuries, THE END OF PLAGUES weaves together the discovery of vaccination, the birth and growth of immunology, and the global eradication of infectious disease into a single compelling narrative. From Edward Jenner’s discovery of vaccination in 1796, to the early nineteenth-century foundling voyages in which chains of orphans, vaccinated one by one, were sent to colonies around the globe, to the development of polio vaccines by Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin in the first half of the twentieth century and the stockpiling of smallpox as a biological weapon in the Cold War, THE END OF PLAGUES describes how vaccination grew to be one of the most effective medical measures of all time, the personalities bound up in this monumental achievement, and what the future holds for the control of infectious disease. It is a tempestuous story of science, politics, economics and big business, peppered with crises, cliffhangers and sudden shifts of fortune, with jealousy, intrigue and conflict taking centre stage. It is a story that affects the lives of all of us – one in which we are all intimately involved, as individuals and as global citizens. And it is a story that will end soon with a name as yet unknown – the last person in human history to be afflicted with polio. JOHN RHODES was educated at University College London and has held research fellowships at the US National Institutes of Health and the University of Cambridge before joining the Wellcome Foundation in London. From 2001 to 2007 he was director of strategy in immunology at GlaxoSmithKline, promoting international research on vaccines and immunotherapy. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, has served on UK government international vaccine missions and published numerous articles in leading journals such as Nature, Science and the Lancet. Married with two daughters, he lives and works in Cambridge, UK. Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (Editors: Luba Ostashevsky (acquiring editor)/Elisabeth Dyssegaard) Published: 24 September 2013 Length: 256 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Palgrave Macmillan)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

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THE POPPY A Cultural History from Ancient Egypt to Flanders Fields to Afghanastan NICHOLAS J. SAUNDERS Praise for ALEXANDER’S TOMB An armchair Indiana Jones... his lively prose draws readers into this compelling tale of conquest, political intrigue and the aura surrounding one of history’s great heroes – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

Our most renowned archaeologist of the First World War unravels the tangled history of the beloved, iconic flower. In the aftermath of the horrific trench warfare of the First World War, the poppy – sprouting across the killing fields of France and Belgium, then immortalized in John McCrae’s moving poem – became a worldwide icon. Yet the poppy has a longer history, as the telltale sign of human cultivation of the land, of the ravages of war and of the desire to escape the earthly realm through inspired Romantic opium dreams or the grim reality of morphine drips. This is a story spanning three thousand years, from the ancient Egyptian fights over prized medicinal potions to the addicted veterans returning home from the American Civil War, from the British political machinations during the Opium Wars with China to the struggle to end Afghanistan’s tribal narcotics trade. Through it all, there stands the transformative poppy. Nicholas J. Saunders brings us the definitive history of this ever-enduring but humble flower of the fields, a story that is at turns tragic, eye-opening and, most essentially, life-affirming – a gift to us all. NICHOLAS J. SAUNDERS is honorary reader in material culture in the Department of Anthropology at University College London. He is the world’s leading authority on the anthropology and archaeology of the First World War. His exhibition of trench art was the centrepiece of the ‘In Flanders Fields’ Museum in Ypres, Belgium. The author of more than twenty books and dozens of academic monographs (including ALEXANDER’S TOMB (BasicBooks, 2007)), he has appeared in numerous documentaries for the BBC and National Geographic. Publisher: Oneworld (Editor: Robin Dennis) Published: 17 October 2013 Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth

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The Science Factory

Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

RECENTLY PUBLISHED

HOW TO MAKE A ZOMBIE The Real Life (and Death) Science of Reanimation and Mind Control FRANK SWAIN A NEW STATESMAN Summer Reading Pick Swain serves up a ghoulish treat… Packed full of bizarre research and jaw-dropping tales, his book succeeds in being simultaneously entertaining, informative and slightly unnerving – Alex Boese, bestselling author of ELEPHANTS ON ACID and ELECTRIFIED SHEEP Delightfully macabre… Swain has pulled off a masterful feat in this broad-ranging and fascinating book. Braiiiins! – Lewis Dartnell, Research Fellow, University of Leicester, and author of LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE Gripping... reads like a nonfiction version of a Stephen King novel – you’ll stay up all night reading it with goose bumps and the lights on – Michael Shermer, NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author of THE BELIEVING BRAIN and SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN columnist

Quite apart from being surrounded by zombies, are we zombies ourselves? From commonplace zombie animals in your back garden to the military’s manipulation of human minds, HOW TO MAKE A ZOMBIE explores our hundred-year scientific quest to control the bodies and minds of fellow humans. It is packed full of previously untold stories from the most incredible annals of scientific literature: animals brought back to life; unsuspecting citizens dosed with zombifying drugs by secret agents; Soviet experiments in which organs are kept alive when separated from the body; microbes that can cause insanity; parasites that can manipulate their hosts in startling ways, forcing unnatural behaviours, sex changes and suicide; the burgeoning black market in cadavers; how to design the perfect plague; and how, despite our supposed intelligence, we all remain extraordinarily susceptible to manipulation. In the book, the acclaimed science writer Frank Swain plots a course into the highly unsettling territory where human mind control is orchestrated from within by tiny pathogens, and worse still, by nothing at all – where the architecture of both the brain and the world around it interferes with rational thought. In this way it ties together disparate subjects from the trypanosome parasites of South America to interrogation techniques in Iraq, from psychologists reducing crime through urban design in Manchester to doctors treating schizophrenia with antibiotics in Ethiopia. It reveals the advances in medicine and technology that are making Hollywood fiction a reality. And it deals with the questions raised by these advances: When is someone truly dead? What is the legal status of someone who has died but lives on? And if parasites can bend minds, encouraging impulsive or even violent behaviour, then could those infected be acquitted in a court of law? Entertaining, eye-opening and mind-bending in its own right, HOW TO MAKE A ZOMBIE not only reminds us that we can be taken over by other organisms, but also points out that such a thing might have already happened without our knowledge. Perhaps what we consider our own identity is a chorus of voices, only one of which is human... FRANK SWAIN site devoted to Wired and the generally being

was born in 1982. He is the founder of SciencePunk, the popular SEED ScienceBlogs the weird and wonderful fringes of science. A regular contributor to media including Guardian, he has a history of climbing buildings, managing burlesque shows, and a force for good – and the scientific method.

Publisher: Oneworld (UK/US) (Editor: Robin Dennis) Published: 6 June 2013 Status: Edited manuscript Length: 256 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Oneworld), Germany (btb/Random House), Japan (Intershift), Netherlands (Paradigma), Sweden (Fri Tanke) 25


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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

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THE EDGE OF PHYSICS A Journey to Earth’s Extremes to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe ANIL ANANTHASWAMY PHYSICS WORLD’s Book of the Year 2010 An accomplished and timely overview of modern cosmology and particle astrophysics – NATURE A remarkable narrative that combines fundamental physics with high adventure – NEW SCIENTIST Stirring, scenic narrative… a wonder-steeped page-turner – SEED A thrilling ride around the globe and around the cosmos – Sean Carroll, California Institute of Technology, author of FROM ETERNITY TO HERE Clean, elegant prose, humming with interest – Robert Macfarlane, author of MOUNTAINS OF THE MIND and THE WILD PLACES A genuinely novel route into the story of modern cosmology… a well written and genuinely accessible tale – Thomas Levenson, author of NEWTON AND THE COUNTERFEITER and EINSTEIN IN BERLIN

An intrepid journalist takes us from desolate deserts to derelict mines to answer some of the most burning questions in physics today. Physics is in crisis. For more than two centuries, our understanding of the laws of nature expanded rapidly. But in the past few decades, we’ve made astonishingly little progress. What will finally break the impasse and get physics back on track? In this timely and original book, the science writer Anil Ananthaswamy sets out in search of the world’s most audacious physics experiments: the telescopes and detectors that promise to shed new light on such things as dark matter, dark energy and the phenomenon of quantum gravity (which string theory tries to explain). He soon finds himself at the ends of the Earth – in cold and remote and sometimes dangerous places. As it turns out, extreme physics requires extreme environments. Reporting from some of the most inhospitable and dramatic research sites on our planet – from the Atacama Desert in Chile, to the Indian Observatory in the Himalayas, to the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica to deep within an abandoned iron mine in Minnesota – Ananthaswamy weaves together stories about the people and places at the heart of this research while beautifully explaining the problems that scientists are trying to solve. In so doing, he provides a unique portrait of the Universe and our quest to understand it. Atmospheric, engaging and illuminating, THE EDGE OF PHYSICS brings cosmology – with all its rarefied concepts – back down to Earth. ANIL ANANTHASWAMY is a consultant editor for New Scientist. He has been with the magazine since 2000, including as a staff writer and deputy news editor, and has also written for National Geographic News, Discover magazine, The Times and Independent and is a columnist for PBS NOVA’s The Nature of Reality blog. He studied electronics, electrical and computer engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, and the University of Washington, Seattle, and worked as a software engineer in Silicon Valley before studying in the University of California Santa Cruz’s science-writing programme. Now a guest lecturer there, he also teaches an annual science journalism workshop at the National Centre for Biological Sciences in Bangalore, India. He lives in Bangalore and California. Publisher: Duckworth (UK)/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (US) (Editor: Amanda Cook, US) Published: 22 April 2010 (UK)/2 March 2010 (US) Length: 336 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Germany (Spektrum), Greece (Travlos), India (Penguin), Italy (Codice), Japan (Kawadeshobo), Korea (Humanist), Poland (Prószyński), Russia (Eksmo) 26


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ATOMIC The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb, 1939–1949 JIM BAGGOTT A BOOKLIST Top Ten Sci-Tech Book of 2010 An excellent introduction to a vast and complicated topic... knits together developments on different sides of the Atlantic into a brisk, exciting and comprehensive narrative – Michael Dobbs, THE NEW YORK TIMES While writing my 20th-century histories… I read everything on [the atomic bomb] I could lay my hands on, but I never read such a good, comprehensive account as Jim Baggott’s… Highly recommended – A. N. Wilson, READER’S DIGEST Replete with drama and insight – Martin J. Sherwin, co-author of AMERICAN PROMETHEUS, winner of the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Biography This is a very good book. I particularly like the way Baggott has been able to weave the science, ‘grand-scale’ politics and espionage together into one compelling narrative – Mark Walker, author of GERMAN NATIONAL SOCIALISM AND THE QUEST FOR NUCLEAR POWER

An epic story of science and technology at the very limits of human understanding; a tale barely believable as fiction, which just happens to be historical fact. Rich in personality, action, confrontation and deception, ATOMIC is the first fully realized popular account of the race between Nazi Germany, Britain, America and the Soviet Union to build atomic weapons. The book draws on declassified material such as MI6’s Farm Hall transcripts, coded Soviet messages cracked by American cryptographers in the Venona project and interpretations by Russian scholars of documents from the Soviet archives. Jim Baggott weaves these threads into a monumental book that spans ten historic years, from the discovery of nuclear fission in 1939 to ‘Joe-1’, the first Soviet atomic bomb test in August 1949. It includes dramatic episodes such as the sabotage of the Vemork heavy-water plant by Norwegian commandos and the infamous meeting between Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, the subject of Michael Frayn’s stage play ‘Copenhagen’. Baggott also tells of how Allied scientists were directly involved in the hunt for their German counterparts in war-torn Europe following D-Day, and brings to light the reactions of captured German scientists on hearing of the Allied success at Hiroshima. Why did physicists persist in developing the atomic bomb, despite the devastation that it could bring? Why, despite having a clear head start, did Hitler’s physicists fail? To what extent did the Soviet atomic programme rely on intelligence gathered by spies such as Klaus Fuchs, Theodore Hall, David Greenglass and the Rosenbergs? Did the Allies really plot to assassinate a key member of the German bomb programme? Did the physicists knowingly inspire the arms race? The book answers these and many other questions. JIM BAGGOTT was born in Southampton, England, in 1957. He graduated in chemistry in 1978 and completed his doctorate at the University of Oxford three years later. He has been studying and writing about the history of physics for some 20 years and has won awards for his scientific research and writing. His books have been widely acclaimed and include A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO REALITY, PERFECT SYMMETRY, BEYOND MEASURE and THE QUANTUM STORY. Publisher: Icon (UK)/Pegasus (US)* (Editor: Simon Flynn, UK) Published: 5 March 2009 (UK)/13 April 2010 (US) Length: 576 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Israel (Books in the Attic/Miskal), Japan (Sakuhinsha), Russia (Eksmo) *Published in the US as THE FIRST WAR OF PHYSICS: The Secret History of the Atom Bomb 27


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THE BELIEF INSTINCT The Psychology of Souls, Destiny and the Meaning of Life JESSE BERING One of CHOICE editors’ Outstanding Academic Titles, 2011 – Top 25 Books Named one of the 11 Best Psychology Books of 2011 by THE ATLANTIC Scintillating… with wit and wisdom – Nicholas Humphrey, London School of Economics, author of SEEING RED A triumph – moving, provocative and entertaining – Paul Bloom, Professor of Psychology, Yale University, author of HOW PLEASURE WORKS Spellbinding – Daniel M. Wegner, Harvard University, author of THE ILLUSION OF CONSCIOUS WILL Marvelously informative... an uncommonly compelling case for the self-loathing of humanity – NEW REPUBLIC A balanced and considered approach to this often inflammatory topic – NATURE A colourful romp through psychology, philosophy and popular culture – NEW HUMANIST

