Page 1

VOLUME I.

4,20€

WHERE AFRICA MEETS EUROPE.


content Natural Dresses // 12 in Africa and their influence on European culture. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5

Aesthetic Origin Identity Tradition Decoration

Urban Labels // 38 #1 Trine Lindegaard #2 Dent De Man #3 Shekudo *Interview with Shekudo // 36

African Fever // 76 is everywhere and hardly to ignore.

African Patterns // 20 and its influence on the fashion scene. #1 Society #2 Expression #3 Extraordinaire #4 Runway #5 Designer

Topshots // 44

#1 Tomas Falmer #2 Julia Hetta #3 Benjamin Vnuk

Man Power // 94


History

natural Dresses in Africa and their influence on European culture.

Photography: Hans Silvester; Author:Tatjana Schmidt


7


History


9

#1 Aesthetic

Essentially the difference between African and European culture is that African artists create forms that provide the content of their religion and philosophy of life. They are bound by strict traditions and meanings. All those body decorations have one style and form a harmonious and ethnical unit. Many European people take over the motifs from different cultures without knowing anything about them. Through the different styles there is no unit anymore – just a decorative composition out of several meaningless and insignificant patterns.   So in Western culture decoration and painting has mostly an aesthetic purpose but African people want to transmit certain statements. In our modern society you can find the impact of African culture not only in clothes and make-up but also in tattooing.

So, depending on different occasions, the faces and bodies of African people form a canvas on which painters unfold their art. The whole figure becomes, through conscious design, a term of human culture which represents the values and ideals of society. The Mursi tribe even paint bodies in a political context; it is a reflection of their history and so it describes current problems.   The symbolism of colors can not be easily defined in general. There are too many different African languages and tribes and therefore there are strong regional differences and many degrees of perception. What can be said is that the symbolism of colors applies in the mental and social area.


History

#2 Identity

Africa is a diverse continent with thousands of cultures, languages and religions. This variety is also reflected in body decoration. In numerous African ethnicities, the creativity of its people is artistically expressed by decorating their bodies. It is part of their everyday life. The body gets primed carefully and becomes an image carrier, a work of art.   Behind its aesthetics there is a huge complex of meaning and symbolism involving social and religious backgrounds. The skin decorations provide information about their social rank, age, wealth, religion and their history. They show us where they come from and which tribe they belong to. So it can set up boundaries of friendship, but alos create togetherness. Moreover it emphasizes people’s culture, traditions, view of the world and boost their social identity.

Ornamental painting itself is a long procedure ranging from the preparation of the skin to the process of the painting itself. Therefore different pigments come to into play, derived from plant juices and natural resources, mixed with chalk, clay and earth.   The most frequently used colors are ochre, red, white and black. For instance plant juices are made out of the henna plant, the randia malleifera plant, the cocoyam root and the crushed seeds of other plants. They lend the colors on the skin longer and better durability.    The dried and pulverized leaves of the henna plant provide a coloring that, depending on the quality and mixture, ranges from red, orange and yellow tones.


11


History

#3 Origin

Since the dawn of history, people have used the surface of thie body as field for creative changes and as a platform for the distribution of nonverbal information.   Body painting became magical early on in ancient history. People began to connect it to mythical and religious mindscapes and furthermore to the proximity of the divine. Forms and colors had the function of protecting them from forces of nature, supporting hunting rituals and so on. Eventually people settled down, so they had more time for body art and body care. Hence, the body painting became refined and was performed in greater detail. It was not just used for decoration but also for religious cults of action and for the dissociation of family affiliation and membership.   So in Africa body painting plays a huge role in self-decoration. The creative po-

wer takes on strong expression through sign-setting and color-intensive paintings. But beside this you can also find other kinds of decoration like complex hairstyles, hair accessories and wigs. Different stages of life are symbolized by certain haircuts. Different stages of life are symbolized by certain haircuts.   People have different patterns shaved out of their hair or wear braided pigtails. They use clay and decorative plumes to make their hair a more colourful work of art. Furthermore, they create glass bead arm bracelets and ankle bracelets made out of different metals.   They also decorate their bodies with piercings, for example nose and lip jewelry, earrings and many other kinds of adornments. Tattoos and ornamental scars are also a part of their body art.


13


History

HANS SILVESTER

For nearly a decade, the collaborative effort between two high-profile New York artists called Guyton\Walker has been delivering a deluge of visual pop and seizure.

