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October 19–22 • Albuquerque, NM


Welcome to ASTC 2013! The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and our hosts, Explora, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, welcome you to beautiful Albuquerque and ASTC’s 2013 Annual Conference! Over the next several days, we hope you will be able to immerse yourself in the more than 100 concurrent educational sessions offered, forge new connections with your colleagues from across the globe (as well as renew past connections), and perhaps most importantly, contribute to the dialogue about our field that occurs in both formal sessions and informal conversations throughout the conference. This free-flowing exchange of information can only serve to strengthen our institutions, our staff, and our field as a whole.

Table of Contents Welcome from ASTC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Welcome from Conference Hosts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Welcome from the Governor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Welcome from the Mayor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Conference Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Acknowledgement of 2013 ASTC Annual Conference Sponsors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Keynote and Featured Speakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2013 Conference Strands and Tracks. . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Preconference Workshops and Events . . . . . . . . . 29 Concurrent Sessions and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

About ASTC

Digital Planetarium Demonstrations. . . . . . . . . . . 60

The Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) is a global organization providing collective voice, professional support, and programming opportunities for science centers, museums, and related institutions, whose innovative approaches to science learning inspire people of all ages about the wonders and the meaning of science in their lives. Through strategic alliances and global partnerships, ASTC strives to increase awareness of the valuable contributions its members make to their communities and the field of informal STEM learning.

Big Screen Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Founded in 1973, ASTC now represents over 650 members in nearly 50 countries, including not only science centers and museums, but also nature centers, aquariums, planetariums, zoos, botanical gardens, and natural history and children’s museums, as well as companies, consultants, and other organizations that share an interest in informal science education.

Pre- and Post-Conference Tours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 ASTC Exhibit Hall Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 ASTC Exhibit Hall Floorplan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 2013 ASTC Annual Conference Sponsors and Exhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Index of Sponsors and Exhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 About Albuquerque . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Guide to the City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 ASTC Members in New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Index of Sessions by Core Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Index of Presenters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 ASTC Board of Directors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 ASTC Conference Program Planning Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 ASTC Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 ASTC 2014/2015 Annual Conferences . . . . . . . . . 106

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Produced by The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis

For more information, visit booth #726 or contact: Sarah Myers, Traveling Exhibits Project Manager Phone: 317-334-4107 • sarahm@childrensmuseum.org childrensmuseum.org

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LEGO and the LEGO logo are trademarks of the LEGO Group. © 2013 The LEGO Group. All rights reserved.

Produced by The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis Produced by The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis


Dear ASTC Colleague: Welcome to Albuquerque! On behalf of ASTC's Board of Directors, volunteers, and staff, we thank you for joining us for the Association's 2013 Annual Conference. While there may be other opportunities, other instances during the year where we have the chance to interact with those in our field, ASTC's Annual Conference provides an excellent opportunity to renew and build connections with colleagues and friends from around the world. Many new collaborations, business ventures, and alliances have found their genesis at an ASTC conference, and we hope this year will be equally rich with potential opportunities. ASTC's Annual Conference provides more than opportunities to network, however. Each year, thanks to the leadership of the Conference Program Planning Committee and the local resources of our host institutions, the caliber of the educational sessions being offered continues to improve. With more than 100 concurrent sessions, we hope that you will find practical information, innovations, and inspiration—and share the same with your fellow conference attendees. This year, for the first time, we have three institutions serving as our conference hosts—Explora, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. The diversity of these museums will undoubtedly enhance your conference experience, and we hope that you will spend ample time exploring each of them during Tuesday's Museum Open House Day. And don't miss the chance to experience some of the history and majestic beauty of Albuquerque and Santa Fe while you're here as well. We encourage you to spend some time in ASTC's Exhibit Hall, which is again jam-packed with the latest traveling exhibitions, products, and services to benefit your institution or company. Be sure to visit the ASTC Resource Center, located in the center of the hall, to: purchase one of ASTC's publications; learn more about the Association's programs and services, including professional development, member services, public policy and advocacy (and get a tour of our new online Legislative Action Center), global engagement, and research; pick up any recent issues you might have missed of our award-winning magazine, Dimensions (the September/October issue is in your conference tote bag); and meet members of the ASTC staff. In the ASTC Resource Center on Saturday evening, you'll be able to meet the recipients of this year's Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Awards (aka the "Edgies"), and on Sunday morning, you'll have a chance to talk with the recipients of this year's Lee Kimche McGrath Fellowship, which enables individuals from non-U.S. emerging science centers to attend the ASTC conference. While ASTC's Annual Conference lasts only a few days, it is the result of at least a year or two of tireless efforts and planning of so many. We are tremendously grateful for the contributions of our Conference Program Planning Committee, chaired so ably by Angela Wenger and Guy Labine, and the team from our host institutions, as well as all of our speakers, sponsors, exhibitors, and volunteers. Thank you for giving your time, energy, support, and passion—all of you help make our annual conference the most exciting and fulfilling experience it can be! Warmly,

R. Bryce Seidl Anthony (Bud) Rock ASTC President ASTC Chief Executive Officer President and CEO, Pacific Science Center brock@astc.org bseidl@pacsci.org

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Multimedia Experiences that open up

new worlds

“Dynamic Wall” – National Museum of Mathematics, NYC Blue Telescope uses technology, storytelling, and design to create engaging interactive exhibits and experiences. From multitouch and mobile apps to games, quizzes, and social interactives, our innovative solutions use the latest technology to educate, communicate, and connect with your visitors.

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KIOSKS GAMES PRESENTATIONS MOTION GRAPHICS WEBSITES MOBILE APPLICATIONS MULTIMEDIA EXPERIENCES


October 18, 2013

¡Bienvenidos! to our ASTC Friends and Colleagues: On behalf of the Boards, museum staff, foundation staff, and volunteers of Explora, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, we are pleased to welcome you to Albuquerque for ASTC’s 2013 Annual Conference. We are honored that ASTC has provided the opportunity for three small institutions to co-host the conference this year, and we are confident that you won’t be disappointed. We have planned an unforgettable conference program for you, and we are thrilled to welcome you to the Land of Enchantment! Albuquerque is a high desert metropolitan area with friendly people, beautiful mountains, the Rio Grande, lively ethnic cultural diversity, good weather, and spectacular sunsets. It is the home to all three host museums, in addition to our friends at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, the Anderson Abruzzo International Balloon Museum, the National Hispanic Cultural Center, the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, the ABQ BioPark, and the NM Informal Science Education Network. Albuquerque has a strong sense of community—a wonderful setting for a conference with a theme of “helping each other learn.” We have initiated a few experiments for evolving conference practices this year. One of these is the Science in the Park activity on Tuesday. You’ll be sharing your best outreach activities, prototypes, and demonstrations with local school children in the 300-year-old park across the street from two of the host museums. We also are implementing Sustained Learning Teams this year for small group discussions of sessions, issues, ideas, inspirations, advice, and challenges. Of course, your favorite classic ASTC activities are here, as well, like the Friday welcome receptions and a rocking Saturday night party. Remember, three museums mean three times the party! We look forward to helping each other learn and to advancing the field of informal science education together. We hope you leave Albuquerque inspired and invigorated by what you experience at this year’s ASTC conference, and we’ll hope to see you back again soon! Sincerely,

Joe Hastings, Executive Director of Explora

Charlie Walter, Executive Director of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

Jim Walther, Executive Director of the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History

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BACK TO THE MOON. FOR GOOD. Fulldome show available in November 2013

Produced by NSC Creative. From the writer of “Earthquake” and “Life: A Cosmic Story.” Available lease-free for all fixed and portable domes. www.googlelunarxprize.org/domeshow

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PRODUCED BY:

CREATED BY:

SPONSORED BY:


Conference Features

Highlights of ASTC 2013... •• More than 100 conference sessions—on everything

from management, finance and development, visitor/ customer service, education and learning, community and member relations, exhibits and experience, and more

•• Thought-provoking, creative, and fascinating

speakers featured during keynote presentations on Saturday and Sunday mornings and Monday evening

•• Two full days of the ASTC Exhibit Hall, jam-packed with a wide range of products and services

•• Meet some of your fellow attendees and get to explore a little of downtown Albuquerque with Friday night’s Albuquerque Welcomes You Receptions (see page 32 for details)

•• Experience the best of Albuquerque’s past, present, and future with Saturday night’s party at the host museums

•• The debut of Sustained Learning Team Discussion Groups, held in the Fran Hill Hall on Saturday morning (see page 34 for details)

•• ASTC Communities of Practice (CoPs) Meet-Ups on Saturday (see pages 14–15 for details)

•• The coolest, most entertaining, and even some of the messiest science demonstration techniques at the wildly popular Live Demonstration Hour on Sunday

•• Explore behind the scenes at all three host museums on Tuesday’s Museum Open House Day

•• See some of the best outreach activities, prototypes,

and demonstrations being shared with local students

and others in the all-new Science in the Park public festival, brought to you by Wells Fargo

•• Big Screen Day, brought to you by the Giant Screen Cinema Association

•• Digital Planetarium Showcase, brought to you by Evans & Sutherland, SkySkan, Seiler-Zeiss, and Google Lunar XPRIZe

Shuttle Transportation Friday, October 18 Shuttles depart from the convention center 30 minutes before scheduled pre-conference sessions on Friday. Buses will pick up in front of the East Building’s main entrance. Please check the program on pages 31–32 for session times. Saturday, October 19 Shuttle service for the Saturday Night Party will depart from the Convention Center at the main entrance of the East Building beginning at 7:15 p.m. and return to the conference hotels beginning at 9:00 p.m. Please have your party ticket with you to expedite check-in at the event. Tuesday, October 22 Continuous shuttle service from the Convention Center to Explora and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science will begin at 8:30 a.m. Transportation to the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History will be provided from the other two host museums. final program ASTC 2013

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First Aid

Certificate of Completion

If you have a medical need, please come to the Registration Desk, located in the registration lobby outside the Fran Hill Exhibit Hall of the Albuquerque Convention Center.

If your institution or professional certification requires you to have a certificate of completion, please contact us via email at conference@astc.org.

Nursing Mothers’ Lounge

ASTC Resource Center

A lounge, located in Suite H of the Albuquerque Convention Center, will be available for nursing mothers during the conference. The lounge will be open from 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Friday, October 18–Monday, October 21.

Meet ASTC staff and leadership, take tours of the new Legislative Action Center and myASTC, purchase our bestselling books, and learn more about the Association's programs and activities in the Resource Center and Bookstore, located in the center of the Exhibit Hall.

Family Lounge If you're traveling with family or friends that aren't registering to attend the conference, and they need some place to wait for you between sessions, they can relax in the Family Lounge, located in the Santa Ana Room of the Albuquerque Convention Center. The lounge will be open from 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Friday, October 18–Monday, October 21.

Find out what's going on in public policy and advocacy, professional development and Communities of Practice (CoPs), global engagement, research, and traveling exhibitions. Members can sign up for free subscriptions to INFORMER, our biweekly email news bulletin, and Dimensions, our bimonthly award-winning magazine. Not a member? Come learn about the benefits of membership and join on the spot. We look forward to seeing you on Saturday and Sunday.

Internet Access

ASTC Job Bank

ASTC will offer complimentary wireless internet access in the public areas of the Albuquerque Convention Center. In addition, a bank of computers will be available in the Registration Area for checking email during conference hours.

The ASTC Job Bank will be open from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 20 and Monday, October 21 in the Estancia Room of the Albuquerque Convention Center. The Job Bank Room will feature listings of current positions available at member institutions, as well as resumes from job seekers, plus text to come.

CFRE Credit Full participation in the 2013 ASTC Annual Conference is applicable for 7.5 points in Category 1.B–Education of the CFRE International application for initial certification and/or recertification. Only selected sessions indicated by this symbol are approved for credit. A Continuing Education Points Tracker form will be available at the registration desk and in the approved session rooms. 14 ASTC 2013 final program

ASTC Communities of Practice (CoPs) Meet-Up Sessions ASTC Communities of Practice (CoPs) are groups of ISE professionals who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly. Many of ASTC's current CoPs will be meeting throughout the conference—meetings are open to anyone interested in participating in the group's activities, so feel free to attend one or many!


The meeting schedule is as follows (see the program listing for room locations): Saturday, October 19 10:00–11:15 a.m. ��������������� Science in Afterschool CoP 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m. ������ Advocates for Diversity CoP Sunday, October 20 9:45–11:00 a.m. ������������������Next Generation Science Standards CoP 1:00–2:15 p.m. ���������������������Membership Managers CoP 2:45–4:00 p.m. ��������������������Intersections of Technology, Art, Science and Culture (TASC) CoP Monday, October 21 8:00–9:15 a.m. ���������������������Volunteer Managers CoP Development Professionals CoP 9:45–11:00 a.m. ������������������Museum Screens CoP Research and Evaluation CoP 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m. �������Public Engagement with Science CoP Making and Tinkering Spaces in Museums CoP 2:00–3:15 p.m. ��������������������Visitor Services CoP

Diversity and Leadership Development Fellows Program Launched in 2001, ASTC’s Diversity and Leadership Development Fellows program is the cornerstone of the Association’s equity and diversity initiative. Conference Fellows receive a free Annual Conference registration and a stipend of up to $1,000 to cover related travel expenses. To date, more than 130 science center professionals from over 70 science centers and museums in the United States and Canada have participated in the program. The Fellowship exemplifies ASTC members’ commitment to reflecting the diversity of the audiences they serve

by supporting the development and advancement of science center professionals from ethnic/racial minority backgrounds, those with disabilities, and those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. The 2013 Diversity and Leadership Development Fellows program is supported in part by generous contributions from EdVenture Children's Science Center, Pacific Science Center, Exploratorium, and the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History, as well as the $10 fee each conference attendee paid to participate in Saturday night's party.

Grandstand What do small science centers do best? Develop amazing programs with almost no money. For the third year in a row, the Saint Louis Science Center’s Science Beyond the Boundaries℠ Network will host GRANDSTAND, to showcase programs developed by science centers for less than $1,000. Be sure to visit Booth 420/422 in the ASTC Exhibit Hall to pick up some new ideas! GRANDSTAND is sponsored by the Saint Louis Science Center and ASTC.

Sustainability and ASTC 2013 The Albuquerque Convention Center, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, and Explora all make efforts to reduce impacts on the environment. Of major concern here in the desert Southwest is water, and this is an area where each institution has been proactive about conservation measures. Our landscape has a beauty all of its own, and it is reflected in the xeric nature of the plantings at each location. From water-wise bathroom facilities, to water on restaurant and banquet tables by request only, to refill stations in the convention center for your reusable water bottles, your Albuquerque hosts know that Water is Life/El Agua es Vida.

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Each institution also makes a concerted effort to make recycling of cardboard, paper, plastic bottles, and aluminum cans a daily occurrence. Our education programs and exhibit activities use recyclable materials in a variety of ways. The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History offers a camp class entitled “Going Green,” so children can learn the value of recycling and re-using. The museum also reuses and reapplies items from Sandia National Laboratories and other corporate entities. The New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science recycles all of their fabrication materials and decommissioned exhibits and uses them to build new exhibits. Explora uses recycled plastic bottles for density experiments, color mixing, aquariums/ terrariums, Cartesian divers, siphon systems, bug and bird houses, boats, solid and liquid portion supply for classroom programs, and musical instruments. The convention hosts also have made efforts to make their buildings more energy efficient. The museums all utilize LED lighting in their exhibition areas. Explora’s recent retrofit of metal halide lamps with energy efficient LED lamps is saving 20,700 kWH per year. These lamps also reduce waste as the metal halides have a 10,000-hour usable life and the PAR 38 LEDs installed have an estimated life of 50,000 hours. The New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science’s Exhibit Production Facility is LEED Silver, and they have converted their exhibits’ halogen projectors to energyefficient LED projectors. The Albuquerque Convention Center uses an energy-smart HVAC system to provide effective and efficient heating and cooling, uses compact fluorescent light bulbs in hallways and lobby areas, and has a solar reflective roof coating to reduce the heat load during the summer months. The Albuquerque Convention Center has a commitment to use food products from local farmers and producers, and they have donated 17 tons of food items to local charities and food banks since 2007. The convention center utilizes china, glass, and silverware for catered functions, and biodegradable food and beverage containers made of materials such as cornstarch for disposable purposes. The convention center also uses green housekeeping products, for the health of conference goers and the environment. 16 ASTC 2013 final program

Let’s Reduce Our Carbon Footprint It is estimated that flying to the ASTC conference contributes an average of 1.75 mT of carbon per passenger to the atmosphere. Driving to the conference contributes an average of 0.75 mT of carbon per person. Since the average carbon footprint per U.S. citizen is 20.5 mT per year (or 0.06 mT per day), how can we help to make up for this carbon-intensive trip? More generally, how can U.S. citizens reduce our carbon footprints to get closer to the worldwide average of 6 mT per year?   Below are some choices you can make to reduce your carbon footprint*: During the conference: • Think twice before adjusting your hotel room’s thermostat to heat/cool to your heart’s desire • Carry your own reusable water bottles and coffee cups • Let the hotel cleaning staff know that your towels and bed sheets don’t need to be changed daily • Take the stairs whenever possible • Rent a bike from Routes to explore Old Town and downtown Albuquerque (see the Guide to the City on pages 88–89), or call (505) 933-5667 instead of taking a cab When you get back home: • Dry your clothes on a line, rather than in a dryer, for at least a week • Make an extra effort to carpool or bike to work for at least a week • Swap out those last few incandescent bulbs in your home with compact fluorescents • Bring your lunch to work every day for at least a week, reducing your need to drive-through • Enable power management on your computer, so that your computer and monitor shut down • Stop your junk mail by contacting 41pounds, a nonprofit service that contacts direct mailers about removing your name from their lists, at www.41pounds.org • Cut out meat from at least a couple of meals each week— vegetarians save at least 3,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per year compared to meat eaters *Ideas from Carbonfund.org Foundation


Do you have what it takes to be a presenter?

We Want

you

ASTC is looking to recruit you for the 2014 ASTC Annual Conference. Submit your session proposal now at https:// astc.confex.com/ astc/2014/cfp.cgi.

Stop by the Tijeras Room on Monday, October 21 at 1:00 p.m. to get some pointers on getting your proposal in shape.

Deadline: October 31


Temporary & Permanent Installations Grande Exhibitions has created a number of compelling digital immersive experiences for audiences of all ages and cultures. To educate and entertain an audience, one must first engage them. SENSORY4™ doesn’t only engage, it WOWS them! This is a whole new multimedia experience on the largest scale.What sets SENSORY4™ apart is that instead of sitting idly in a seat to view one giant screen in front, you actually walk and dance amongst up to 40 giant screens and feel as though you are part of the whole experience; that you are inside the subject itself, immersed and thoroughly interacting with the sensory experience. SENSORY4™ experiences are available to license singularly or collectively from Grande Exhibitions and arrive at your chosen venue totally stand alone and turnkey ready for you to sell tickets. We bring everything.

Sponsorship & Private Events Imagine an exhibition that, at the flick of switch, transforms itself into a corporate-themed event space. That’s right – Grande Exhibitions is able to take a company video or latest TV commercial and adapt it for the SENSORY4™ environment, playing it before or after the main experience. Your sponsors will love it!!

www.grandeexhibitions.com


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2013 ASTC Annual Conference Sponsors We are extremely grateful to the organizations that have chosen to support the 2013 ASTC Annual Conference and wish to thank them for their generous support:

Corporate Partner

Gold Sponsors

™

Silver Sponsors

Jade Sponsors

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Keynote and Featured Speakers Saturday, October 19

Sunday, October 20

Opening Keynote Session Speaker

Keynote Session Speaker

Eugenie C. Scott, D.Sc. Executive Director National Center for Science Education

Ramu Damodaran Deputy Director for Partnerships and Public Engagement United Nations Outreach Division, Department of Public Information

Eugenie C. Scott is Executive Director of the National Center for Science Education, Inc., a not for profit membership organization of scientists, teachers, and others that works to improve the teaching of science as a way of knowing, the teaching of evolution, and the teaching of climate change. A former college professor, Dr. Scott lectures widely, and is called upon by the press and other media to explain science and evolution to the general public. Scott is the author of Evolution vs Creationism: An Introduction, co-editor (with Glenn Branch) of Not In Our Classrooms: Why Intelligent Design Is Wrong For Our Schools, and the author of many articles in science journals. She has served as President of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, and has been honored by both scientists and educators, having been awarded the National Academy of Sciences Public Welfare Medal, the National Science Board Public Service Award, the AIBS Outstanding Service Award, the Geological Society of America Public Service Award, the AAAS Award for Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, the California Science Teachers Association Distinguished Service Award, and the National Association of Biology Teachers Honorary Membership award, “the association’s highest honor.” In 2009, Scientific American named her “one of 10 outstanding leaders involved in research, business or policy pursuits that have advanced science and technology.” She holds honorary D.Sc. degrees from McGill University, The Ohio State University, Mt. Holyoke University, the University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Rutgers University, the University of New Mexico, Colorado College, the University of Missouri, and Chapman University, and was awarded the University Medal from the University of California-San Francisco. 22 ASTC 2013 final program

Ramu Damodaran is Deputy Director for Partnerships and Public Engagement in the United Nations Department of Public Information’s Outreach Division and is chief of the United Nations Academic Impact initiative, which aligns institutions of higher learning and research with the objectives of the United Nations and the States and peoples who constitute it. He is also the current secretary of the United Nations Committee on Information. His earlier posts with the Organization have included the Departments of Peacekeeping and Special Political Questions, as well as the Executive Office of the Secretary-General. Damodaran has been a member of the Indian Foreign Service, where he was promoted to the rank of Ambassador, and where he served as Executive Assistant to the Prime Minister of India as well as in the diplomatic missions in Moscow and to the United Nations, and in a range of national governmental ministries. He has been actively involved in mass media in India, including print, radio and television, and was a recipient of the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union award for the best radio documentary.


Monday, October 21 Thinking Big: A Conversation with Neal Stephenson Nothing sparks the imagination like a good story. Fiction helps us make sense of a complicated universe and inspires visions of the future that we can work together to build. Sadly, most of the visions of the future that we encounter today, whether in fiction or real-life policy debates, are grim and dystopian. Neal Stephenson founded Project Hieroglyph to break out of our dystopian rut and encourage writers, scientists, engineers, and others to help us think more optimistically and ambitiously about our shared future. To build a better future, we need better dreams. Science fiction is a tool for connecting those dreams to real science and tangible outcomes. Stephenson will talk with Ed Finn of Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination and Alexander Zwissler of the Chabot Space and Science Center about the importance of storytelling in communicating about science, educating for the future, and getting Big Stuff Done. Neal Stephenson Author Neal Stephenson is an author of historical and science fiction, a technology consultant, and a video game designer. He is perhaps best known for his novels Cryptonomicon, The Diamond Age, and Snow Crash, which presented compelling, socially and culturally rich visions of human futures while also prefiguring the development of major technologies such as social networking, nanorobotics, and 3D printers. He also penned The Baroque Cycle, a sprawling three-volume work (Quicksilver, The Confusion, and The System of the World) about the history of ideas in 17th and 18th century Europe, and co-created The Mongoliad, a collaborative work of transmedia fiction produced in collaboration with filmmakers, martial artists, computer programmers, and video game designers. His most recent novel, REAMDE, transforms the now-quotidian realm of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) into a global minefield of criminality, religious extremism, and geopolitical intrigue.

Ed Finn Founding Director Center for Science and the Imagination Arizona State University Ed Finn is the founding director of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, where he is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media and Engineering and the Department of English. Ed’s research and teaching explore digital narratives, contemporary culture, and the intersection of the humanities, arts, and sciences. He is currently working on a book about the changing nature of reading in the digital era titled The Social Lives of Books. He completed his PhD in English and American literature at Stanford University in 2011. Before graduate school Ed worked as a journalist at Time, Slate, and Popular Science. To learn more about the Center for Science and the Imagination, visit csi.asu.edu.

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CREATIVE SERVICES CUSTOM EXHIBITS MULTITOUCH TABLES TOUCH WALLS

See us at booth 201/300 Get an invitation to our Monday night studio party hosted with the Exhibitionist Journal (published by the National Association for Museum Exhibition).

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Keynote and Featured Speakers (continued) Alexander Zwissler Executive Director/CEO Chabot Space and Science Center Alexander Zwissler is Executive Director/CEO of Chabot Space and Science Center in Oakland, California. Zwissler has led Chabot’s development of new programs in the field of climate change education and communication including Bill Nye’s Climate Lab at the center, a NASA-funded Climate Change Teachers Institute, and a partnership with UC Berkeley on a student-led, NSF-funded GHG monitoring project. In 2009, he was the executive producer of Tales of the Maya Skies, a full dome planetarium show now in 55 venues around the world. Currently, he is leading the development of a new outdoor science playground, SpaceTime, which is guided by the idea of “whatever you imagine can happen, will."

Other Featured Speakers Featured Session Monday, October 21 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m. Larry S. Crumpler, PhD Research Curator New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Larry S. Crumpler, PhD is Research Curator specializing in Volcanology and Space Sciences at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. His focus is volcanism of New Mexico, the Southwest, and other planets (Io, Venus, Mars). He is a member of the Mars Exploration Rover science team and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter High-Resolution Camera science team—uplinking instructions and downlinking information from the Mars rovers on a daily basis from his office in the Museum.

Prior to Chabot, Zwissler was the executive director of the Fort Mason Foundation in San Francisco. Before joining Fort Mason, Zwissler had a 17-year career as a senior executive in the cable television and telecommunications industry in the U.S. and the U.K. Zwissler serves in the leadership of both local and national non-profits and is currently on the Board of Directors of ASTC, the San Francisco Market Street Railway, and Techbridge. He is current co-chair of the Gateways Eastbay STEM Network and is a commissioner on the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission. Zwissler graduated with a BA (Hons) in Political Science from the University of California at Berkeley, and went on to become a Postgraduate Research Fellow at the Centre for Mass Communication Research at the University of Leicester, England. In 2008 Zwissler was a fellow of the Noyce Leadership Institute.

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F

R

E

In 1971, Apollo 14 astronaut Alan Shepard swung a makeshift 6-iron on the moon’s surface — and the golf ball went flying “miles and miles and miles,” as Shepard put it after his swing. Golf was the first sport played on the moon!

Who kneW? There’s no doubt that a single visit to a museum can expose you to a universe of history, culture, art, and science. Sandia national Laboratories, The national Museum of nuclear Science and Technology, and Lockheed Martain are proud to support the Association of Science-Technology Centers that encourage the innate curiosity that resides in all of us. Spend the day at a science center, museum, or nature center and...

LeARn SoMeThInG neW!

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ment of energy’s national nuclear Security Administration under contract De-AC04-94AL85000.


Strands and Tracks Conference Goals The program and content of the ASTC Annual Conference are designed to:

•• Inspire attendees, both personally and professionally,

through exciting and engaging speakers and experiences

•• Build capacity through high-quality sessions that

leverage what individuals and organizations already know to generate new capacity

•• Strengthen relationships that connect people and

organizations in ways that advance informal science education

•• Highlight innovations in every aspect of informal science education and museum practice

•• Focus on reflection and feedback that strengthen the

field by learning from past successes or shortcomings

ASTC 2013 Content Strands Core Practices sessions focus on skill-building for individuals, highlighting ready-to-use strategies and lessons learned from all areas of informal science education practice. These sessions are designed for entry- to midlevel professionals. Organizational Development sessions focus on improving management and organizational systems, with special attention to issues relevant to informal science education organizations. These sessions are designed for mid-level to senior-level professionals, primarily managers and assistant directors. Challenges for the Field sessions focus on broad issues that affect the direction of the field and strategic planning. These sessions are designed for senior level professionals (vice presidents, directors, CEOs, COOs, etc.).

Sessions in each of the content strands include content from one or more of the following core areas of informal science education practice:

•• Communications and Public Relations •• Community and Member Relations •• Digital and Emerging Media •• Education and Learning •• Exhibits and Experience •• Finance and Development •• Management •• Research and Evaluation •• Science and Technology •• Staff Development •• Supporting Diversity and Inclusion •• Theater and Demonstrations •• Visitor/Customer Service •• Volunteers •• Youth Programs

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The Industrial Designer’s Society of America has nominated the Galvin Physics Forest as a finalist for its 2013 International Design Excellence Award. Hands On! is jumping for joy about this great collaboration with Kidspace Children’s Museum to bring science exploration outdoors. Enchanting Exhibitions • Masterful Planning • Compelling Design • Flawless Fabrication (727) 824-8988 • St. Petersburg, Florida • www.hofl.org Photo: © Oscar Williams


Friday, October 18

Friday, October 18 7:00–8:30 a.m.