A startling new take on why we believe in God – and how this belief ensured human survival. God is not merely an idea to be entertained or discarded based on the evidence. Nor is God a cultural invention, an existential Band-Aid or an opiate of the masses. Instead, Jesse Bering argues, belief in God evolved in the human species as an ‘adaptive illusion’. Drawing on groundbreaking research in cognitive science, he unravels the evolutionary mystery of why we grapple for meaning, purpose and destiny in our everyday lives. He argues that the strangely deep-rooted sense that some intentional agent created us as individuals, wants us to behave in particular ways, observes our otherwise private actions and intends to meet us after we die would also have been felt by our ancestors, leading them to behave in ways that favoured their reputations – and thus saved their genes. But in today’s world, these psychological illusions have outlasted their evolutionary purpose, and Bering points out a whole new challenge: escaping them. His own experiments have revealed that the perceived presence of a supernatural being can affect a person’s behaviour – although in this case the being was not God, but the ghost of a dead person. He has also done studies that indicate that religion promotes fitness by encouraging collaboration within groups. A sense of being watched by a god might be useful, he says: it might encourage cheats to detect and police themselves. JESSE BERING was born in 1975. He is a frequent contributor to Scientific American, Slate and Das Magazin. His work has also appeared in New York Magazine, the Guardian and New Republic, and been featured on NPR, the BBC, Playboy Radio, and more. Formerly director of the Institute of Cognition and Culture at Queen’s University, Belfast, and professor at the University of Arkansas, he is the author of the forthcoming WHY IS THE PENIS SHAPED LIKE THAT? (Scientific American/Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 3 July 2012) and is currently working on a book on human sexuality and deviance. He lives near Ithaca, New York. His website is at www.jessebering.com. Publisher: Nicholas Brealey (UK)*/Norton (US) (Editor: Angela von der Lippe, US) Published: 11 November 2010 (UK)/7 February 2011 (US) Length: 288 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Brazil (Zahar), China (Economic Science Press – simplified Chinese characters), Croatia (Naklada Ljevak), Germany (Piper), Italy (Rizzoli), Japan (Kagaku-Dojin), Korea (Purun Communication), Netherlands (Nieuw Amsterdam), Portugal (Temas e Debates), Spain (Paidós), Taiwan (Apocalypse – traditional Chinese characters) *Published in the UK as THE GOD INSTINCT 28


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THE MAN WHO RAN THE MOON James E. Webb, NASA and the Secret History of Project Apollo PIERS BIZONY Bizony’s excellent corrective to NASA’s mythologised history takes an unflinching look… A firebrand of a book – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

The gripping story of how one man steered NASA through a morass of politics, special interests, profiteering, untested systems, budget restrictions and volatile personalities. In spring 1961, James E Webb, a North Carolina farm boy turned Washington insider, took charge of the grandest exploration project ever known: America’s bid for the Moon. He persuaded John F. Kennedy to support him and gained control of five per cent of the US federal budget. Webb’s NASA controlled half-a-million workers across America as they built new machines, launch pads and control centres. But when a spacecraft caught fire in 1967, killing three astronauts, the press exposed a series of failures and the profiteering of Webb’s business partners. To protect NASA’s future, Webb took the heat for the corruption and deaths and enabled his colleagues to land on the Moon by the end of the decade. America had won the Space Race – but the name of the man who made it possible was wiped from history. THE MAN WHO RAN THE MOON reveals the secret history of Project Apollo and the true cost of America s victory in space. PIERS BIZONY is a science journalist and space historian who writes for newspapers and magazines such as the Independent, BBC Focus and Wired. His award-winning book on Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ was described as ‘full of sparkling enthusiasm’ by New Scientist and ‘excellent, in every way worthy of Kubrick’s original precision-crafted vision’ by the Evening Standard. His most recent books include ATOM (Icon, 2007), HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN SPACESHIP (Portobello/ Plume, 2008) and ONE GIANT LEAP: Apollo 11 Forty Years On (Aurum, 2009). Publisher: Icon (UK)/Thunder’s Mouth (US) (Editor: John Oakes, US) Published: 5 October 2006 (UK)/10 May 2006 (US) Length: 242 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US

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WETWARE A Computer in Every Cell DENNIS BRAY Drawing on the similarities between Pac-man and an amoeba and efforts to model the human brain, this absorbing read shows that biologists and engineers have a lot to learn from working together – DISCOVER Bray tackles the question [of how complex behaviour can arise in a simple life form] with remarkable clarity and style in this excellent book... highly recommended – Graham Lawton, NEW SCIENTIST One of the book’s major strengths is Bray’s overall unity of vision; another is the way he marshals a breathtaking diversity of fields to make his case... Whether cells think or not, there is no question that WETWARE will get the reader thinking – Wallace F. Marshall, SCIENCE A beautifully written journey into the mechanics of the world of the cell, and even beyond – Denis Noble, author of THE MUSIC OF LIFE In this timely and illuminating volume, Bray passionately weaves a compelling case for a computational view of life – Martyn Amos, author of GENESIS MACHINES Does an admirable job explaining complex biological phenomena… to non-experts while keeping the attention of people already familiar with these ideas… a highly thought-provoking look at how cells are similar to computers. Or, perhaps more correctly, how computers should try to be like living cells – Laura DeMare, YALE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

How does a single-cell creature such as an amoeba lead such a sophisticated life? How does it hunt living prey, respond to lights, sounds and smells, and display complex sequences of movements without the benefit of a nervous system? This book offers a startling and original answer. In clear, jargon-free language, Dennis Bray taps the findings of the new discipline of systems biology to show that the internal chemistry of living cells is a form of computation. Cells are built out of molecular circuits that perform logical operations, as electronic devices do, but with unique properties. Bray argues that the computational juice of cells provides the basis of all the distinctive properties of living systems: it allows organisms to embody in their internal structure an image of the world, and this accounts for their adaptability, responsiveness and intelligence. WETWARE offers imaginative, wide-ranging and perceptive criticism of robotics and complexity theory, as well as many entertaining and telling anecdotes. For the general reader, the practising scientist and all others with an interest in the nature of life, the book is an exciting portal to some of biology’s latest discoveries and ideas. DENNIS BRAY is emeritus professor in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge. A fellow of the Royal Society, he is co-author of several bestselling and influential texts in molecular and cell biology and is internationally sought after as a lecturer on the interface of cell biology and physics. An enthusiastic advocate of the computational approach to living cells, he was awarded the 2007 European Science Prize in Computational Biology – one of the largest international prizes in science. Publisher: Yale University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Jean Black) Published: 30 June 2009 (UK)/26 May 2009 (US) Length: 267 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Yale), Japan (Hayakawa), Korea (East Asia)

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BRAIN BUGS How the Brain’s Flaws Shape Our Lives DEAN BUONOMANO Excellent… Buonomano treks across evolutionary psychology, cognitive science, neurobiology, philosophy, theory of mind, and a number of other disciplines – though, it’s worth noting, not at all in the fluffy, formulaic fashion of ‘Big Idea books’ – Maria Popova, ATLANTIC An ingenious idea… a remarkably accessible and engaging introduction to the neuroscience of the human condition – Sam Harris, author of THE MORAL LANDSCAPE, LETTER TO A CHRISTIAN NATION and THE END OF FAITH Buonomano has brilliantly pulled off what few psychological scientists can do. In elegant and clear writing, he masterfully conveys the astonishing capability of the human mind, along with its flaws and limitations – Elizabeth Loftus, Distinguished Professor, University of California at Irvine, author of EYEWITNESS TESTIMONY What a great book, filled with nuggets about how the brain works – and falters – and even some suggestions on how to put it to better use. Very enjoyable – Joseph LeDoux, Professor of Neuroscience and Psychology, New York University, author of THE EMOTIONAL BRAIN and SYNAPTIC SELF An intriguing take on behavioral economics, marketing and human foibles – KIRKUS REVIEWS

A lively, surprising tour of our mental glitches and how they arise. With its trillions of connections, the human brain is more beautiful and complex than anything we could ever build, but it’s far from perfect. Our memory is unreliable; we can’t multiply large sums in our heads; advertising manipulates our judgment; we tend to distrust people who are different from us; supernatural beliefs and superstitions are hard to shake; we prefer instant gratification to longterm gain; and what we presume to be rational decisions are often anything but. Drawing on striking examples and fascinating studies, the neuroscientist Dean Buonomano illuminates the causes and consequences of these ‘bugs’ in terms of the brain’s innermost workings and their evolutionary purposes. He then goes one step further, examining how our brains function – and malfunction – in the digital, predator-free, information-saturated, special effects-addled world that we have built for ourselves. Along the way, BRAIN BUGS gives us the tools to hone our cognitive strengths while recognizing our inherent weaknesses. DEAN BUONOMANO is a full professor in the departments of neurobiology and psychology at the University of California at Los Angeles and an investigator at UCLA’s Brain Research Institute. He has been invited to speak at many American universities and international meetings, published numerous scientific articles in leading journals such as Science and Neuron and been interviewed for newspapers and magazines including Discover, Newsweek, Scientific American and Die Zeit, most recently about his novel research on the psychological perception of time. His laboratory’s website is at www.neurobio.ucla.edu/~dbuono/. Publisher: Norton (UK/US) (Editor: Angela von der Lippe) Published: 11 July 2011 Length: 310 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Norton), Brazil (Elsevier), China (Beijing Multimillion Electronic Graphics and Information – simplified Chinese characters), Germany (Hans Huber), Japan (Kawadeshobo), Korea (Chiho), Russia (Hippo/Kariera), Taiwan (Business Weekly/Cite – traditional Chinese characters)

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THE SUN KINGS The Unexpected Tragedy of Richard Carrington and the Tale of How Modern Astronomy Began STUART CLARK 2007 Professional and Scholarly Publishing Award for Excellence in Cosmology and Astronomy Longlisted for the 2008 Royal Society Prize for Science Books I found myself captivated by the characters, the colossal problems they tackled, and the stunning conclusions they finally reached. I commend Stuart Clark for combining so many interesting ideas into a single, fastpaced, beautifully crafted story – Dava Sobel, author of LONGITUDE Undoubtedly the most gripping and brilliant popular science history account that I have ever read. It is informative, accurate and relevant. The author’s ability to write so vividly makes me seethe with jealousy – Owen Gingerich, Professor of Astronomy and of the History of Science, Harvard University, author of THE BOOK THAT NOBODY READ

The engrossing story of the great 19th-century scientific controversy about the Sun’s hidden influence on our planet – a debate that is of renewed topicality today. In September 1859, the entire Earth was engulfed in a gigantic cloud of seething gas, and a blood-red aurora erupted across the planet from the poles to the tropics. Around the world, telegraph systems crashed, machines burst into flames, and electric shocks rendered operators unconscious. Compasses and other sensitive instruments reeled as if struck by a massive magnetic fist. For the first time, human beings began to suspect that the Earth was not isolated from the rest of the Universe. But nobody knew what could have released such strange forces upon the Earth – nobody, that is, except the English amateur astronomer Richard Carrington. In this riveting account, Stuart Clark tells for the first time the full story behind Carrington’s observations of a mysterious explosion on the surface of the Sun and how his brilliant insight – that the Sun’s magnetism directly influences the Earth – helped to usher in the modern era of astronomy. Clark brings to life the scientists who rejected the significance of Carrington’s discovery of solar flares, as well as those who took up his struggle to prove that the Earth could be touched by influences from space. Clark also reveals new details about the sordid scandal that destroyed Carrington’s reputation and led him from the highest echelons of science to the lowest reaches of love, villainy and revenge. STUART CLARK is the former editor of Astronomy Now. He has a PhD in astrophysics and until 2001 was director of public astronomy education at the University of Hertfordshire, where he remains a visiting fellow. In 2001, the Independent ranked him alongside Stephen Hawking and Sir Martin Rees, the Astronomer Royal, as one of the ‘stars’ of British astrophysics teaching. He writes for the European Space Agency and is a regular contributor to such magazines as New Scientist and BBC Focus, he is also the author of several nonfiction books including DEEP SPACE, GALAXY and THE BIG QUESTIONS: The Universe (Quercus/Barnes & Noble; 2008, 2009, 2010) and VOYAGER (Atlantic, 2010). His most recent book is THE SKY’S DARK LABYRINTH (Polygon/Birlinn, 2011), the first in a trilogy of novels dramatizing the main revolutions in our understanding of the cosmos. His website is at www.stuartclark.com. Publisher: Princeton University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Ingrid Gnerlich) Published: 30 March 2007 Length: 224 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Princeton), Brazil (Record), Greece (Travlos), Italy (Einaudi), Russia (Azbooka Atticus), Taiwan (Goodness/Wu-Nan – traditional Chinese characters) 32