ASTC Finance Committee Meeting Hyatt Albuquerque, Enchantment C For ASTC Finance Committee members and invited guests 7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby Sponsored by Premier Exhibitions

Convention Center Workshops

CORE PRACTICES: Science and Technology

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

C A E E D Hands-On Microcomputer and Sensors Workshop

Supporting Equitable STEM Teaching Practices through Museum-Based Professional Development

Convention Center, San Miguel This workshop is for people who are using or considering the use of electronics in exhibits or in “Makerspace”-type workshops. The workshop will provide direct hands-on experience for manipulating and using electronic sensors with microcontrollers and PCs typically used in informal science and technology learning. Beginners are welcome. Session Leaders: Stanley Cohen, Science Research Associate, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; Miriam Langer, Assistant Professor, New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas; and Gordon McDonough, Educator, Bradbury Science Museum, Los Alamos, NM

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Team-Based Inquiry: A Practical Evaluation Approach for NonEvaluators Convention Center, Ruidoso Interested in incorporating evaluative thinking and reflective practice into your work? This hands-on workshop will introduce a practical, tested approach for building your evaluation capacity and using data to improve your educational products and practices. The session will be particularly relevant for educators, program and exhibit developers, and their managers. Session Leader: Scott Pattison, Research and Evaluation Strategist, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland Presenters: Ali Jackson, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; Sookram Ramsaroop, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Liz Kollmann, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Sarah Cohn, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; and Brad Herring, Museum of Life and Science, Durham, NC

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

NEON: National Education Outreach Network Convention Center, Galisteo Outreach programs include some of the most innovative and valuable offerings from science centers. In this full-day session, outreach professionals from around the world will gather to learn about all aspects of outreach. The session will include brainstorming, hands-on activities, networking opportunities, and presentations from centers large and small. Session Leader: Jonah Cohen, Outreach/ Public Programs Manager, The Children’s Museum, West Hartford, CT Presenters: Nicole Rife, COSI, Columbus, OH; and Paul Taylor, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA

Convention Center, Cimarron This interactive leadership session focuses on promoting equity in K-12 STEM through teacher programs. Through a STEM investigation anchored in social justice, it introduces the NSF-funded MUSE Framework for Access and Equity, provides compelling impact data, and shares strategies for incorporation in teacher education programs. Funded follow-up support is available. Session Leaders: Liesl Chatman, Director, Erin Strauss, Project Lead, and Wren Walker Robbins, Project Lead, Teacher Professional Development Group, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Make It Work: Tinkering and Design Thinking at Your Museum Convention Center, Dona Ana Starting a tinkering space can simultaneously be exciting, invigorating... and overwhelming. Join us for practical tips on facilitation, storage and safety, hands-on activities (with analysis of what makes them work), and the chance to connect with peers who may be facing similar challenges. Session Leader: Karen Wilkinson, Director, The Tinkering Studio™, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA Presenters: Dana Schloss, TELUS Spark, Calgary, AB, Canada; Peggy Monahan, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Luigi Anzivino, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; David Wells, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Adam Nye, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh; Monika Mayer, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; Elena Baca, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; Lydia Beall, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Kristin Bayans, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; and Bridget Rigby, The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, CA

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CORE PRACTICES: Research and Evaluation

Multiple Perspectives on Making Evaluation Meaningful: A HandsOn Workshop Convention Center, Pecos Build understanding of how to work with an external evaluator to get information you can actually use to improve programs and share results. You will learn and apply strategies and tools to communicate expectations, define roles, set measurable objectives, collect and organize data, and reflect on and share evaluation findings. Session Leader: Susan Burger, Director of Evaluation Services, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR Presenters: Lauren Russell, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Nolan Doesken, CoCoRaHS– Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Noah Newman, CoCoRaHS–Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Elizabeth Rosino, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Shannon Weiss, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR; and Jessica Wode, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

D E L E C N CA

Creating a Transcontinental Network for Expanding Informal STEM for Latinos Convention Center, La Cienega In this full-day workshop, professionals from science centers, community/ youth organizations, universities, federal agencies, and Latino-focused STEM organizations will convene to explore opportunities for better engaging Latinos in informal science learning. The workshop will lead off with a keynote address by Dr. Alejandro Frank, a world-renowned nuclear physicist from the National Autonomous University of Mexico City (UNAM), and founder of the innovative PAUTA project in Mexico. Breakout sessions will focus on increasing the involvement of Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking communities in science awareness, achievement, and research participation; effective informal science education strategies from across the Americas; and developing and sharing resources among U.S. and Latin

American informal science education organizations. Generous support for this preconference is provided by the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO. Session Leader: Robert Russell, Senior Education Associate, National Center for Interactive Learning, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO Presenter: Alejandro Frank, National Autonomous University of Mexico City (UNAM), Mexico

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Installation Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall For exhibitors only 8:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.

Setting the Agenda for Giant Screen Research Hyatt Albuquerque, Sage This by-invitation workshop will bring together researchers and giant screen stakeholders to develop the agenda/ priorities for giant screen research. 9:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

ASTC Diversity and Leadership Fellows Workshop Hyatt Albuquerque, Enchantment A/B For preregistered 2013 Fellows, alumni, and invited guests

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Community and Member Relations

Fostering Collaboration between Science Centers and Afterschool Programs Convention Center, Mesilla The Afterschool Alliance and ASTC are partnering to increase interactions between science centers and the afterschool community. This session brings together leaders and STEM coordinators of the Statewide Afterschool Networks and Science Centers. Participants gain an understanding of the needs and challenges of each community and actively discuss partnership opportunities. Session Leader: Anita Krishnamurthi, Director, STEM Policy, Afterschool Alliance, Washington, DC Presenters: Melanie McClintock, Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence, Phoenix; Jeff Davis, California Afterschool Network, UC Davis School of Education CCSP; Ellie Mitchell, Maryland Out of School Time Network, Baltimore; Jeff Cole, Nebraska Community Learning Center Network, Nebraska Children and Families Foundation, Lincoln; Diane Genco, New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition, Westfield; Julia Reeves, New Mexico Public Education Department, Santa Fe; Beth Unverzagt, Oregon Afterschool for Kids, Salem; Kacy Conley, Pennsylvania Statewide Afterschool/Youth Development Network, Camp Hill; and Blaire Denson, Virginia Partnership for Out-ofSchool Time, Richmond

1:00–3:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

ASTC Board of Directors Meeting Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta Room For ASTC Board members, committee chairs, and invited guests 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Portal to the Public Network Annual Meeting Convention Center, Cochiti By invitation only

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12:00–4:00 p.m.

CORE PRACTICES: Research and Evaluation

Findings from the AISL OPMS and National AISL Evaluation Hyatt Albuquerque, Enchantment C/D This meeting will present findings from the OPMS for all AISL projects funded since 2006, as well as from the AISL Program Evaluation. Session Leader: Gary Silverstein, Senior Study Director, Westat, Rockville, MD


Friday, October 18

1:00–3:30 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Museum-Library Partnerships: Strategies for Connecting Science and Literacy in Communities Convention Center, Aztec Museums and libraries are natural community partners in supporting science and literacy learning. Through their work with the NSF-funded LEAP into Science, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science and Albuquerque/ Bernalillo County library partners will highlight their program model and resources. Participants are invited to observe programming at a library following the session. Session Leader: Julia Skolnik, Manager and Curriculum Specialist, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA Presenters: Dale McCreedy, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; Debra Novak, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; and Linda Davis, Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Library, NM

1:00–5:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

ExhibitSEED Workshop: Sustainable Practices for Creating Exhibits Convention Center, San Miguel This hands-on workshop for museum and exhibition professionals offers practical ways to incorporate sustainability into everyday work. Workshop includes tools like the “Green Exhibit Checklist.” Session Leader: Kari Jensen, Senior Exhibit Developer, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland

3:00–5:00 p.m.

Science Museum Exhibit Collaborative (SMEC) Directors Meeting Convention Center, San Juan

off-site workshops Shuttles depart from the Convention Center 30 minutes before scheduled preconference sessions on Friday. Buses will pick up in front of the East Building’s main entrance.

8:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Bridging the Gap: Connecting Citizens and Students to Scientific Research Sandia Mountain Natural History Center The Sandia Mountain Natural History Center is an environmental education facility that is bringing visitors into direct contact with scientists and real data collection. This workshop will spend a day in the Sandia Mountains introducing four programs that use strong partnerships to improve education and stimulate interest in scientific inquiry. Participants should dress appropriately. Session Leader: Christopher Modelski, Outreach Coordinator, Sandia Mountain Natural History Center, Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Paul Mauermann, Sandia Mountain Natural History Center, Albuquerque, NM; Vince Case, Albuquerque Public Schools, NM; and Selena Connealy, New Mexico EPSCoR, Albuquerque

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

How Children Develop Ideas about How the World Works

Session Leader: Laura Martin, Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix Presenters: Jennifer Martin, Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose, CA; Jennifer Jipson, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo; Maureen Callanan, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Minda Borun, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Transforming Natural History Museums through Collaborative Innovation and Learning Research New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, MPR Natural history museums are transforming from places of static exhibitions into trailheads for lifelong science exploration. This workshop focuses on tools for conducting collaborative, applied research to innovate new ways to use collections, data, and scientists to engage audiences in current science and scientific challenges of the 21st century. Session Leaders: Moe Flannery, Ornithology and Mammalogy Collection Manager, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; Brad Irwin, Learning Research Manager, The Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom; Randi Korn, Founding Director, Randi Korn & Associates, Inc., Alexandria, VA; Leah Melber, Senior Director, Hurvis Center for Learning Innovation and Collaboration, Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago, IL; Kirsten Rowell, Curator of Malacology and Acting Assistant Professor, Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, Seattle, WA; MaryAnn Steiner, Director, Lifelong Science Learning, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA; Steven Yalowitz, Principal, Audience Viewpoints, Edgewater, MD; and Alicia Borrego-Pierce, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Preschool Classroom We will review research on how children think about the world and develop concepts about science, including consideration of broad theories of cognitive development. Material will inform the design of exhibits and programs that meaningfully engage children, from youngsters to teens. We will discuss diversity in interests and learning styles.

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CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

21-Tech-Niques: Engaging Museum Visitors Using Mobile Technologies Explora, Explora Inquiry Lab A/B The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded 21-Tech project team of five science centers has spent the past three years developing techniques to engage visitors using mobile devices as facilitation tools, along with the associated staff training methodologies. This workshop will examine the project’s findings and provide hands-on opportunities to experience many of the techniques. Session Leaders: Keith Ostfeld, Director of Educational Technology and Exhibit Development, and Cheryl McCallum, Director of Education, Children’s Museum of Houston, TX Presenters: Neelam Damani, Children’s Museum of Houston, TX; Marilyn Johnson, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Cecilia Garibay, Garibay Group, Chicago, IL; Sookram Ramsaroop, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Ali Jackson, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; and Darrell Porcello, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA

1:00–4:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

What’s Up With Walls? Design Matters Explora, Explora Community Room What’s up with walls? Discover the potential of enclosing planes to shape experience and affect human behavior. Renowned for its intentional use of walls, Explora will serve as the context for immersion activities, shared practices, and discussion. Selected readings will be distributed in advance. Session Leader: Chris Burda, Senior Exhibit Developer, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Presenters: Paul Tatter, Consultant, Albuquerque, NM; Kate Sutton-Johnson, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Dennis Bateman, Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA; and Andrea Deets, Explora, Albuquerque, NM

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networking events

4:30–5:30 p.m.

Conference Navigation and Networking Convention Center, Aztec Is this your first time at ASTC’s Annual Conference? Want to know what is happening at this year’s conference? THIS IS THE SESSION FOR YOU! Join us for an overview of key networking opportunities and provide you with some ideas and suggestions on how to navigate the conference. Preregistration required. 5:00–7:00 p.m.

Albuquerque Welcomes You Receptions Get to know downtown Albuquerque and your fellow ASTC delegates before the conference kicks off. Staff from the three host museums will be on hand to welcome delegates at one of four unique, informal reception locations. All venues are within walking distance of the convention center. HQue Hyatt Hotel, 330 Tijeras NW Downtown Albuquerque’s “HeadQuarters” for hand-crafted cocktails, local microbrews, eclectic wines by the glass, and choice social destination. Relax in the modern furnishings of the glass roof lobby atrium and unwind under the New Mexico skies. Ibiza Hotel Andaluz, 125 Second Street NW Fresh, tantalizing, all good, all Ibiza. Ibiza offers a magnificent Albuquerque rooftop bar and patio overlooking the eastern Albuquerque sky and mountains. ICE Lounge DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 201 Marquette Avenue NW Relax with an ICE cold drink in our new contemporary lounge.

La Esquina Restaurante 40 First Plaza Center NW, Suite 60 A charming New Mexico atmosphere, beer and wine, with fresh chips and amazing salsa made daily. A scene in the film Crazy Heart starring Jeff Bridges was filmed here, at the bar.

NISE Network Happy Hour Hotel Andaluz, Ibiza Rooftop Bar NISE Network partners will meet at the Ibiza Rooftop Bar at Hotel Andaluz, 125 Second Street NW. 6:00–9:00 p.m.

Teacher Educator Network (TEN) Dinner Hyatt Albuquerque, Enchantment C/D Begin the 2013 ASTC Conference by networking with colleagues interested in science centers’ work with teacher education. Join us for the upbeat TEN dinner in Albuquerque. Reconnect with familiar colleagues and initiate new relationships. While we enjoy the food and camaraderie, we will informally share current issues and ideas influencing our work. Preregistration required. 7:00–9:00 p.m.

ASTC Leadership Reception By Invitation Only Co-sponsored by Lockheed Martin/ Sandia National Laboratories and Alexander Haas: Museum Services


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby Sponsored by Premier Exhibitions

7:30–9:30 a.m.

Breakfast and Opening Keynote Presentation Convention Center, Ballroom A-C 7:30–8:00 a.m. Keynote Breakfast 8:00–8:45 a.m. Welcoming Remarks 8:45–9:30 a.m. Keynote Presentation Eugenie C. Scott, Executive Director, National Center for Science Education Sponsored by Science Channel

9:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall Ribbon cutting ceremony at 9:30 a.m.; coffee break from 9:30–10:30 a.m. Open to all registered attendees. 10:00–11:00 a.m.

Sustained Learning Teams Discussion Groups Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall In an effort to challenge our habits and continue to learn and grow, the Albuquerque host committee has proposed experimental Learning Team Discussion Groups for the ASTC 2013 conference. Attendees can sign up to participate in small group discussions and will be randomly assigned to learning teams of 10-12 members. This will give team members an opportunity to

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meet new people, diversify perspectives in the field, and contribute in a personal way to each other’s concerns and interests. The teams will provide an opportunity to hear voices and viewpoints they may not previously have heard in a small, personal format that encourages participation. Each group will decide when and where subsequent meetings will take place during the conference. Preregistration required. 10:00–11:15 a.m.

Science in Afterschool CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about! 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Lunch Concessions in the Exhibit Hall Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall Concession stands will be available to purchase coffee and lunch. 11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Leadership and Awards Luncheon Convention Center, Ballroom A-C During this new event, the recipients of the Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Awards will be honored, as will the recipient of the ASTC Fellow Award for Outstanding Contribution, the highest honor bestowed by the Association. Leading Edge Awards sponsored by Hands On! Inc. Luncheon sponsored by Blackbaud

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Advocates for Diversity CoP Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about.

1:00 pm.–2:15 p.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

PD, NGSS, Science Centers, and Schools…Oh My! Convention Center, Cimarron Join Arizona Science Center’s K-12th grade professional development department for an interactive session to share how the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are impacting both formal and informal learning. Gain ideas on utilizing new standards to enhance the learning experience for teachers and students at the Center and in the field. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Lisa Flesher, Learning Projects Director, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix Presenters: Kelly Stewart, RaeAnn Fox, Lelanie Aromin, Sharon Kortman, and Robert Robertson, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Engineering Innovation in AfterSchool Programs Convention Center, Dona Ana If you are struggling with how to move from talking STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) to doing STEM with your school-age community, we will share successful approaches to help you. Presenters will describe and demonstrate incorporating STEM using mechanical engineering concepts, programming technology, and competitive experiences in an after-school program. Limited to 25 participants. Preregistration required. Session Leader: Marla Griego, Mathematics and Technology Educator, Explora, Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Stanley Cohen, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; Ellis Dawson, EG&G Inc. contracted to SNL Robotics Center, Albuquerque, NM; and Russell FisherIves, RoboRAVE International of Inquiry Facilitators Inc, Bernalillo, NM


Saturday, October 19

CORE PRACTICES: Youth Programs

Going Full Circle: Connecting Community Groups to STEM Convention Center, San Miguel Explore ways science centers can recruit and partner with networks of scientists to effectively work with youth facilitators in delivering STEM activities to community groups. Discussions will include best practices for engaging youth and scientists in active learning and sharing, and ways to reach and impact target audiences. Session Leader: Colin Wilson, Senior Educator, Saint Louis Science Center, MO Presenters: Calvin Uzelmeier, Rochester Museum & Science Center, NY; Kristen Edwards, California Science Center, Los Angeles; and Heidi Heidgerken, Explora, Albuquerque, NM

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Community and Member Relations

Can We Collaborate with Our Competitors? Convention Center, Aztec Collaboration: grants often require it, community leaders support it, and it just feels like the right thing to do. How can we collaborate with other local museums, while being honest that we’re competing for the same audiences and resources? Participate in a frank discussion with your three host museums. Session Leader: Kristin Leigh, Deputy Director, Explora, Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Alicia Borrego-Pierce, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; and Jeanette Miller, National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, Albuquerque, NM

CORE PRACTICES: Digital and Emerging Media

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

Gaming in Museums to Engage Audiences

The 4th Paradigm: Connecting Visitors to Complex Science

Convention Center, Brazos Games are being played everywhere: on computers, game systems, and mobile devices. How are science centers and museums taking advantage of the new technologies? This session will explore how some museums are utilizing different methods to help 6th-12th grade audiences connect with content.

Convention Center, Mesilla The rapid acceleration of 21st century science has revealed that nature is rife with complexity, but the gap between science practice and science education is widening. This session will address efforts underway in three science centers to fill this gap through novel approaches in learning complex science for their audiences.

Session Leaders: Sarah Carter, Science and Outreach Specialist, SciGirls, Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN; and Jessie Herbert, Public Education Specialist, spectrUM Discovery Area, Missoula, MT Presenters: Sookram Ramsaroop, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Keith Braafladt, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Linda Ortenzo, Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA; Barry Joseph, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; and Tamara Schwarz, Chabot Space & Science Center, Oakland, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Think Outside the Building: Safety and Science Parks Convention Center, Galisteo Outdoor exhibits can be bigger, visitors can get wilder, you might have water exhibits, or other special challenges. How can you make them engaging, allowing some challenges, and yet safe? We’ll share expertise from certified playground inspectors, other resources, and real-life experiences from a variety of large and small museums. Session Leader: Kathleen Krafft, Exhibitions Curator, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY Presenters: Tal Berman, MadaTech, The Israel National Museum of Science, Technology, and Space, Haifa; Greg Belew, Hands On! Inc., St. Petersburg, FL; Chad Gehring, Children’s Museum of Houston, TX; Erich Rose, Erich Rose Design, Austin, TX; Michael Shanklin, Kidspace Children’s Museum, Pasadena, CA; Bruce Quast, Discovery Center Museum, Rockford, IL; and Adam Zuckerman, The Discovery Museum and Planetarium, Bridgeport, CT

Session Leader: Stephen Uzzo, Vice President, Science and Technology, New York Hall of Science, Queens Presenters: Patrick Hamilton, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Jennifer Frazier, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; and Geralyn Abinader, New York Hall of Science, Queens

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Off Script: Facilitating Using Visitors’ Cues Convention Center, Pecos Facilitating design and make activities means letting visitors take the lead. No more “explaining” for floor staff. How do you respond to what visitors need while going through their own creative learning process? The session will offer principles and practices, focused on finding your own style. Session Leader: Peggy Monahan, Exhibit Projects Creative Director, New York Hall of Science, Queens Presenters: Lydia Beall, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Priya Mohabir, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Dana Schloss, TELUS Spark, Calgary, AB, Canada; Satbir Multani, New York Hall of Science, Queens; and Carlos Romero, New York Hall of Science, Queens

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CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

International Science Center Impact Study Convention Center, La Cienega Hear an overview of a major international study to determine if informal education experiences at science centers improve science knowledge, interest, creativity, and engagement. The results provide a better understanding of science center impacts and an empirical basis for public debates about their efficacy and value in supporting public science literacy and participation. Session Leader: John Falk, Professor, Oregon State University, Corvallis Presenters: Lynn Dierking, Oregon State University, Corvallis; Per-Edvin Persson, Heureka, the Finnish Science Centre, Vantaa; Lesley Lewis, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; and Silvia Singer, MIDE, Museo Interactivo de Economía, D.F., Mexico

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Science and Technology

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Roundtable: Submitting Competitive NSF Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) Proposals Convention Center, Ruidoso Learn valuable tips from U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) program officers and principal investigators for planning projects and writing competitive proposals for submission to NSF’s STEM education programs. The session will include a brief general overview of NSF’s current solicitation and small group discussions of key issues, such as research, innovation, and broadening participation. Session Leader: Robert Russell, Senior Education Associate, National Center for Interactive Learning, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO Presenters: Dennis Schatz, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; and Ellen McCallie, Alphonse DeSena, and Sandra Welch, National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA

Using Online Tools to Make Accessible Museum Collections Convention Center, Tijeras Museum collections are valued as important scientific resources, and are increasingly recognized as an important educational resource, too. Online tools make collections data accessible to the general public and museum educators, opening doors to collections and inspiring an integrated network of educators working on questions based on specimens or artifacts. Session Leader: Ayesha Burdett, Bioscience Curator, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque Presenters: Joseph Cook, Sandra Brantley, Catherine Baudoin, and Kayce Bell, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; and Christopher Orwoll, The New Mexico Museum of Space History, Alamogordo

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2:45–4:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Science Centers Serving the Native American Community Convention Center, Galisteo How can science centers and informal science educators create science explorations that are attractive to Native American students and their teachers, in order for our centers to better serve this community? Session Leader: Duane Dill, Educator, Explora, Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Pamela Woodis, National Museum of the American Indian Office of Education, Washington, DC; Jen Lokey, Durango Discovery Museum, CO; and Darva Randolph, Pueblo of Acoma, NM

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Data: Stop! Collaborate and Listen Convention Center, Pecos Data on ISE visitors’ experiences can be overwhelming to collect and digest. This session will feature roundtable discussion on existing efforts to monitor visitor experiences from multiple perspectives, including research, visitor services, educational programming, and senior-level management, and present a collaborative approach to inform a field-wide measurement effort. Session Leader: Ryan Auster, Research Associate, Museum of Science, Boston, MA Presenters: Tania Tiburcio, New York Hall of Science, Queens; R. L. Lindsey, ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum, Ashland, OR; Jacie Hood, Science Spectrum, Lubbock, TX; Rebecca Prosino, Sci-Port: Louisiana’s Science Center, Shreveport; and Beck Tench, Museum of Life and Science, Durham, NC

CORE PRACTICES: Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

Bilingual Exhibits Research: Findings and Implications For ISE Institutions Convention Center, Tijeras This session summarizes the research component of the NSF-funded Bilingual Exhibits Research Initiative (BERI), which involved observations and indepth interviews with Spanish-speaking groups at four science institutions. Findings revealed valuable insights and a deeper understanding that the bilingual experience varies based on group characteristics and designed experiences. Session Leader: Laura Huerta Migus, Director, Professional Development and Inclusion, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC Presenters: Steven Yalowitz, Audience Viewpoints, Edgewater, MD; Cecilia Garibay, Garibay Group, Chicago, IL; and Carlos Plaza, Babel No More, Miami, FL


Saturday, October 19

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Donor-Centered Communications: Inspiring and Engaging Supporters Convention Center, Mesilla This session will focus on the key messages that are inspiring donors to give to science and technology centers today. We will discuss donors as partners who want their contributions to make a measurable difference. You will come away equipped to reach all levels of donors with compelling stories that demonstrate your success. Session Leader: Kristin Priscella, Vice President of External Affairs, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix Presenter: Greg Simoncini, Marts and Lundy, Chicago, IL

extended sessions 2:45–4:45 p.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

Building Stronger Board/CEO Relationships Convention Center, San Miguel Building on the success of the 2012 sessions on the same topic, this extended session will explore the question of how to strengthen the relationship between a science center board and its CEO. Following brief presentations from respected CEOs, session participants will explore issues and challenges in small groups. Session Leaders: Lesley Lewis, CEO, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; and Joanna Haas, Executive Director, Kentucky Science Center, Louisville Presenters: Neville Petrie, Science Alive! The New Zealand Science Centre, Christchurch; Linda Conlon, International Centre for Life, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom; Chevy Humphrey, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix; Nancy Stueber, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; and Barry Van Deman, Museum of Life and Science, Durham, NC Sponsored by Event Network

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

International Corporations and Science Museums and Centers

Big Ideas for Small Science Centers

Convention Center, Aztec This session will be an opportunity to better understand why international corporations are interested in establishing different types of partnerships with science centers and museums, and why science centers and museums are interested in collaborating with international corporations. This session will clarify that relationships between science centers and museums and international corporations are very different in North America as compared to Europe.

Convention Center, Ruidoso Being small requires thinking big! Join your fellow small science centers as we share the top tips that have helped launch big ideas in our own centers. You will walk away with content, connections, and clues to turn your big ideas into reality for exhibits, visitor experience, outreach, and more.

Session Leaders: Alain Coine, General Delegate, Universcience Partenaires, Paris, France; and Walter Staveloz, Director of International Relations, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC Presenter: Linda Conlon, International Centre for Life, Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

The Art/Science Interface: How to Implement at Your Institution Convention Center, La Cienega Would you like to include art/science initiatives in your institution? Join a geographically and institutionally diverse group of professionals to learn how to do this. Learn about the benefits, successes, and challenges, in addition to specific strategies – from first steps to final evaluations. Our art/science blog offers continuing support. Session Leader: Lucinda Presley, Executive Director, ICEE Success Foundation, Palestine, TX Presenters: Barbara Stauffer, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC; Elena Baca, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; Jenna Blanton, Iridescent, Chicago, IL; Helena Carmina, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; Rick Hall, Ignite!, Nottingham, England, United Kingdom; Sherry Marshall, Science Museum Oklahoma, Oklahoma City; and Catherine Sutera, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC

Session Leader: Michele Laverty, Director, National Ag Science Center, Modesto, CA Presenters: Kathy Dawes, Palouse Discovery Science Center, Pullman, WA; Lori Ann Terjesen, Children’s Science Center, Herndon, VA; Kathleen Krafft, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; William Katzman, LIGO, Livingston, LA; and Christopher Cable, Durango Discovery Museum, CO

double sessions 2:45 p.m.–5:15 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Fast Prototyping to Learn Science Convention Center, Dona Ana This session will take you on a zip-line of active learning. From the moment you walk into the room you and colleagues will zip to build models, test them, innovate solutions, and learn science. You’ll end with a smile in place, ready to employ fast prototyping in your programs. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Ed Sobey, Workshop Instructor, Teknikens Hus, Redmond, WA Presenters: Tim Pula, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC; Robert Corbin, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC; George Moran, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; and Paul Orselli, POW! (Paul Orselli Workshop), Baldwin, NY

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ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Staff Development

Noyce Leadership Institute: Leading for the Public Good Convention Center, Brazos The Noyce Leadership Institute (NLI) offers a yearlong executive education program for leaders of science centers and children’s museums. During the first hour, this session offers a program overview including: application process, eligibility, program components, and the requirements of working with a sponsor. Then, we will engage in an interactive workshop on the “Strategic Initiative” (SI), an action-learning opportunity essential to the Fellowship, to help prospective applicants understand, identify, and perhaps shape possible SIs. Past and present NLI Fellows will share their experiences and address participants’ questions. Participants may join for either portion of this session or both. Session Leader: Jennifer Zoffel, Associate Director, Noyce Leadership Institute, Sacramento, CA Presenters: William Booth, Booth Learning, Maumee, OH; and Marilyn Hoyt, Marilyn Hoyt Consulting, Pelham, NY

CORE PRACTICES: Youth Programs

Youth Program Network Workshop •

Convention Center, Cimarron How do you provide support and guidance, and contribute to the growth and development of youth within your programs? This hands-on session will focus on skill sets and tools needed to effectively mentor youth within your programs. Youth from select programs will help lead workshop activities. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Cheronda Frazier, Director of Community Initiatives; and Don Wittrock, Youth & Community Programs Manager, New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences, Camden Presenters: Angela Scardina, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA; Youth Participant, New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences, Camden, NJ; and Youth Participant, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA

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4:00–6:00 p.m.

7:30–11:30 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Welcome Reception

3 Museums = 1 Great Party!

Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall Join your fellow attendees for a complimentary drink (all registered attendees will receive one drink ticket) and don't forget to visit the exhibitors, some of whom have food in their booths waiting for you to join them!

Explora and New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science With one foot in the past, one foot in the present, and both eyes on the future, your Albuquerque host museums will treat you to a fiesta that spans space and time! Visit the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science to journey deep into the past when Albuquerque was New Mexico's seacoast, visit the present by enjoying the Entrance Tent where the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History will welcome party guests, step over to Explora for an evening filled with predictions of the future, and hang out with mariachis and flamenco dancers in a giant street party celebrating Albuquerque's present. Margaritas in hand, explore New Mexico's tricultural food and music, and dance the night away at one great party!

Meet and congratulate this year's Leading Edge Award recipients in the ASTC Resource Center from 5:00–5:30 p.m. and perhaps win a little something for yourself during our prize drawings. Must be present to win. 5:00–7:00 p.m.

Science Museum Exhibit Collaborative (SMEC) Production Meeting Convention Center, San Juan By invitation only 6:00–7:30 p.m. Product Demo Sessions PRODUCT DEMO

Voices of the Arctic Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta 1 Presented by Science North Be immersed in one of the most captivating regions on the planet – the Arctic. Explore the land, sea, and ice through interactive exhibits and multimedia experiences. Available Fall 2014. PRODUCT DEMO

Why Books and Guides Are Important—and Can Make Money Hyatt Albuquerque, Sage Presented by Osprey Custom Publishing Come discover how books, catalogs, and guides (physical, digital, and apps) can not only enrich and extend your visitors' experience, but also enhance your institution’s image—and be profitable, too. Hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be available.

Tickets for non-registered guests may be purchased for $60. Shuttle service will depart from the Convention Center at the main entrance of the East Building beginning at 7:15 p.m. and return to the conference hotels beginning at 9:00 p.m. Please have your party ticket with you to expedite check-in at the event.


Create interactive weather exhibits by leveraging Weather Underground's dynamic weather feeds, meteorological expertise and climatology content.

To learn more, visit www.wunderground.com/astc or email Kari Strenfel at: kari@wunderground.com Booth #401/500


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 7:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby Sponsored by Premier Exhibitions

7:30–9:30 a.m.

Breakfast and Keynote Presentation Convention Center, Ballroom A-C 7:30–8:00 a.m.

Breakfast . 8:00–8:45 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks 8:45–9:30 a.m.

Keynote Presentation Speaker: Ramu Damodaran, Deputy Director for Partnerships and Public Engagement, Outreach Division, Department of Public Information, United Nations, New York, NY Sponsored by Unified Field, Inc.

9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

ASTC Job Bank Convention Center, Estancia The ASTC Job Bank features listings of current positions available at member institutions and companies, as well as resumes from job seekers.

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9:45 a.m.–11:00 a.m. CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Activating Science in Living History Museums Convention Center, Pecos History museum interpreters and science museum exhibit developers and evaluators discuss a new science/history partnership. This project explores a new model of blending history and STEM in these museums in a way that stays true to the museums’ history mission while providing integrated, high quality STEM experiences. Session Leader: Cathy Ferree, Vice President of Exhibit, Programs and Facilities, Conner Prairie Interactive History Park, Fishers, IN Presenters: Molly Phipps, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; and Brian Mancuso and Jason Adams, Conner Prairie Interactive History Park, Fishers, IN

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Healthy and Wise: New Approaches to Presenting Health Convention Center, La Cienega Health literacy is an important goal as health care becomes more complex. How can we develop new ways of engaging our visitors and increase their health literacy in order to make more informed health choices? Come to a discussion of different ways of engaging visitors in increasing their health literacy. Session Leader: Sasha Palmquist, Principal, Palmquist & Associates, Washington, DC Presenters: Laurie Fink, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Katura Reynolds, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Jeff Kennedy, Jeff Kennedy Associates, Inc, Somerville, MA; Nicole Cartwright Kwiek, The Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus; Molly Brown, The Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus; and Victoria Coats, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Resources to Support Classroom Teachers on Field Trips Convention Center, Mesilla This interactive session features diverse perspectives from large and small museums as to how they support classroom teachers with supplementary materials on visits to their institution. Each participant will walk away with resources that they can use or adapt in their setting to support classroom teacher field trip experiences. Session Leader: Meghan Schiedel, Museum Educator, Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum, Reno Presenters: Tara Henderson, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; Sharon Horrigan, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Ann Hernandez, Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum, MI; and Jennifer Matlock, Monterey Bay Aquarium, CA

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Staff Development

Understanding Institutional Culture: Tools for Cultivating a Positive Environment Convention Center, Aztec What can we do to retain great staff? How do we ensure they feel valued, respected, and confident in their work? This interactive workshop will provide guiding principles and practical advice for cultivating an institutional environment that supports the diverse needs and interests of both staff and visitors. Session Leader: Andrea Motto, After School Program Director, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT Presenters: Joe Heimlich, OSUExtension@ COSI, Columbus, OH; Steven Yalowitz, Audience Viewpoints, Edgewater, MD; Azuka MuMin, COSI, Columbus, OH; and Diane Miller, Saint Louis Science Center, MO


Sunday, October 20

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Communications and Public Relations

Change We Don't Believe In Convention Center, San Miguel We like change because it is the promise of something better. The fact is that we like talking about change and sticking to what we do. We embrace some change because it facilitates what we do, and then there is everything else. This session explores what prevents us from changing. Session Leader: Walter Staveloz, Director of International Relations, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC Presenters: Eli Kuslansky, Unified Field, Inc., New York, NY; John Fraser, New Knowledge Organization, New York, NY; Tom Rockwell, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; and Deborah Runkle, AAAS, Washington, DC

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Research and Evaluation

Building a Culture of Evaluation from the Ground Up Convention Center, Galisteo Program evaluation: leaders expect it; funders require it; staff want to know. From pilot projects to building internal capacity, panelists at various stages in developing a system and culture of program evaluation will describe methods you can implement at your institution, regardless of where you are in the process. Limited to 80 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Claire Thoma, Evaluation & Research Coordinator, The Children's Museum Indianapolis Presenters: Whitney Owens, Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH; and Rita Deedrick, COSI, Columbus, OH

Next Generation Science Standards CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Science and Technology

Working with NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Convention Center, Tijeras New Mexico EPSCoR and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science have been working together for five years in an innovative partnership to connect current research on climate change to the citizens of New Mexico. This session will highlight opportunities to partner with EPSCoR in your home state. Session Leader: Charlie Walter, Executive Director, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque Presenters: Mary Jo Daniel, New Mexico EPSCoR, Albuquerque, NM; Elsa Bailey, Elsa Bailey Consulting, San Francisco, CA; Paul Mauermann, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; and Dennis Schatz, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Science and Sustainability: From Hands-On Activities to Community Action Convention Center, Ruidoso Experience multiple perspectives and innovative models from five diverse institutions about their successful projects on sustainability, especially regarding energy efficiency in buildings, and how these can lead to community action. Do hands-on activities, take away ideas and detailed plans that work, and learn about an opportunity for future collaboration. Session Leader: Kathy Dawes, Educational Outreach Coordinator, Palouse Discovery Science Center, Pullman, WA Presenters: Sarah Margoles, Durango Discovery Museum, CO; Denise LeBlanc, The Discovery Museums, Acton, MA; Kyrie Kellett, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; and Lindzy Bivings, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Creating a Culture of Philanthropy Convention Center, Brazos UnderDeveloped: A National Study of Challenges Facing Nonprofit Fundraising reveals that many nonprofits are stuck in a vicious cycle that threatens their ability to raise the resources they need to succeed. In this session we’ll share key findings from the report, outline implications, and identify actionable next steps for organizations to take in creating a culture of philanthropy. Session Leader: Marla Cornelius, Senior Project Director, CompassPoint Nonprofit Services, Oakland, CA Session speaker sponsored by the Arizona Science Center and The Franklin Institute

Extended Sessions 9:45–11:45 a.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Youth Programs

How to Build a Digital Learning and Innovation Practice Convention Center, Cimarron This workshop will show how the American Museum of Natural History and the California Academy of Sciences have successfully launched youth-based digital learning programs. After hearing from workshop presenters, participants will split into small groups, each of which will focus on one practice question for their digital learning work. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leaders: Barry Joseph, Associate Director for Digital Learning, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; Puja Dasari, Senior Manager of Digital Learning, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; and Elizabeth Babcock, Chief Public Engagement Officer and Roberts Dean of Education, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco Presenter: Katie Levedahl, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco

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CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

Learning in Informal Science Centers: Readings and Discussion Convention Center, Dona Ana Want a chance to reflect on science learning as a field, at your institutions, or as an individual? Participants will be invited to read short articles before joining the session to discuss new insights on what we do and how we learn. Preregistration required. Limited to 60 participants. Session Leaders: Eric Meyer, Associate Educational Services Director, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; Marilyn Johnson, Science Director, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; J Newlin, Director, Physical Sciences, Engineering, and Math, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Robert West, President, Informal Learning Experiences, Inc., Denver, CO; Robert Russell, Senior Education Associate, National Center for Interactive Learning, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO; and Joe Ruggiero, Exhibit Developer, The Exhibit Guys, Tucson, AZ

10:00–10:30 a.m.

Exhibitor/Sponsor Appreciation Breakfast Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall ASTC 2013 exhibitors and sponsors are cordially invited to the annual Appreciation Breakfast, an interactive event, to let our partners know how much we appreciate their work on behalf of the science center field. Open to exhibitors and sponsors only; must have an exhibitor or sponsor ribbon to attend. 10:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Open Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall 11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Lunch in the Exhibit Hall Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall Box lunches will be available for you to enjoy at your leisure.

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11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Live Demonstration Hour Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall Join us for the annual Live Demonstration Hour, an ASTC tradition for more than 25 years. This is one program you don’t want to miss.

Meet the McGrath Fellows ASTC Resource Center Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall ASTC's Lee Kimche McGrath Fellowship Program aims at helping individuals from non-U.S. emerging science centers to attend the ASTC conference, in the hope that this experience will help them in the development of their institution and growth of the field worldwide. The Fellowship is named for ASTC's first executive director. This year, four Fellows have been chosen, thanks to exceptional contributions: Diego Vaz Bevilaqua, Museu da Vida/Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Susan Wairimu Mahachi, Chisipite School, Harare, Zimbabwe; and Fiorella Silveira Segui, Espacio Ciencia —Laboratorio Tecnológico del Uruguay Montevideo. Come to the ASTC Resource Center to meet the Fellows, hear about their experiences, and ask questions. 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Development Luncheon: Engaging Your Constituents and Their Generosity Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta Room The purpose of this luncheon panel will be to look at the use of social media as expansively as possible, in an effort to give an overview of these media and the ways that they impact our daily lives with a specific focus on their exploitation in science centers, museums, and other educational cultural institutions, as well as on best and cutting edge practices. Preregistration required. Luncheon fee: $45.

1:00-2:15 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

ARIS: Mobile Design as a Path to Civic Participation Convention Center, Cimarron This workshop focuses on ARIS, a mobile development platform used by youth and educators to study community issues, organize collective action, and design geo-locative participatory media experiences. In the workshop, participants will learn basic functionalities of ARIS and have an opportunity to create interactive experiences of their own. Preregistration required. Limited to 20 participants. Participants should bring their own smartphone and a laptop. Session Leader: Jim Mathews, Researcher/ Designer, Local Games Lab, ARIS/University of Wisconsin, Madison Presenters: Puja Dasari, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; and Chris Holden, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

Small Spaces: Creating Intimate Visitor Experiences Convention Center, La Cienega Come learn about creating small, intimate, meaningful visitor experiences in your museum. Speakers will present on the benefits as well as the challenges of creating content-rich intimate visitor experiences within both small and large museums. Speakers will weave visitor evaluation data throughout their presentations. Session Leader: Catherine McCarthy, Project Leader–NISE Network, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Presenters: Neil Gordon, The Discovery Museums, Acton, MA; Paul Martin, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; and Carol Harsh, Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) Museum on Main Street, Washington, DC


Sunday, October 20

CORE PRACTICES: Research and Evaluation

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Membership Managers CoP Meeting

Field Trips: What Teachers Told Us

Overnight Programming in the 21st Century

Convention Center, Acoma

Convention Center, Mesilla Three museums will share what they learned from studies of school groups/ teachers who visit on field trips. Panelists will share methods, tools, and findings, focused on what motivates teachers to book field trips. Audience members will be better able to implement a study at their museum. Session Leader: Mary Ann Wojton, Research and Evaluation Associate, COSI, Columbus, OH Presenters: Heather Norton, Orlando Science Center; and Al Onkka, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Class is in...the Science Center!

Convention Center, Aztec For over 40 years, science museums around the world have been working with partners from various fields to create compelling, meaningful, and fun overnight programming. We'll take a look at successful strategies for creating, maintaining, and advancing overnight programming for diverse audiences. Session Leader: Kevin Michael Seymour, Director of Public and Member Programs, COSI, Columbus, OH Presenters: Ashley Larose, Science North, Sudbury, ON, Canada; and Doug Raney, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CORE PRACTICES: Digital and Emerging Media

Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

ASTC Public Policy Committee Open House Convention Center, Tesuque Join members of the ASTC Public Policy Committee for an informal session where you’ll hear about the Committee’s past and current work, learn about ways you can get more involved with advocacy efforts in your state and in Washington, and share thoughts about where the Committee should focus its efforts in the year ahead.

Convention Center, Dona Ana Learn from science center leaders who have made significant commitments to apply informal science education techniques to the classroom, creating elementary, middle, and high schools within their science centers’ walls. Explore award-winning international science center/school partnerships and investigate the benefits and challenges of deep partnerships with formal education.

Mobile Bridges: Using Apps to Extend Museums Beyond the Walls

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

Existing in Two Worlds Pecha Kucha

Session Leader: Whitney Owens, Vice President, Education, Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH Presenters: Frederic Bertley, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; Catherine Paisley, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; and Ron Rohovit, California Science Center, Los Angeles

Convention Center, Brazos Rather than use smartphones as information devices, how do we harness people’s desires to share what they do to inspire learning beyond the museum walls? This session will explore how mobile technologies and people’s social impulses are being used to bridge visitors’ museum experiences to the classroom and beyond. Session Leader: Dorothy Bennett, Director of Design-based Learning in Schools, New York Hall of Science, Queens Presenters: Kyrie Kellett, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Catherine Paisley, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; Paul Kortenaar, SciWorks, The Science Center and Environmental Park of Forsyth County, Winston Salem, NC; and Scott Wayne Indiana, New York Hall of Science, Queens

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Communications and Public Relations

D E L E C N CA

Tweet Me, Pin Me, Like Me,....Me Convention Center, Galisteo We all do it. Is it worth it? How do we measure it? What are we getting from it? How do we stay ahead of it?

Convention Center, Pecos Eight provocative presenters—technophiles, technophobes, and those in-between—will present existing, new, or conceptual exhibitions and programming projects that exist either in the physical or virtual worlds, or both. Presenters will discuss how these converging worlds impact science centers— positively and negatively. An informal discussion period follows. Session Leaders: Kathy Gustafson-Hilton, Senior Developer, Hands On! Inc., St. Petersburg, FL; and Eli Kuslansky, Chief Strategist/ Partner, Unified Field, Inc., New York, NY Presenters: Lath Carlson, The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, CA; Jennifer Martin, TELUS Spark, Calgary, AB, Canada; Paul Orselli, POW! (Paul Orselli Workshop), Baldwin, NY; Liza Rawson, Liberty Science Center, Jersey City, NJ; Darrell Porcello, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; and Jim Spadaccini, Ideum, Corrales, NM

Session Leader: Christopher Cropper, Director of Marketing, Maryland Science Center, Baltimore

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Edson Soares, Associazione Assumpta Science Center Owerri (ASCO), Rome, Italy; Francesco Salvadore, Associazione Assumpta Science Center Owerri (ASCO), Rome, Italy; Eugenio Fazio, Assumpta Science Center Owerri (ASCO), Rome, Italy; Anthony Okere, Assumpta Science Center Ofekata–Owerri (Nigeria); Netzach Farbiash, Carasso Science Park, Beer Sheva, Israel; and Delox Nwachukwu, Assumpta Science Center Ofekata–Owerri (Nigeria)

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Encouraging Visitor STEM Decision-Making Using Public Engagement with Science Convention Center, Ruidoso A recent science museum trend is to not only teach science content but also help visitors with science decision-making. Learn about research and evaluation from exhibits and programs that used dialogue about societal and ethical implications to promote nanotechnology, climate, and health decision-making. Then, brainstorm ways to apply these lessons. Session Leaders: Larry Bell, Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, and Liz Kollmann, Senior Research & Evaluation Associate, Museum of Science, Boston, MA Presenters: Kirsten Ellenbogen, Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH; Gina Svarovsky, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; and Patrice Legro, Koshland Science Center of the National Academies of Science, Washington, DC

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

Is Africa the New Frontier for Developing the Field? Convention Center, San Miguel Exploring strategies to build science centers in Africa based on concrete examples from South Africa, Ethiopia, North Africa, and Nigeria. Topics to be covered: educational needs; policy and advocacy for science and technology; and developing the right scale project. The audience will share needs and experiences in setting up science centers. Session Leaders: Ronen Mir, Founding Director of Science Learning Laboratories and Science Coordinator, Levinson Visitors Center, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel; and Tobechi Anyadike, Director, Assumpta Science Centre Owerri (ASCO), Rome, Italy Presenters: Derek Fish, Unizul Science Centre, Mtunzini, South Africa; Eyoel Hailu, Foka Science Center, Oromiya, Ethiopia; Ngozi Linder Anyadike, Assumpta Science Center Ofekata–Owerri (Nigeria);

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Challenges for the field: Finance and Development

Hiring and Keeping Great Development Officers Convention Center, Tijeras Recently a national report was released that proved what many science centers have known: finding and keeping quality development staff is difficult. Our panel will discuss what is going on, strategies to find and keep great development staff, and what you need to do NOW to protect your contributed income. Session Leader: Jim Hackney, Managing Partner, Alexander Haas, Atlanta, GA

1:00–2:15 p.m. PRODUCT DEMO

Ice Age, A New Journey Through the Time of Glaciation Convention Center, Galisteo Presented by Imagine Exhibitions, Inc. An interactive walk through the ice age for visitors of all ages. Imagine President Tom Zaller, with scientific advisors, will lead this engaging, informal conversation! Session Leader: Tom Zaller, President, Imagine Exhibitions, Inc., Atlanta, GA

2:45–4:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Hands-On Activities in Energy and Climate Science for Educators Convention Center, Cimarron Creating a professional learning community! This hands-on workshop of activities from our 10-day Energy and Climate Science Institute for grade 4-5 teachers will demonstrate several of the skills and thinking strategies highlighted in the new K–12 Science Framework, which are essential for success in science and engineering careers. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Etta Heber, Director of Education, Chabot Space & Science Center, Oakland, CA Presenters: Stanley Fukunaga and Eric Havel, Chabot Space & Science Center, Oakland, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

IMLS-Funded Early Learning Programs in Science Centers Convention Center, La Cienega In 2012, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) made a twoyear commitment to funding projects that advance the goals of the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading. This session will feature case studies of three funded projects and introduce a recently released policy report on the role of museums and libraries in the national early learning ecosystem. Session Leader: Tim Carrigan, Program Specialist, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC Presenters: Jennifer Jovanovic and Carol Valenta, Saint Louis Science Center, MO; Dale McCreedy and Julia Skolnik, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; and Patricia Crawford, EcoTarium, Worcester, MA


Sunday, October 20

CORE PRACTICES: Staff Development

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

ASTC Professional Development: Strategic Approaches to Support the Field

Rethinking Field Trips: It’s Not a Trip, It’s An Experience

Convention Center, Aztec The ASTC Leadership and Field Development Committee (LFD) will present the new vision and tactics that were developed to create a robust and ongoing suite of professional development activities to support members in the field, and gather data and feedback on how ASTC can better serve members’ professional development needs. Session Leader: Andy Aichele, Director, Human Capital Development, COSI, Columbus, OH Presenters: Laura Huerta Migus, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC; Joanna Haas, Kentucky Science Center, Louisville; Cheronda Frazier, New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences, Camden; Jennifer Martin, TELUS Spark, Calgary, AB, Canada; Kate Bennett, Rochester Museum & Science Center, NY; and Wendy Hancock, Association of ScienceTechnology Centers, Washington, DC

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

Interactives, Touch Tables, Maker Spaces: Trends, Fads, What's Next Convention Center, Pecos In our field there appears to be trends or movements that sweep through. A discussion with panelists and audience members will focus on the positives and negatives of this activity and then suggest what might be the next "wave" to sweep our industry. Session Leader: Wayne LaBar, Principal, ALCHEMY Studio, Maplewood, NJ Presenters: Eric Siegel, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Hooley McLaughlin, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; Erika Kiessner, Aesthetec Studio, Toronto, ON, Canada; and Kirsten Ellenbogen, Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH

Convention Center, Ruidoso What makes a field trip into a compelling, relevant experience that you couldn’t have anywhere else? Learn about the successes and challenges involved with creating immersive experiences by packaging pieces of your museum puzzle. Hear how three museums have increased school attendance, revenue, and teacher satisfaction while leveraging pre-existing programs. Session Leader: Margaret Aiken, Program Developer, Lifelong Learning, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Presenters: Kurt Huffman, COSI, Columbus, OH; Hillary Olson, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; and Al Onkka, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CORE PRACTICES: Visitor/ Customer Service

SOS: The Science of Service Convention Center, Tijeras Service can only be as strong as the staff providing that service. We will rotate through roundtable discussions about four areas of service: recruiting, developing, communicating, and motivating. Together we will share specific tools to recruit the right staff and turn them into outstanding ambassadors of informal science education. Session Leader: Toph Bryant, Visitor Services Senior Manager, Kentucky Science Center, Louisville Presenters: Josh Giblin, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; and Jennifer Jenkins, WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology, Bloomington, IN

Intersections of Technology, Art, Science and Culture (TASC) CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Measuring Impact: Reporting to Funders Return On Their Investment (ROI) Convention Center, San Miguel This session will demonstrate the ways three institutions of varying scale approach impact reporting to funders as a best practice in their donor centered approach to fundraising. Attendees will take away action steps that will enable their science center to more effectively raise funds in an increasingly competitive environment. Session Leader: Erik Pihl, Vice President for Development, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA Presenters: Deb Hackathorn, COSI, Columbus, OH; and Kristin Leigh, Explora, Albuquerque, NM

extended session 2:45–4:45 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Bridging Formal/Informal: Science Museums as Learning Labs for Pre-Service Teachers Convention Center, Galisteo How can museums serve as learning laboratories for pre-service teachers? We will describe how museum and university collaborations provide pre-service teachers opportunities to use resources and assets afforded by a museum setting to develop skills necessary for effective teaching practices. Overall goals, practical strategies, and evaluation results will be shared. Session Leader: Gabor Zsuppan, Manager (In)Formal Education, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC Presenters: Preeti Gupta, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; Maya Halevy, Bloomfield Science Museum Jerusalem, Israel; Maria Rivera-Maulucci, Barnard College, New York, NY; Jennifer Collins, Queens University, Charlotte, NC; Maggie Winkowski, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC; and Monica Theysohn, Queens College, Charlotte, NC

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double sessions 2:45–5:15 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Youth Programs

Expanding Roles for Youth: Explainers and Beyond III Student Showcase Convention Center, Brazos Youth and adolescents are an untapped resource during these tough economic times. With thoughtful programming that addresses the needs of your institution, its strengths, and the developmental assets of youth, science centers can address critical needs for them and their community. Teen participants from six institutions will highlight their programs. Session Leaders: Don Wittrock, Youth & Community Programs Manager, New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences, Camden; and Anika Ward, Director, Kitty Andersen Youth Science Center, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Presenters: Linda Gillis, Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City; Priya Mohabir, New York Hall of Science, Queens; Andrea Motto, Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT; Lucy Green, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Angela Scardina, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA; and Rich Pennington, Robby Schreiber, Emmanuel Donaby, Joseph Adamji, Aiyana Machado, and Grace Gbolo, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

Museum Leaders Debate Questions of Mission and Money Convention Center, Mesilla Leaders of very different ISE museums provoke audience debate about our field’s foundational questions by stating intentionally opposing and potentially controversial views about: Why do we exist? Who are we serving? How do we measure value? What should be our business model? Session Leader: Robert West, President, Informal Learning Experiences, Inc., Denver, CO; and John Jacobsen, President, White Oak Associates, Inc., Marblehead, MA

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Presenters: Dennis Bartels, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Patrice Legro, Koshland Science Center of the National Academies of Science, Washington, DC; John Mackay, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC; Van Romans, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, TX; Bryce Seidl, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; Elizabeth Stage, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; Nancy Stueber, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; and Dennis Wint, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Science and Technology

Science Centers as Key Partners in Transdisciplinary Research for Sustainability Convention Center, Dona Ana In moving toward a sustainable future, economical, environmental, social, and institutional aspects intersect, thus transdisciplinary research is crucial to develop new knowledge and policies, make decisions, and take action. The session will discuss how science centers can become key venues and resources for facilitating engagement between research and stakeholder communities. Session Leader: Ilan Chabay, Senior Fellow, Professor, Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Potsdam, Germany Presenters: Steve Adams, Institute for Sustainable Communities, Montpelier, VT; Patrick Hamilton, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Walter Staveloz, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC; Julia Tagüeña, Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City; and Sander van der Leeuw, Arizona State University, Tempe

4:00–6:00 p.m.

Networking Receptions in the Exhibit Hall Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall To promote networking opportunities at ASTC 2013, we continue our series of special interest networking receptions, this time in the Exhibit Hall. The receptions are offered free of charge (cash bar available). Conference attendees can “meet and greet” colleagues in four professional categories: • Advocates for Diversity • Development, Marketing, and Membership • Exhibit Developers Sponsored by Blue Telescope

• Museum Educators

Sponsored by Connecticut Science Center Food sponsored by SAVOR

4:30–6:00 p.m.

ASTC Governing Member Directors Appreciation Reception Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta Room By invitation only Sponsored by National Geographic Cinema Ventures

6:00–7:00 p.m.

Portal to the Public Network Interest Group Meeting Hyatt Albuquerque, Enchantment F


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MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Conference Registration Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby Sponsored by Premier Exhibitions

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

ASTC Satellite Bookstore Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby 7:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Concessions Open Convention Center, Exhibit Hall Lobby Concessions will be open throughout the day for you to purchase coffee, food, and beverages at your leisure.

8:00–9:15 a.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Community and Member Relations

Cities of Scientific Culture Convention Center, Ruidoso Within the European project PLACES (www.openplaces.eu), 70 cities from 23 countries are establishing partnerships between science communication institutions, municipalities, and other stakeholders, changing the way science communication is perceived in policymaking and in governance, and making science part of the cultural fabric of the city: the “Cities of Scientific Culture.” Session Leader: Antonio Gomes da Costa, PLACES Coordinator, Ecsite–The European Network of Science Centres and Museums, Brussels, Belgium Presenters: Catherine Franche, Ecsite–The European Network of Science Centres and Museums, Brussels, Belgium; and Leonardo Alfonsi, Eusea–European Science Events Association, Perugia, Italy

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CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Informal Math Learning: What Do We Know?