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THE EGG AND SPERM RACE The Seventeenth-Century Scientists Who Unravelled the Secrets of Sex, Life and Growth MATTHEW COBB A fascinating subject, full of arresting material and personalities – Lisa Jardine, SUNDAY TIMES Lively… You can almost smell the formaldehyde on the page – FINANCIAL TIMES It is a story as relevant today as it was in its own time, and Matthew Cobb tells it with great scholarship and tremendous panache – Tim Birkhead, author of PROMISCUITY and THE RED CANARY A ripping yarn – MANCHESTER EVENING NEWS

Where do we come from? Where do animals come from? For thousands of years we had no idea how living things were created – great thinkers such as Aristotle and Hippocrates had attempted to explain what became know as the problem of ‘generation’, but none of them had the tools or the insight to solve the mystery. The result was a wealth of weird and wonderful ideals about the components necessary to create new life – blood, ‘vapours’, invisible particles in the air. It was widely accepted that animals could sometimes produce different species, for example; the notion that two sheep can only ever make another sheep is a surprisingly modern idea. THE EGG AND SPERM RACE is the story of the exciting, largely forgotten decade during the seventeenth century when a group of young men – Jan Swammerdam, the son of a Protestant apothecary, Nils Stensen (also known as Steno), a Danish anatomist who first discovered the human tear duct, Reinier de Graaf, the attractive and brilliant son of a rich and successful Catholic architect, and Antoni Leeuwenhoek, a self-taught draper – dared to challenge thousands of years of orthodox thinking about where life comes from. By meticulous experimentation, dissection and observation with the newly invented microscope, they showed that like breeds like, that all animals come from an egg, that there is no such thing as spontaneous generation and that there are millions of tiny wriggling ‘eels’ in semen. But their ultimate inability to fully understand the evidence that was in front of them led to a fatal mistake. As a result, the final leap in describing the process of reproduction – which would ultimately give birth to the science of genetics – took nearly two centuries for humanity to achieve. Including previously untranslated documents, THE EGG AND SPERM RACE interweaves the personal stories of these scientists against a backdrop of the Dutch ‘golden age’. It is a riveting account of the audacious men who swept away old certainties and provided the foundation for much of our current understanding of the living world. MATTHEW COBB is professor of zoology and associate dean for social responsibility at the University of Manchester. He is also a reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement, and has translated five books on popular science and science history from French into English. Publisher: Simon & Schuster (UK)/Bloomsbury (US)* (Editors: Andrew Gordon, UK/Gillian Blake, US) Published: 3 April 2006 (UK)/8 August 2006 (US) Length: 332 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Netherlands (Bezige Bij), Turkey (Everest) *Published in the US as GENERATION

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THE RESISTANCE The French Fight Against the Nazis MATTHEW COBB Winner of the Franco-British Society’s Enid McLeod Book Prize 2009 Cobb comes perhaps closer than any other historian to explaining why the Resistance matters – SPECTATOR A fabulous book, painstakingly researched, even-handed and dripping with poignancy… A good book about the Resistance has long been overdue – HERALD Impeccably sourced… A fine piece of work, illustrated with excellent photographs… a successful tribute to extraordinary men and women – THE SUNDAY TIMES

An exciting, tragic and perceptive account of one of the most striking events of the twentieth century – and how one of the most powerful modern myths came to be forged. The French resistance to Nazi occupation during the Second World War was a struggle in which ordinary people fought for their liberty, despite terrible odds and horrifying repression. Hundreds of thousands of Frenchmen and women carried out an armed struggle against the Nazis, producing underground anti-fascist publications and supplying the Allies with vital intelligence. Based on hundreds of French eye-witness accounts and including recently released archival material, THE RESISTANCE begins with the catastrophic Fall of France in 1940, and shatters the myth of a unified Resistance created by General de Gaulle. In fact, De Gaulle never understood the Resistance, and sought to use, dominate and channel it to his own ends. Brave men and women set up organizations, only to be betrayed or hunted down by the Nazis, and to die in front of the firing squad or in the concentration camps. Eventually, through the determination of Frenchman Jean Moulin, the Resistance was unified. But without the sacrifice of British Special Operations Executive agents and RAF pilots flying into makeshift airstrips on moonlit nights, there would have been no radio contact with London, little money and fewer arms. In 1943, thousands of young men took to the hills (the maquis) to avoid being sent to work in Nazi Germany. The question of who would control these men – de Gaulle, the Allies or the Resistance – took on a crucial importance after D-Day, when hundreds of thousands of Resistance fighters harassed the retreating Nazi forces and helped two million Allied troops liberate France. Liberation threatened to transform itself into Revolution – the outcome that both De Gaulle and the Allies feared most, and did their utmost to prevent. Victorious, De Gaulle was able to neuter the Resistance, turning its revolutionary force into part of the establishment. Over the next half-century, the true story of the Resistance got blurred and distorted, its heroes and conflicts forgotten as the movement became a myth. MATTHEW COBB is a professor of zoology and an associate dean at the University of Manchester. He has translated five books from French into English, and spent most of his adult life as a researcher in Paris, before returning to the UK in 2002. Author of THE EGG AND SPERM RACE (Simon & Schuster/ Bloomsbury, 2006), he is a frequent contributor to the Times Literary Supplement and Journal of Experimental Biology. Publisher: Simon & Schuster (UK/US)) (Editor: Mike Jones) Published: 1 June 2009 Length: 416 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Simon & Schuster UK)

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FROM CELLS TO CIVILIZATIONS The Principles of Change that Shape Life ENRICO COEN Shortlisted for the 2013 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books Has tremendous scope and ambition. It challenges your thinking of how evolution works. It is unbelievably alive in parts and we could feel our brains growing as we read – Judging Panel, Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books Clearly written… intriguing, thought-provoking – LIBRARY JOURNAL Packed with fascinating facts – NEW SCIENTIST The ideas are subtle, possibly significant, and slightly unsettling. What more could a reader wish for? – NEW YORK JOURNAL OF BOOKS Ambitious and stimulating – TruthDig.com His clever ideas and engaging and creative writing style suggest that he would make a fascinating dinner companion. I loved this book – Charalambos P. Kyriacou, TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION Charming, clever and thought-provoking – Stephen C. Stearns, Edward P. Bass Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University Valuable to both general readers and specialists. Its breadth is unmatched – Michael Corballis, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Auckland

The first unified account of how life transforms itself – from the production of bacteria to the emergence of complex civilizations. What are the connections between evolving microbes, an egg that develops into an infant and a child who learns to walk and talk? In CELLS TO CIVILIZATIONS, the award-winning scientist Enrico Coen synthesizes the growth of living systems and creative processes and reveals that the four great life transformations – evolution, development, learning and human culture – while typically understood separately, actually all revolve around shared core principles and manifest the same fundamental recipe. Coen blends provocative discussion, the latest scientific research and colourful examples to demonstrate the links between these critical stages in the history of life. Coen tells a story rich with genes, embryos, neurons and fascinating discoveries. He examines the development of the zebra, the adaptations of seaweed, the cave paintings of Lascaux and the formulations of Alan Turing. He explores how dogs make predictions, how weeds tell the time of day and how our brains distinguish a Modigliani from a Rembrandt. Locating commonalities in important findings, Coen gives readers a deeper understanding of key transformations and provides a bold portrait for how science both frames and is framed by human culture. A compelling investigation into the relationships between our biological past and cultural progress, CELLS TO CIVILIZATIONS presents a remarkable story of living change. ENRICO COEN is a plant biologist at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK. His work is regularly published in top scientific journals such as Science, Nature and Cell. He was elected fellow of the Royal Society in 1998 and foreign member of the US National Academy of Sciences in 2001. He was also awarded the EMBO Medal in 1996, the Science for Art Prize in 1996, the Linnean Gold Medal in 1997 and the Royal Society Darwin Medal in 2004. He is the author of a popular book on the principles of development, THE ART OF GENES (Oxford University Press, 1999). Publisher: Princeton University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Alison Kalett) Published: 27 May 2012 Length: 322 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Princeton University Press), Germany (Hanser), Spain (Critica) 35


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STARMAN The Truth Behind the Legend of Yuri Gagarin JAMIE DORAN & PIERS BIZONY Takes us breakneck speed through Gagarin’s strange trajectory… Without books like these to shelter it, history is eroded by propaganda and real heroes fall victim to spin – NEW SCIENTIST A riveting account of Gagarin’s life... STARMAN brilliantly captures the atmosphere of the time – EUROPEAN Skilfully achieves two distinct objectives: the uncovering of much of the mystery around one of mankind’s finest periods, and a full and respectful acknowledgement that its many great heroes, both sung and unsung, were, first and foremost, human beings – MOSCOW TIMES Worth writing and definitely worth reading – DAILY TELEGRAPH A fascinating – yet chilling – look at bureaucracy gone wrong – AMAZON.CO.UK

New edition to mark the 50th anniversary of Gagarin’s historic space flight. On April 12 1961, Yuri Gagarin became the first human to leave the Earth’s atmosphere and venture into space. An icon of the twentieth century, he also became a danger to himself and a threat to the Soviet state. At the age of 34, he was killed in a plane crash. Based on KGB files, restricted documents from Russian space authorities, and interviews with his friends and colleagues, this biography of the Russian cosmonaut reveals a man in turmoil: torn apart by powerful political pressures, fighting a losing battle against alcoholism and rebelling against the cruelties of a corrupt totalitarian regime. This reissued edition of STARMAN includes a new afterword that reflects on Gagarin’s legacy and celebrates the importance of his momentous expedition. JAMIE DORAN is an Irish/Scottish independent documentary filmmaker and former BBC producer. In conjunction with Piers Bizony, he directed and produced for BBC Television the 1998 biographical film about Gagarin, which was shown in more than 60 countries worldwide. PIERS BIZONY is a science journalist and space historian who writes for newspapers and magazines such as the Independent, BBC Focus and Wired. His award-winning book on Stanley Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ was described as ‘full of sparkling enthusiasm’ by New Scientist and ‘excellent, in every way worthy of Kubrick’s original precision-crafted vision’ by the Evening Standard. His most recent books include THE MAN WHO RAN THE MOON (Icon/Thunder’s Mouth, 2006), ATOM (Icon, 2007), HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN SPACESHIP (Portobello/Plume, 2008) and ONE GIANT LEAP: Apollo 11 Forty Years On (Aurum, 2009). Publisher: Bloomsbury (UK/US) (Editor: Nick Humphrey, UK) Published: 4 April 2011 Length: 248 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, China (China Youth Press – simplified Chinese characters), Japan (Kawadeshobo), Lithuania (De Libris), Poland (Prószyński), Russia (Azbooka Atticus)

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THE DEVIL’S DERIVATIVES The Untold Story of the Slick Traders and Hapless Regulators Who Almost Blew Up Wall Street… and Are Ready to Do It Again NICHOLAS DUNBAR We highly recommend reading this most serious account. The book is light years ahead of the lurid bestsellers on the crisis – Marc Roche, LE MONDE Well written and will grab the interest of financial professionals before the first time they have to turn a page – REUTERS A well-researched account of the forces and events that led to the implosion of the financial system three years ago – IRISH TIMES A triumphant romp through a decade of financial mismanagement. A must-read – THE NATIONAL An intriguing and original analysis of the problems that Wall Street has been spreading to the world – MIDWEST BOOK REVIEW Nicholas Dunbar follows the first rule of good journalism: talk to everybody… As this book makes clear, the dark side of financial innovation is just getting darker – Frank Partnoy, University of San Diego School of Law A compelling book… Dunbar is a fine writer who combines a deep knowledge of finance with a great knack for storytelling – Edward Chancellor, author of CRUNCH TIME FOR CREDIT and DEVIL TAKE THE HINDMOST A bold book written by a hard-nosed journalist with a stiff backbone… At last, a book on the subject that shows true grit – Jules Kroll, founder of Kroll Inc., and chairman and cofounder of K2 Global Consulting

A compelling narrative about what went wrong with our financial system – and who’s to blame. From an award-winning journalist who has been covering the industry for more than a decade, THE DEVIL’S DERIVATIVES charts the untold story of modern financial innovation: how investment banks invented new financial products, how investors across the world were wooed into buying them, how regulators were seduced by the political rewards of easy credit and how speculators made a killing from the near-meltdown of the financial system. Nicholas Dunbar demystifies the revolution that briefly gave finance the same intellectual respectability as theoretical physics. He explains how bankers worldwide created a secret trilliondollar machine that delivered cheap mortgages to the masses and riches beyond dreams to the financial innovators. Fundamental to this saga is how ‘the people who hated to lose’ were persuaded to accept risk by ‘the people who loved to win’. Why did people come to trust and respect arcane financial tools? With whom were the bankers competing to assemble the basic components into increasingly intricate machines? How did this process achieve its own unstoppable momentum – ending in collapse, bailouts and a public outcry against the giants of finance? Provocative and intriguing, THE DEVIL’S DERIVATIVES sheds much-needed light on the forces that fuelled the most brutal economic downturn since the Great Depression. NICHOLAS DUNBAR was born in 1965. A columnist for the authoritative financial commentary website breakingviews.com, he is a former editor of Risk magazine and author of INVENTING MONEY (Wiley, 1999). In 2007, he won the State Street award for institutional financial journalism. He lives in London. His website is at www.nickdunbar.hitrefresh.co.uk. Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (UK/US) (Editor: Jacqueline Murphy) Published: 12 July 2011 Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Harvard Business Review Press), China (China Citic – simplified Chinese characters), Italy (EGEA), Japan (Kobunsha), Taiwan (Wealth Press – traditional Chinese characters) 37