Connecting Visitors Live to Research and Exploration: Opportunities and Rewards

Convention Center, Pecos Informal STEM learning institutions can play a critical role in supporting math literacy. Exhibit developers and evaluators will share lessons learned from three recent math exhibition projects: Geometry Playground, Design Zone, and Math Moves. These demonstrate promising approaches and exhibit design strategies for engaging visitors in mathematical thinking and discourse. Session Leader: Scott Pattison, Research & Evaluation Strategist, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland Presenters: Cecilia Garibay, Garibay Group, Chicago, IL; J Newlin, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Toni Dancu, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Andee Rubin, TERC, Cambridge, MA; and Karyn Bertschi, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland

CORE PRACTICES: Research and Evaluation

Learning Opportunities through Making and Tinkering Convention Center, La Cienega The Maker movement has grown, but the learning potential of making remains largely undocumented. This session presents four research studies of learning in different making/tinkering contexts: science museums, children’s museums, out-of-school clubs, and after-school programs. After their presentations, panelists will engage the audience in a conversation about learning through making. Session Leader: Joshua Gutwill, Director of Visitor Research and Evaluation, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA Presenters: Lisa Brahms, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh; Lee Martin, University of California, Davis; Shirin Vossoughi, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; and Meg Escude, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA

Convention Center, San Miguel This session will engage participants in a discussion about bringing science to visitors through live connections with scientists and expeditions in remote locations. The panel will explore the opportunities and rewards for visitors and institutions from live connections with science expeditions and discuss various methods and technologies employed. Session Leaders: Christopher Knowlton, Marine Research Associate, and Dwight Coleman, Director, Inner Space Center, University of Rhode Island, Narragansett Presenter: Mary Miller, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

STEM Fellows: Life-Long, LifeWide, Life-Deep Inspiration for Teachers Convention Center, Mesilla Explore a STEM Fellows Program (SFP) through the experiences of an elementary science teacher, university professor, and informal educators. In SFP, formal educators are introduced to the methodologies of informal educators and valid tools for assessing learning and inspiration, allowing delivery of “Life-Long,” “Life-Wide” (across multiple venues), and “Life-Deep”(appropriate levels of complexity) learning. Session Leaders: Robert Corbin, Vice President, Learning Experiences, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC; Elaine O’Reilly, PASS Center Coordinator/Advisor/Lecturer, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Evaluator, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Center for Educational Measurement and Evaluation; and Stephanie Hathaway, Director, Education, Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, NC Presenter: Cindy Woolery, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Elizabeth Traditional Elementary School, Charlotte, NC


Monday, October 21

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Staff Development

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

Design 360: Cross-Departmental Planning from All Directions

Integrating Scientists and Their Research into the Science Museum Matrix

Convention Center, Dona Ana What better way to encourage employees to believe in and practice your mission than by giving them true ownership within your institution? From day to day operations, traveling exhibits, and large scale events, cross-departmental involvement will give you a 360-degree view of what your institution is really capable of. Session Leaders: Mellisa Blankenship, Manager of Workshop and Offsite Programs, Kentucky Science Center, Louisville; Doug Buchanan, Education Programs Marketing Manager, COSI, Columbus, OH; and Mikko Myllykoski, Experience Director, Heureka, the Finnish Science Centre, Helsinki

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Integrated STEM Education: A Conceptual Framework and Future Research Agenda Convention Center, Aztec What does a truly integrated STEM (iSTEM) learning experience look like? How can science centers provide leadership, resources, and exemplary models for iSTEM in their communities? Hear about a recent National Academy of Engineering report about iSTEM and what research is recommended to advance the iSTEM field. Session Leader: David Heil, President, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR Presenters: Greg Pearson, National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC; Margaret Honey, New York Hall of Science, Queens; and Mia Jackson, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR

Convention Center, Galisteo This panel of scientists with active research programs working in museum settings aims to inspire lively discussion on how bringing scientists into science museums, towards demystifying intimidating fields of study, can make science more accessible and strengthen the institution’s role in informing and inspiring public interest in science. Session Leader: Rachel Smith, Director, Astronomy & Space Observation Research Lab, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and Assistant Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC Presenters: Michelle Trautwein, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Nicole Kwiek, The Ohio State University and COSI, Columbus, OH; Molly Brown, The Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, and COSI, Columbus, OH; Kurt Huffman, COSI, Columbus, OH; and Julie Urban, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Youth Programs

Engage Teens with a YouthDirected Teen Science Café Convention Center, Brazos Learn how to attract youth to your institution with highly interactive Teen Science Cafés. Presenters from the national Teen Science Café Network will provide you with key strategies, resources, and lessons learned to jump start your own local program. Join the network for continued support. Session Leaders: Michelle Hall, President, Science Education Solutions, Los Alamos, NM; Michael Mayhew, Senior Research Scientist, Science Education Solutions, Los Alamos, NM; and Stacey Forsyth, Director, Science Discovery, University of Colorado, Boulder Presenters: Katey Ahmann, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh; E.

Howard Rutherford, Pier Aquarium, St. Petersburg, FL; Sharon Locke, Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville STEM Center; Sean Herberts, Southern Illinois University–Edwardsville; Brooke Cockson, The Pier Aquarium, St. Petersburg, FL; Meena Selvakumar, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; Alexandra Rose, University of Colorado, Museum of Natural History, Boulder; and Lynn Cross, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Finance and Development

Your Assets Are More Valuable Than You Thought! Convention Center, Tijeras Creating new revenue streams by leveraging your institution’s assets presents enormous opportunities as well as challenges. Licensing can be lucrative but needs to be considered carefully. Through fascinating case studies and expert speakers, this session will explore the issues and successful management of risks in capitalizing on your intellectual property. Session Leader: Audrey O’Connell, Principal, Audrey O’Connell and Associates, Seattle, WA Presenters: John Beckman, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL; Julie Moskalyk, Science North, Sudbury, ON, Canada; and Wendy Heimann-Nunes, Nolan Heimann, Beverly Hills, CA

Volunteer Managers CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

Development Professionals CoP Meeting Convention Center, Nambe Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

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CORE PRACTICES: Visitor/ Customer Service

CORE PRACTICES: Staff Development

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Geeked Up for Guest Service: Round 2

Training Facilitators for Their Important Roles on the Exhibit Floor

Collaborative Family Learning at Engineering Studio: Design, Facilitation, and Evidence

Convention Center, Ruidoso Facilitators, whether interns, volunteers, or paid staff, wear many hats as they effectively engage visitors. Come experience snippets of training elements and then join the conversation as we share lessons learned, ready-to-use strategies, and resources on training staff in basic interpretive skills, customer service, questioning strategies, and inquiry.

Convention Center, La Cienega Creating collaborative, design-based engineering experiences that are inviting to a wide range of visitors can be challenging. Come hear about the development, facilitation, and use of Engineering Studio, a new exhibit at the Science Museum of Minnesota, where family groups engage in the design process together on the museum floor.

Session Leader: Heidi Heidgerken, Visitor Services Weekend Manager, Explora, Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Eddie Goldstein, Denver Museum of Nature & Science; and Andrea Deets, Explora, Albuquerque, NM

Session Leader: Gina Svarovsky, Senior Research and Evaluation Associate, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Presenters: Bette Schmit and Keith Braafladt, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

Convention Center, Cimarron “Speed date” your way to a bigger network in this repeat of a popular session from 2011! Spend a fast-paced hour with members of the ASTC Visitor Service Community of Practice to learn and share how different museums are serving guests, engaging visitors, and deepening relationships with patrons. Session Leader: Toph Bryant, Visitor Services Senior Manager, Kentucky Science Center, Louisville Presenters: Jennifer Jenkins, WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology, Bloomington, IN; Josh Giblin, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; Adam Phelps, Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, Cary, NC; Robert Herbert, Lancaster Science Factory, PA; and Carla Thacker, Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL

9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

ASTC Job Bank Convention Center, Estancia Room The ASTC Job Bank features listings of current positions available at member institutions and companies, as well as resumes from job seekers. 9:45–11:00 a.m CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Hitchhiking to Pluto: YouthDesigned Planetarium Shows Convention Center, Aztec Forget a driver’s license: how about giving teens their own spaceships? In this roundtable session, three science centers discuss the rewards and challenges of programs that teach youth to use planetarium software to design and present original space shows. Session Leader: Nathan Bellomy, Youth Initiatives Coordinator, YouthCaN NYC, and Coordinator, Youth Programs Alumni, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY Presenters: Rik Panganiban, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; and Lisa Hoover, Chabot Space & Science Center, Oakland, CA 50 ASTC 2013 final program

CORE PRACTICES: Youth Programs

Science Centers and Girls’ LongTerm STEM Engagement and Career Choices Convention Center, Pecos This interactive session will engage participants in a learning discussion around the role of science centers in girls’ and young women’s long-term participation in STEM. Panelists will first present current research and best practices and then facilitate discussions aimed at sharing knowledge and advancing the field. Session Leader: Jennifer Adams, Assistant Professor, Brooklyn College, City University of New York Presenters: Preeti Gupta, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; Dale McCreedy, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; and Karen Peterson, National Girls Collaborative Project, Lynnwood, WA

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

A Baker’s Dozen: 13 Ideas That Will Rock Your Outreach! Convention Center, San Miguel With so many sessions, why should you choose this one? Consider this: we will present 13 great ideas for outreach that work. In five minutes or less, presenters will offer you their best idea or program that you can utilize at your museum. No hype, just great ideas. Session Leader: Paul Taylor, Manager of Traveling Science Shows, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA Presenters: Brian Berry, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Jennifer Young, Science Central, Fort Wayne, IN; Jonah Cohen, The Children’s Museum, West Hartford, CT; Hannah Motl, spectrUM Discovery Area, Missoula, MT; Keri Medwid, Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA; Jeannie Colton, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix; Mia Jackson, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR; Miriam Krause, Maryland Science Center, Baltimore; Joe Schwanebeck, Science Center of Iowa & Blank IMAX Dome Theater, Des Moines; Holly Walter Kerby, Fusion Science Theater, Madison, WI; Jessica Aronson Cook, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; and Anika Taylor, The Bakken Library and Museum, Minneapolis, MN


Monday, October 21

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Learning Labs in Science Centers

Government Policy: Could Science Centers Have an Even Bigger Impact?

Engaging a Linguistically Diverse Audience in Museum Education Programs

Convention Center, Galisteo Science centers across the globe have relationships with governments from local to international levels. In this session, international experts explore in which policy arenas science centers could increase their impact on government policy and how we could better achieve this, with enhanced outcomes for citizens, science centers, and government agencies.

Convention Center, Cimarron This workshop will introduce participants to the synergistic relationship between science and literacy development. Interactive activities will demonstrate instructional strategies that promote enhanced understanding for students from diverse linguistic backgrounds. Resources to successfully engage English language learners in science learning will be shared and discussed. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated.

Convention Center, Mesilla Three diverse examples of Learning Labs in science centers will be highlighted. Funded jointly by IMLS and the MacArthur Foundation, Learning Labs are intended to engage youth in mentorled, interest-based, youth-centered, collaborative learning using digital and traditional media. Funded projects are research-based and designed to provide prototypes for the field. Session Leader: Helen Wechsler, Senior Program Officer, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Washington, DC Presenters: Joe Heimlich, OSUExtension@ COSI, Columbus, OH; Chuck English, Science Museum of Virginia, Richmond; Kristin Bayans, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; and Azuka MuMin, COSI, Columbus, OH

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Sharing: If Preschoolers Can Do It, So Can We Convention Center, Dona Ana How does sharing among museums bring tangible, measurable benefits? From infant workshops, library partnerships, and play coaches, to the first children’s museum in Africa, “Science Beyond the Boundaries” science centers and children’s museums discuss best practices in science literacy and school readiness programs for preschoolers in the “Early Learners Collaborative.” Session Leader: Jennifer Jovanovic, Director, Science Beyond the Boundaries, Saint Louis Science Center Presenters: Amy Eisenmann, COSI, Columbus, OH; Derek Fish, Unizul Science Centre, Mtunzini, South Africa; Elisa Israel, Saint Louis Science Center; Diane Robaina, Museum of Discovery and Science, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Tanya Feldman, Imagine Children's Museum, Everett, WA; and Melissa Thomas, Saint Louis Science Center, MO

Session Leaders: Anthony (Bud) Rock, CEO, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC; and Graham Durant, Director, QUESTACON, The National Science and Technology Centre, Kingston, Australia Presenters: Claire Craig, Government Office for Science, London, England, United Kingdom; Asger Hoeg, Experimentarium, Copenhagen, Denmark; and Dennis Schatz, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

How We Learned from Interactives That Suck Convention Center, Brazos What makes a good interactive exhibit? Why do others fail miserably? We must answer these questions because much of our institutions’ success rides on visitors having positive experiences with interactive exhibits. Panelists from diverse perspectives will present guiding principles illustrated with both good and bad examples. Q&A will follow. Session Leader: Adam Zuckerman, Director of Exhibits and Public Programs, The Discovery Museum and Planetarium, Bridgeport, CT Presenters: Clifford Wagner, Clifford Wagner Science Interactives Inc., Philadelphia, PA; Daniel MacDonald, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Kathleen Krafft, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; Kelly Fernandi, Minotaur Mazes, Seattle, WA; Franklin Ebbert, LandWave AE, Arlington, VA; and Tal Berman, MadaTech, The Israel National Museum of Science, Technology, & Space, Haifa

Session Leaders: Erica Barrueto, Director of School and Family Programs, and Ellen Blinderman, Coordinator of Early Childhood Programs, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

Beyond Fire and Flood: Is Your Museum Prepared for Emergencies? Convention Center, Tijeras Museums have emergency plans that address ‘what to do’ in the case of a fire or flood and in some cases how to care for collections in such circumstances. Are museums prepared for other emergencies such as an active shooter, an armed robbery or a domestic dispute that spilled over into the Museum? Session Leaders: Alicia Borrego-Pierce, Deputy Director, and Rachel Veraka, Operations Manager, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque Presenter: AJ Lehocky, Albuquerque Police Department, NM

Museum Screens CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!

Research and Evaluation CoP Meeting Convention Center, Nambe Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about! final program ASTC 2013

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11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

Is There Science in a Maker Event? Convention Center, Ruidoso The Maker movement has motivated us to investigate new ways of learning and thinking about the material world. But opinions vary. Where is the science behind the craft-making? Join us for a debate on the merits of the Maker movement. All audience members will be involved in the presentation. Session Leader: Hooley McLaughlin, Vice President Science Experience, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada Presenters: Karen Wilkinson, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Mike Petrich, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Paul Orselli, POW! (Paul Orselli Workshop), Baldwin, NY; and Lisa Brahms, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: Exhibits and Experience

Exhibit SEED: Resources for Sustainable Exhibits Convention Center, Pecos Explore tools and resources for developing, designing, and building more sustainable exhibits. Learn about sustainable practices developed and tested at science centers across the U.S. and documented on exhibitSEED.org. Bring your ideas and questions to add to this resource for the museum community. Session Leaders: Kari Jensen, Senior Exhibit Developer, and Victoria Coats, Manager of Exhibit Research & Development, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland Presenters: Cheryl McCallum, Children’s Museum of Houston; Sean Duran, Miami Science Museum; and Bette Schmit, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Engaging Visitors with Disabilities in STEM Learning Convention Center, La Cienega Visitors with disabilities are an important and growing part of science center audiences. This session will share specific techniques and tools that have been used successfully to fully engage these visitors in learning in science centers, both on a broad institutional level and exhibit-specific level. Session Leader: Anna Lindgren-Streicher, Project Manager, Research & Evaluation, Museum of Science, Boston, MA Presenters: Leigh Ann Mesiti, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Jim Spadaccini, Ideum, Corrales, NM; Ben Wilson, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; and Alexandra Burch, National Museum of Science and Industry, London, England, United Kingdom

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Communications and Public Relations

Learning the Basis for Participation Convention Center, Mesilla Widespread STEM engagement is crucial to solutions for the huge challenges humanity faces. But how can science centers serve segments of their communities that are unlikely to attend a museum? Festivals and dialogue events provide case studies for programs that create relevance with both experienced visitors and otherwise hard-to-reach audiences. Session Leaders: Jan Riise, Executive Director, European Science Events Association (Eusea), Onsala, Sweden; and Ben Wiehe, Manager, Science Festival Alliance, MIT Museum, Cambridge, MA Presenters: Natalie Ireland, Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, England, United Kingdom; and Gerri Trooskin, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

The Final Frontier? Interpreting Space for the Next Generation Convention Center, Tijeras As space shuttles become artifacts and new research priorities emerge, NASA is evolving. How can science centers adapt to changing aerospace priorities and communicate them to visitors? Learn 52 ASTC 2013 final program

how several science centers have partnered with NASA to develop compelling new exhibitions and programs that present the many possible “final frontiers.” Session Leader: Whitney Owens, Vice President, Education, Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland, OH Presenters: Joseph Imholte, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Karen Carney, The Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL; Diane Perlov, California Science Center, Los Angeles; and Nora Normandy, NASA, Washington, DC

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

Public Engagement with Science (PES) Community of Practice Convention Center, Aztec Join ASTC’s PES Community of Practice for a review of our 2013 activities and updates on plans for 2014. This session will offer an opportunity to provide feedback on how this Community of Practice can best support your institution’s public engagement efforts and to learn more about public engagement with science. Session Leader: Larry Bell, Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, Museum of Science, Boston, MA

NIH ISE Funding Workshop Convention Center, Cimarron The NIH SEPA program provides fiveyear, $1.3M awards for health-related science museum projects. Program Officer Dr. Tony Beck will discuss the SEPA program and the NIH grant and review processes. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Tony Beck, Program Officer, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Presenters: Judy Brown, Miami Science Center, Coral Gables, Florida; and Martin Weiss, New York Hall of Science, Queens

Making and Tinkering Spaces in Museums CoP Meeting Convention Center, Nambe Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about!


Monday, October 21

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Management

Informalscience.org, Newly Rebuilt for the Informal Science Education Field

So You Wanna Be A CEO?

Convention Center, San Miguel The Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE) re-launched informalscience.org in May 2013, transforming the site into a one-stop shop for informal science education professionals by merging several related sites, connecting databases, and adding new functionality. Join us for an overview of available resources, tools, and discussion. Session Leaders: Trevor Nesbit, Director of Online Engagement, and Jamie Bell, Project Director and Principal Investigator, CAISE, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC Presenters: Darrell Porcello, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; and Miles Washington, Ideum, Albuquerque, NM

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Science Centers and Gender Equity in STEM: Mapping our Opportunities Convention Center, Dona Ana Informal science education is a complex and multi-faceted effort, which must respond to and reflect a variety of social issues, including issues of gender equity in STEM participation. An international coalition of museum and science center professionals from Latin America, Europe, and the United States is developing a research agenda to help articulate the unique roles of science centers and museums on this issue. Initial findings will be presented, and participants will have the opportunity to review and add to this emerging research agenda for the field. Session Leader: Judy Brown, Senior Vice President, Education, Miami Science Museum, Coral Gables, FL

Convention Center, Galisteo What does it take to lead a science center? Is there a particular path to follow? Get practical advice from current CEOs to help you pave your way to the top. Session Leader: Chevy Humphrey, President and CEO, Arizona Science Center, Phoenix

Featured Sessions

Ten Years of Going to Work on Mars Every Day Convention Center, Ballroom B/C This modern natural history expedition to another planet began 10 years ago and continues to result in major revisions of our knowledge about the red planet. A science team member from the Mars Exploration Rover mission, Larry Crumpler, will give a summary of results and an update of the ongoing mission. Presenter: Larry S. Crumpler, Research Curator, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque

extended sessions

11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Still Kicking It Indie Style: Low Cost, High Impact Programming! Convention Center, Brazos We love doing hands-on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) activities with our visitors. But we can’t always afford expensive materials and equipment. This seventh installment of the Indie Style series will showcase multiple low-cost, high impact STEAM experiences guaranteed to help advance your visitors’ curiosity, creativity, and comprehension. Session Leader: Keith Ostfeld, Director of Educational Technology and Exhibit Development, Children’s Museum of Houston

Presenters: Darrell Porcello, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; R. Lewis Ferguson, Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences of West Virginia, Charleston; Lisa Regalla, Maker Education Initiative, St. Paul, MN; Karen Wilkinson, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Kevin Dilley, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; Corinne Sosso, Discovery Center Museum, Rockford, IL; Jonah Cohen, The Children’s Museum, West Hartford, CT; Kristina Anderson, Perot Museum of Nature and Science, Dallas, TX; Megan Pratt, The Pensacola MESS Hall, FL; Aisha Salazar, Ideaventions, Oakton, VA; Maura Thompson, WNET-Thirteen, New York, NY; Elena Baca, Explora, Albuquerque, NM; Sarah Carter, SciGirls, Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN; Rosie Norlander, Sandia Mountain Natural History Center, Albuquerque, NM; and Paul Mauermann, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque

1:00–1:30 p.m.

Creating a Great Conference Session (Brown Bag Lunch) Convention Center, Tijeras Want some practical advice on how to make your session proposal stand out from the crowd? Want to share your innovative practices, programs and partnerships. Bring your own lunch and learn about the updated guidelines and key factors that will strengthen your session proposal Session Leaders: Angela Wenger, Executive Vice President and COO, New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences, Camden; and Karen Hager, Director, Science Engagement, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

1:00–2:00 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Development Brown Bag Lunch Convention Center, Cochiti Join Greg Simoncini (Simoncini Strategies) for an informal lunch discussion. Bring your own lunch and your questions about donor communication, creating a philanthropic culture, and more! Luncheon speaker sponsored by the Arizona Science Center and The Franklin Institute

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1:00–2:30 p.m.

CEO/Trustee Luncheon Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta Room A luncheon designed to offer museum CEOs and trustees the opportunity to get acquainted, network, and address issues of mutual interest. The Mother of All Parades Hear about the challenges and opportunities associated with the high-risk, high-profile project of transporting Space Shuttle Endeavour through 12 miles of urban streets. This involved a crushing number of media and demanding fundraising requirements, the engineering challenges of moving a massive, national treasure unprotected down city streets, and addressing contentious community concerns. Panelists will share learned insights and perspectives, relevant to science centers and museums of all sizes, which enabled the project to be successful. Preregistration required. Luncheon fee: $45. Open to museum CEOs and trustees only. Presenters: Jeffrey Rudolph, President and CEO, California Science Center, Los Angeles, CA; and William T. Harris, Senior Vice President, Development and Marketing, Shell Amega, Vice President, Communications, and Monique Hudson, Vice President, Government and Communication Affairs, California Science Center Foundation, Los Angeles, CA Sponsored by National Geographic Cinema Ventures

2:00–3:15 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Learning From Reggio Emilia about Exploring in Nature with Families Convention Center, Galisteo This workshop examines how three educators are inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach in their work with children and their families while exploring nature. The natural world provided an environment for “playful inquiry.” Participants will explore tools and techniques that promote opportunities for children and families as co-explorers in nature. Limited to 60 participants. 54 ASTC 2013 final program

Session Leaders: Cirrelda SniderBryan, Early Childhood Educator, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque; and Gigi Yu, Project Manager, New Mexico Wonder of Learning Collaborative, Albuquerque Presenter: Linda McDowell, Bernalillo County Open Space and New Mexico School for the Deaf Preschool, Albuquerque

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Science Learning Activation: Positioning Youth for Future Success in Science Convention Center, Ruidoso The session explores how science learning activation ignites persistent engagement in science. In this session we explore multiple pathways that learners follow from childhood to career; consider a functional theory of activation; examine measures of activation that support program improvement and evaluation; and discuss how to design activating learning experiences. Session Leader: Rena Dorph, Director of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA Presenters: Lisa Brahms, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh; Matthew Cannady, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; Eric Greenwald, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA; Catherine Halversen, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; and Gretchen Walker, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Digital and Emerging Media

Creative Use of Digital Media in Science Centers and Museums Convention Center, Pecos This session discusses the creative use of digital media in our industry, including high-definition slow motion work, interactive video-conferencing, pioneering work in science engagement and mobile augmented reality technology, the merger of physical space and cyberspace, the application of digital adoption technology to get the right balance, digital design studio initiatives, etc.

Session Leader: Chee-Kuen Yip, Honorable Curator and Advisor, Macao Science Center, Macao SAR, China Presenters: Graham Durant, QUESTACON, The National Science and Technology Centre, Kingston, Australia; Robert Semper, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Tit Meng Lim, Science Centre Singapore; and Diana Marques, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Effective and Speedy Exhibit/ Program Development Using the Agile Approach Convention Center, La Cienega In order to keep visitor experiences fresh and relevant, the process museum professionals use to develop exhibits and programs must evolve. Learn how to implement an Agile Development Process that is visitor-centered, rapid, and iterative. Session Leader: Lath Carlson, Vice President–Exhibits and Content Development, The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, CA Presenter: Maryanna Rogers, The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Combating Anti-Science in • Our Society Convention Center, San Miguel “Everyone is entitled to his own opinions, but not to his own facts.” (D.P. Moynihan) A growing anti-science trend encourages citizens to think that all claimed “facts” are equal. For science-related matters from evolution to global warming, this is harmful. How can we combat this relativism and restore respect for science? Session Leader: Eddie Goldstein, Senior Educator/Coordinator for Space Science Gallery Programs, Denver Museum of Nature & Science Presenters: Alan Friedman, Friedman Consults, New York, NY; and J Newlin, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul


Monday, October 21

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Community and Member Relations

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Exhibits and Experience

CORE PRACTICES: Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

Citizen Engagement on Science and Policy: Critical Questions, Best Practices

We Didn’t Come Here to Play!