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HOW INTELLIGENCE HAPPENS JOHN DUNCAN A wonderfully compact summary of brain architecture and function – WALL STREET JOURNAL Like getting into a gripping novel… The book is an invigorating read – SACRAMENTO BOOK REVIEW An elegant book… engaging and easily comprehensible without being simplistic – Wendy Johnson, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION A highly personal and fascinating account – Michael I. Posner, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Oregon A comprehensive account… offering a unique perspective and hypothesis – Earl K. Miller, Massachusetts Institute of Technology A timely, original and highly readable contribution – Nancy Kanwisher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology The experimental findings… are unexpected and arresting… rewarding for the lay reader – Charles F. Stevens, PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY

From the 2012 winner of the prestigious Heineken Prize for Cognition Science, a firsthand account of his search for the biological basis of intelligence. Understanding how brains build intelligence is among the most fascinating challenges of modern science. How does the biological brain, a collection of billions of cells, enable us to do things no other species can do? John Duncan has spent 30 years studying the human brain, and in this book he tells the story of his hunt for the basic principles of human intelligence, behaviour and thought. Using results from classical studies of intelligence testing, from attempts to build computers that think, from studies of how minds change after brain damage, from modern discoveries of brain imaging and from groundbreaking recent research, Duncan synthesizes often difficult-to-understand information into a book that will appeal to scientific and popular readers alike. He explains how brains break down problems into useful, solvable parts, then assemble these parts into the complex mental processes of human thought and action. At the heart of the book is the quest for the seat of intelligence: the cerebral source of general intelligence. The author and his colleagues have identified just one brain region that seems to be at the core of IQ: a zone in the frontal lobes, just above the outer edges of the eyebrows. The region is important for planning and solving novel tasks, keeping many things in mind at once and screening out irrelevant information – and is revealing itself as a hitherto unknown window into human nature. Moving from the foundations of psychology, artificial intelligence and neuroscience to the latest scientific thinking, HOW INTELLIGENCE HAPPENS is for all those curious to understand what we mean by intelligence, how and why it happens and what this can tell us about ourselves. JOHN DUNCAN is assistant director of the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge, honorary professor of cognitive neuroscience at the universities of Cambridge and Bangor, visiting professor at the University of Oxford, and fellow of the Royal Society and the British Academy. His work has been covered in the media worldwide, including the BBC, ABC News, The New York Times, Washington Post, Science and New Scientist. HOW INTELLIGENCE HAPPENS is his first book for a popular audience. For more details see www.howintelligencehappens.com. Publisher: Yale University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Jean Black) Published: 26 October 2010 Length: 244 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Yale University Press), Japan (Hayakawa), Russia (Hippo/ Kariera) 38


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MINDFIELD How Brain Science is Changing Our World LONE FRANK A fascinating exploration of the most intriguing brain experiments so far this century… Her hesitant participation in experiments… along with brutally honest descriptions of the experts add a welcome dose of humour – NEW SCIENTIST Think that you know yourself? Think again. The coming neurorevolution will destroy your certainties – but maybe set you free. Arm yourself. Read this book – Armand Leroi, Professor of Evolutionary Developmental Biology, Imperial College London, author of MUTANTS Riveting. Lone Frank has selected the most intriguing issues currently engaging scientists and philosophers, and presented them in a way that will engage anyone who possesses the organ she writes about – Rita Carter, author of MAPPING THE MIND and MULTIPLICITY Does a great job of exploring the impending neurorevolution and sometimes scary consequences of neuro-technology – Susan Blackmore, BBC FOCUS

A comprehensive survey of the frontiers of modern neuroscience, interlacing fascinating accounts of the latest findings with witty irreverent interviews with leading researchers in their laboratories. From religious experience, moral sense and personal choice to subliminal advertising, lie-detection and self-control, the brain has become the focal point for all questions about human nature. Modern neuroscience is now going to the heart of what it means to be human, and beginning to have important social and political repercussions, forcing us to think afresh about who we really are, why we behave as we do and where we are going. MINDFIELD is the first book to document this coming age of ‘neurocentrism’. In it the award-winning science writer Lone Frank surveys how brain researchers are dissecting everything that makes us human and anchoring all sorts of phenomena we have previously considered incorporeal in soggy biology. She explores the influences these neuroscientific findings are having on society, reveals how this in turn is changing the structure and function of our brains, and speculates on what this cognitive revolution means for us all. LONE FRANK was born in 1966. She has a PhD in neurobiology and worked as a research scientist in the US biotech industry before becoming a journalist in 1997. Today she is an award-winning science writer and broadcaster based in Copenhagen. As well as writing for Denmark’s leading newspaper Weekendavisen, she contributes to Science, Nature and Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Widely sought after as a speaker on science and society, she has been invited to talk at Harvard Medical School, the Library of Congress, the 2009 NeuroLeadership Summit in Los Angeles, London’s Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, TEDx Istanbul and the Sydney Writer’s Festival. She has also appeared on US National Public Radio’s ‘The Leonard Lopate Show’, ‘To The Best of Our Knowledge’ and ‘Radio Lab’ as well as Globosat television. She has written several bestselling books in Danish. MINDFIELD is the first to appear in English. Publisher: Oneworld (UK/US)* (Editor: Marsha Filion) Published: 1 April 2009 Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Oneworld), Denmark (Gyldendal), Netherlands (Maven), Sweden (Fri Tanke) *Reissued in paperback in June 2011 as THE NEUROTOURIST: Postcards from the Edge of Brain Science

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MY BEAUTIFUL GENOME Exposing Our Genetic Future, One Quirk at a Time LONE FRANK Shortlisted for the 2012 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books Shortlisted for the 2013 Society of Biology General Book Award An excellent look into the postgenomic world – FINANCIAL TIMES A pin-sharp, lively memoir-cum-investigation... Frank’s discoveries make for some truly tingling moments... Absorbing – MAIL ON SUNDAY Covers some of the most interesting controversies in biology today… an enthralling read – NEW SCIENTIST I haven’t seen Lone Frank’s entire genome, but it’s obvious from the first page of MY BEAUTIFUL GENOME that she’s got the SKFF2 gene (Sharp as a Knife and Friggin’ Funny, Too). No decoding needed here: I love this book – Mary Roach, author of STIFF and PACKING FOR MARS Provocative, wryly humorous, illuminating, deeply personal – Frank Ryan, author of VIROLUTION

What can modern genetics tell us about our past, present and future? Is our destiny written in our genes? And if so, how can we read them? Genomics has hit a tipping point. Today a full genome sequence laying out your six billion DNA building blocks will set you back $10,000 and can be completed in a few months. Companies are now on the march towards reducing the costs to under $1,000. Walgreens, America’s largest drugstore chain, has begun to offer genetic tests to the masses. Within the next decade, all newborns will have their genome mapped and deciphered as a matter of routine. In MY BEAUTIFUL GENOME, the internationally acclaimed science writer Lone Frank adopts the mantle of an intrepid consumer to look at how this revolution is changing the way in which we view ourselves and live our lives. The possibilities of early detection and prevention of disease are tantalizing, she points out, as are the prospects for personalized drug treatment. Even characteristics such as personality and temperament are being redefined as subtle variations in our chromosomes. From ancestry tracing and genome sequencing to breast-cancer scanning and personality profiling, Frank describes not only the science and the scientists behind the testing but also how it feels to be at the receiving end of all this genetic information – as both consumer and research subject. Drawing on candid interviews and commentary and adding just a touch of self help, she aims to provide the first truly popular account of what this shiny new science means for the average punter. Laconic, witty and irreverent, MY BEAUTIFUL GENOME is set to be the essential sightseer’s guide to our newly revealed genetic terrain. LONE FRANK was born in 1966. She has a PhD in neurobiology and worked as a research scientist in the US biotech industry before becoming a journalist in 1997. Today she is an award-winning science writer and TV presenter based in Copenhagen. As well as writing for Denmark’s leading newspaper Weekendavisen, she contributes to such publications as Scientific American, Science and Nature. Her previous book was MINDFIELD, which was published by Oneworld in 2009 (republished in paperback in 2011 as THE NEUROTOURIST: Postcards from the Edge of Brain Science). Publisher: Oneworld (UK/US) (Editor: Robin Dennis) Published: 1 September 2011 (UK)/16 October 2011 (US) Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Oneworld), Denmark (Gyldendal), Germany (Hanser), Netherlands (Maven), Norway (Danor), Russia (Azbooka Atticus), Sweden (Fri Tanke) 40


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FLAT EARTH The History of an Infamous Idea CHRISTINE GARWOOD An energetic, all-inclusive and amusing account of man’s impressive capacity for self-delusion. Every creationist should read it – Steve Jones, author of THE LANGUAGE OF THE GENES Quirky and highly entertaining… elicits plentiful laughter and astonishment – SUNDAY TIMES Highly entertaining and often hilarious – SUNDAY TELEGRAPH Impressive research – NEW SCIENTIST A glorious romp around the world of Flat Earthism –DAILY EXPRESS Wonderful . . . dispassionate and understanding – FINANCIAL TIMES A wonderfully rich archive of tracts and correspondence – FORTEAN TIMES

Social and intellectual history at its best – and strangest. Contrary to popular belief, fostered in countless school classrooms the world over, Christopher Columbus did not discover that the world was round. The idea of the world as a sphere had been widely accepted in scientific, philosophical and even religious circles from as early as the fourth century BC. Yet, bizarrely, it was not until the supposedly more rational nineteenth century that the notion that the world might actually be flat really took hold. Even more bizarrely, it persists to this day, despite Apollo missions and widely publicized pictures of the decidedly spherical Earth from space. Meticulously researched and compellingly readable, Christine Garwood provides the first definitive account of this infamous idea. She explodes the myths surrounding Columbus and the battles between science and religion, explores the wilder shores of flat-Earth belief and establishes, without doubt, that the world is most emphatically not flat. From Samuel ‘Parallax’ Rowbotham and his slick advocacy of Zetetic – or free-thinking – astronomy to Darwin’s friend and collaborator Alfred Russel Wallace, and his wager with the flat-Earther John Hampden; from Lady Blount’s earnest pamphleteering in the flat-Earth’s cause to Wilbur Glenn Voliva’s belief that there was no such thing as gravity; from the English Flat Earth Society’s campaign against the Apollo missions to the work of sister organizations in America and Canada, FLAT EARTH is a remarkable study of strange obsessions and sometimes stranger individuals. CHRISTINE GARWOOD has a BA in history and a PhD in the history of science. She was formerly a research fellow at the Open University, where she was principal archivist of the Wallace Project. The author of several articles on Alfred Russel Wallace and on Victorian and Edwardian science and society more generally, she now works as a freelance heritage consultant and a lecturer in history at the University of Hertfordshire. Publisher: Macmillan (UK)/Thomas Dunne (US) (Editor: Georgina Morley, UK) Published: 20 April 2007 (UK)/5 August 2008 (US) Length: 436 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Greece (Travlos)

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WHAT DOESN’T KILL US The New Psychology of Posttraumatic Growth STEPHEN JOSEPH Sounds a hopeful note. Suffering need not destroy – Terry Waite CBE A thorough and common-sense look at the psychology of survival – NATURE Informative and thoughtful – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Accessible for all readers… Well worth the time to read, digest, and utilize in one’s daily life – NEW YORK JOURNAL OF BOOKS A sure-to-be-controversial, provocative challenge to prevailing wisdom on how to deal with stress – KIRKUS REVIEWS A compelling, honest and hopeful argument in favour of Nietzsche’s dictum – Jennifer O’Connell, SUNDAY BUSINESS POST (Ireland) Fascinating… should appeal to anyone interested in the human condition – Richard Bentall, Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Liverpool Insightful and entertaining… An invaluable guide – Elaine Fox, Professor of Psychology, University of Essex A book of wisdom... psychology at its best: honest, hopeful, helpful, and based on sound serious research – Robert J. Wicks, Professor, Loyola University Maryland, author of BOUNCE: Living the Resilient Life Literate and compelling – John Harvey, Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Iowa Beautifully written – Mick Cooper, Professor of Counselling, University of Strathclyde Convincingly challenging, highly enlightening and compulsively readable – Elaine Iljon Foreman, author of FLY AWAY FEAR: Overcoming Your Fear of Flying

What would you do if life as you knew it were to fall apart? And how would you recover? Surprisingly, psychologists studying the effects of trauma have discovered it can benefit us in remarkable ways... For the past 20 years, the pioneering psychologist Stephen Joseph has worked with survivors of trauma. His studies have yielded a startling discovery: that a wide range of traumatic events – from illness, divorce, separation, assault and bereavement to accidents, natural disasters and terrorism – can act as catalysts for positive change. Boldly challenging the conventional wisdom about trauma and its aftermath, Joseph demonstrates that rather than ruining one’s life, a traumatic event can actually improve it. Drawing on the wisdom of ancient philosophers, the insights of evolutionary biologists and the optimism of positive psychologists, WHAT DOESN’T KILL US reveals how all of us can navigate change and adversity – traumatic or otherwise – to find new meaning, purpose and direction in life. STEPHEN JOSEPH is a professor of psychology, health and social care at the University of Nottingham, UK, where he is the cluster co-ordinator of counselling and psychotherapy training. He has published more than two hundred academic papers, numerous chapters and nine academic books, and often comments in the media on topical events relating to his work.. Publisher: Little, Brown (UK)/BasicBooks (US) (Editors: Anne Lawrance, UK/Lara Heimert, US) Published: 2 February 2012 (UK)/1 November 2011 (US) Length: 288 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, China (Cheers Publishing Company – simplified Chinese characters), Germany (Springer Spektrum), Japan (Chikuma Shobo), Netherlands (Archipel), Russia (Hippo/ Kariera) 42