Supporting More Inclusive Approaches to Citizen Science

Convention Center, Mesilla Whether about local zoning or global climate change, science centers face critical questions when engaging a public audience in dialogue and deliberation. This session brings experts in public dialogue and deliberation together for a frank discussion of the problems and benefits of public engagement on science policy questions. Session Leader: Trevor Parry-Giles, Associate Director for Academic & Professional Affairs, National Communication Association, Washington, DC Presenters: Martin Carcasson, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Anthony Dudo, University of Texas, Austin; and Lisa Keranen, University of Colorado-Denver

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Developing and Running Successful Revenue Generating Programs Convention Center, Aztec Museums are under a great deal of pressure to generate revenues in new and creative ways. Learn about successful programs and share your successes and great ideas with the group. We will discuss how to develop, market, staff, and sustain programs that can be replicated in other museums. Session Leader: Jessica Lausch, Director of Visitor Experience, Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh, PA Presenters: Tammie Kahn, Children’s Museum of Houston; and Jen Snively Cassidy, COSI, Columbus, OH

Convention Center, Brazos Exhibits and programs that focus on skills development are often misunderstood. Parents often don’t see or value the skills their children are developing in open-ended experiences. How do we help parents or other stakeholders understand the value of these types of experiences? Session Leaders: Devon Hamilton, Vice President, Content, TELUS Spark, Calgary, AB, Canada; and Peggy Monahan, Exhibit Projects Creative Director, New York Hall of Science, Queens, NY Presenters: Maryanna Rogers, The Tech Museum of Innovation, San Jose, CA; and Betsy Adamson, Children’s Discovery Museum of the Desert, Rancho Mirage, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

A Little Less Conversation, a Little More Action Convention Center, Dona Ana Strategic thinkers understand that diversity and inclusion practices not only positively affect your visitor experience, but will ultimately help your museum’s bottom line. From large museums to small, from comprehensive diversity plans to independent staff efforts, presenters will discuss a variety of methods for expanding institutional diversity through policies and practices. Participants will identify a plan that fits the needs of their institution Session Leader: Timothy Hecox, Exhibit & Program Developer, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland Presenters: Adrienne Barnett, Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA; Azuka MuMin, COSI, Columbus, OH; Courtney Rudd, San Francisco State University, CA; Frieda Smith, Saint Louis Science Center, MO; Jennifer Jenkins, WonderLab Museum of Science, Health and Technology, Bloomington, IN; Josh Kemper, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; and Laura Huerta Migus, Association of ScienceTechnology Centers, Washington, DC

Convention Center, Tijeras An NSF-funded partnership between ASTC and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology explored how science centers can be key players in more inclusive citizen science. This session will share promising practices, case studies, and more, emphasizing the importance of inclusivity for all stakeholders, including science centers, communities, and scientists. Session Leader: Jennifer Shirk, Project Leader, CitizenScience.org, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY Presenters: Norman Porticella, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY; and Flisa Stevenson, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Houston, TX

Visitor Services CoP Meeting Convention Center, Acoma Open to current or prospective CoP members, those interested in the topic, or those just interested in seeing what CoPs are all about! double sessions

2:00–4:30 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Summit on Informal Science Networks Convention Center, Cimarron This double session will address the development and operation of informal science learning networks (CAISE, NiseNet, etc.). After network leaders discuss building networks, network tools, how to be the “go to” network, and how to sustain networks after funding ends, small groups will discuss key network issues. Preregistration required. Limited to 60 participants. Session Leader: Robert Russell, Senior Education Associate, National Center for Interactive Learning, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO

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Keynote Speaker: Louis Gomez, Professor of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles Presenters: Barbara Streicher, Austrian Science Center Network, Vienna; Larry Bell, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Karen Peterson, National Girls Collaborative Project, Lynnwood, WA; Paul Dusenbery, Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO; Carol Tang, Lawrence Hall of Science, Berkeley, CA; Minda Borun, The Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, PA; Ben Wiehe, Science Festival Alliance, MIT Museum, Cambridge, MA; and Dennis Schatz, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA This session is partially sponsored by the Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE)

3:45 p.m.–5:00 p.m. CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

Museums As Community Hubs: Building the Maker Network Convention Center, Pecos Science Centers are incorporating “maker” programs into their regular offerings, including maker spaces, maker faires, camps, workshops, etc. At the same time maker groups are growing up in communities large and small. This session explores the opportunity for science centers to serve as hubs for making activity in their communities. Session Leader: Eric Siegel, Director and Chief Content Officer, New York Hall of Science, Queens Presenters: Keith Braafladt, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; Lisa Brahms, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh; Lisa Regalla, Maker Education Initiative, St. Paul, MN; and David Wells, New York Hall of Science, Queens

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Education and Learning

STEM Engagement, Collaborations, and Grant Competitions: Ask NASA and NOAA Convention Center, La Cienega NOAA and NASA directly provide unique content for STEM engagement and fund others to support learners in diverse communities. Education managers from Washington, D.C. and California, or regional experts, explain the present and future of the agencies’ competitive funding opportunities; 56 ASTC 2013 final program

support for learning practices; content resources infrastructures; and existing/ potential partnerships. Session Leaders: Mary Sladek, Manager, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC; Anita Sohus, NASA Museum Alliance Manager, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; and Carrie McDougall, Senior Program Manager, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Washington, DC

CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Training Research Scientists to Be Effective Communicators with Public Audiences Convention Center, San Miguel There is increasing demand for science centers to involve research scientists in presenting current science, especially topics that have societal impacts (e.g., climate change). Come hear about four institutions’ programs that meet this demand and have addressed the challenge of scientists being content experts, but not typically strong science communicators. Session Leader: Dennis Schatz, Senior Vice President, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA Presenters: Sheena Laursen, Experimentarium, Copenhagen, Denmark; Linda Leuchars, Dundee Science Centre, Dundee, United Kingdom; and Katherine Nielson, Science and Health Education Partnership–UCSF, San Francisco, CA

CORE PRACTICES: Volunteers

Developing Volunteer Talent to Increase Organizational Retention and Talent Convention Center, Mesilla This is a panel discussion inviting innovative volunteer programs to share volunteer professional development opportunities and career tracks, data supporting the success of these programs, key lessons learned, and future plans. Developing these key stakeholders can increase organizational retention and development of talent, and allow us to live our mission of being lifelong learning organizations. Session Leader: Craig Kelley, Manager of Career Ladder & Team Leader of Volunteers, COSI, Columbus, OH Presenters: Terri Gregoroff, COSI, Columbus, OH; Lisa Hoover, Chabot Space & Science Center, Oakland, CA; and Shelly Hanover, Children’s Discovery Museum, Normal, IL

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Are We Really Doing Our Job As Life-Long Learning Organizations? Convention Center, Dona Ana Science centers offer unique opportunities as hubs of networks of cultural and educational institutions collaborating in the task of preparing well-informed citizens in science-related issues. Necessary characteristics of an informal educational environment and new research questions are explored. Session Leader: Elaine Reynoso, President, SOMEDICyT, and coordinator, Diplomado en Diuvlgacion de la Ciencia, Universum, Museo de las Ciencias, UNAM, Mexico City, Mexico Presenters: Nohora Elisabeth Hoyos, Maloka, Centro Interactivo de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia; Carmen Sanchez, Universum, Museo de las Ciencias, UNAM, Mexico City, Mexico; Luisa Massarani, Museu da Vida–Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Brenton Honeyman, QUESTACON, The National Science and Technology Centre, Canberra, Australia; and Paul Tatter, Albuquerque, NM

CORE PRACTICES: Finance and Development

Mini-Grants: Doing a Lot with Just a Little Convention Center, Aztec Even small projects can have a big effect! In this fast-paced lightning session, presenters will share how they have taken advantage of mini-grant programs to accomplish strategic goals in their own institutions. Presenters will include National Girls Collaborative Project and NISE Network mini-grant awardees. Session Leaders: Catherine McCarthy, Project Leader–NISE Network, Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul; and Karen Peterson, Principal Investigator, National Girls Collaborative Project, Lynnwood, WA Presenters: Kimberly Hanson, Las Cruces Museum of Natural History, NM; Michael Rathbun, Discovery Center Museum, Rockford, IL; R. L. Lindsey, ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum, Ashland, OR; Christi Whitworth, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, Rosman, NC; Lisa Chappa, Informal Science Learning Associates, Laredo, TX; and Heather Armstrong, Nanoscience and Microsystem Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque


CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Digital and Emerging Media

CHALLENGES FOR THE FIELD: Research and Evaluation

Bringing the Planetarium to Earth: Community Dialogues for Ecological Resilience

Attendance Trends: Ten Years Past and into the Future

Convention Center, Galisteo The Worldviews Network employs a new model of engagement using data visualizations. Each institution identifies a local human-environment issue requiring public discourse, and collaborates with external scientists and organizations to host a presentation on that theme. Live engagements about proactive strategies give network members a powerful role in their communities. Session Leader: Ka Chun Yu, Curator, Denver Museum of Nature & Science Presenters: Jessica Sickler, COSI, Columbus, OH; Ryan Wyatt, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco; Edward Gardiner, NOAA Climate Program Office, Asheville, NC; Matthew Linke, University of Michigan Museum of Natural History, Ann Arbor; and Jim Rock, Indigenous Education Design, Golden Valley, MN

CORE PRACTICES: Exhibits and Experience

Effective Strategies for Featuring Current Science in Museum Settings Convention Center, Brazos Presenters will briefly describe approaches for integrating current science and contemporary research into their institutions’ programs and exhibits, focusing on effective strategies and lessons learned. Then, participants will discuss a strategy in more depth during two rounds of small group discussions, with each table moderated by a presenter. Session Leader: Dana Vukajlovich, Portal to the Public Program Manager, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA Presenters: Carol Lynn Alpert, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; MJ Morse, Museum of Science, Boston, MA; Lauren Russell, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; Meena Selvakumar, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA; and Kristin Leigh, Explora, Albuquerque, NM

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Convention Center, Tijeras What factors have contributed to attendance patterns in recent years, and what might we expect in years to come? This session will include a look at ASTC’s 10-Year Attendance Report, contributing factors at small and large centers, and possible future changes to our audience, followed by small group discussions. Session Leader: Christine Ruffo, Research and Web Manager, Association of ScienceTechnology Centers, Washington, DC Presenters: Charles Trautmann, Sciencenter, Ithaca, NY; and Susie Wilkening, Reach Advisors, Quincy, MA

extended sessions

3:45–5:15 p.m. CORE PRACTICES: Education and Learning

Family STEM Explorations: Engaging Families with Elementary-Age Children in STEM Convention Center, Ruidoso Experience a family STEM event firsthand and be inspired to create effective family learning environments. Try out hands-on science, engineering, and math activities that engage the entire family using simple, inexpensive materials. Learn how to partner with schools, businesses, and higher education to host events for families in your community. Limited to 60 participants. First come, first seated. Session Leader: Mia Jackson, Associate, David Heil & Associates, Inc., Portland, OR Presenters: David Heil, David Heil & Associates, Inc., and Foundation for Family Science & Engineering, Portland, OR; and Maddie Zeigler, Foundation for Family Science & Engineering and New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Albuquerque

5:15–6:30 p.m.

Keynote Session/ASTC Business Meeting Convention Center, Ballroom B/C 5:15–5:45 p.m.

ASTC Business Meeting Speakers: Bryce Seidl, President & CEO, Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA, and ASTC President; and Anthony (Bud) Rock, CEO, Association of Science-Technology Centers, Washington, DC

5:45–6:30 p.m.

Thinking Big: A Conversation with Neal Stephenson Speakers: Neal Stephenson, Author; Ed Finn, Founding Director, Center for Science and the Imagination, Arizona State University, Tempe; and Alexander Zwissler, Executive Director/CEO, Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 Tuesday is Wearable Identity Day! Be sure to wear items that identify your science center or museum. Badges, buttons, hats, jackets, ties, and t-shirts are all welcome. Feel free to dress comfortably and casually, especially today! 7:00–8:00 a.m.

NISE Network Partner Breakfast Hyatt Albuquerque, Fiesta Room ASTC attendees from NISE Network partner institutions are invited to join us for an informational and networking breakfast. By invitation only. 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Open House at Host Museums Continuous shuttle service from the Convention Center to Explora and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science will begin at 8:30 a.m. Transportation will be provided to the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History from Explora and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

At Explora:

Explore Portal to the Public activities— visitors and Albuquerque scientists engage in experiential activities related to the scientists’ current work. See dynamic theater presentations, including Eratosthenes’ Shadow, Frank Oppenheimer: Of Bombs and Museums, and Fusion Science Theater. Meet and greet staff educators, exhibit developers and fabricators, and marketing, public relations, graphics, and volunteer coordinators. See snippets of animated films students have made in Explora programs.

At the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History:

Explore the nation’s only congressionally chartered museum in its field and learn the story of the Atomic Age, from early research of nuclear development through today’s peaceful uses of nuclear technology (the Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate member). Learn about National Nuclear Science Week, started by the Museum. Special tours will be available of the new Dynamics of Flight exhibition, and the Museum’s collection of vintage aircraft. Meet and greet staff educators and exhibit designers. 60 ASTC 2013 final program

At the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science:

Take a behind the scenes tour of the Museum’s collection of over 90,000 fossil and biology specimens, including a demonstration of a specimen digitization project. Take a special art and natural history tour of the Museum. Explore the Museum’s Cultural Technology Classroom, including its 3D printing capabilities, in partnership with New Mexico Highlands University. Take a shuttle to the Sandia Mountain Natural History Center and learn about its field ecology program and about the wildlife of the Sandia Mountains. 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Big Screen Day Lockheed Martin DynaTheater, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science See schedule and description of movies on page 61. 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Science in the Park/Outreach Live Tiguex Park See what happens when science centers and museums from all over the world share their best outreach activities and demonstrations with students from the Albuquerque area! Sponsored by Wells Fargo

11:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Digital Planetarium Demonstrations The Planetarium, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Evans & Sutherland (E&S) will present Digistar 5, the world’s leading digital planetarium system, using multiple video projectors and our auto-align/autoblend technology for a virtually seamless

full-dome image. E&S will demonstrate Digistar 5’s powerful features and highlight shows from their extensive fulldome show library, including giant screen films converted to digital full-dome. Visit the Sky-Skan demonstration featuring a stunning 4K resolution system and see what’s it really like to float in space like an astronaut. Imagine what it would be like to fly inside of a protein molecule. Sky-Skan Defniti theaters put you inside the visuals like no other experience can. The opportunity to educate and inspire the science and technology leaders of tomorrow is here. Google Lunar XPRIZe will present scenes from its fulldome show Back to the Moon For Good to be released in November of 2013. Executive Producer Alexandra Hall will introduce the show, and the programs available to science centers that support this exciting race to the Moon. The Navajo Sky is a NASA-supported project of educational digital planetarium modules that feature authentic Navajo sky stories, complementary Western astronomy vignettes, and compelling features from NASA space science missions.

Schedule of Presentations

11:00-11:40 a.m...........Evans & Sutherland 11:45 a.m.-12:25 p.m........................Sky-Skan 12:30-12:45 p.m...... Google Lunar XPRIZe 12:50-1:30 p.m.............Evans & Sutherland 1:35-2:15 p.m.......................................Sky-Skan 2:20-2:35 p.m.......... Google Lunar XPRIZe 2:40-3:20 p.m...............Evans & Sutherland 3:25-4:05 p.m.....................................Sky-Skan 4:10-4:25 p.m.......... Google Lunar XPRIZe 4:30-5:10 p.m......................... The Navajo Sky Sponsored by Evans & Sutherland, Google Lunar XPRIZe, Seiler Instrument/Zeiss Planetariums, and Sky-Skan, Inc.

12:00–2:00 p.m.

Street Festival Lunch Trucks Explora and New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science


Tuesday, October 22

Come to Big Screen Day TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22

Sponsored by the Giant Screen Cinema Association

Fighter Pilot 3D: Operation Red Flag

The Giant Screen Cinema Association (GSCA) advances the business of producing and presenting educational giant screen and immersive cinema experiences globally. Visit us at www.giantscreencinema.com. Contact us for more information about these and other films, or about GSCA membership. Tammy Thurmon Executive Director tammy@giantscreencinema.com 919-346-1123 Kelly Germain Director of Membership and Communications kelly@giantscreencinema.com 651-917-1080

Release Date: July 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital, Fulldome Length: 49:00 Producer: The Stephen Low Company and Passmore Lab Distributor: K2 Communications Contact: Ed Capelle, edwardcapelle@comcast.ent Fighter Pilot: Operation Red Flag has been seen by 5.5 million people and generated world box office revenue of $33 million at more than 100 theaters. By any measure, the film has been a tremendous success. K2 worked with Passmore Lab with undertaking a meticulous conversion of Fighter Pilot to 3D in 2K and 4K. Fighter Pilot takes audiences on a challenging and ultra-realistic experience as Captain John “Otter” Stratton arrives at Red Flag base—the final training spot for pilots and their air crews before they are sent into actual combat—along with hundreds of other pilots, ground crews, mechanics, and rescue personnel from allied international forces. Bringing their planes with them, the film features many exciting flight sequences and includes American F-15 Strike Eagles, German Tornados, Israeli F-16s, British Harrier jump jets, and Canadian F-18 Hornets.

Schedule Time Event 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m................ Titans of the Ice Age 3D 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m................................. Jerusalem 3D 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.......Mysteries of the Unseen World 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.......... Space-Unraveling the Cosmos 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m..........................Hidden Universe 3D 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m............................Watermelon Magic 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m...................................... Penguins 3D 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m................................. Fighter Pilot 3D

Hidden Universe 3D Release Date: June 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital, IMAX digital, Dome-customized 15/70, Fulldome digital Length: 37:00 Producer: December Cinema Productions Distributor: MacGillivray Freeman Films Contact: Bob Harman, bharman@macfreefilms.com Hidden Universe takes audiences on a journey into space through the cinematic medium that transports like no other. The deepest reaches of our universe are brought to life through real images captured by the world’s most powerful telescopes. Mesmerizing, high-resolution 3D images of space allow audiences to explore the earliest galaxies and travel the terrain of Mars; witness distant celestial structures, including our Sun; and peer inside the universe’s most mysterious nebulae. Seen for the first time on the giant screen, these new images of deep space offer insight into the evolution of the universe. Produced by December Cinema Productions.  

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Jerusalem Release Date: September 12, 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital, IMAX digital, Dome-customized 15/70 Length: 44:53 Producer: Arcane/Cosmic Pictures Distributor: National Geographic Cinema Ventures Contact: Mark Katz, mkatz@ngs.org Jerusalem is home to some of the most sacred sites in the world for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Put together, the followers of these three religions make up nearly 4 billion people—over half our population. Even those who aren't religious recognize Jerusalem as a wellspring of events and stories that shaped Western Civilization. How did this small city on a hill become so pivotal in human history? Why does it still matter to us?

Mysteries of the Unseen World

Release Date: November 1, 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital, IMAX digital, Dome-customized 15/70 Length: 40:00 Producer: National Geographic Cinema Ventures, Days End Pictures Distributor: National Geographic Cinema Ventures Contact: Mark Katz, mkatz@ngs.org Mysteries of the Unseen World will allow viewers to see things not visible to the naked eye, thanks to the film’s innovative use of high-speed and time-lapse photography, electron microscopy, and nanotechnology. The audience will be taken into the microscopic world once reserved only for scientists to see a whole new universe of things, events, and creatures. Visually stunning and rooted in cutting-edge research, Mysteries of the Unseen World will be available in 3D and 2D, 15/70, and digital formats.

Penguins 3D

Release Date: May 24, 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital Length: 38:00 Producer: Atlantic Productions Distributor: nWave Pictures Distribution Contact: Marco Renteria, mrenteria@nwave.com Narrated by David Attenborough, Penguins 3D celebrates the destiny of a very special King Penguin, who returns to his birthplace in the sub-Antarctic. Known as Penguin City, the island is also home to hundreds of albatrosses, fur seals, and brawling 62 ASTC 2013 final program

elephant seals—as well as six million penguins! Somehow our hero must earn his place among the island inhabitants and fulfill his destiny by finding a mate and raising a family. What follows is the story of the most challenging time in a King Penguin’s life, when he is driven to nurture and defend his offspring against harsh weather and fierce predators. The cosmic drama plays out in one of Earth’s last great wildernesses, amid steep mountain ranges and windblown plains half buried below snow and ice. Penguins 3D is an unforgettable tale of one King Penguin’s journey through his species’ central rite of passage.

Space: Unraveling the Cosmos Release Date: October 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, DCI-compliant digital Length: 40:00 Producer: 3Net Distributor: K2 Communications Contact: edwardcapelle@comcast.net From the origins of the universe, to the present time of mankind's exploration of the unknown, and into the future of what lies beyond, Space: Unraveling the Cosmos brings audiences closer than ever before to distant planets, galaxies, and terrestrial phenomenon that make up the limitless expanse that surrounds us. Ultra high-definition 4K and hyper-realistic CGI transports audiences on an adventure to explore the mysteries of the cosmos.

Titans of the Ice Age 3D Release Date: January 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, 15/70, DCI-compliant digital, IMAX digital, Dome-customized 15/70 Length: 20:00 and 37:33 Producer: Giant Screen Films & D3D Cinema Distributor: Giant Screen Films Contact: Derek Threinen, dthreinen@gsfilms.com Titans of the Ice Age transports viewers to the beautiful and otherworldly frozen landscapes of North America, Europe, and Asia ten thousand years before modern civilization. Dazzling computer-generated imagery brings this mysterious era to life—from saber-toothed cats and giant sloths to the iconic mammoths, giants both feared and hunted by prehistoric humans. The magic of the giant screen reveals the harsh and beautiful kingdom of these titans: an ancient world of ice, the dawn of our ancestors, a time when humans fought for survival alongside majestic woolly beasts.


Giant Screen cinema aSSociation The network of theaters, filmmakers, distributors, manufacturers, and service suppliers who provide educational cinema experiences in science centers and museums around the world. Whether your screen is 125 feet wide or 30 feet wide, if you’re converting a film theater to digital, just thinking about adding a theater to your institution, or simply need content for an existing screen, the GSCA network is your resource for all things related to educational cinema experiences.

J o i n u S at B i G S c r e e n Day tueSDay, octoBer 22 Sponsored by GSCA At the New Mexico Museum of Natural Science and History Lockheed Martin Dyna Theater Films shown on the hour from 10:00 am–5:00 pm

Visit GSCA at booth 700 during the ASTC trade show C o n ta Ct U s : Tammy Thurmon Executive Director tammy@giantscreencinema.com 919-346-1123

Kelly Germain Director of Communications and Membership kelly@giantscreencinema.com 651-917-1080

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT GIANTSCREENCINEMA.COM twitter.com/gsca

facebook.com/giantscreencinema


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Watermelon Magic

Release Date: October 2013 Available Formats: 2D and 3D, DCI-compliant digital, IMAX digital Length: 37:00 Producer: Spring Garden Pictures Distributor: BIG & Digital Contact: Tina Ratterman, tratterman@biganddigital.com International audiences will delight in this nearly wordless burst of color and music that draws inspiration from children’s film classic The Red Balloon. Weaving together documentary and narrative elements, Watermelon Magic chronicles a season on the family farm as young Sylvie grows a patch of watermelons to sell at market. The film employs a dynamic visual style that uses high-resolution stills at varying shutter-burst frame rates with stunning time-lapse sequences to trace the journey from seed to flower to fruit. When harvest time arrives, Sylvie must decide if she will share her precious watermelon babies with the world.

NISE Network Community • Work Group National Museum of Nuclear Science and History NISE Network Community Work Group/Regional Hub Leaders meeting By Invitation Only

exhibitFiles is an online community of exhibit practitioners building a shared collection of exhibition records and reviews. It’s a place to connect with colleagues, find out about exhibits, and share your own experiences.

Join the community • Share your exhibition experiences • Share your work through case studies and reviews

traveling exhibitions • Advertise your exhibitions • Find exhibitions for your museum • Ask about our management services

For more information, contact Wendy Hancock at exhibits@astc.org or 202.783.7200 x117 64 ASTC 2013 final program


Congratulations to this year’s Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Award Recipients! 2013 Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Award for Business Practice Sciencenter for MuseumTools.org: A High-Impact HR Toolkit for Science Museums 2013 Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Award for Visitor Experience Science Alive! The New Zealand Science Centre for A Science Centre Without Walls 2013 Roy L. Shafer Leading Edge Award for Experienced Leadership Asger Høeg Executive Director, Experimentarium

Awardees are honored for recent achievements that not only enhance the performance of their own institutions but also significantly advance the mission of science-technology centers and museums. Sponsored by Hands On! Inc. Special thanks to the Maryland Science Center for hosting the jury deliberations, and the following individuals for serving on the 2013 award jury: Jan Luth, Chair, Exploration Place; Chris Cropper, Maryland Science Center; Erica Lacey, Kirby Science Discovery Center; Steve Langsdorf, Roto; Azuka I. MuMin, COSI; Keith Ostfeld, Children’s Museum of Houston; Rae Ostman, Royal Ontario Museum; Whitney Owens, Great Lakes Science Center; Erik Stengler, University of the West of England; and Susan Webb Rawls, Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago)

Participate in next year’s competition! For more information, visit the ASTC Resource Center in the Exhibit Hall or www.astc.org.


Altru

People spend five years of their lives waiting in lines. And no exhibit is worth that kind of wait. Shorten your line by combining leading ticketing software for nonprofits and industry best practices. Altru , our robust nonprofit ticketing software, will make your ticket lines faster and keep visitors coming back for more. What are you waiting for? 速

Learn more at www.Blackbaud.com/TheWaitIsOver


Pre- and Post- Conference Tours

Pre- and Post-Conference Tours ASTC 2013 is pleased to offer several pre- and post-conference tours of Albuquerque, Santa Fe, and the surrounding area. These tours are being managed separately by Destination Southwest, an external destination management services company. To register for these tours online, visit www.destinationsouthwest.com. (Note: A minimum of 20 participants is required for all tours to run. Destination Southwest reserves the right to cancel a tour if preregistration does not meet the minimum number. A complete refund will be offered in that event.)

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18

10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Acoma Pueblo (aka “Sky City”) 8:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Tent Rocks Deconstructed Spend a morning with a geologist and learn how Tent Rocks National Monument came to be. Located on land managed jointly by Cochiti Pueblo and the Bureau of Land Management, Tent Rocks is a truly unique geological site that features massive, cone-shaped formations that hug the steep cliffs of Peralta Canyon. These formations are wind- and water-eroded pumice and tuff deposits topped by erosion-resistant caprocks that protect the softer pillars below. While fairly uniform in shape, the tent rock formations vary in height from a few feet to 90 feet. No other national park or national monument in the western United States illustrates more dramatically the geologic aspects of faulting, volcanic activity, and infilling by sediment and groundwater. Tour fee: $75 (includes motor coach transportation, professional tour guide, admission to Tent Rocks, geologist to accompany group, bottled water on coach, box lunch, guide and driver gratuities, and all applicable taxes). Attendees should wear comfortable shoes and a hat.

Acoma Pueblo, also known as “Sky City,” is situated 350 feet above an outstretched valley atop a massive sandstone mesa at 7,000 feet above sea level, and is the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in the United States. Archeologists put the initial occupation of the Pueblo around 1150 AD. The first Europeans, led by Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, visited Acoma in 1540. On the way to Acoma, we will stop at El Malpais National Monument and enjoy a box lunch. This magnificent site encompasses miles of ancient lava flows created more than 3,000 years ago when volcanoes gushed a river of molten lava 30 miles long and 20 miles wide. Upon arrival at Acoma Pueblo, a Pueblo member will take you on a guided tour of the village, explaining the culture and history of the tribe. The tour includes a camera permit, but note that video recorders and camera phones are prohibited. After your tour, enjoy a traditional pottery demonstration by one of Acoma’s tribal member artisans. Tour fee: $91 (includes motor coach transportation, professional tour guide, walking tour of Pueblo with camera permit, pottery demonstration, bottled water on coach, box lunch, guide and driver gratuities, and all applicable taxes).

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Jemez Mountain Trail/Los Alamos/Bandelier National Monument This tour takes you along one of the Southwest’s most spectacular routes – the Jemez Mountain Trail, a National Scenic and Historic Byway in 1998. Your first stop will be the Walatowa Visitors Center at Jemez Pueblo, one of the 19 Native American Pueblos of New Mexico, situated against the deep red rocks of the Jemez Mountains. You then continue along the Jemez River as it cuts through canyons with fantastic geologic formations whose colors change dramatically from brown to brilliant red and orange. Climbing east out of Jemez Canyon you enter Valle Grande, at 8,500 feet, one of the largest volcanic craters in the world. Stop in Los Alamos, selected by the U.S. government in 1942 as the site of the top secret Manhattan Project, for a visit to Bradbury Science Museum, which is operated by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the museum you will learn how LANL scientists are using the latest technologies to deal with the complex challenges of today’s world, including issues of national security, energy, transportation, and commercial applications of military technology. Bandelier National Monument is best known for its mesas, sheer-walled canyons, and the ancestral Pueblo dwellings found among them. The Park was designated in 1916 and named for 19th century anthropologist Adolph Bandelier. Frijoles Canyon is famous for its extensive Anasazi ruins and cliff dwellings that date back to about 1100 AD. Tour fee: $83 (includes motor coach transportation, professional tour guide, admission to Bandelier Monument, bottled water on coach, box lunch, guide and driver gratuities, and all applicable taxes). final program ASTC 2013

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VISIT US AT ASTC 2013

BOOTH 305

PARTNER WITH US!

CONNECTICUT SCIENCE CENTER

STEM UNITS Learn about opportunities to partner with the Connecticut Science Center to: • Effectively work with middle and high schools in your state • Offer Professional Development programs for educators • Make curriculum connections integrating Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards

For more information, contact

Hank Gruner, Vice President of Programs and Exhibits 860.520.2118 hgruner@CTScienceCenter.org

Connecticut Science Center STEM Units are developed in collaboration with

United Technologies

and school partners


Pre- and Post- Conference Tours

9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

12:30–5:30 p.m.

“Made in New Mexico” Tour

Sandia Peak Tramway and Hike

Travel north to Santa Fe via the historic Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway, which links Albuquerque and Santa Fe and encompasses 15,000 square miles in the heart of central New Mexico. You will drive back into history through the mining towns of Golden, Madrid, and Cerrillos, whose mines once yielded gold, silver, lead, zinc, and turquoise. En route you will stop at the Tinkertown Museum. It took Ross Ward over 40 years to carve, collect, and lovingly construct what is now the Tinkertown Museum. His miniature wood-carved figures were first part of a traveling exhibit, driven to county fairs and carnivals in the 1960s and 1970s. Today over 50,000 glass bottles form rambling walls that surround a 22room museum. Enjoy a hosted lunch at a local favorite restaurant upon arrival in Santa Fe, then a stop at Shidoni Foundry and Galleries. Shidoni, an art gallery including eight acres of sculpture gardens and bronze art foundry, is situated along the Rio Tesuque on a former apple orchard. Visitors have the opportunity to visit the indoor art galleries which represent more than 150 artists from all over the country, stroll the gallery sculpture gardens, as well as watch 2000-degree molten bronze being poured into ceramic shell molds. Our final stop will be a visit to the Museum of International Folk Art. Tour the museum’s current exhibitions and also participate in a “Make Tour”— there will be two artist demonstrations/ make stations for you to choose from.

Head east to the foothills of the Sandia Mountains for a ride on the Sandia Peak Tram, one of the world’s longest freespan cable tramways, and a hike along part of the Sandia Crest Trail accompanied by an experienced geologist. The 2.7mile tramway ride to the top will take you through four of the seven life zones found in North America. Traversing these zones is equivalent to taking a trip from Mexico City to Alaska! Once atop Sandia Peak, at an elevation of 10,378 feet above sea level, you will marvel at the thousands of square miles of breathtaking scenery and panoramic views in all directions. There is an extensive system of maintained trails in the Sandia Mountain Wilderness Area. The Crest Trail runs for 28 miles from Tijeras Canyon in the south to the village of Placitas at the north end of the Sandias. Your optional hike will take you along a section of the trail with magnificent overlooks. Tour fee: $92 (includes transportation, professional tour guide, geologist to accompany group, round trip boarding pass on Sandia Peak Tram, box lunch, bottled water, guide and driver gratuities, and all applicable taxes). Please note: In the event of high winds or severe weather the tram reserves the right to suspend operations.

Tour fee: $135 (includes motor coach transportation; professional tour guide; admission to Tinkertown Museum, Museum of International Folk Art, and “Making Projects”; lunch at San Francisco Street Bar & Grill; admission and tour of Shidoni Foundry and Galleries; bottled water on coach; and all applicable taxes).

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ASTC Annual Conference Exhibit Hall October 19–20, 2013 Albuquerque Convention Center, Fran Hill Hall SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20

9:30 a.m.