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THE RISE OF THE INDIAN ROPE TRICK The Biography of a Legend PETER LAMONT Wry and thoughtful – Teller, THE NEW YORK TIMES Lamont has finally managed to unravel the bizarre truth behind the world’s tallest tale… quirky and expertly written – Derren Brown A fascinating, quirky and authoritative investigation into the world’s greatest mystery – Simon Singh A short, sharp little book… wonderfully entertaining – THE TIMES A great yarn – IRELAND ON SUNDAY Entertaining… Lamont marshals the available evidence with an assured and light touch – LITERARY REVIEW Lamont… has conjured a rather magical read – OBSERVER

How a spectacular hoax became history. It is the greatest legend of the Orient. A rope is thrown into the air and rises into the sky until it is completely vertical. A boy then climbs up the rope, higher and higher. There, in broad daylight and surrounded by spectators, the boy disappears. The Indian rope trick has been called a conjuring feat, but nobody has been able to discover how it is done. It has been called impossible, yet many have claimed to have seen it with their own eyes. Everyone has agreed, however, that the legend is an ancient trick, perhaps as old as India itself. But everyone has been wrong. In THE RISE OF THE INDIAN ROPE TRICK, Peter Lamont reveals the truth behind this remarkable legend. The Indian rope trick isn’t Indian, it doesn’t involve a rope and it isn’t a trick. From the Victorian fascination with the East to the Magic Circle, from Chicago and London to the beaches of India, Lamont describes how a simple hoax grew into the world’s most famous mystery, assisted on its way by those in search of fame and fortune, and by others whose aim was to destroy it in defence of the West. PETER LAMONT is a research fellow in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. He specializes in the history and psychology of magic and psychic phenomena, and is a past winner of the Jeremiah Dalziel Prize for British History. He has also worked professionally as a magician and psychic, and has performed and lectured across the world. His most recent book, THE FIRST PSYCHIC, was published in 2005 by Little, Brown in the UK. Publisher: Little, Brown (UK)/BasicBooks (US) (Editor: Tim Whiting, UK) Published: 1 January 2004 Length: 264 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US

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THE FIRST PSYCHIC The Peculiar Mystery of a Notorious Victorian Wizard PETER LAMONT Well-researched and illuminating – Philip Hoare, GUARDIAN Lively and engaging… a colourful tale and a rewarding read – SUNDAY HERALD A superb, ingenious biography – SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY [Lamont’s] shrewd and often very funny book distills the perplexities of an age – Hilary Mantel, NEW STATESMAN Great fun, an entertaining, engrossing, provocative portrayal of Victorian society in the mid-1800s – SCOTTISH SUNDAY HERALD

The story of a controversial Victorian celebrity and of the strange and seemingly inexplicable events that occurred in his presence. On the evening of Sunday 13 December 1868, a remarkable event took place in the Westminster home of Viscount Adare. A 35-year-old man, whose extraordinary exploits had already made him something of a sensation, floated out of one third-floor window and in through another. This was the most notorious of many feats performed by Daniel Douglas Home, a lowborn Scot who became an international celebrity by convincing the rich and famous that tables floated, that spirit hands materialized and that he himself could levitate. Home is virtually unknown today, but everybody who was anybody in Victorian society, and many who were not, had a strong opinion about him. He was hated by Dickens, defended by Thackeray, denounced by Faraday and mysterious to Darwin. He was insulted by Tolstoy, praised by Mark Twain and patronized by Napoleon III. When he married a god-daughter of the Tsar of Russia, his best man was Alexandre Dumas. Home was the only subject upon which Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning disagreed. And the question that divided them was the same one asked by the Royal Society and the British Association for the Advancement of Science: how did he do it? THE FIRST PSYCHIC investigates the changing fortunes of a man whose life challenged the Victorian obsession with both science and religion, a man who baffled the establishment so much that they coined the word ‘psychic’ to describe him. PETER LAMONT is a research fellow in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. He specializes in the history and psychology of magic and psychic phenomena, and is a past winner of the Jeremiah Dalziel Prize for British History. He has also worked professionally as a magician and psychic, and has performed and lectured across the world. His first book, THE RISE OF THE INDIAN ROPE TRICK, was published in 2003 by Little, Brown in the UK and Thunder’s Mouth in the US to wide critical acclaim. Publisher: Little, Brown (UK) (Editor: Tim Whiting) Published: 18 August 2005 Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth

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EMPIRE OF THE STARS Friendship, Obsession and Betrayal in the Quest for Black Holes ARTHUR I. MILLER Shortlisted for the 2006 Aventis Prize for Science Books Remarkable… a story that needed to be told – Sir Roger Penrose A fascinating book – SIr Martin Rees, SUNDAY TIMES Fascinating… a quite brilliant account… based on meticulous and thoughtful research – Graham Farmelo, SUNDAY TELEGRAPH

Ever since the evocative term was coined in 1967, black holes have assumed an almost mystical appeal for the public. This is the first book to tell the story of their discovery – a remarkable tale of friendship, rivalry and betrayal. In August 1930, the 20-year-old Indian astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (Chandra) calculated that certain stars could end their lives by collapsing indefinitely to a point of infinite density. But Sir Arthur Eddington, the grand-old man of British astronomy, ridiculed the idea at a meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1935. Chandra abandoned his work and emigrated to the US. Although his discovery was eventually recognized with a Nobel Prize in 1983, the episode damaged Chandra professionally and personally and set back astrophysics for 40 years. EMPIRE OF THE STARS teases out the major implications of this infamous event, setting it against the backdrop of the turbulent growth of astrophysics. As such, it also follows the rise of the two great theories of twentieth-century science – relativity and quantum mechanics – which meet head on in black holes. In the ensuing clash of personalities, epochs and nationalities, the book reveals the deep-seated psychological and philosophical prejudices at work in the acceptance and rejection of new scientific ideas: prejudices that create resistance to the idea of black holes even today. ARTHUR I. MILLER is emeritus professor of history and philosophy of science at University College London. He is the author of several acclaimed books, including EINSTEIN, PICASSO (BasicBooks, 2001). An experienced broadcaster, lecturer and biographer, he is particularly interested in the relationship between science and creativity and noted for writing engagingly about complex social and intellectual dramas, weaving the personal with the scientific to produce page-turners that read like novels. His most recent book is DECIPHERING THE COSMIC NUMBER (Norton, 2009). His website is at www.arthurimiller.com. Publisher: Little, Brown (UK)/Houghton Mifflin (US) (Editors: Tim Whiting, UK/Amanda Cook, US) Published: 17 March 2005 (UK)/25 April 2005 (US) Length: 400 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, France (Jean-Claude Lattes), Germany (DVA), Greece (Travlos), Italy (Codice), Japan (Soshisha), Korea (Prunsoop), Poland (Albatros), Russia (Azbooka Atticus)

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DECIPHERING THE COSMIC NUMBER The Strange Friendship of Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung ARTHUR I. MILLER Arthur I. Miller is a master at capturing the intersection of creativity and intelligence – Walter Isaacson, President and CEO, Aspen Institute, author of EINSTEIN Gives you a sense of how scientists’ minds work: by leaps of intuition that are quite as irrational and excitable as any poet’s or psychologist’s – Sam Leith, DAILY MAIL A fascinating and unlikely story… brisk and accessible – Gino Segrè, Emeritus Professor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, author of FAUST IN COPENHAGEN [Miller] writes in the smooth and engaging voice of an experienced teacher, conveying an infectious sense of wonder – Sophia Carroll, BOOKSLUT.COM

The story of the bizarre friendship between two equally brilliant yet very different men who together ventured into the ‘no-man’s land between physics and psychology’. This is the story of two mavericks: Wolfgang Pauli, the eminent physicist who – unlike his peers – was fascinated by the inner reaches of his own psyche and not afraid to dabble in the occult; and Carl Jung, the famous psychoanalyst who was sure that science held answers to some of the questions that tormented him. Both made enormous and lasting contributions to their fields. But in their many conversations over dinner and wine at Jung’s Gothic mansion on the shores of Lake Zurich, they went much further, striking sparks off each other as they explored the peculiar middle ground between their two subjects. Jung spent many hours analysing the dream imagery of Pauli, for the great scientist’s unconventional and wild life had brought him to the brink of a mental breakdown. Pauli was obsessed by how he had made his greatest discovery, feeling that he had tapped into something beyond physics – archetypal numbers that hinted at a deeper meaning to the Universe. In recounting this extraordinary meeting of minds, the historian of science Arthur I. Miller encompasses many of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century, as well as taking readers back to the roots of modern science, steeped as they are in mysticism and ancient history. He explores how physicists discover fundamental concepts, probes the relationship between mathematics, the mind and the real world, and reveals how one man’s discoveries pushed him beyond the assumptions of scientific rationalism into what Jung described as ‘the no-man’s land between Physics and the Psychology of the Unconscious… the most fascinating yet the darkest hunting ground of our times’. ARTHUR I. MILLER is emeritus professor of history and philosophy of science at University College London. He is the author of several acclaimed books including EINSTEIN, PICASSO (BasicBooks, 2001) and EMPIRE OF THE STARS (Little, Brown/Houghton Mifflin, 2005; shortlisted for the 2006 Aventis Prize for Science Books). An experienced broadcaster, lecturer and biographer, he is particularly interested in the relationship between science and creativity, and noted for writing engagingly about complex social and intellectual dramas, weaving the personal with the scientific to produce page-turners that read like novels. His website is at www.arthurimiller.com. Publisher: Norton (US/UK)* (Editor: Angela von der Lippe) Published: 27 April 2009 (US)/5 June 2009 (UK) Length: 368 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Norton), Germany (DVA), Greece (Travlos), Italy (RCS), Japan (Soshisha) *Published in paperback as 137: Jung, Pauli, and the Pursuit of a Scientific Obsession 46


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INCOMING! Or: Why We Should Learn to Stop Worrying and Love the Meteorite TED NIELD Opens a window on the night sky and the marvels that streak across it – GUARDIAN Fascinating… rich in detail, informative and entertaining – NATURE It is hard not to be engaged by this richly explored and expertly explained subject – FINANCIAL TIMES A scrupulously researched and cleverly assembled gem – Simon Winchester, author of THE MAP THAT CHANGED THE WORLD and ATLANTIC A fascinating account – Richard Fortey, author of LIFE, THE EARTH and SURVIVORS Nobody writes better on matters geological than Ted Nield… a scientific page-turner of the best kind, rich with personal insights and anecdote – John Gribbin, author of IN SEARCH OF SCHRÖDINGER’S CAT A witty and lively account not just of the perils of asteroids but also of their many mysteries. An entertaining story, delightfully told – Gabrielle Walker, author of SNOWBALL EARTH, THE HOT TOPIC and AN OCEAN OF AIR

An introduction to the science and history of the falling sky that challenges the orthodox view that meteorite strikes are always bad news for life on Earth. Astonishing new research suggests that 470 million years ago, a stupendous collision in the Asteroid Belt (whose debris is still falling today) bombarded the Earth with meteorites of all sizes. A revolutionary idea is emerging that the resulting ecological disturbance may have been responsible for the single greatest increase in biological diversity since the origin of complex life – the previously unexplained Great Ordovician Biodiversity Event. Introducing a wealth of extraordinary new research and the fascinating characters behind it, Ted Nield challenges the orthodox view that meteorite strikes are always bad news for life on Earth. He argues that one of the most widely known scientific theories – that dinosaurs were wiped out by a strike 65 million years ago – isn’t the whole picture, and that the causes of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (of which the dinosaurs’ demise was a part) were much more varied and complex. Meteorites have been the stuff of legend throughout human history, interpreted as omens of doom or objects of power. But only in the eighteenth century, when the study of falling space debris became a science, were meteorites used to unlock the mysteries of our universe. INCOMING! traces the history of meteorites from the first recorded strike to the video recordings made routinely today, showing how our interpretations have varied according to the age in which the meteorites fell, and how meteorite impacts were given fresh urgency with the advent of the atom bomb. TED NIELD holds a doctorate in geology and works for the Geological Society of London as editor of the monthly magazine Geoscientist. A former chair of the Association of British Science Writers, he is a fellow of the Geological Society and a member of the Meteoritical Society. His first book, SUPERCONTINENT, was published in 2007 (Granta/Harvard University Press). He lives in London. Publisher: Granta (UK)/Lyons Press (US)* (Editor: Bella Lacey, UK) Published: 6 January 2011/18 October 2011 Length: 272 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US *Published in the US as THE FALLEN SKY

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REINVENTING DISCOVERY The New Era of Networked Science MICHAEL NIELSEN FINANCIAL TIMES nonfiction favourite in science 2011 BOSTON GLOBE’s best book on science 2011 A thought-provoking call to arms… will frame serious discussion and inspire wild, disruptive ideas for the next decade – Chris Lintott, NATURE Captivating and enlightening – Jonathan Bodnar, LIBRARY JOURNAL A survey, an analysis, a how-to, and a harbinger of greater things to come – Robert Schaefer, NEW YORK JOURNAL OF BOOKS Nuanced, intelligent descriptions… Highly recommended! – Tim O’Reilly, Founder and CEO, O’Reilly Media The most compelling manifesto yet for the transformative power of networked science – James Wilsdon, FINANCIAL TIMES Timely and important – Jack Stilgoe, GUARDIAN The best synthesis I’ve seen of this new kind of science... a delightfully written, thought-provoking book – Carl Zimmer, author of A PLANET OF VIRUSES and THE TANGLED BANK: An Introduction to Evolution This is the book on how networks will drive a revolution in scientific discovery; definitely recommended – Tyler Cowen, author of THE GREAT STAGNATION An unparalleled account of how new tools for collaboration are transforming scientific practice – Clay Shirky, author of HERE COMES EVERYBODY and COGNITIVE SURPLUS

Science, but not as we know it... We are living at the dawn of the most dramatic change in science in more than 300 years. This change is being driven by powerful new cognitive tools, enabled by the internet, which are greatly accelerating scientific discovery. There are many books about how the internet is changing business or the workplace or government. But this is the first book about something much more fundamental: how the internet is transforming the nature of our collective intelligence and how we understand the world. Science is being done harder, faster and smarter. In REINVENTING DISCOVERY, Michael Nielsen tells the exciting story of an unprecedented new era of networked science. We learn, for example, how mathematicians in the Polymath Project are spontaneously coming together to collaborate online, tackling and rapidly demolishing previously unsolved problems. We learn how 250,000 amateur astronomers are working together in a project called Galaxy Zoo to understand the large-scale structure of the Universe, and how they are making astonishing discoveries, including an entirely new kind of galaxy. These efforts are just a small part of the larger story told in this book – the story of how scientists are using the internet to dramatically expand our problem-solving ability and increase our combined brainpower. MICHAEL NIELSEN is one of the pioneers of quantum computing. Born in Brisbane, Australia, in 1974, he is an essayist, speaker and advocate of open science. He lives in Toronto, Canada. His blog is at www.michaelnielsen.org/blog. Publisher: Princeton University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Ingrid Gnerlich) Published: 21 October 2011 Length: 280 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Princeton University Press), Italy (Einaudi), Japan (Kinokuniya), Lithuania (Eugrimas), Russia (AST)

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THE SCIENCE OF DOCTOR WHO PAUL PARSONS Foreword by Arthur C. Clarke There should be a copy in the glove compartment of every Tardis – Colin Baker, the sixth Doctor Snappy, lively, journalistic… imaginative too – NATURE As instructive as it is entertaining – Sir Patrick Moore, THE TIMES

Have you ever wondered if a sonic screwdriver could really work? How Cybermen make little Cybermen? Or where the toilets are on the Tardis? ‘Doctor Who’ arrived on British television screens in 1963. Since then, across light-years and through millennia, the journeys of the Time Lord have shown us alien worlds, strange life-forms, futuristic technology and mind-bending cosmic phenomenon. Viewers cowered terrified of Daleks, were amazed with the wonders of time travel and sped through black holes into other universes and new dimensions. The breadth and imagination of the Doctor’s adventures have made the show one of science fiction’s truly monumental success stories. Paul Parsons explains the scientific reality behind the fiction in this highly acclaimed unofficial guide. PAUL PARSONS is the former editor of the monthly science and technology magazine BBC Focus, and has contributed popular science articles to publications ranging from the Daily Telegraph to FHM. He holds a DPhil in cosmology and is a lifelong worshipper of ‘Doctor Who’. His most recent books are SCIENCE 1001: Absolutely Everything that Matters in Science, HOW TO DESTROY THE UNIVERSE: And 34 Other Really Interesting Uses of Physics and SCIENCE: In 100 Key Breakthroughs, (Quercus, 2010/2011). As well as writing, he works as a trading solutions analyst at Ladbrokes. Publisher: Icon (UK)/Johns Hopkins University Press (US) (Editor: Simon Flynn, UK) Published: 30 March 2006 (UK)/5 May 2010 (US) Length: 342 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US

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LIKE A VIRGIN How Science is Redesigning the Rules of Sex AARATHI PRASAD The female equivalent of Brain Cox... Entertaining and provocative – Stylist.co.uk, Hottest Debuts of 2012 Thoroughly fascinating and feisty – SUNDAY TIMES As much fun as you’ll ever have thinking about sex without working up a sweat – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Thought-provoking stuff, accessibly written – BOOKSELLER A fascinating book – MATT RIDLEY, author of THE RATIONAL OPTIMIST In the future, girls will do it for themselves, boys – those who are left – will just be toys. Cheer or weep, but read this book – ARMAND LEROI, Professor of Evolutionary Developmental Biology, Imperial College London A scintillating cocktail... a fascinating, topical and hugely readable investigation – METRO Prasad’s humorous and anecdote-laden approach sweeps the reader along – BBC FOCUS

Now that we have the competent hand of science in our lives, will girls still need men? Sexual evolution is a slippery business. Like all mammals, we humans seem to have been left no choice in the matter: even though it is costly, inefficient and dangerous, if we want to reproduce we simply have to have sex. Yet most human cultures tell the tale of a maiden who gives birth untouched by a man; and in the wild there are plenty of creatures – such as turkeys, komodo dragons, sharks and the ‘Jesus Christ’ lizard (which walks on water, too) – that take various approaches to reproducing without sex. In LIKE A VIRGIN, Aarathi Prasad looks at reproduction without sex in animals and explores why evolution hasn’t made it an option for humans – yet. In doing so, she provides a novel survey of the mysteries of evolutionary biology, sex and reproduction – past, present and future. It’s a remarkable story that ranges across Greek mythology, natural history, agriculture, conservation and medicine; takes in some of the most exciting areas of developmental genetics and molecular biology that other popular science books largely ignore; and is packed full of a cast of amazing characters, be they obscure animals or eccentric scientists such as the respected geneticist Dr Helen Spurway who in the UK in the 1950s unwittingly sparked a nationwide search for a virgin mother. There is now a plethora of strategies being developed that could keep our species going in a world of embellished sex: the creation of artificial eggs and sperm from bone marrow, labs-on-chips on which eggs are fertilized, silicone wombs (where fetuses can spend their full nine months) and even research on reproduction in space. What’s more, we are finally starting to understand what genetic modifications are needed to allow the creation of women who could have babies without having sex. AARATHI PRASAD is a biologist and science writer. She has appeared on TV and radio programmes, including as presenter of Channel 4’s controversial ‘Is It Better to Be Mixed Race?’ and ‘Brave New World with Stephen Hawking’, as well as BBC Radio 4’s ‘The Quest for Virgin Birth’, and written for Wired, the Guardian, and many other publications. Previously a cancer genetics researcher at Imperial College London, she subsequently moved into the worlds of science communication and policy, in areas including passage of the human-animal chimaera stem-cell bill in the UK Parliament. A single mother, she lives in London. Her website is at www.aarathiprasad.com. Publisher: Oneworld (UK/US) (Editor: Robin Dennis) Published: 16 August 2012 Length: 276 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Oneworld), Arabic (Arab Scientific), Bulgaria (ROI Communication), Italy (Bollati Boringhieri), Japan (East Press), Netherlands (De Bezige Bij) 50


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MASSIVE The Hunt for the God Particle IAN SAMPLE Now with a new final chapter reporting on the announcement of the discovery of a Higgs-like particle at CERN on 4 July 2012 Shortlisted for the 2011 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books Shows a keen eye for the personal equation, even while narrating large swatches of physics history… Sample’s exciting, easy-to-read narrative captures the collaboration, and competition, among the theorists – WALL STREET JOURNAL A lively account… fine reportage… makes clear the sheer achievement of the scientists who have built the LHC – Graham Farmelo, GUARDIAN A fast-moving narrative… a great scientific adventure – Frank Close, BBC FOCUS A compelling work of popular science, full of mind-boggling ideas and a real sense of the excitement of scientific discovery – GUARDIAN Wondering what all the hype over the Higgs boson is about? Look no further… A hundred anecdotes bring the towering figures of particle physics and their key discoveries to life – NEW SCIENTIST When the Higgs boson is discovered, it will be front page news, and this is the book that sets the stage. Ian Sample mixes cutting-edge science with behind-the-scenes stories to paint a compelling picture of one of modern science’s greatest quests – Sean Carroll, author of FROM ETERNITY TO HERE

The most up-to-date and readable account so far of the greatest race science has ever seen. In the early 1960s, three groups of physicists, working independently in different countries, stumbled on an idea that would change physics and fuel the imagination of scientists for decades. That idea was the ‘God particle’, or Higgs boson. To find this elementary particle would be to finally understand the origins of mass – the last building block of life itself. Weaving together the personal stories and intense rivalries of the teams of scientists searching for the particle, MASSIVE is a tale of grand ambition, transatlantic competition, clashing egos and occasionally spectacular failures. From the giant particle colliders built to further the scientists’ quest to the political fallout of budget blowouts and debates about whether the search might destroy the Universe, it is an epic story of imagination, personal ambition, subatomic exploration and global significance. Drawing on his unprecedented access to Peter Higgs, the scientist after whom the particle is named, the award-winning science writer Ian Sample chronicles the science, culture and politics behind the multinational and multibillion-dollar quest to solve the mystery of mass. Until now, the story of the search has never been told. But with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Laboratory for Nuclear Research near Geneva, we may be on the cusp of discovering the God particle and with it the very origin of mass. Whichever way you look at it, this story is massive. IAN SAMPLE has a PhD in biomedical science from Queen Mary, University of London. A science correspondent at the Guardian, he has won several journalism prizes, including two from the Association of British Science Writers, which named him investigative journalist of the year in 2005. He joined the Guardian in 2003 after four years as a reporter, feature writer and news editor at New Scientist. Born in Oxfordshire in 1970, he now lives in London. His website is at www.iansample.com. Publisher: Virgin (UK)/BasicBooks (US) (Editors: Ed Faulkner, UK/Lara Heimert, US) Published: 17 June 2010 (UK)/2 November 2010 (US) Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Greece (Travlos), Israel (Books in the Attic), Italy (Il Saggiatore), Japan (Kodansha), Poland (Prószyński), Russia (Azbooka Atticus), Turkey (Arkadas) 51


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DOOMSDAY MEN The Real Dr Strangelove and the Dream of the Superweapon P. D. SMITH Smith’s dynamic, riveting narrative reveals details of people, places and events that are rarely covered in textbooks, bringing to life not just scientists like Robert Oppenheimer and Leo Szilard but the horrors of chemical and atomic warfare… Captivating and thoroughly referenced, this chronicle should interest a wide audience, from science and history buffs to armchair politicos – PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Important – John Gribbin, LITERARY REVIEW Readable and entertaining – Tibor Fischer, DAILY TELEGRAPH

The riveting, untold story of the doomsday bomb – the ultimate weapon of mass destruction. In 1950, the Hungarian-born scientist Leo Szilard made a dramatic announcement on American radio: science was on the verge of creating a doomsday bomb. For the first time in history, mankind realized that he had within his grasp a truly God-like power, the ability to destroy life itself. The shockwave from this statement reverberated across the following decade and beyond. If detonated, Szilard’s doomsday device – a huge cobalt-clad H-bomb – would pollute the atmosphere with radioactivity and end all life on Earth. The scientific creators of such apocalyptic weapons had transformed the laws of nature into instruments of mass destruction and for many people in the Cold War there was little to distinguish real scientists from that ‘fictional master of megadeath’, Stanley Kubrick’s Dr Strangelove. Indeed, as P. D. Smith’s chilling account shows, the dream of the superweapon begins in popular culture. This is a story that cannot be told without the iconic films and fictions that portray our deadly fascination with superweapons, from H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds to Nevil Shute’s On the Beach and Kubrick’s Dr Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Weaving together biography, science and art, DOOMSDAY MEN creates a compelling history of physics in the twentieth century, focusing on the long-lasting search for ever-more destructive weapons, from the development of chemical warfare in First World War Germany through the arms race of the Cold War. As it forcefully shows, the culture that grew up in the shadow of this frightening weapon has helped shape all our contemporary anxieties about science, technology and the future. P. D. SMITH is an independent researcher and writer. He is the author of a short biography of Einstein, and an academic study of science in German literature, both of which were very well received. He has taught at University College London where he is an honorary research fellow in the Department of Science and Technology Studies; writes a biweekly piece for the Guardian in the books section, as well as reviewing for other national publications such as The Times, Independent and Times Literary Supplement; and is a guest contributor to the influential website 3quarksdaily.com. He lives in Winchester, England, and his website is at www.peterdsmith.com. Publisher: Allen Lane (UK)/St Martin’s Press (US) (Editor: John Turney, UK) Published: 31 May 2007 (UK)/10 December 2007 (US) Length: 576 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Brazil (Companhia das Letras)