Exhibit Hall Ribbon Cutting

10:00–10:30 a.m.

9:30–10:30 a.m.

Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall

Exhibitor/Sponsor Appreciation Breakfast

10:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Open

9:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Open

11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Lunch in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

Lunch Concessions in the Exhibit Hall

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Live Demonstration Hour

4:00–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Networking Receptions

4:00–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Welcome Reception

WWW . PREMIEREXHIBITIONS . COM

PLEASE VISIT US AT BOOTH 631 70 ASTC 2013 final program


ASTC MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES (ALL THE COOL COMPANIES ARE DOING IT!) What are your marketing goals? Who do you want to interact with? What kind of exposure do you want and when do you want it? What best suits your needs in order to maximize your marketing budget? Here’s a sampling of ways you can join ASTC this coming year: For the Widest Overall Exposure:

Lanyards ● Badge Holders ● Conference Bags ● Exhibit at the Annual Conference ● Advertise: ● Dimensions: Year-round exposure in ASTC’s awardwinning bi-monthly magazine ● INFORMER: Year-round exposure in ASTC’s bi-weekly email newsletter ● Annual Conference Advertising: Preliminary Program (June) and Final Program (October) ●

For a Targeted Impact:

For a High Profile with a Specific Group:

Big Screen Day Registration Counter ● Awards Luncheon ● Planetarium Demo ●

Opening and General Sessions Leadership Reception ● CEO Luncheon ● Governing Members Reception ● Development Luncheon ● Networking Receptions ●

Be sure to meet with Kathy and David at the Sales Center at the front of the ASTC Exhibit Hall for more details. W:

conference.astc.org

P:

202.783.7200

E:

conference@astc.org


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Entrance

Museum Educators Networking

Advocates for Diversity Networking

Networking Areas

422

Demo Hour

Entrance

625

627

Development, Marketing and Membership Networking

Exhibit Developers Networking

Networking Areas

Exhibit Hall Floorplan


Sponsors and Exhibitors Alphabetical List Action Moving Services, Atlas Van Lines 323

ARC Science Simulations 229

Blue Telescope Studios 315*

LOVELAND, CO

NEW YORK, NY

www.actionmoving.com Action Moving Services is an award-winning agent for Atlas Van Lines, providing exhibit transportation and logistics nationally and internationally.

www.arcscience.com The OmniGlobe Spherical Display provides a captivating, educational way to display data about human impact, climate change, oceanography, geology, migrations, or the planets and moons.

ALCHEMY studio 414

Arizona Science Center*

MAPLEWOOD, NJ

PHOENIX, AZ

www.blue-telescope.com Blue Telescope Studios uses technology, storytelling, and design to create unique interactive experiences that communicate, educate, and entertain. We combine emerging and mature technologies to dynamically illustrate complex concepts and data.

BURNSVILLE, MN

www.alchemystudio.com ALCHEMY studio is an experience/exhibition development and design studio that plans, develops, and provides creative direction for museums, science centers, and other lifelong learning experiences. Alexander Haas* ATLANTA, GA

www.fundraisingcounsel.com We bring results to science, history, art, and specialty museums nationwide with focused service and personal attention to meeting major gifts and capital campaign goals. American Alliance of Museums 831 WASHINGTON, DC

aam-us.org Our new middle name reflects our commitment to unite the field in making the case that museums are essential. Learn how our new approach makes membership affordable, accessible, and relevant. American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) 817/916 NEW YORK, NY

www.amnh.org/traveling-exhibitions AMNH is a global leader in providing state-of-the-art traveling exhibitions, planetarium shows, HD programming, customizable intellectual property, and fully fabricated exhibition components to museums worldwide.

www.azscience.org Arizona Science Center's mission is to inspire, educate, and entertain people of all ages about science. Using an informal, hands-on approach to science exploration and inspiration, the Center has more than 164,000 square-feet of space, of which 98,000 is dedicated to the exploration of our guests. Available Light 802

www.bossdisplay.com Boss Display is a full-service design and fabrication firm that has been creating interactive exhibits for museums throughout the world for over 35 years. BPI 309 NORWOOD, MA

www.availablelight.com Available Light is an industry-leading lighting design firm specializing in museum exhibitions, sustainable architecture, and corporate communication events. Benee's, Inc. 321

Brad Larson Media, Inc. 814

FARMINGTON, MO

CANTON, MA

www.benees.com Benees, Inc. is a diverse manufacturer of school and early childhood furniture, custom pieces for museums, and store fixture/display furniture for a wide range of customers. If you can think of it, we can make it for you!

www.bradlarson.com Developer of StoryKiosk: Add visitors’ stories to exhibits, upload to YouTube and Facebook, and email stories home for post-visit learning.

Betty Brinn Children's Museum 921 MILWAUKEE, WI

www.bbcmkids.org Betty Brinn Children's Museum offers high-quality exhibits for sale and rent that are designed to help children build fundamental skills that support school readiness and a child’s lifelong success. CHARLESTON, SC

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COLUMBUS, OH

www.bostonproductions.com BPI creates compelling experiences through exciting and memorable multimedia based exhibits. We offer interactive programming, film production, experiential design, and hardware integration services.

SALEM, MA

Blackbaud, Inc. 601*

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor

Boss Display Corp. 605

www.blackbaud.com Blackbaud offers a full spectrum of cloudbased and on-premise software solutions and related services for organization of all sizes. For more information, visit www.blackbaud.com.

Bruns B.V. and Exhibits 214 BERGEIJK, THE NETHERLANDS

www.bruns.nl and www.exhibits.nl Budd Wentz Productions (Wentzscope Microscopes) 416 OAKLAND, CA

www.wentzscope.com WENTZSCOPE Easy-View Microscopes, featuring a giant view lens and battle-zone construction for hands-on exhibits. A solid reputation spanning two decades. Earthfriendly, using only 4 watts of electricity.


BWC Visual Technology, Spherical Systems 327

Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose (CDM) 731

UPPER MARLBORO, MD

SAN JOSE, CA

www.bwcviz.com BWC Visual Technology is an authorized dealer for spherical displays, globes, NOAA Science On a Sphere, iGlobe, iGlobe 3D, backlit and traditional trade show portable exhibits.

www.cdm.org/exhibits CDM is the distributor of two creative math- and science-based exhibits sure to delight your visitors: Pinscreen and Gear Up! components.

www.cornell.edu The Cornell Lab will showcase online birding resources, the Raven Exhibit sound visualization system, the world’s largest collection of animal sounds, educational programs, and products.

Children's Museum of Houston 402

COSI 736

California Science Center 708

HOUSTON, TX

COLUMBUS, OH

LOS ANGELES, CA

www.cmhouston.org Our STEM-based exhibits will increase attendance and generate media attention. We have something to meet your interest, budget, and space with concepts including science, math, culture, and health.

www.cosi.org COSI creates imaginative and innovative experiences for museums around the world. More than 28 million visitors in 56 cities worldwide have enjoyed our educational and interactive exhibits.

Catawba Science Center 911

The Children's Museum of Indianapolis 726

Creative Discovery Museum • (CDM) 216

HICKORY, NC

INDIANAPOLIS, IN

CHATTANOOGA, TN

www.CaliforniaScienceCenter.org The California Science Center offers fun, educational, and interactive traveling exhibits and exhibit design sales. Experience Goose Bumps! The Science of Fear and Science in Toyland!

www.catawbascience.org Catawba Science Center supports its mission, and that of other museums, by renting great traveling exhibitions at reasonable rates such as Body Carnival, Dinosaurs, and Spin. The Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE) 424 WASHINGTON, DC

www.informalscience.org The Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE) is an NSF-funded resource for organizations, programs, and professionals engaged in providing informal STEM learning experiences. Stop by to try informalscience.org. Chicago Scenic Studios Inc. 815 CHICAGO, IL

www.chicagoscenic.com With more than 35 years in business, Chicago Scenic Studios provides custom design, fabrication, and management to museums, helping clients add excitement to their immersive environments.

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor

Cornell Lab of Ornithology 925 ITHACA, NY

www.childrensmuseum.org Provider of interactive traveling exhibitions: Bob the Builder™ —Project: Build It, LEGO® Castle Adventure, Nickelodeon's Dora & Diego —Let's Explore!, and LEGO® Travel Adventure.

www.cdmfun.org CDM is a children’s museum working with BESC across the nation. We provide educational programs that bring real science experiences related to current scientific research to students and families.

Cincinnati Museum Center 738

Creatures On Tour 935

CINCINNATI, OH

ASHMORE CITY, QLD, AUSTRALIA

www.cincymuseum.org/ travelingexhibits Cincinnati Museum Center Exhibits provides design, fabrication, registrar services, traveling exhibits, and tour management to visionaries who are fired up to make great projects happen.

www.johncox.net How to Make a Monster— the art and technology of animatronics, the highly popular, highly interactive, traveling exhibition exploring the skills and processes of making movie monsters.

CineMuse, Inc. 129

EVANSTON, IL

SUNNYSIDE, NY

www.cinemuse.com 3D and HD films from Discovery, BBC, NHK, Rabbit Ears, and more. Connecticut Science Center 305* HARTFORD, CT

www.ctsciencecenter.org The Connecticut Science Center is launching a new Academy for Teachers to promote professional development and STEM program initiatives with schools.

D3D Cinema 408 www.d3dcinema.com Complete Digital 3D and 4D theater solutions. Theater design and installation, touring exhibition theaters, 3D/4D film catalog, and signature film production. Add value and introduce new revenue streams! Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc. 431 BREMERTON, WA

www.digitaliseducation.com Digitarium digital planetarium systems and Digitalis inflatable domes: portable, capable, cost-effective astronomy education tools. Easiest operation, lowest training costs, best value on the market. final program ASTC 2013

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Dinosaur Resin Replica 337 FORT WORTH, TX

www.dinosaurresinreplica.com Life-size replica dinosaurs, wild animals, fish, birds, and human figures. Dinosaurs Unearthed 501* RICHMOND, BC, CANADA

www.dinosaursunearthed.com Dinosaurs Unearthed leads the industry with turnkey, innovative, and immersive indoor and outdoor experiences, customdesigned to engage, entertain, and educate your audiences of all ages. Discovery Dome 531 HOUSTON, TX

www.e-planetarium.com E-Planetarium provides planetarium shows, planetarium projection equipment, and software for portable and fixed theaters (up to 50 feet). Exhibit software through our partner company, spaceupdate.com. Discovery Times Square 939 NEW YORK, NY

www.discoverytsx.com Discovery Times Square offers unique and immersive traveling exhibits. Now available — Leonardo Da Vinci’s Workshop, The Dead Sea Scrolls, and The Art of the Brick. eCybermission 742 ARLINGTON, VA

www.ecybermission.com eCYBERMISSION is a FREE on-line STEM competition for students in grades 6, 7, 8, and 9. Electrosonic* LOS ANGELES, CA

www.electrosonic.com Electrosonic specializes in interpreting client requirements and turning audiovisual needs into integrated systems that engage, excite, and operate reliably in every environment. The Elumenati 104/106 MILWAUKEE, WI

www.elumenati.com The Elumenati, creators of the GeoDome, build innovative solutions for immersive visualization. We’re obsessed with developing simple, effective systems and novel applications of immersion and interactivity. *ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor 76 ASTC 2013 final program

Evans & Sutherland Digital Theater 701/800* SALT LAKE CITY, UT

www.es.com Evans & Sutherland and its subsidiary, Spitz, provide Digistar 5, the world’s most advanced digital planetarium, NanoSeam projection domes, and a catalog of fulldome content.

EyeTech Digital Systems, Inc. 134 MESA, AZ

www.eyetechds.com Experience the future of hands-free computing with our eye control technology exhibits, available for rent or purchase today from EyeTech Digital Systems! The Field Museum of Natural History 717

Event Network*

CHICAGO, IL

SAN DIEGO, CA

www.fieldmuseum.org The Field Museum combines groundbreaking research of its world-renowned scientific staff and award-winning design expertise to create high-quality, traveling exhibitions.

www.eventnetwork.com Event Network is the leading operator of gift shops for science centers, natural history museums, and other highly regarded cultural attractions throughout North America and Europe. Evergreen Exhibitions 724

FleXhibits- Exhibits Reimagined 407

SAN ANTONIO, TX

SPOKANE, WA

www.evergreenexhibitions.com Evergreen Exhibitions is a premier provider of interactive educational exhibitions, with over 19 years of experience touring science, natural history, art, and object exhibitions worldwide. ExhibitFiles 623 WASHINGTON, DC

www.exhibitfiles.org ExhibitFiles is an online community of exhibit practitioners building a shared collection of exhibition records and reviews. It's a place to connect with colleagues, find out about exhibits, and share your own experiences. Exploratorium 515 SAN FRANCISCO, CA

www.exploratorium.edu Exploratorium Global Studios provides museum planning + design, exhibit prototyping and fabrication, education, and professional development services to other organizations worldwide. To learn more, please go to exs.exploratorium.edu/. Explorer Systems, Inc. 217 KELSEYVILLE, CA

www.explorer-systems.com Premier software solution, designed for and used exclusively by museums. Includes integrated online application, donations, memberships, advanced sales, kiosks, scanned admissions, school reservations, gift shop, camp registration.

www.iqsmartinteractive.com FLEXHIBITS are a unique approach to the exhibit classics. Created by individuals with “real world” exhibit experience, FLEXHIBITS are affordable, attractive to sponsors, and designed to encourage repeat visits. Fondazione IDIS-Città della Scienza 426 NAPLES, ITALY

www.cittadellascienza.it The Franklin Institute 228* PHILADELPHIA, PA

www.fi.edu/exhibitservices A leader in interactive exhibits, we make science fun and accessible to the public. We offer consulting services, traveling exhibition rentals, and exhibits for sale. Gateway Ticketing Systems 130 BOYERTOWN, PA

www.gatewayticketing.com Gateway Ticketing Systems provides software solutions for ticketing, admission control, passes and membership, group and consignment sales, consumer and mobile web stores, F&B, and retail. Giant Screen Cinema Association (GSCA) 700* HOLLY SPRINGS, NC

www.giantscreencinema.com GSCA’s core purpose is to advance the production and presentation of educational giant screen and cultural cinema experiences globally.


Global Experience Specialists (GES)* www.ges.com GES Entertainment is a leader in the creation and management of touring exhibitions including Harry Potter™: The Exhibition and National Geographic Presents: Earth Explorers.

GWF Associates, LLC 200

The KidWind Project 840

TINTON FALLS, NJ

ST. PAUL, MN

www.gwfassociates.com Custom educational interactive programming for museums, mobile tours, exhibits, and industry meetings. Our platforms include virtual and augmented reality, mobile applications, and medical simulations.

www.learn.kidwind.org KidWind engages minds for a responsible future through clean energy educational resources, including training, science kits, student competitions, curriculum, and online resources.

PLAYA VISTA, CA

Haizlip Studio 702

K'NEX Brands 116

www.xprize.org The $30 million Google Lunar XPRIZe challenges and inspires entrepreneurs worldwide to place a robotic spacecraft on the Moon, travel 500 meters, and transmit HD video and images back to Earth.

MEMPHIS, TN

HATFIELD, PA

www.haizlipstudio.com Specialists in planning, exhibition, and architectural design for family learning environments and attractions.

Google Science Fair*

ST. PETERSBURG, FL

www.knexexhibits.com Bring STEM excitement to your science center with K'NEX: Thrill Rides. New for 2014—visitors can write programs and control K'NEX models. Stop by and give it a try!

Google Lunar XPRIZe 606/608*

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA

www.google.com/events/sciencefair/ index.html The Google Science Fair is an online science competition seeking curious minds from the four corners of the globe. Anybody and everybody between 13 and 18 can enter. All you need is an idea. GRANDSTAND – Saint Louis Science Center 420/422 ST. LOUIS, MO

www.sciencebeyondtheboundaries.com GRANDSTAND is an ASTC/Saint Louis Science Center booth by and for small science centers. We all know that small science centers specialize in doing amazing programs for almost no money. Here’s your chance to see those great ideas. Grande Exhibitions 917 BLACK ROCK, VIC, AUSTRALIA

www.grandeexhibitions.com Grande Exhibitions creates and markets traveling exhibitions of broad mass appeal that are of the highest quality and large in size. Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS 603 HEIDELBERG, GERMANY

www.bodyworlds.com Experienced by nearly 40 million people, the original anatomical exhibition (human and animal) by the inventor of Plastination, with an established body donation program.

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor

Hands On! Inc.* www.hofl.org Through educational innovation, superior design, and flawless fabrication, we create enchanting exhibitions that embody the excitement of scientific discovery and reflect each client’s unique mission. Ideum 201/300* CORRALES, NM

www.ideum.com Ideum (www.ideum.com) specializes in multitouch hardware and software development, including multitouch tables and touch-walls. Imagine Exhibitions Inc. 927/929* ATLANTA, GA

www.imagineexhibitions.com Imagine Exhibitions offers traveling exhibitions, museum consulting on a variety of topics, and has a semi-permanent venue to host exhibitions in Las Vegas. Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies 316 POTSDAM, GERMANY

www.iass-potsdam.de Trans-disciplinary concepts for research on sustainability. Information booth with movies about climate engineering, shortlived, climate-forcing pollutants, and soil. Interactive game on personal CO2 footprint. Jack Rouse Associates, Inc. 607 CINCINNATI, OH

www.jackrouse.com Jack Rouse Associates (JRA) provides master planning, exhibit design, media production, and project management for science technology centers around the world.

KONICA MINOLTA PLANETARIUMMAGNA-TECH ELECTRONIC CO INC 900 NORTH MIAMI, FL

www.mediaglobeplanetarium.com Planetarium projection equipment. Sound equipment, seating, dome design, engineering, installation. KRE8 360 905 ATLANTA, GA

www.kre8360.com kre8 360 specializes in the identification, creation, development, fabrication, and management of immersive and educational traveling exhibition content for museums, zoos and aquariums. Kubik Maltbie, Inc. 609/611 MT. LAUREL, NJ

www.maltbie.com For 51 years, Maltbie has focused on developing its ability to produce industryleading permanent museum exhibitions. Kurt Hüttinger GmbH & Co. KG 930 SCHWAIG BEI NUREMBERG, GERMANY

www.huettinger.de Hüttinger is a one-stop shop for exhibition planning, design, and fabrication, working for clients throughout Europe and on an international scale. LF Creative Group 131 CINCINNATI, OH

www.lfcreativegroup.com LF Creative Group is dedicated to creating experiences that encourage interaction, play, and exploration. We are able to provide a specialized element or an entire experience.

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Liberty Science Center 314

Mindsplash 803

JERSEY CITY, NJ

NAPERVILLE, IL

www.lsc.org Liberty Science Center provides museum planning and design services. Presenting Beyond Rubik's Cube, a traveling exhibition celebrating the world's most popular puzzle. Available January 2015.

www.mindsplash.net Mindsplash creates interactive exhibits and environments proven to keep visitors coming back! We offer individual exhibits like A-Mazing Airways, master planning, design, and exhibit enrichment.

Luci Creative 215

Minnesota Children's Museum 830

LINCOLNWOOD, IL

ST. PAUL, MN

www.lucicreative.com We are experiential storytellers. We plan and design museum exhibits, interactive displays, and other experiential environments, and provide fabrication and installation with our parent company, Ravenswood Studio.

www.mcm.org/travel Expand your audience with STEM-based traveling exhibits! Minnesota Children's Museum is recognized for producing traveling exhibits that boost attendance and activate learning. Visit our booth to learn more!

Luckey LLC 115

Minotaur Mazes 720

EAST HAVEN, CT

SEATTLE, WA

www.luckeyllc.com Luckey LLC specializes in bespoke, oneof-a-kind climbers for institutional clients.

www.minotaurmazes.com Minotaur Mazes creates immersive traveling exhibitions built on the powerful appeal of walk-through mazes. Our exhibitions foster curiosity and empathy while inspiring global responsibility.

Magian Media Studio 404 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

www.magian.com Magian is a media design and production studio that has developed a unique content management software system specifically for multimedia in science centers and museums.

MultiTouch 716 LOS GATOS, CA

www.multitaction.com Interactive displays.

Making Steam, Inc. 231

Museum of Science and Industry 816

LITTLE ROCK, AR

CHICAGO, IL

www.makingsteam.com Custom exhibits and 21st century manufacturing labs. Michael Holland Productions 923 BOZEMAN, MT

www.michaelhollandproductions.com and www.macromicroexhibit.com MacroMicro: The exciting new traveling exhibit exploring the world of nature through CT imaging and 3D printing. Themes include functional morphology, evolution, biomimicry, and technology.

www.msichicago.com/exhibitsales MSI is licensing over 40 award-winning interactives covering topics from health and wellness to the exploration of physics, material science, and chemistry. Museum of the Earth 101 ITHACA, NY

museumoftheearth.org Our dynamic, hands-on traveling exhibitions, designed for small- to medium-sized spaces, engage visitors in a host of topics from prehistory to global climate change. Mystic Scenic Studios, Inc. 303 NORWOOD, MA

www.mysticscenic.com National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) at the Space Science Institute 307 BOULDER, CO

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor 78 ASTC 2013 final program

www.nc4il.org Learn about NCIL's Great Balls of Fire exhibition, and our STEM library initiatives.

National Geographic Cinema Ventures* WASHINGTON, DC

www.nationalgeographic.com/movies National Geographic Entertainment is a leading producer and distributor of documentary and 3D films for all screen types, specifically for those in museums and science centers worldwide. National Living Laboratory 202 BOSTON, MA

www.livinglab.org Learn how you can become involved in the National Living Laboratory Initiative, and try research-inspired educational activities that foster public awareness of child development. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 729/828 WASHINGTON, DC

www.noaa.gov NOAA is a federal science agency providing earth systems’ information and services. NOAA’s science touches the lives of all Americans, encouraging environmental literacy and stewardship. The Natural History Museum 931 LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM

www.nhm.ac.uk The Natural History Museum in London draws on the experience of the 300 scientists working at the museum to create its ground-breaking and award-winning traveling exhibitions. NISE Network 203/302 ST. PAUL, MN

www.nisenet.org The NISE Network is a community of researchers and informal science educators dedicated to fostering public awareness of, engagement with, and understanding of, nanoscience, engineering, and technology. NRG! Exhibits 722 KIRKLAND, WA

www.nrg-exhibits.com Our traveling exhibits are immersive, engaging, educational, and fun. We offer a variety of topics that visitors truly enjoy, ranging from sustainability to treasure hunting.


nWave Pictures Distribution 710

Penn Museum 941

Science First/STARLAB 331

PALMDALE, CA

PHILADELPHIA, PA

YULEE, FL

www.nwave.com nWave Studios is a fully integrated digital studio specializing exclusively in producing, developing, and financing 3D (stereoscopic) content for the institutional and attraction-themed entertainment market.

www.penn.museum Traveling exhibitions further Penn Museum's mission to advance the understanding of the world's cultural heritage.

www.starlab.com Science First designs, markets, and manufactures the Classic and Digital STARLAB, time-tested and easy-to-use portable planetarium solutions.

ST. LOUIS, MO

Science Museum of Minnesota 715

Ontario Science Centre 829/928

www.pgavdestinations.com PGAV Destinations helps science centers and museums achieve their mission and business objectives through strategic master plans, experience design, and architectural services.

ST. PAUL, MN

TORONTO, ON, CANADA

www.OntarioScienceCentre.ca We offer customized science experiences and duplicates or modified versions of existing exhibits using our in-house design and fabrication team. Oregon Museum of Science & Industry (OMSI) 915 PORTLAND, OR

www.omsi.edu OMSI is known internationally for innovative, educational, highly interactive science exhibits. OMSI provides traveling exhibits, exhibit sales, customized exhibits, exhibit development, evaluation, and fabrication.

PGAV Destinations 403

Premier Exhibitions 631*

www.smm.org/exhibitservices The Science Museum of Minnesota offers the highest-quality traveling exhibitions, as well as master planning, development, design, and fabrication services for your exhibition projects.

ATLANTA, GA

Science North 714

www.prxi.com PRXI is the recognized leader in developing and displaying unforgettable exhibitions for education and entertainment that utilize compelling stories and authentic artifacts in extraordinary settings.

SUDBURY, ON, CANADA

RedBox Workshop, Ltd. 801*

www.sciencenorth.ca Science North, Canada, since 1984 we have created award-winning, high impact, traveling exhibits, exhibits, and multimedia experiences for science centers, museums, and visitor centers worldwide.

CHICAGO, IL

Sciencenter 317 ITHACA, NY

www.ospreycustompublishing.com Publisher of high quality and affordable exhibition guide and catalogs, including eBooks, apps, and websites.

www.redboxworkshop.com RedBox Workshop collaboratively designs and fabricates interactive, immersive, intuitive exhibits; addressing multiple intelligences and educational models to reach diverse audiences. IPMA Certified Project Management.

Outbound Software 311

Richard Lewis Media Group 410

ScienceWorks Museum 330

KILL DEVIL HILLS, NC

WATERTOWN, MA

ASHLAND, OR

www.outboundsoftware.com Outbound Software is a complete online reservation, scheduling, and ticketing solution for your education, visitor services, development, special events, and group sales departments.

www.rlmg.com The Richard Lewis Media Group specializes in the planning, design, and production of media projects and installations for museums and public facilities worldwide.

www.scienceworksmuseum.org ScienceWorks Exhibitions providing interactive exhibit rentals and sales.

Roto 615/617*

Pacific Studio 325

DUBLIN, OH

ST. LOUIS, MO

Osprey Custom Publishing 103 HUNTINGTON STATION, NY

SEATTLE, WA

www.pacific-studio.com Pacific Studio designs and fabricates exhibits for cultural institutions. We specialize in museum quality display cases, metal fabrication, interactives, artifact mounts, murals, sculpting, casting, and dioramas.

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor

www.sciencenterexhibits.org Sciencenter offers fun, hands-on, interactive exhibitions. Experience plate tectonics and engineering in When the Earth Shakes; journey from mountain stream to the sea in Ocean Bound!

Seiler Instrument/Zeiss Planetariums 301*

www.roto.com Roto is an international design-build firm specializing in highly interactive exhibits and master plans for today's leading science centers.

www.seilerinst.com and www.planetariums.zeiss.com Seiler is the exclusive North American representative and distributor for Carl Zeiss Planetarium star projectors and fulldome digital video projection technology.

Science Channel*

Siriusware, Inc. 406

SILVER SPRING, MD

science.discovery.com Science Channel is home for the thought provocateur, those unafraid to ask the questions “how” and “why not.” A playground for those with audacious intellects and programming willing to go beyond imagination to explore the known and unknown.

TAOS, NM

www.siriusware.com Siriusware provides the right solution for you and your guests, not just a software application. Integrate your gift shop, café, web sales, and memberships into one seamless solution that’s easy to learn.

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Sky-Skan, Inc. 400*

Tietronix Software Inc. 108/110

NASHUA, NH

HOUSTON, TX

www.skyskan.com Sky-Skan’s Definiti digital fulldome theaters educate millions with fantastic voyages through space, entertain using ultra-high resolution visuals, and inspire children to science and technology careers.

www.tietronix.com Tietronix is showing the latest 3D and Large Screen Liquid Galaxy display systems along with the latest augmented reality systems including high definition animations.

Spot On Entertainment, Inc. 937

Time Warner Cable*

AJAX, ON, CANADA

COLUMBUS, OH

www.spotonentertainment.ca The Science of SuperDogs.

www.connectamillionminds.com Time Warner Cable’s Connect a Million Minds (CAMM) is a five-year, $100 million philanthropic initiative aiming to connect kids to STEM-related afterschool activities.

Stratasys 230 BILLERICA, MA

www.stratasys.com Stratasys - FDM® and Polyjet® 3D printers that produce parts from 3D CAD files. Makes a range of systems for concept modeling, prototyping, and manufacturing. www.stratasys.com. Superior Exhibits & Design, Inc.* ELK GROVE VILLAGE, IL

www.superiorexhibits.com Superior Exhibits fabricates interactive permanent and traveling exhibits. Full in-house capabilities include: interactives, electronics, metal, welding, acrylic, plastic, cabinetry, finishing, scenic, graphics, and installation. TAM Retail 909 ORLAND PARK, IL

www.nonprofitpos.com TAM Retail is the premier software provider for advanced POS, E-commerce, inventory management, reservations management, admissions, and membership management. Visit us at www.nonprofitpos.com. Tandem Motion Picture Studio 741 HIGHLAND, UT

www.cinemagroup.net We are an industry leader offering three hand-crafted, state-of-the-art films for educational theaters: ExoPlanets: Worlds Of Wonder, Dinosaur Passage To Pangaea, and Light Before Christmas. Tessitura Network 703* DALLAS, TX

www.tessituranetwork.com Tessitura Software is a unified database specifically for the arts, cultural, and entertainment sector that handles admissions, memberships, web transactions, CRM, marketing, reporting, and more. 80 ASTC 2013 final program

TPT Twin Cities Public Television 100 ST. PAUL, MN

www.sparticl.org Sparticl—a new interactive website presenting the best STEM content on the web, including curated science museum content from around the world, at Sparticl.org. Triotech 415 MONTREAL, PQ, CANADA

www.trio-tech.com Triotech prides itself in developing highimpact products such as 7Di, XD Dark Ride, and XD Theaters, which offer an intense and realistic experience with a multi-seat 6D motion simulator ride. Unified Field, Inc. 507/509* NEW YORK, NY

www.unifiedfield.com Unified Field creates interactive media that combine bold ideas, advanced technology, and elegant designs to provide audiences with rich sensory experiences that border on magic. Universal Services Associates, Inc. 704 COLWYN, PA

www.BuildWithUSA.com Universal Services Associates (USA, Inc.), is a full-service fabrication firm, specializing in museums, interactive exhibits, prototyping, engineering, and design/ build projects.