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Written in Stone Evolution, the Fossil Record, and Our Place In Nature

Brian Switek

WRITTEN IN STONE Evolution, the Fossil Record and Our Place in Nature BRIAN SWITEK Pithy accounts... [an] excellent book – WALL STREET JOURNAL Switek seamlessly intertwines two types of evolution: one of life on earth and the other of paleontology itself – DISCOVER A fine guide to the four-dimensional tapestry of life – Jan Zalasiewicz, NATURE A fascinating historical, scientific and cultural tour – Sid Perkins, SCIENCE NEWS Highly instructive… a warm, intelligent yeoman’s guide – KIRKUS REVIEWS

Thoroughly entertaining... a godsend to armchair explorers everywhere – BOOKLIST Magisterial… marks the debut of an important new voice – Neil Shubin, author of YOUR INNER FISH Elegantly and engagingly crafted… unique, informative and entertaining – Niles Eldredge, author of DARWIN A compelling historian of science – Carl Zimmer, author of AT THE WATER’S EDGE and THE TANGLED BANK

A brilliant young science writer takes readers on a wonderful journey through the fossil record, and the people and events that have shaped our understanding of the variety of life on Earth. In 1859, Charles Darwin unveiled his revolutionary idea that all life had evolved over countless ages by means of natural selection. It made sense of the whole of biology, yet was dogged by a major problem: the connecting forms between the main groups of organisms were seemingly nowhere to be found. Even by the 1970s, some palaeontologists were starting to wonder if the transitions – dubbed ‘missing links’ in common parlance – had been so quick that no trace of them had been left. Thankfully these scientists turned out to be wrong. Palaeontologists just had not been looking in the right places. Although the fossil deposits in North America and Europe were the most familiar to academics in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the keys to some of history’s most magnificent evolutionary transformations were discovered in much more distant locations. During the past three decades palaeontologists have unearthed walking whales from Pakistan, feathered dinosaurs from China, fish with feet from the Arctic Circle, ape-like humans from Africa, and many more bizarre creatures that fill crucial gaps in our understanding of evolution. WRITTEN IN STONE is the first popular account of the remarkable discovery of these gap fossils. Only now, with the marriage of palaeontology, genetics and embryology, can such a comprehensive story be told. Scientists are finally beginning to understand how whales walked into the sea, how horses stood up on their tiptoes, how feathered dinosaurs took to the air and how our own ancestors came down from the trees. As this book shows, there is much still to discover and debates will continue, but this is truly a golden age for those looking to reconstruct the past. BRIAN SWITEK was born in 1983. A freelance science writer with a background in ecology and evolution from Rutgers University, he has done fieldwork on fossils in Utah, Montana and Wyoming. He is a regular guest on BBC Radio, has written popular articles for Smithsonian magazine, Scientific American, Nature, Guardian and the London Times and has contributed to the edited publications Evolution: Education and Outreach and Dinosaurs and Other Extinct Saurians: A Historical Perspective. He is also the author of the acclaimed blogs Dinosaur Tracking for Smithsonian.com and Laelaps for Wired.com (’Brilliant writing about palaeontology and evolution’, The Times). His website is at www.brianswitek.com. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. Publisher: Bellevue Literary Press (US)/Icon (UK) (Editor: Erika Goldman, US) Published: 1 November 2010 (US)/7 July 2011 (UK) Length: 320 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Japan (Bungeishunju), Russia (Hippo/Kariera) 53


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SELECTED Why Some People Lead, Why Others Follow and Why It Matters MARK VAN VUGT & ANJANA AHUJA The book’s practical suggestions are worth taking seriously – NATURE A really novel book on one of the most important human topics of our time… well written, innovative and fun! – Cary L. Cooper, Distinguished Professor of Organisational Psychology and Health, Lancaster University Management School An intriguing and subtle account of the clash that results when old instincts meet new conditions – Matt Ridley, author of THE RATIONAL OPTIMIST A fascinating and eminently readable book, full of information you will want to share and arguments you will want to debate – Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive, Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce Head and shoulders above most management books – Jeremy Hazlehurst, CITY A.M. The authors appear to be blazing a new trail… NATURALLY SELECTED comes closer than any previous leadership theory to [providing] an ‘integrative theory of leadership’ – POLITICS AND THE LIFE SCIENCES

We are all leaders or followers – or both – and we can recognize leadership in almost every area of life. But what makes a good, bad or even outstanding leader? Fusing psychology, business, history and current affairs, SELECTED examines how and why leadership has evolved over tens of thousands of years, and presents a compelling new hypothesis: that the slow pace of evolution means there is a mismatch between modern leadership and the kind of leadership that our Stone Age brains are still wired for. Combining academic authority with journalistic style, and full of fascinating examples spanning politics, commerce, sport and culture, the authors explain why taller political candidates usually win, why middle managers are so disliked and why we don’t like working for huge companies. This extraordinary book explores how the psychology of leadership affects us all – and what we can do about it. MARK VAN VUGT is professor of social and organizational psychology at the VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands. A leading authority on the evolutionary origins of leadership, he has worked with major figures in evolutionary science, including David Buss, David Sloan Wilson, Robert Hogan and Robin Dunbar. His research has been reported all over the world in both print and broadcast media. He has been featured in The Times and New Scientist, and talked about his work on BBC Radio 4 and CNN and ABC television. He regularly gives lectures to research departments and business schools in both the UK and the US. ANJANA AHUJA worked for 16 years at The Times, where she was a feature writer and science columnist. She has a PhD in space physics from Imperial College London. She has been an advisor to the Royal Society, the British Science Association and the British Council. She has also written for Elle, Science in Parliament and the Oldie, and is a columnist for Prospect. She makes regular radio and television appearances as a science commentator. Now a freelance writer, she lives in London. Publisher: Profile (UK)/HarperCollins (US)* (Editor: Daniel Crew, UK) Published: 26 August 2010 (UK)/18 January 2011 (US) Length: 272 pages All rights available excluding UK & Commonwealth, US, Brazil (Pensamento – Portuguese), Canada (Random House), Japan (Hayakawa), Korea (Wooongjin Think Big Co.), Netherlands (Bruna), Russia (Hippo/Kariera), Turkey (Everest Yayinlari) *Published in the US as NATURALLY SELECTED: The Evolutionary Science of Leadership 54


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THE EVOLUTIONARY WORLD How Adaptation Explains Everything from Seashells to Civilization GEERAT J. VERMEIJ Superb writing… first-rate science… wonderful… This fabulous book deserves widespread attention by specialists and lay readers alike – starred review, PUBLISHERS WEEKLY From why grass evolved to why insects do not inhabit the sea, Vermeij answers questions most of us have forgotten even to ask – Matt Ridley, author of GENOME A bold, brash, and magisterial account… sure to stir the pot... a compelling story to read, to debate and to enlighten – Neil Shubin, author of YOUR INNER FISH A wonderfully rich and wise book… Vermeij is also a refreshingly original thinker. His insights… are striking and thought-provoking. An illuminating book – Nick Lane, author of LIFE ASCENDING [Vermeij’s] naturalistic bent is coupled with literary flair – DALLAS MORNING NEWS A transcendent view of evolution as adaptation – KIRKUS REVIEWS An absorbing joy to read – BOOKLIST

One of the master naturalists of our time celebrates the explanatory power of evolution. Evolution has outgrown its original home in biology and geology. It is a concept that organizes, explains and predicts a multitude of unconnected facts and phenomena. Adaptation plays a part in the development not only of new species but of human civilization, too. By understanding how evolutionary theory applies to areas such as our economic system, our preparation for catastrophes and even the development of communities, we can learn not just how these systems work but also what challenges lie ahead. Blind since the age of three, Geerat J. Vermeij has become renowned for his unique ability to recognize details in the natural world that other scientists would never have noticed. In this book, he presents a new argument for evolution’s broader importance. He explores similarities between genomes and languages, the contrasting natural economies of islands and continents, the emergence and importance of human values, the long-range effects of global warming and the perils of monopoly. He also shows that the lessons of evolution have implications for education, our system of laws and economic growth. THE EVOLUTIONARY WORLD makes a fascinating argument about the broad-reaching influence and importance of evolution. It offers a way for us to understand and work with evolution’s principles so that we can devise better solutions for our own lives, society and the environment around us. GEERAT J. VERMEIJ is distinguished professor of geology at the University of California at Davis. Born in the Netherlands, he came to the US with his family in 1955. He has received the Daniel Giraud Elliot Medal from the National Academy of Sciences and was honoured as a MacArthur Fellow. He has published more than two hundred scientific papers and five books and served as editor of Evolution and Paleobiology, the top journals in their fields. He also has a world-class collection of shells and is an intrepid field naturalist and explorer. Publisher: Thomas Dunne/St Martin’s Press (US) (Editor: Peter Joseph) Published: 23 November 2010 Length: 336 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Thomas Dunne), China (Zhe Jiang University Press – simplified Chinese characters), Israel (Books in the Attic), Netherlands (Nieuw Amsterdam)

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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

BACKLIST TITLE

A PORTRAIT OF THE BRAIN ADAM ZEMAN A remarkable achievement... neurology has found a fine advocate – LANCET A book which, like the brain itself, is artfully arranged… Zeman’s portrait of the brain is more even than a portrait of Man: it is a portrait of the world he perceives too – THE ECONOMIST A fascinating tale about what we do know about the brain, and what happens when it goes wrong… Zeman comes across as a lucid explainer of scientific complexity, but also as a humane practitioner – FINANCIAL TIMES An erudite discourse on brain components… The science is clear, and the stories of patients are suspenseful and gripping – NATURE Zeman’s enthusiasm for neurology and his fascination with the workings of the nervous system come across clearly – BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL

One of the best short introductions to the human brain, written by a clinical psychologist with expertise in neuroscience and philosophy. In this compelling book, the neurologist Adam Zeman tells the stories of patients with a variety of neurological disorders, some familiar (epilepsy, chronic fatigue, stroke, memory loss) and others relatively mysterious (narcolepsy, chronic déjà vu, compulsive fidgeting, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease). Chapter by chapter, he reveals the various levels of the brain, from the atom to the mind, and explores what happens when workings at each level go awry – be they its genes, proteins, neuronal networks or lobes. He requires of his readers no special knowledge of medicine or science, yet he takes us to the very frontiers of current scientific knowledge and elucidates the workings of the brain in astonishing detail. A PORTRAIT OF THE BRAIN weaves together fascinating case histories, clear accounts of concepts and discoveries in neuroscience, and an intimate view of the suspense, excitement, fun and angst that colour a neurologist’s days. Zeman also considers what the brain’s behaviour and misbehaviour can tell us about the human self as physical system, living creature and conscious mind. In a final chapter, he reflects on the place of the mind in nature. On every page he both entertains and informs, and readers will find themselves pondering the enigmas of brain and mind long after closing the covers of this elegant and erudite volume. ADAM ZEMAN is professor of cognitive and behavioural neurology, Peninsula Medical School, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter, UK. He is the author of CONSCIOUSNESS: A User’s Guide (Yale University Press, 2003). Publisher: Yale University Press (UK/US) (Editor: Heather McCallum) Published: 5 February 2007 Length: 246 pages All rights available excluding World English Language (Yale University Press), Korea (Chiho), Spain (Ediciones de Intervición Cultural)

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SCIENCE FACTORY CLIENTS & PROJECTS World rights sales not detailed in the rights list are indicated here with asterisks. For further information please contact the publishers directly. WEL rights, world English language rights ANJANA AHUJA Science Writer and Journalist, UK SELECTED (Profile/HarperCollins – in US as NATURALLY SELECTED) ANIL ANANTHASWAMY Science Writer; Consultant, New Scientist, US/India THE EDGE OF PHYSICS (Duckworth/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) MALADIES OF THE SELF (publisher to be confirmed) JIM BAGGOTT Science Writer, UK ATOMIC (Icon/Pegasus – in US as THE FIRST WAR OF PHYSICS) FAREWELL TO REALITY (Constable/Pegasus) DAVID BAINBRIDGE Zoologist; Director of Studies in Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, UK *TEENAGERS (Portobello) – world rights, Portobello *MIDDLE-AGE (Portobello) – world rights, Portobello CURVOLOGY (Portobello) – translation rights, Portobello JESSE BERING Psychologist, Science Writer and Columnist, US THE BELIEF INSTINCT (Nicholas Brealey – in UK as THE GOD INSTINCT/Norton) *WHY IS THE PENIS SHAPED LIKE THAT? (Scientific American/Farrar, Straus & Giroux) – world rights, FSG *PERV: The Surprising Science of Sexual Deviance (Scientific American/FSG) – world rights, FSG LEE BILLINGS Science Writer, US FIVE BILLION YEARS OF SOLITUDE (Current/Penguin US) – WEL rights, Penguin US PIERS BIZONY Science Writer and Space Historian, UK THE MAN WHO RAN THE MOON (Icon/Thunder’s Mouth) *ATOM (Icon) – world rights, Icon *HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN SPACESHIP (Portobello/Plume) – world rights, Portobello *THE SCIENCE GUIDE (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *THE SEARCH FOR ALIENS: A Rough Guide to Life on Other Worlds (Rough Guides) – world rights, Penguin STARMAN (with Jamie Doran) – 50th anniversary edition (Bloomsbury, UK & US) DANIEL BOR Psychologist and Science Writer; Visiting Scientist, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, UK; Research Scientist, Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, UK *RAVENOUS FOR WISDOM (BasicBooks, UK & US) – world rights, BasicBooks DENNIS BRAY Biologist/Fellow of the Royal Society; Emeritus Professor, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, UK WETWARE (Yale University Press, UK & US) DEAN BUONOMANO Psychologist; Associate Professor, Departments of Neurobiology and Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles, US BRAIN BUGS (Norton, UK & US) – WEL rights, Norton STUART CLARK Astronomy and Cosmology Writer; Former Editor, Astronomy Now, UK THE SUN KINGS (Princeton University Press, UK & US) *DEEP SPACE (Quercus/Barnes & Noble) – world rights, Quercus 57


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Frankfurt Book Fair 2013

*GALAXY (Quercus/Barnes & Noble) – world rights, Quercus *THE BIG QUESTIONS: The Universe (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *VOYAGER (Atlantic) – world rights, Atlantic *THE SKY’S DARK LABYRINTH: Novels 1, 2 & 3 (Polygon/Birlinn) – world rights, Polygon/Birlinn DANIEL CLERY European News Editor, Science, UK A PIECE OF THE SUN (Duckworth/Overlook) MATTHEW COBB Biologist, Historian, Writer; Professor of Zoology and Associate Dean for Social Responsibility, University of Manchester, UK THE EGG AND SPERM RACE (Simon & Schuster/Bloomsbury – in US as GENERATION) THE RESISTANCE (Simon & Schuster) ELEVEN DAYS IN AUGUST (Simon & Schuster) LIFE’S GREATEST SECRET: The Story of the Race to Crack the Genetic Code (Profile) – WEL rights, Profile ENRICO COEN Plant Biologist/Fellow of the Royal Society; Department of Cell & Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre, UK FROM CELLS TO CIVILIZATIONS (Princeton University Press, UK & US) MICHAEL C. CORBALLIS Psychologist; Professor of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand *THE RECURSIVE MIND (Princeton University Press, UK & US) – world rights, Princeton TREVOR COX Acoustic Engineer and Science Broadcaster; Former President of the Institute of Acoustics; Professor of Acoustic Engineering, Salford University, UK SONIC WONDERLAND (Bodley Head/Norton) NICHOLAS DUNBAR Finance Editor and Journalist, UK THE DEVIL’S DERIVATIVES (Harvard Business School Press, UK & US) JOHN DUNCAN Psychologist/Fellow of the Royal Society; Assistant Director, MRC Cognition and Brain Science Unit, University of Cambridge, UK HOW INTELLIGENCE HAPPENS (Yale University Press, UK & US) RICHARD ELWES Popular Mathematics Writer; Visiting Fellow, University of Leeds, UK *MATHEMATICS 1001 (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *HOW TO BUILD A BRAIN (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *MATHS HANDBOOK (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *MATHS IN 100 KEY DISCOVERIES (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *50 MORE MATHS IDEAS YOU REALLY NEED TO KNOW (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus GEORGINA FERRY Science Writer and Biographer, UK ROUGH MAGIC: Shakespeare’s World of Science (Bloomsbury) – WEL rights, Bloomsbury (UK) LONE FRANK Science Writer and Broadcaster, Denmark MINDFIELD (Oneworld, UK & US – republished in 2011 as THE NEUROTOURIST) MY BEAUTIFUL GENOME (Oneworld, UK & US) MARIANNE FREIBERGER Maths Writer; Editor of Plus Magazine, UK *NUMERICON (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus CHRISTINE GARWOOD Freelance Heritage Consultant; Lecturer, University of Hertfordshire, UK FLAT EARTH (Macmillan/Thomas Dunne) DAVID HAND Statistician/Former President of the Royal Statistical Society; Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Senior Research Investigator, Imperial College London; Chief Scientific Advisor, Winton Capital Management, UK 58


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THE IMPROBABILITY PRINCIPLE (Scientific American/Farrar, Straus & Giroux, US; Transworld, UK) BOB HOLMES Science Writer and New Scientist Correspondent, Canada FLAVOUR (Norton/WH Allen (Random House)) SIMON INGS Science Writer and Novelist, UK *THE WEIGHT OF NUMBERS (Atlantic/Grove Atlantic) – world rights, Atlantic *THE EYE (Bloomsbury/Norton) – world rights, Bloomsbury *DEAD WATER (Atlantic) – world rights, Atlantic *RUSSIAN DOLLS (Faber) – world rights, Faber WOLVES (Gollancz) – WEL rights, Gollancz HARRIS IRFAN Founder and Managing Partner, Cordoba Capital; Former Global Head of Islamic Finance, Barclays Group; Cofounder of Deutsche Bank’s Islamic Finance Team, Dubai HEAVEN’S BANKERS (Constable) – WEL rights, Constable STEPHEN JOSEPH Psychologist and Psychiatrist; Professor of Psychology, Health and Social Care, University of Nottingham, UK, WHAT DOESN’T KILL US (Little, Brown/BasicBooks) JAY KENNEDY Historian and Philosopher of Science, University of Manchester, UK THE PLATO CODE (Simon & Schuster, UK) ADAM KUCHARSKI Science Writer; Mathematics and Epidemiology Researcher, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK PETER LAMONT Psychologist; Research Fellow, School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Science, University of Edinburgh, UK THE RISE OF THE INDIAN ROPE TRICK (Little, Brown/BasicBooks) THE FIRST PSYCHIC (Little, Brown) EHSAN MASOOD Science Writer, Journalist and Broadcaster; Editor, Research Fortnight and Research Europe; Former Editor on Nature and New Scientist; Former Director of Communications, LEAD International, UK *SCIENCE AND ISLAM (Icon) – world rights, Icon THE GREAT INVENTION: GDP and the Making and Unmaking of the Modern World (publisher to be confirmed) ARTHUR I. MILLER Historian of Science; Emeritus Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, University College London, UK EMPIRE OF THE STARS (Little, Brown/Houghton Mifflin) DECIPHERING THE COSMIC NUMBER (Norton, US & UK) THE NEW AVANT-GARDE: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Art and Science (Norton, US & UK) MARK MIODOWNIK Materials Scientist and Science Communicator/Presenter; Professor of Materials and Society, and Director of the Institute of Making, University College London, UK *STUFF MATTERS (Viking/Penguin UK) – world rights, Penguin UK TED NIELD Geology Writer; Editor, Geoscientist magazine, and Science and Communications Officer, Geological Society of London, UK INCOMING! (Granta/Lyons Press – in US as THE FALLING SKY) UNDERLANDS (Granta) – WEL rights, Granta MICHAEL NIELSEN Physicist, Innovator, Science Writer, Canada REINVENTING DISCOVERY: How Online Tools Are Transforming Science (Princeton University Press, UK & US) PAUL PARSONS Science Writer; Trading Solutions Analyst, Ladbrokes; Former Editor, BBC Focus, UK THE SCIENCE OF DOCTOR WHO (Icon) 59


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*SCIENCE 1001 (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *HOW TO DESTROY THE UNIVERSE: And 34 Other Really Interesting Uses of Physics (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *SCIENCE: In 100 Key Breakthroughs (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *THE ROUGH GUIDE TO SURVIVING THE END OF THE WORLD (Rough Guides) – world rights, Penguin *THE PERIODIC TABLE (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *3-MINUTE STEPHEN HAWKING (Ivy Press) – world rights, Ivy Press AARATHI PRASAD Biology Writer, Advisor, Science Communication and Natural Resources, British Council, UK LIKE A VIRGIN (Oneworld, UK & US) JOHN RHODES Biologist and Science Historian; Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists; Former Director of Strategy in Immunology, GlaxoSmithKline, UK THE END OF PLAGUES (Palgrave Macmillan) – WEL rights, Palgrave Macmillan ANGELA SAINI Science Writer and Broadcaster, UK *GEEK NATION: A Journey Through the New India (Hodder) – world rights, Hodder IAN SAMPLE Science Correspondent, Guardian, UK MASSIVE (Virgin/BasicBooks) – WEL rights, Virgin NICHOLAS J. SAUNDERS Archaeologist; Honorary Reader in Material Culture, Department of Anthropology, University College London, UK *ALEXANDER’S TOMB (BasicBooks, UK & US) – world rights, BasicBooks THE POPPY (Oneworld, UK) MENNO SCHILTHUIZEN Evolutionary Biologist, Netherlands Centre for Biodiversity (’Naturalist’), Leiden, Netherlands NATURE’S NETHER REGIONS (Viking/Penguin US) – WEL rights, Viking/Penguin US P. D. SMITH Independent Researcher and Writer; Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Science and Technology Studies, University College London, UK DOOMSDAY MEN (Macmillan/St Martin’s) *CITY (Bloomsbury, UK & US) – world rights, Bloomsbury (UK) *WATCHING THE DETECTIVES (Bloomsbury, UK & US) – world rights, Bloomsbury (UK) TOM STAFFORD Psychologist; Lecture in Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK *THE ROUGH GUIDE BOOK OF BRAIN TRAINING (Rough Guides Reference/Penguin) – world rights, Penguin IAN STEWART Mathematician; Popular Science and Science Fiction Writer; Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Digital Media Fellow, University of Warwick, UK *LETTERS TO A YOUNG MATHEMATICIAN (BasicBooks, UK & US) – world rights, BasicBooks *WHY BEAUTY IS TRUTH (Basic, UK & US) – world rights, Basic *TAMING THE INFINITE (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus *PROFESSOR STEWART’S CABINET OF MATHEMATICAL CURIOSITIES (Profile/Basic) – world rights, Profile *PROFESSOR STEWART’S HOARD OF MATHEMATICAL TREASURES (Profile/Basic) – world rights, Profile *PROFESSOR STEWART’S CASEBOOK OF MATHEMATICAL MYSTERIES (Profile) – world rights, Profile *THE MATHEMATICS OF LIFE (Profile/Basic) – world rights, Profile *THE GREAT MATHEMATICAL PROBLEMS (Profile/Basic) – world rights, Profile *SEVENTEEN EQUATIONS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD (Profile/Basic) – world rights, Profile THOMAS SUDDENDORF Psychologist; School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Australia THE GAP (BasicBooks, UK & US) – WEL rights, BasicBooks FRANK SWAIN Science Writer, Speaker and Blogger, UK HOW TO MAKE A ZOMBIE (Oneworld, UK & US)

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BRIAN SWITEK Science Writer and Blogger, US WRITTEN IN STONE (Icon/Bellevue Literary Press) *MY BELOVED BRONTOSAURUS (Scientific American Books/Farrar, Straus & Giroux) – world rights, FSG JEREMY TAYLOR Science Writer and Science Documentary Filmmaker, UK NOT A CHIMP (Oxford University Press) BOTCHED BODIES (Chicago University Press) – WEL rights, Chicago University Press RACHEL THOMAS Maths Writer; Editor of Plus Magazine, UK *NUMERICON (Quercus) – world rights, Quercus ROBERTO TROTTA Science Communicator; Senior Lecture in Astrophysics, Imperial College London, UK THE EDGE OF THE SKY (BasicBooks, UK & US) – WEL rights, Basic MARK VAN VUGT Professor of Social and Organizational Psychology, VU University Vugt Amsterdam, Netherlands SELECTED (Profile/HarperCollins) GEERAT J. VERMEIJ Biologist; Distinguished Professor of Geology, Department of Geology, University of California at Davis, US THE EVOLUTIONARY WORLD (Thomas Dunne/St Martin’s) – WEL rights, Thomas Dunne MATT WILKINSON Zoologist and Science Communicator, University of Cambridge, UK RESTLESS CREATURES (BasicBooks) – WEL rights, BasicBooks ADAM ZEMAN Neurologist; Professor of Cognitive and Behavioural Neurology, Peninsula Medical School, Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, Exeter, UK A PORTRAIT OF THE BRAIN (Yale University Press, US & UK)

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SCIENCE FACTORY FOREIGN LANGUAGE CO-AGENTS JAPAN Hamish Macaskill: hamish@eaj.co.jp Junzo Sawa: junzo_sawa@eaj.co.jp The English Agency (Japan) Sakuragi Building 4F 6-7-3 Minami Aoyama Minato-ku Tokyo 107-0062 JAPAN tel: +81 3 3406 5385 fax: +81 3 3406 5387

KOREA Duran Kim: duran@durankim.com Joe Moon: joe@durankim.com Duran Kim Agency 2F Taeyang Building 1586-5 Seocho-dong, Seocho-ku Seoul 137-070 KOREA tel: +822 583 5724 fax: +822 584 5724

REST OF THE WORLD Louisa Pritchard: louisa@louisapritchard.co.uk Louisa Pritchard Associates Flat 5 81 Battersea Church Road London SW11 3LY UNITED KINGDOM skype: + 44 (0)20 7193 7145 mobile: +44 (0)7714 721 787

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Autumn Rights List 2013