Weather Underground, Inc. 401/500* SAN FRANCISCO, CA

www.wunderground.com Weather Underground, the world's first online weather service, provides unique weather data and climatology research to millions of people and businesses across the world. West Office Exhibition Design, Inc. 328 OAKLAND, CA

www.woed.com West Office creates engaging exhibit experiences for science centers, history museums, and cultural facilities. We offer complete design services, from master planning to fabrication supervision. Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts—Expedition Chesapeake 706 HARRISBURG, PA

www.expeditionchesapeake.org and www.whitakercenter.org Take a journey of discovery with Expedition Chesapeake, a multi-media watershed education project that includes a giant screen film, digitally-delivered educational materials, a made-for-TV documentary, and a traveling exhibition. Wood Street, Inc. 621* FREDERICK, MD

www.woodst.com Wood Street presents MyQRoSites—an application that lets museums and science centers create and manage QR codeactivated mobile web sites. SAVOR 502* WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, PA

www.savormg.com Since 1983, SAVOR specializes in providing food and beverage services showcasing branded and local cuisine expertly prepared and presented to ensure a seamless hospitality experience for science and technology centers. O8O Leasing, LLC 341 TAMPA, FL

www.hurricanesimulator.com Hurricane simulator for your museum— FREE! Fun! Interactive! Custom Graphics! Revenue Share!

*ASTC Annual Conference Sponsor


Customer Centric. Community Focused.

300 Conshohocken State Road, Suite 770 West Conshohocken, PA 19428 savorsmg.com | 610-729-7900

Hospitality Driven.


A place to learn, to imagine, to think and to draw your own conclusions.

YOU WON’T LEAVE THE WAY YOU CAME.

601 Eubank Blvd. SE · Albuquerque, NM 87123 www.nuclearmuseum.org · 505-245-2137 Open daily from 9 am to 5 pm Smithsonian Institution Affiliations Program


Sponsors and Exhibitors by Category Animation

Educational Programs

Blue Telescope Studios............................ 315

ARC Science Simulations...................... 229 The Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE).............. 424 Connecticut Science Center..................305 Cornell Lab of Ornithology....................925 Creative Discovery Museum.................216 eCybermission...........................................742 Exploratorium............................................ 515 Google Lunar XPRIZe....................606/608 Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies.......................................................316 The KidWind Project.............................. 840 KONICA MINOLTA PLANETARIUMMAGNA-TECH ELECTRONIC CO INC............................................................ 900 Minotaur Mazes........................................ 720 National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute...........307 National Living Laboratory.................. 202 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)............ 729/828 NISE Network..................................203/302 Penn Museum.............................................941 Spot On Entertainment, Inc..................937 TPT Twin Cities Public Television.....100 Triotech........................................................415 Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts- Expedition Chesapeake............706

Association American Alliance of Museums...........831 The Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education (CAISE).............. 424 Giant Screen Cinema Association...... 700

Audio Tours BWC Visual Technology, Spherical Systems.....................................................327

Audio/Visual BPI................................................................. 309 Budd Wentz Productions (Wentzscope Microscopes)...........................................416 D3D Cinema............................................... 408 Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.......431 Dinosaur Resin Replica...........................337 Magian Media Studio.............................. 404 Richard Lewis Media Group..................410

Computer Software Blackbaud, Inc............................................601 Brad Larson Media, Inc...........................814 Explorer Systems, Inc..............................217 Gateway Ticketing Systems...................130 Magian Media Studio.............................. 404 MultiTouch.................................................. 716 Outbound Software................................... 311 Siriusware, Inc.......................................... 406 TAM Retail................................................. 909 Tessitura Network....................................703

Consultants ALCHEMY Studio....................................414 The Field Museum of Natural History.717 Gateway Ticketing Systems...................130 Haizlip Studio............................................ 702 Imagine Exhibitions Inc............... 927/929 KONICA MINOLTA PLANETARIUMMAGNA-TECH ELECTRONIC CO INC............................................................ 900 Liberty Science Center............................314 Mindsplash................................................. 803 Museum of Science and Industry........816 PGAV Destinations.................................. 403

Electronic/Multimedia Products ARC Science Simulations...................... 229 Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.......431 Ideum.................................................. 201/300 TPT Twin Cities Public Television.....100

Exhibit Design ALCHEMY Studio....................................414 Boss Display Corp......................................605 BPI................................................................. 309 California Science Center......................708 Chicago Scenic Studios Inc.................... 815 Cincinnati Museum Center...................738 Exploratorium............................................ 515 FleXhibits- Exhibits Reimagined....... 407 Grande Exhibitions................................... 917 Haizlip Studio............................................ 702 Ideum.................................................. 201/300 Jack Rouse Associates, Inc....................607

Kurt Hüttinger GmbH & Co. KG.......... 930 LF Creative Group.................................... 131 Liberty Science Center............................314 Luci Creative...............................................215 Making Steam, Inc....................................231 Mindsplash................................................. 803 NRG! Exhibits............................................722 Ontario Science Centre................. 829/928 Pacific Studio..............................................325 PGAV Destinations.................................. 403 Premier Exhibitions.................................631 RedBox Workshop, Ltd............................801 Roto....................................................... 615/617 Universal Services Associates, Inc..... 704 West Office Exhibition Design, Inc.....328

Exhibit Display Systems Budd Wentz Productions (Wentzscope Microscopes)...........................................416 BWC Visual Technology, Spherical Systems.....................................................327 Dinosaur Resin Replica...........................337 FleXhibits- Exhibits Reimagined....... 407 Sky-Skan, Inc............................................. 400

Exhibitions for Rent/Purchase Betty Brinn Children's Museum..........921 California Science Center......................708 Catawba Science Center......................... 911 Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose (CDM)................................. 731 Children's Museum of Houston.......... 402 The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.............................................726 Cornell Lab of Ornithology....................925 COSI...............................................................736 Creatures On Tour....................................935 Dinosaur Resin Replica...........................337 Dinosaurs Unearthed...............................501 Discovery Times Square.........................939 Evergreen Exhibitions.............................724 Exploratorium............................................ 515 EyeTech Digital Systems, Inc................134 The Field Museum of Natural History.717 FleXhibits- Exhibits Reimagined....... 407 Grande Exhibitions................................... 917 Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS.................................... 603 Imagine Exhibitions Inc.........................927 final program ASTC 2013

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Michael Holland Productions...............923 Mindsplash................................................. 803 Minnesota Children's Museum........... 830 Museum of Science and Industry........816 Museum of the Earth............................... 101 National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute...........307 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)............ 729/828 The Natural History Museum...............931 NISE Network..................................203/302 NRG! Exhibits............................................722 Ontario Science Centre................. 829/928 Oregon Museum of Science & Industry.. 915 Penn Museum.............................................941 Premier Exhibitions.................................631 RedBox Workshop, Ltd............................801 Science Museum of Minnesota............ 715 Science North.............................................714 Sciencenter.................................................. 317 ScienceWorks Museum..........................330

Fabricators American Museum of Natural History............................. 817/916 Boss Display Corp......................................605 Bruns B.V. and Exhibits.nl.......................214 Chicago Scenic Studios Inc.................... 815 Cincinnati Museum Center...................738 Kubik Maltbie, Inc...........................609/611 Kurt Hüttinger GmbH & Co. KG.......... 930 LF Creative Group.................................... 131 Luci Creative...............................................215 Making Steam, Inc....................................231 Michael Holland Productions...............923 Pacific Studio..............................................325 RedBox Workshop, Ltd............................801 Roto....................................................... 615/617 Universal Services Associates, Inc..... 704

Film/Video CineMuse, Inc............................................129 Cornell Lab of Ornithology....................925 D3D Cinema............................................... 408 Evans & Sutherland Digital Theater.............................. 701/800 Giant Screen Cinema Association...... 700 Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies..........................316 Jack Rouse Associates, Inc....................607 nWave Pictures Distribution.................710 Richard Lewis Media Group..................410 84 ASTC 2013 final program

Tandem Motion Picture Studio............ 741

Fundraising Blackbaud, Inc............................................601 Tessitura Network....................................703

Graphic Design ALCHEMY Studio....................................414 Haizlip Studio............................................ 702 West Office Exhibition Design, Inc.....328 Wood Street, Inc........................................621 Installation/Dismantling Chicago Scenic Studios Inc.................... 815 Kubik Maltbie, Inc...........................609/611

Interactive Betty Brinn Children's Museum..........921 Blue Telescope Studios............................ 315 Boss Display Corp......................................605 BPI................................................................. 309 Bruns B.V. and Exhibits.nl.......................214 Budd Wentz Productions (Wentzscope Microscopes)................416 Children's Museum of Houston.......... 402 EyeTech Digital Systems, Inc................134 The Franklin Institute............................ 228 Google Lunar XPRIZe....................606/608 GWF Associates, LLC............................. 200 The KidWind Project.............................. 840 Kurt Hüttinger GmbH & Co. KG.......... 930 Luci Creative...............................................215 Minotaur Mazes........................................ 720 MultiTouch.................................................. 716 Museum of Science and Industry........816 Oregon Museum of Science & Industry................................ 915 Pacific Studio..............................................325 Roto....................................................... 615/617 Science Museum of Minnesota............ 715 Science North.............................................714 Sciencenter.................................................. 317 ScienceWorks Museum..........................330 TPT Twin Cities Public Television.....100 Triotech........................................................415 Unified Field, Inc............................. 507/509 Universal Services Associates, Inc..... 704 West Office Exhibition Design, Inc.....328 Wood Street, Inc........................................621

Large-format Films CineMuse, Inc............................................129 D3D Cinema............................................... 408

Evans & Sutherland Digital Theater.............................. 701/800 Giant Screen Cinema Association...... 700 nWave Pictures Distribution.................710 Tandem Motion Picture Studio............ 741 Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts—Expedition Chesapeake...........706

Lighting Available Light.......................................... 802

Multimedia Blue Telescope Studios............................ 315 Brad Larson Media, Inc...........................814 BWC Visual Technology, Spherical Systems.................................327 GWF Associates, LLC............................. 200 Jack Rouse Associates, Inc....................607 Magian Media Studio.............................. 404 Richard Lewis Media Group..................410 Science North.............................................714 Unified Field, Inc............................. 507/509 Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts—Expedition Chesapeake...........706

Planetarium American Museum of Natural History............................. 817/916 Digitalis Education Solutions, Inc.......431 Discovery Dome......................................... 531 Evans & Sutherland Digital Theater.............................. 701/800 KONICA MINOLTA PLANETARIUMMAGNA-TECH ELECTRONIC CO INC..................................................... 900 Science First/STARLAB........................ 331 Seiler Instrument/Zeiss Planetariums...........................................301 Sky-Skan, Inc............................................. 400 Tandem Motion Picture Studio............ 741

Publications/Books Osprey Custom Publishing....................103

Robotics Creatures On Tour....................................935 Dinosaurs Unearthed...............................501 The KidWind Project.............................. 840 LF Creative Group.................................... 131 Making Steam, Inc....................................231

Shipping/Transportation Action Moving Services, Atlas Van Lines.......................................323


Signage/Wayfinding

Traveling Exhibits

EyeTech Digital Systems, Inc................134 MultiTouch.................................................. 716 Simulations/Simulators ARC Science Simulations.................. 229 GWF Associates, LLC............................. 200 nWave Pictures Distribution.................710 Seiler Instrument/Zeiss Planetariums...........................................301 Triotech........................................................415

American Museum of Natural History............................. 817/916 Betty Brinn Children's Museum..........921 Bruns B.V. and Exhibits.nl.......................214 California Science Center......................708 Catawba Science Center......................... 911 Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose (CDM)................................. 731 Children's Museum of Houston.......... 402 The Children's Museum of Indianapolis........................................726 Cincinnati Museum Center...................738 COSI...............................................................736 Creatures On Tour....................................935 Dinosaurs Unearthed...............................501 Discovery Times Square.........................939 Evergreen Exhibitions.............................724 The Field Museum of Natural History...717 The Franklin Institute............................ 228 Grande Exhibitions................................... 917 Gunther von Hagens’ BODY WORLDS...603 Imagine Exhibitions Inc.........................927 K'NEX Brands............................................ 116 Kubik Maltbie, Inc...........................609/611

Space Theater Seiler Instrument/Zeiss Planetariums...........................................301 Sky-Skan, Inc............................................. 400 Ticketing systems/solutions Blackbaud, Inc............................................601 Explorer Systems, Inc..............................217 Gateway Ticketing Systems...................130 Outbound Software................................... 311 Siriusware, Inc.......................................... 406 TAM Retail................................................. 909 Tessitura Network....................................703

Liberty Science Center............................314 Michael Holland Productions...............923 Minnesota Children's Museum........... 830 Minotaur Mazes........................................ 720 Museum of the Earth............................... 101 National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute...........307 The Natural History Museum...............931 NRG! Exhibits............................................722 Ontario Science Centre................. 829/928 Oregon Museum of Science & Industry.. 915 Penn Museum.............................................941 Premier Exhibitions.................................631 Science Museum of Minnesota............ 715 Sciencenter.................................................. 317 ScienceWorks Museum..........................330

Visitor Research/Services Brad Larson Media, Inc...........................814 PGAV Destinations.................................. 403

Web Design Outbound Software................................... 311 Unified Field, Inc............................. 507/509 Wood Street, Inc........................................621

10_09555 7.25x4.75 4c

When you nurture the scientific power of a young mind, you give a great gift to humanity. We’re very grateful for your vital contribution to our futures.

Wells Fargo is proud to honor the Association of Science-Technology Centers. wellsfargo.com

Thank you for the discoveries she’ll make someday © 2013 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (1071710_09555)

1071710_09555 7.25x4.75 4c.indd 1

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9/5/13 1:13 PM


About Albuquerque Where Adventure meets Culture This Southwestern city is home to a colorful collection of art, culture, and natural treasures. Leading travel websites are touting Albuquerque as the place to be. Hotwire.com® recognized Albuquerque as one of the Top 10 Value Cities in the U.S. based on low hotel rates,

discounts, affordable entertainment, and destination appeal. Fodor’s Travel recently named Albuquerque as one of the Top 25 Places to Go in 2013, highlighting the city’s family-friendly attractions, accessible outdoor recreation, and great weather–all at an incredible value.

Arts & Culture

Hollywood’s Less Expensive Neighbor

While the modern city of Albuquerque is a center of high-tech industry and research, it retains vital connections to the past, blending Native American, Spanish, and Western cultural influences. Many traditional techniques and skills of the Pueblo people are practiced to this day, handed down through the generations. Visit the city’s beautiful cultural centers for a taste of how Albuquerque has developed into the multi-cultural city it is today. The Native American, Spanish, and Western cultural influences are evident throughout the city. As a consistent Top 10 Arts Destination by AmericanStyle magazine, traditional and modern creativity flourish here. Visitors enjoy exploring living history at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, ancient cliff dwellings, petroglyphs, and neighboring pueblos. Cultural highlights include the National Hispanic Cultural Center, historic Old Town, 19 museums, and an abundance of theaters. Albuquerque’s 19 museums provide you with a unique and in-depth perspective on diverse topics covering art, history, culture, science, nature, and unique topics such as hot air ballooning and turquoise. With so many options, museum lovers will be captivated for days.

86 ASTC 2013 final program

The great weather, excellent tax incentives, and ability to transform into nearly any city or location (including Mars) make Albuquerque an ideal location for film and television crews. From Breaking Bad to The Lone Ranger, this Southwestern city plays host to many film projects. Check out a local film tour for a glimpse at popular shoot locations in one of MovieMaker.com’s Top 10 Cities to be a Moviemaker.

Cuisine

Every meal in Albuquerque presents you with an opportunity to experience the exotic, addictive flavors of America’s most unique and cherished regional cuisine. New Mexican cuisine is all about the chile–red and green. Chile, beans, and corn make up the basic ingredients of the addictively flavorsome New Mexican cuisine found all over the state. These ingredients give New Mexican cuisine a different flavor than that of Mexican and Tex-Mex food. In addition to the popular New Mexican cuisine, Albuquerque has a diverse array of culinary offerings that will satisfy any appetite. With sunny days year-round, opt to enjoy your meal al fresco at one of many patio-dining options.

Neighborhoods

Albuquerque’s neighborhoods are as diverse as its culinary offerings. Visit Old Town for a taste of Southwestern history with local shops, galleries, and museums. The North Valley provides local, traditional New Mexican restaurants with lovely patios. Enjoy dinner and a cocktail in trendy Nob Hill, featuring some of the city’s best restaurants, boutiques, and nightlife options. For familiar, upscale retail and dining options, check out the ever-developing ABQ Uptown, the city’s newest shopping district.


Outdoor Recreation•

The city’s location in a high desert valley rift lends itself to hiking, biking, rock climbing, mountaineering, bouldering, geocaching, birding, and more among dependably sunny days, blue skies, crisp mountain air, and stunning vistas everywhere. Guided adventures include jeep and mountain bike outings, and our signature hot air balloon flights. As the “Hot Air Ballooning Capital of the World,” balloons dot the sky here nearly every morning. You might even have time to sneak away for a flight of your own before the sessions start one morning.

Golf

Golf Digest and Golf Magazine have ranked several of our courses among the best in the country. At our 14 year-round golf courses, you’ll play with rocky mountain peaks, slumbering volcanoes, and the meandering Rio Grande as stunning backdrops. The area’s breathtaking scenery combines with affordability to provide unbeatable cost-to-quality value. Whatever you choose to do, a world of adventure, authentic experiences and culture awaits you. Call 1-800-284-2282, visit www.ItsATrip.org, or check out @VisitABQ on social media for information, events, coupons, and specials.

Clockwise from left: Traditional Mexican Dancers, courtesy MarbleStreetStudio.com; Thousands of luminarias light up the Old Town Plaza on December 24 and during the holiday season, courtesy MarbleStreetStudio.com; the Sandia Peak Aerial Tramway at dusk with a spectacular Albuquerque sunset, courtesy Jay Blackwood; Twin Warriors Golf Club, courtesy www.itsatrip.org; Background image: Cottonwood trees turn golden in Autumn along the Rio Grande, courtesy MarbleStreetStudio.com final program ASTC 2013

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W

N

E

S ntion Conve Center

25 l

UNM

Nob Hill

Edo

Best Brewery/Winery: National Museum of Nuclear Science and History 6.3 mi. from Central and I-25

Best Vegetarian/Vegan Food ■ Annapurna’s ■ Mint Tulip ■ Thai Vegan ■ Fei’s Café

Best Breakfast Spot: ■ Frontier Restaurant ■ Flying Star ■ Gold Street Caffé ■ The Grove

■ Anodyne Pool Hall ■ Downtown Distillery Food & Drink with a View

Best New Mexico Souvenirs: ■ Anywhere on Old Town Plaza ■ National Hispanic Cultural Center ■ Indian Pueblo Cultural Center

Best Sports Bar:

Best New Mexican Food:

■ Two Fools Tavern ■ Saggios

■ Duran’s Central Pharmacy (breakfast, lunch only) ■ Cocina Azul

Best Live Music: ■ Launchpad ■ QBar in Hotel Albuquerque

Best Upscale Restaurant: ■ Artichoke Café ■ Seasons Rotisserie & Grill ■ Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro

1/8

Best LGBT Bar: ■ Effex

UNM

1/4 mi.

te on

Central Ave. Mint Tulip

■ Ibiza in Hotel Andaluz ■ Apothecary Bar in Hotel Parq Central

■ Anodyne Pool Hall ■ Sister ■ Nob Hill Bar & Grill ■ Zinc Cellar

■ JC’s NYPD Pizza ■ Garcia’s Kitchen ■ Dog House Drive In

0

Best Place to Shoot Pool:

Best Bar:

Best Cheap, Quick Eats:

Frontier Fei Cafe

Annapurna

■ Marble Brewery ■ Kelly’s Brew Pub ■ St. Clair Bistro & Winery ■ Tractor Brewing Co.

M

Best Unique Gifts: ■ Anywhere in Nob Hill ■ Beeps ■ All museum stores ■ Mariposa Gallery ■ Masks y Más

Nob Hill

ta

Vis

Zinc

Two Fools

Masks Y Más Nob Hill Bar & Grill

Einstein Bros. Bagels

Saggios

IL Vicino Pizza Flying Star Mariposa Beeps Tractor Thai Vegan

Kelly’s

88 ASTC 2013 final program

Wellesley

Bryn Mawr

Richmond

Dartmouth

Girard

Vassar

Princeton

Columbia

Stanford

Cornell

Harvard

Yale

Buena Vista

El Patio (NM food)

Solano

3 mi.

Parkland

2

Carlisle

1

■ Blackbird Buvette (Mondays)

Amherst

0

Ave.

Eubank

Centra Downtown

Best Karaoke:

Tulane

Old Town


St. Clair

Old Town

of seum NM Mu istory H l Natura ience and Sc

19th

19th

. High Noon Saloon

Golden Crown Tiguex Park

Church St. Cafe

n Tow Old

Cocina Azul Routes

Rd.

n

Old Tow Plaza

1/8

We hope you enjoy these spots as much as we do!

Lomas

Ce

nt

0

Mountain

12th

Old Town Pizza

Staff from the host museums voted on top picks near the Convention Center.

Explora

18th

de Blvd

Hotel Albuquerque, QBar Seasons

Duran’s

ra

lA

¡Bienvenidos a Albuquerque!

16th

n Rio Gra

Bellamah

ve

.

Dog House: 0.6 mi. from Central and Lomas

1/4 mi.

Garcia's

Marble Brewery 0.6 mi. from Central and 2nd

ntion Conve Center

Marquette

Cafe Lush

s

a er

0

1/8

on sportati do Tran ation st Alvara s u b (City Center runner train) il and Ra

Hotel Parq Central

25

1/4 mi.

Other Things Not to Miss: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Grove

Elm

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

Gold St. Caffé 8th

9th

10th

Gold

Artichoke

High

Effex

Walter

Launchpad

Central Ave.

NYPD Pizza

Distillery Chama River

Luther King Jr.

Edo

Edith

Blackbird

Park

Hotel Andaluz

Tij

Arno

KiMo, Anodyne, Sister

Copper

RR Tracks

Tijeras

Dr. Martin

Broadway

Downtown

Sandia Tram Take the Railrunner to Santa Fe See the Kimo Theater Rent a bike at Routes Take a Segway tour of Old Town Visit the bakery at Golden Crown Panaderia Hike La Luz Trail Visit the Albuquerque BioPark

Most Commonly Heard New Mexico Saying: Red or Green? (Which color of chile do you want on that?) Christmas (I’d like both red and green chile.) Burque (Albuquerque)

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NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY & SCIENCE THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY AND SCIENCE

is the State’s largest museum and informal science education center. A collections-based Museum with over 100,000 fossil and biological specimens – the Museum’s many exhibits highlight the rich natural history of New Mexico. Take a walk through prehistoric New Mexico and see the only Triassic Hall in North America, discover how and why the personal computer revolution started in Albuquerque, and see one of the largest moon rocks on display in the world. With a large format 3D theater, a planetarium, interactive exhibits, active science research programs, and the Sandia Mountain Natural History Center – the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science has something for every interest.

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science 1801 Mountain Rd NW | Albuquerque, NM 87104 nmnaturalhistory.org | (505) 841-2800


ASTC Members in New Mexico Explora 1701 Mountain Road NW Albuquerque, NM www.explora.us Explora is a learning place that provides real experiences with real things and puts people's learning in their own hands. It's a place where families can get to know each other better, learn together, and share new experiences of the basic processes and materials investigated and used by science, technology, and art. Explora's exhibit activities engage people of all ages with small-scale materials and equipment in personal spaces, where family and friends can communicate comfortably with each other, manipulate a wide range of physical variables, and develop their own thinking about what they are experiencing. Explora serves more than 234,000 people a year, and facilitates over 2,500 educational programs to more than 72,000 students from schools in all 33 counties of New Mexico. Among the many educational programs offered are Growing a Scientist for preschoolers and their adult caregivers, and Robo Task Force, an afterschool robotics program. Explora's Youth Intern Program prepares high-achieving, low-income teens to serve as educators for younger students in their communities. Explora also provides professional development for a number of teachers, early childhood educators, informal science educators, and local scientists and engineers each year, in part through its involvement with the Portal to the Public and Girls RISEnet national networks. One of Explora’s core values is Community. Explora has provided over 18,900 Helping Hand memberships at no cost to families whose children qualified for free and reduced-price school lunches. Explora has collaborated with more than 50 other organizations and has embarked on a new strategic initiative focused on community listening, beginning with a series of community conversations around Albuquerque.

National Museum of Nuclear Science and History 601 Eubank Boulevard SE Albuquerque, NM www.nuclearmuseum.org The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History was established in 1969 as an intriguing place to learn the story of the Atomic Age. The Museum represents the early research of nuclear development through today’s peaceful uses of nuclear technology. The permanent displays and changing special exhibits present history, science applications, and future developments of nuclear energy. Exhibits include The Atomic Pioneers, who shaped and influenced atomic science; Nuclear Medicine from the “Revigator” to the Gamma Camera; Energy Encounters, which informs about efforts to meet the world’s hunger for power; and the Manhattan Project, which shows the secret city, the scientists, and personnel who worked to develop “The Gadget,” and its test at the Trinity site in New Mexico. Children will love the Little Albert’s Lab, where young inquisitive minds can try their hand at science activities or develop their own experiments; outdoor in the Heritage Park, there are many missiles and four iconic aircraft on display. The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History is a Smithsonian Affiliate and the only Congressionally chartered museum in New Mexico. The Museum’s mission is “to serve as America’s resource for nuclear history and science. The Museum presents exhibits and quality educational programs that convey the diversity of individuals and events that shape the historical and technical context of the nuclear age.”

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New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science

Other ASTC Members in New Mexico

1801 Mountain Road NW Albuquerque, NM www.nmnaturalhistory.org

Andrew Merriell & Associates LLC 7198 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, NM merriell.com

Open to the public for over 27 years, the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science is the State’s largest natural history museum. The Museum is a collections-based museum and is the official State repository for all fossils collected on state and federal lands in New Mexico. With nearly 100,000 fossil and biological specimens from our State, the Museum’s many exhibits highlight the rich natural history of New Mexico. Take a walk through prehistoric New Mexico and see the only Triassic Hall in North America, discover how and why the personal computer revolution started in Albuquerque, and see one of the only moon rocks on display in the world. With a large format theater, a planetarium, interactive exhibits, and active science research programs, the Museum of Natural History and Science has something for every walk of life.

Thank you! ASTC wishes to thank the board of directors, staff, and volunteers of Explora, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science for all of their efforts in making the 2013 ASTC Annual Conference such a success.

92 ASTC 2013 final program

Farmington Museum 3041 East Main Street Farmington, NM www.farmingtonmuseum.org Las Cruces Museum of Nature and Science 411 North Main Street Las Cruces, NM www.las-cruces.org/Departments/Public%20Services/ Services/Museums/Natural%20History%20Museum The New Mexico Museum of Space History Top of New Mexico Highway 2001 Alamogordo, NM www.nmspacemuseum.org


Index of Core Areas Communications and Public Relations Change We Don't Believe In

Engaging a Linguistically Diverse Audience in Museum Education Programs

Learning the Basis for Participation

Engineering Innovation in After-School Programs

Community and Member Relations

Family STEM Explorations: Engaging Families with Elementary-Age Children in STEM

Can We Collaborate with Our Competitors? Cities of Scientific Culture Citizen Engagement on Science and Policy: Critical Questions, Best Practices Fostering Collaboration between Science Centers and Afterschool Programs

Digital and Emerging Media Bringing the Planetarium to Earth: Community Dialogues for Ecological Resilience Creative Use of Digital Media in Science Centers and Museums Gaming in Museums to Engage Audiences Mobile Bridges: Using Apps to Extend Museums Beyond the Walls

Education and Learning 21-Tech-Niques: Engaging Museum Visitors Using Mobile Technologies A Baker's Dozen: 13 Ideas That Will Rock Your Outreach! ARIS: Mobile Design as a Path to Civic Participation Bridging Formal/Informal: Science Museums as Learning Labs for PreService Teachers Bridging the Gap: Connecting Citizens and Students to Scientific Research Class is in...the Science Center! Combating Anti-Science in Our Society Connecting Visitors Live to Research and Exploration: Opportunities and Rewards Encouraging Visitor STEM DecisionMaking Using Public Engagement with Science 96 ASTC 2013 final program

Hands-On Activities in Energy and Climate Science for Educators Hitchhiking to Pluto: Youth-Designed Planetarium Shows How Children Develop Ideas about How the World Works IMLS-Funded Early Learning

Exhibits and Experience Exhibit SEED: Resources for Sustainable Exhibits Activating Science in Living History Museums Big Ideas for Small Science Centers Collaborative Family Learning at Engineering Studio: Design, Facilitation, and Evidence Effective and Speedy Exhibit/Program Development Using the Agile Approach Effective Strategies for Featuring Current Science in Museum Settings Engaging Visitors with Disabilities in STEM Learning Existing in Two Worlds Pecha Kucha Fast Prototyping to Learn Science Healthy and Wise: New Approaches to Presenting Health How We Learned from Interactives That Suck Informal Math Learning: What Do We Know? Integrating Scientists and Their Research into the Science Museum Matrix Interactives, Touch Tables, Maker Spaces: Trends, Fads, What's Next Make It Work: Tinkering and Design Thinking at Your Museum

Small Spaces: Creating Intimate Visitor Experiences The 4th Paradigm: Connecting Visitors to Complex Science The Final Frontier?

Finance and Development Creating a Culture of Philanthropy Developing and Running Successful Revenue Generating Programs Donor-Centered Communications: Inspiring and Engaging Supporters Hiring and Keeping Great Development Officers. International Corporations and Science Museums and Centers Measuring Impact: Reporting to Funders Return On Their Investment (ROI) Mini-Grants: Doing a Lot with Just a Little NIH ISE Funding Workshop Roundtable: Submitting Competitive NSF Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) Proposals Your Assets Are More Valuable Than You Thought!

Management Beyond Fire and Flood: Is Your Museum Prepared for Emergencies? Building Stronger Board/CEO Relationships Government Policy: Could Science Centers Have an Even Bigger Impact? Is Africa the New Frontier for Developing the Field? Museum Leaders Debate Questions of Mission and Money So You Wanna Be A CEO?

Research and Evaluation Are We Really Doing Our Job As LifeLong Learning Organizations? Attendance Trends: Ten Years Past and Into the Future


Building a Culture of Evaluation from the Ground Up Data: Stop! Collaborate and Listen Field Trips: What Teachers Told Us International Science Center Impact Study Learning Opportunities through Making and Tinkering Multiple Perspectives on Making Evaluation Meaningful: A Hands-On Workshop Science Centers and Gender Equity in STEM: Mapping our Opportunities Science Learning Activation: Positioning Youth for Future Success in Science Transforming Natural History Museums through Collaborative Innovation and Learning Research

Understanding Institutional Culture: Tools for Cultivating a Positive Environment

Volunteers

Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

Youth Programs

A Little Less Conversation, a Little More Action Bilingual Exhibits Research: Findings and Implications For ISE Institutions Collaboration with Integrity Workshop and Traditional Feast Day Laguna Pueblo Supporting More Inclusive Approaches to Citizen Science

Visitor/Customer Service Geeked Up for Guest Service: Round 2

Developing Volunteer Talent to Increase Organizational Retention & Talent

Engage Teens with a Youth-Directed Teen Science CafĂŠ Expanding Roles for Youth: Explainers and Beyond III Student Showcase Going Full Circle: Connecting Community Groups to STEM How to Build a Digital Learning and Innovation Practice Science Centers and Girls' Long-Term STEM Engagement and Career Choices Youth Program Network Workshop

SOS: The Science of Service

Science and Technology C A E E D Hands-On Microcomputer and Sensors Workshop Science Centers as Key Partners in Transdisciplinary Research for Sustainability Using Online Tools to Make Accessible Museum Collections Working with NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR)

Staff Development ASTC Professional Development: Strategic Approaches to Support the Field Design 360: Cross-Departmental Planning from All Directions Noyce Leadership Institute: Leading for the Public Good Training Facilitators for Their Important Roles on the Exhibit Floor

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Index of Presenters A

Abinader, Geralyn................... 35 Adamji, Joseph.......................46 Adams, Jason.........................40 Adams, Jennifer......................50 Adams, Steve..........................46 Adamson, Betsy..................... 55 Ahmann, Katey.......................49 Aichele, Andy.......................... 45 Aiken, Margaret....................... 45 Alfonsi, Leonardo....................48 Alpert, Carol Lynn................... 58 Anderson, Kristina.................. 53 Anyadike, Ngozi Linder .........44 Anyadike, Tobechi ..................44 Anzivino, Luigi.........................29 Armstrong, Heather............... 56 Aromin, Lelanie....................... 34 Auster, Ryan............................36

B

Babcock, Elizabeth..................41 Baca, Elena.................. 29, 37, 53 Bailey, Elsa................................41 Barnett, Adrienne................... 55 Barrueto, Erica.........................51 Bartels, Dennis........................46 Bateman, Dennis.................... 32 Baudoin, Catherine................36 Bayans, Kristin...................29, 51 Beall, Lydia.........................29, 35 Beck, Tony............................... 52 Beckman, John.......................49 Belew, Greg............................. 35 Bell, Jamie............................... 53 Bell, Kayce...............................36 Bell, Larry....................44, 52, 56 Bellomy, Nathan.....................50 Bennett, Dorothy.................... 43 Bennett, Kate.......................... 45 Berman, Tal........................35, 51 Berry, Brian.............................50 Bertley, Frederic...................... 43 Bertschi, Karyn.......................48 Bivings, Lindzy.........................41 Blankenship, Mellisa...............49 Blanton, Jenna ....................... 37 Blinderman, Ellen....................51 Booth, William.........................38 Borrego-Pierce, Alicia.. 31, 35, 51 Borun, Minda.................... 31, 56 Braafladt, Keith...........35, 50, 56 Brahms, Lisa........ 48, 52, 54, 56 Brantley, Sandra.....................36 Brown, Judy......................52, 53

Brown, Molly.....................40, 49 Bryant, Toph......................45, 50 Buchanan, Doug.....................49 Burch, Alexandra.................... 52 Burda, Chris............................ 32 Burdett, Ayesha......................36 Burger, Susan . .......................30

C

Cable, Christopher................. 37 Callanan, Maureen..................31 Cannady, Matthew................. 54 Carcasson, Martin.................. 55 Carlson, Lath.....................43, 54 Carmina, Helena..................... 37 Carney, Karen......................... 52 Carrigan, Tim..........................44 Carter, Sarah.....................35, 53 Case, Vince...............................31 Cassidy, Jen Snively............... 55 Chabay, Ilan.............................46 Chappa, Lisa........................... 56 Chatman, Liesl........................29 Coats, Victoria...................40, 52 Cockson, Brooke....................49 Cohen, Jonah..............29, 50, 53 Cohen, Stanley..................29, 34 Cohn, Sarah............................29 Coine, Alain.............................. 37 Cole, Jeff..................................30 Coleman, Dwight....................48 Collins, Jennifer....................... 45 Colton, Jeannie.......................50 Conley, Kacy............................30 Conlon, Linda.......................... 37 Connealy, Selena.....................31 Cook, Jessica Aronson...........50 Cook, Joseph...........................36 Corbin, Robert...................37, 48 Cornelius, Marla.......................41 Craig, Claire..............................51 Crawford, Patricia...................44 Cross, Lynn..............................49

D

Damani, Neelam..................... 32 Dancu, Toni..............................48 Daniel, Mary Jo........................41 Dasari, Puja....................... 41, 42 Davis, Jeff.................................30 Davis, Linda..............................31 Dawes, Kathy..................... 37, 41 Dawson, Ellis........................... 34 Deedrick, Rita...........................41 Deets, Andrea...................32, 50 Denson, Blaire.........................30

DeSena, Alphonse..................36 Dierking, Lynn.........................36 Dill, Duane................................36 Dilley, Kevin.............................. 53 Doesken, Nolan.......................30 Donaby, Emmanuel................46 Dorph, Rena............................ 54 Dudo, Anthony........................ 55 Duran, Sean............................. 52 Durant, Graham................ 51, 54 Dusenbery, Paul...................... 56

E

Ebbert, Franklin........................51 Edwards, Kristen..................... 35 Eisenmann, Amy.....................51 Ellenbogen, Kirsten..........44, 45 English, Chuck.........................51 Escude, Meg............................48

F

Falk, John.................................36 Farbiash, Netzach...................44 Fazio, Eugenio.........................44 Feldman, Tanya........................51 Ferguson, R. Lewis.................. 53 Fernandi, Kelly..........................51 Ferree, Cathy...........................40 Fink, Laurie..............................40 Fish, Derek..........................44, 51 Fisher-Ives, Russell................. 34 Flannery, Moe..........................31 Flesher, Lisa............................. 34 Forsyth, Stacey.......................49 Fox, RaeAnn............................ 34 Franche, Catherine.................48 Frazier, Cheronda.............38, 45 Frazier, Jennifer....................... 35 Friedman, Alan........................ 54 Fukunaga, Stanley..................44

G

Gardiner, Edward.................... 58 Garibay, Cecilia...........32, 36, 48 Gbolo, Grace...........................46 Gehring, Chad......................... 35 Genco, Diane...........................30 Giblin, Josh........................45, 50 Gillis, Linda..............................46 Goldstein, Eddie................50, 54 Gomes da Costa, Antonio......48 Gomez, Louis.......................... 56 Gordon, Neil............................ 42 Green, Lee............................... 37 Green, Lucy.............................46

Greenwald, Eric....................... 54 Gregoroff, Terri........................ 56 Griego, Marla........................... 34 Gupta, Preeti........................... 45 Gustafson-Hilton, Kathy........ 43 Gutwill, Joshua........................48

H

Haas, Joanna......................37, 45 Hackathorn, Deb.................... 45 Hackney, Jim...........................44 Hager, Karen............................ 53 Hailu, Eyoel..............................44 Halevy, Maya........................... 45 Hall, Michelle...........................49 Hall, Rick.................................. 37 Halversen, Catherine............. 54 Hamilton, Devon..................... 55 Hamilton, Patrick..............35, 46 Hancock, Wendy..................... 45 Hanover, Shelly....................... 56 Hanson, Kimberly................... 56 Harsh, Carol............................ 42 Hathaway, Stephanie.............48 Havel, Eric................................44 Heber, Etta...............................44 Hecox, Timothy....................... 55 Heidgerken, Heidi.............35, 50 Heil, David..........................49, 58 Heimann-Nunes, Wendy.......49 Heimlich, Joe..................... 40, 51 Henderson, Tara.....................40 Herbert, Jessie........................ 35 Herbert, Robert.......................50 Herberts, Sean........................49 Hernandez, Ann......................40 Herring, Brad...........................29 Hoeg, Asger..............................51 Holden, Chris.......................... 42 Honey, Margaret.....................49 Honeyman, Brenton............... 56 Hood, Jacie..............................36 Hoover, Lisa.......................50, 56 Horrigan, Sharon....................40 Hoyos, Nohora Elisabeth....... 56 Hoyt, Marilyn...........................38 Huerta Migus, Laura...36, 45, 55 Huffman, Kurt...................45, 49 Humphrey, Chevy..............37, 53

I

Imholte, Joseph...................... 52 Indiana, Scott Wayne............. 43 Ireland, Natalie........................ 52 Irwin, Brad................................31 Israel, Elisa................................51 final program ASTC 2013

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J

Jackson, Ali........................29, 32 Jackson, Mia...............49, 50, 58 Jacobsen, John.......................46 Jenkins, Jennifer.........45, 50, 55 Jensen, Kari....................... 31, 52 Jipson, Jennifer........................31 Johnson, Marilyn.................... 42 Joseph, Barry.....................35, 41 Jovanovic, Jennifer............44, 51

K

Kahn, Tammie......................... 55 Katzman, William.................... 37 Kellett, Kyrie...................... 41, 43 Kelley, Craig............................. 56 Kemper, Josh.......................... 55 Kennedy, Jeff...........................40 Keranen, Lisa.......................... 55 Kerby, Holly Walter.................50 Kiessner, Erika......................... 45 Knowlton, Christopher...........48 Kollmann, Liz.....................29, 43 Korn, Randi...............................31 Kortenaar, Paul....................... 43 Kortman, Sharon.................... 34 Krafft, Kathleen............ 35, 37, 51 Krause, Miriam........................50 Krishnamurthi, Anita..............30 Kuslansky, Eli.................... 41, 43 Kwiek, Nicole Cartwright.40, 49

L

LaBar, Wayne.......................... 45 Langer, Miriam........................29 Larose, Ashley......................... 43 Laursen, Sheena..................... 56 Lausch, Jessica....................... 55 Laverty, Michele...................... 37 LeBlanc, Denise ......................41 Legro, Patrice....................44, 46 Lehocky, AJ..............................51 Leigh, Kristin................35, 45, 58 Leuchars, Linda...................... 56 Levedahl, Katie.........................41 Lewis, Lesley..................... 36, 37 Lim, Tit Meng.......................... 54 Lindgren-Streicher, Anna...... 52 Lindsey, R. L.......................36, 56 Linke, Matthew........................ 58 Locke, Sharon.........................49 Lokey, Jen................................36

M

MacDonald, Daniel..................51 Machado, Aiyana....................46 Mackay, John..........................46

Mancuso, Brian.......................40 Margoles, Sarah.......................41 Marques, Diana....................... 54 Marshall, Sherry..................... 37 Martin, Jennifer (San Jose)....31 Martin, Jennifer (Calgary)........................43, 45 Martin, Laura............................31 Martin, Lee...............................48 Martin, Paul............................. 42 Massarani, Luisa..................... 56 Mathews, Jim.......................... 42 Matlock, Jennifer....................40 Mauermann, Paul........31, 41, 53 Mayer, Monika.........................29 Mayhew, Michael....................49 McCallie, Ellen.........................36 McCallum, Cheryl.............32, 52 McCarthy, Catherine........42, 56 McClintock, Melanie...............30 McCreedy, Dale...........31, 44, 50 McDonough, Gordon.............29 McDougall, Carrie................... 56 McDowell, Linda..................... 54 McLaughlin, Hooley..........45, 52 Medwid, Keri...........................50 Melber, Leah.............................31 Mesiti, Leigh Ann..................... 52 Meyer, Eric............................... 42 Miller, Diane.............................40 Miller, Jeanette........................ 35 Miller, Mary..............................48 Mir, Ronen...............................44 Mitchell, Ellie............................30 Modelski, Christopher.............31 Mohabir, Priya...................35, 46 Monahan, Peggy.........29, 35, 55 Moran, George........................ 37 Morse, MJ................................ 58 Moskalyk, Julie........................49 Motl, Hannah...........................50 Motto, Andrea...................40, 46 Multani, Satbir......................... 35 MuMin, Azuka............. 40, 51, 55 Myllykoski, Mikko....................49

N

Nesbit, Trevor.......................... 53 Newlin, J.......................42, 48, 54 Newman, Noah.......................30 Nielson, Katherine.................. 56 Norlander, Rosie..................... 53 Normandy, Nora..................... 52 Norton, Heather...................... 43 Novak, Debra............................31 Nwachukwu, Delox.................44 Nye, Adam...............................29

O

O'Connell, Audrey...................49 O'Reilly, Elaine.........................48 Okere, Anthony.......................44 Olson, Hillary........................... 45 Onkka, Al............................43, 45 Orselli, Paul...................37, 43, 52 Ortenzo, Linda......................... 35 Orwoll, Christopher................36 Ostfeld, Keith.....................32, 53 Owens, Whitney.......... 41, 43, 52

P

Paisley, Catherine................... 43 Palmquist, Sasha....................40 Panganiban, Rik......................50 Parry-Giles, Trevor.................. 55 Pattison, Scott..................29, 48 Pearson, Greg..........................49 Pennington, Rich.....................46 Perlov, Diane............................ 52 Persson, Per-Edvin.................36 Peterson, Karen................50, 56 Petrich, Mike............................ 52 Petrie, Neville........................... 37 Phelps, Adam..........................50 Phipps, Molly...........................40 Pihl, Erik................................... 45 Plaza, Carlos...........................36 Porcello, Darrell...........32, 43, 53 Porticella, Norman................. 55 Pratt, Megan............................ 53 Presley, Lucinda...................... 37 Priscella, Kristin...................... 37 Prosino, Rebecca....................36 Pula, Tim.................................. 37

Q

Quast, Bruce........................... 35

R

Ramsaroop, Sookram..................29, 32, 35 Randolph, Darva.....................36 Raney, Doug............................ 43 Rathbun, Michael.................... 56 Rawson, Liza........................... 43 Reeves, Julia............................30 Regalla, Lisa.......................53, 56 Reynolds, Katura....................40 Reynoso, Elaine....................... 56 Rife, Nicole...............................29 Rigby, Bridget..........................29 Riise, Jan.................................. 52 Rivera-Maulucci, Maria.......... 45 Robaina, Diane.........................51 Robertson, Robert.................. 34

Rock, Anthony (Bud)...............51 Rock, Jim................................. 58 Rockwell, Tom..........................41 Rogers, Maryanna............54, 55 Rohovit, Ron............................ 43 Romans, Van...........................46 Romero, Carlos....................... 35 Rose, Alexandra......................49 Rose, Erich............................... 35 Rosino, Elizabeth....................30 Rowell, Kirsten.........................31 Rubin, Andee...........................48 Rudd, Courtney....................... 55 Ruffo, Christine....................... 58 Ruggiero, Joe........................... 42 Runkle, Deborah......................41 Russell, Lauren..................30, 58 Russell, Robert............36, 42, 55 Rutherford, E. Howard...........49

S

Salazar, Aisha.......................... 53 Salvadore, Francesco.............44 Sanchez, Carmen................... 56 Scardina, Angela...............38, 46 Schatz, Dennis.......36, 41, 51, 56 Schiedel, Meghan...................40 Schloss, Dana...................29, 35 Schmit, Bette....................50, 52 Schreiber, Robby....................46 Schwanebeck, Joe..................50 Schwarz, Tamara.................... 35 Seidl, Bryce.............................46 Selvakumar, Meena..........49, 58 Semper, Robert...................... 54 Seymour, Kevin Michael........ 43 Shanklin, Michael................... 35 Shirk, Jennifer......................... 55 Sickler, Jessica........................ 58 Siegel, Eric.........................45, 56 Silverstein, Gary......................30 Simoncini, Greg...................... 37 Singer, Silvia............................36 Skolnik, Julia...................... 31, 44 Sladek, Mary........................... 56 Smith, Frieda........................... 55 Smith, Rachel..........................49 Snider-Bryan, Cirrelda........... 54 Soares, Edson.........................44 Sobey, Ed ................................ 37 Sohus, Anita............................ 56 Sosso, Corinne........................ 53 Spadaccini, Jim.................43, 52 Stage, Elizabeth......................46 Stauffer, Barbara.................... 37 Staveloz, Walter...........37, 41, 46 Steiner, MaryAnn.....................31 Stevenson, Flisa...................... 55 Stewart, Kelly.......................... 34 Strauss, Erin............................29 final program ASTC 2013

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t Based:

Streicher, Barbara.................. 56 Stueber, Nancy..................37, 46 Sutera, Catherine................... 37 Sutton-Johnson, Kate............ 32 Svarovsky, Gina ................44, 50

T

U

Unverzagt, Beth......................30 Urban, Julie.............................49 Uzelmeier, Calvin.................... 35 Uzzo, Stephen......................... 35

V

Tagüeña, Julia..........................46 Tang, Carol............................... 56 Valenta, Carol..........................44 Tatter, Paul.........................32, 56 Van Deman, Barry.................. 37 Taylor, Anika............................50 van der Leeuw, Sander..........46 Taylor, Paul.........................29, 50 forVeraka, center advancement of Rachel.........................51 WEB: Tench, Beck.............................36 Vossoughi, Shirin....................48 informal science education .ORG Terjesen, Lori Ann................... 37 Vukajlovich, Dana................... 58 Thacker, Carla.........................50 Theyson, Monica.................... 45 for advancement of center PRINT: Thoma, Claire...........................41 informal science education Wagner, Clifford.......................51 Thomas, Melissa......................51 Walker, Gretchen.................... 54 Thompson, Maura.................. 53 Walker Robbins, Wren............29 Tiburcio, Tania.........................36 Walter, Charlie..........................41 Trautmann, Charles................ 58 Ward, Anika.............................46 Trautwein, Michelle.................49 Washington, Miles.................. 53 lined Version: Trooskin, Gerri......................... 52

insci

caise

W

Wechsler, Helen ......................51 Weiss, Martin........................... 52 Weiss, Shannon......................30 Welch, Sandra.........................36 Wells, David 29,....................... 56 Wenger, Angela....................... 53 West, Robert......................42, 46 Whitworth, Christi................... 56 Wiehe, Ben........................52, 56 Wilkening, Susie...................... 58 Wilkinson, Karen.........29, 52, 53 Wilson, Ben.............................. 52 Wilson, Colin............................ 35 Winkowski, Maggie................. 45 Wint, Dennis............................46 Wittrock, Don....................38, 46 Wode, Jessica..........................30 Wojton, Mary Ann................... 43 Woodis, Pamela......................36 Woolery, Cindy........................48 Wyatt, Ryan...........................583

Y

Yalowitz, Steven..........31, 36, 40 Yip, Chee-Kuen....................... 54 Young, Jennifer........................50 Yu, Gigi..................................... 54 Yu, Ka Chun............................. 58

Z

Zaller, Tom...............................44 Zeigler, Maddie........................ 58 Zoffel, Jennifer.........................38 Zsuppan, Gabor...................... 45 Zuckerman, Adam.............35, 51

WEB:

A Cooperative Agreement with the National Science Foundation Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

RINT:

InformalscIence.org

An online community and collection of Informal STEM Learning projects, evaluation, and research resources.

■■ Join our community:■share■your■work■with■the■field,■

receive■timely■information■from■CAISE,■engage■in■ group■conversations,■and■find■potential■collaborators. ■■ search and Browse: our■collection■of■Informal■STEM■

Learning■resources.■Guide■your■search■with■tags■such■ as■learning■environment,■content,■and■audience. ■■ make the case: access■exemplars■and■evidence■that■

portray■the■quality,■variety,■and■impact■of■Informal■ STEM■Learning■experiences.

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association of science-Technology centers 818 Connecticut Avenue, 7th Floor Washington, D.C. 20006 caise@informalscience.org (202)783-7200 This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation. (Award Nos. DRL-0638981 / DRL-1212803). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation


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ASTC Board of Directors, Planning Committee and Staff Executive Committee

Directors

Bryce Seidl

Dennis Bartels

President Pacific Science Center Seattle, Washington, USA

Linda Conlon

Vice President International Centre for Life Newcastle Upon Tyne, England, United Kingdom

Chevy Humphrey

Exploratorium San Francisco, California, USA

David Chesebrough COSI Columbus, Ohio, USA

Ann Fumarolo

Sci-Port: Louisiana’s Science Center Shreveport, Louisiana, USA

Secretary/Treasurer Arizona Science Center Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Nohora Elisabeth Hoyos

Joanna Haas

Guy Labine

Member-at-Large Kentucky Science Center Louisville, Kentucky, USA

Nancy Stueber

Immediate Past President Oregon Museum of Science and Industry Portland, Oregon, USA

Anthony (Bud) Rock

CEO Association of Science-Technology Centers Washington, DC, USA

Maloka Bogota, Colombia

Science North Sudbury, ON, Canada

Tit-Meng (TM) Lim

Science Centre Singapore Singapore

Ronen Mir

Levinson Visitors Center, Weizmann Institute of Science Rehovot, Israel

David Mosena

Museum of Science and Industry Chicago, Illinois, USA

Neville Petrie

Science Alive! The New Zealand Science Centre Christchurch, New Zealand

Stephanie Ratcliffe

The Wild Center Tupper Lake, New York, USA

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ASTC 2013 final program

Barry Van Deman

Museum of Life and Science Durham, North Carolina, USA

Alexander Zwissler

Chabot Space & Science Center Oakland, California, USA

Conference Planning Committee Angela Wenger

Committee Co-Chair New Jersey Academy for Aquatic Sciences Camden, New Jersey, USA

Guy Labine

Committee Co-Chair Science North Sudbury, ON, Canada

Katey Ahmann

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

Alicia Borrego-Pierce

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Dean Briere

Arizona Science Center Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Roy Campbell

North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences Raleigh, North Carolina, USA

Jen Cassidy

COSI Columbus, Ohio, USA


Liesel Chatman

Science Museum of Minnesota St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

Chris Cropper

Maryland Science Center Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Len Duda

Albuquerque Host Committee Chair Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Deb Hackathorn

COSI Columbus, Ohio, USA

Karen Hager

Ontario Science Centre Toronto, ON, Canada

Joe Hastings

Explora Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Chevy Humphrey

Arizona Science Center Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Patrick Weeks

Roto Dublin, Ohio, USA

Ryan Wyatt

California Academy of Sciences San Francisco, California, USA

ASTC Staff Anthony (Bud) Rock

Monica Jones

Alejandro Asin

Mary Mathias

Jamie Bell

Laura Huerta Migus

CEO brock@astc.org

Administrative Assistant aasin@astc.org CAISE Project Director jbell@astc.org

Bradley Brookens Staff Accountant bbrookens@astc.org

David Corson

Director of Conferences dcorson@astc.org

Jessica Evans

Member Services Coordinator jevans@astc.org

Diane Frendak

Director, Membership dfrendak@astc.org

Margaret Glass

Grants Accountant mjones@astc.org Association Services Coordinator mmathias@astc.org Director, Professional Development and Inclusion lhuertamigus@astc.org

Trevor Nesbit

CAISE Director of Online Engagement tnesbit@astc.org

Kathy Pasley

Director of Development kpasley@astc.org

Christine Ruffo

Manager, Research cruffo@astc.org

Kalie Sacco

CAISE Program and Community Manager ksacco@astc.org

Program Manager, Professional Development mglass@astc.org

Emily Schuster

Wendy Hancock

Leah Secunda

Manager, Professional Development and Exhibition Services whancock@astc.org

Larry H. Hoffer Chief of Staff lhoffer@astc.org

Nina Humes

Conference Coordinator nhumes@astc.org

Editor eschuster@astc.org Controller lsecunda@astc.org

Sean Smith

Director, Government and Public Relations ssmith@astc.org

Walter Staveloz

Director, International Relations wstaveloz@astc.org

Korie Twiggs

Program Specialist, Professional Development ktwiggs@astc.org

final program ASTC 2013

105


Upcoming ASTC Annual Conferences October 18–21, 2014

October 17–20, 2015

Raleigh, North Carolina

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Hosted by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Hosted by the Montreal Science Centre

Join ASTC and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, North Carolina for ASTC 2014! Submit your conference proposal online at conference. astc.org (session proposals are due October 31), and for marketing, sponsorship, and exhibitor opportunities in Raleigh, visit the 2014 Integrated Marketing Prospectus online at conference.astc.org.

Mark your calendars and start looking for your passport, as ASTC and the Montreal Science Centre host the Association’s 2015 Annual Conference in historic Montreal! More details to come in 2014…

The Nature Research Center at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

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ASTC 2013 final program


Designing and realizing memorable science museums around the world.

The Mind Museum Taguig, Philippines

master planning + exhibit design + media production + project management

Booth #607


GIVING TECHNOLOGY A BOOST! Roto congratulates the Science Museum of Virginia on the recent grand opening of Boost!, a new 8,000 ft2 permanent exhibition on human health and improvement. Designed and built by Roto to foster a greater depth of visitor engagement, all 30 major interactives in Boost! are activated by a personal ID card, allowing visitors to durably store, analyze, compare and improve on their results. Learn more about the technology at www.roto.com/boost.

Roto is a full-service design and design-build firm specializing in interactive science learning. From institutional master planning to exhibit design and development, robust prototyping to turnkey production and installation, Roto is a science center’s leading choice for flexibility, quality and value.

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ASTC 2013 Final Program  

Final Program for ASTC 2013, October 19-22 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.