As with their own separate, very distinct careers, the men behind this visionary endeavor, Wade Guyton and Kelley Walker, rely heavily on the ink-jet printer and the scanner as a principle engine in the machinery, printing designs that range from sliced fruit and checkerboard patterns to polka dots and kitchen knives.   Now in the show "Wade Guyton, Guyton\Walker, Kelley Walker," opening this month at Austria's Kunsthaus Bregenz, the connections between the collaboration and their respective solo trajectories will be tied together in one extended exhibition, and this time Guyton is including some printed mattresses should audience members collapse from overstimulation on this.   According to Guyton the show is a continuation of their artistic processes.


15


History


17

#4 Tradition

Most cultural and religious rituals serve a very old tradition. They structure the seasons of the year, daily routines and create transitions to new stages of life. In this manner important occasions like birth,death and marriage become visible to individuals and society.   Body decoration is an important part of this ceremony. Every event and show of faith is appointed its own culture-specific expression through traditional signs. For this purpose there are specific colors and patterns. Due to this, the rituals achieve their desired goal.   So, depending on different occasions, the faces and bodies of African people form a canvas on which painters unfold their art. The whole figure becomes, through conscious design, a term of human culture which represents the values and ideals of society.

Some tribes also perform circumcisions on women and men. Most of the time it happens after birth, but the age varies depending on the tribe. It also signifies the, marriageable age of men, a regular practice for the Maasai. It is common to demonstrate the transition to adulthood.   The degree of pain for each ritual varies from tribe to tribe, as does the technique they use. Clay is an important natural material used for boys. Tribes perceive it as magical. It is applied to the wounds to promote faster healing. Moreover, the whole body is covered in clay. This fosters the belief that the body dies during the initiation and the person is reborn as an adult.


History

#5 Decoration

So in Africa body painting plays a huge role in self-decoration. But beside this you can also find other kinds of decoration like complex hairstyles, hair accessories and wigs. Different stages of life are symbolized by certain haircuts. They also decorate their bodies with piercings, for example nose and lip jewelry, earrings and many other kinds of adornments. Tattoos and ornamental scars are also a part of their body art.   Some piercings on certain areas of the body are said to have magical powers. Tattoos can also be signals to the environment or can have a symbolic meaning for the carrier. Here too, magical powers play an important role. The section of the body where the design is placed and the combination of patterns depends on the religion, region and tradition of the tribe. Due to their dark skin, a lot of people

prefer scars because they are more pronounced than tattoos.   Or the different design elements, different tools are used. The simplest painting instrument is made of a thin wooden pick which is dipped into the color. Parts of a palm frond are chewed until they assume the form of a brush. Feathers and flat metal pieces are assembled to form a blunt knife. Furcated instruments made of wood are used to make parallel lines.   All these utensils are really good and practical for making lines, but dimensonal patterns call for fingers or wide wooden parts, For hair decorations people use combs and wires and hairpins made of brass. To add scars to the body thorns, small hooks and razors are used. These hooks are used to pull up the skin so that incisions can be made with the razors.


19


History

African Patterns and its influence on the fashion scene.

Photography: Focus Feautures; Author:Raphael Steiner


21


History


23

#1 Society

Throughout history, humanity has found the most different means, forms and ways of decorating bodies to accentuate individuality, personal beauty and sexual attraction. Clothes, ornamental painting, tattoos, scars and jewelry played a role in appearances.   You are how you look. First impressions are vital in making contacts and connections. People automatically judge a person, whether it is conscious or unconscious, on appearances. So the way way a person presents themselves is an important factor in communication. The decorated body is an expression of personal identity. This is always questioned by society, either they accept it or they don‘t. There are comromises, not only in everyday life but also for festive occasions, between personal unfolding and social policy.

  The colorful body decorations from the indigenous peoples comprising tattoos, scars, colors and symbols, are hardly ordinary in Western society.   In Western culture people generally just just stick to putting makeup on their faces. This is what counts as beauty care and highlights the aesthetics of the individual. Mainly woman use this medium. They want to produce a certain effect, stimulate a certain expression. Say red lips are perceived as sensual. Also people can uncover a part of their personality with removing their makeup.   The most significant way of expressing oneself is through the choice of clothes one is wearing.


History


25

#2 Expression

The colorful body decorations from the indigenous peoples comprising tattoos, scars, colors and symbols, are hardly ordinary in Western society. In Western culture people generally just stick to putting makeup on their faces. This is what counts as beauty care and highlights the aesthetics of the individual.   The most significant way of expressing oneself is through the choice of clothes one wears. For most Europeans it would be inconceivable, for reasons of ethics and modesty, to paint their bodies instead of wearing clothes in everyday life. However there are special occasions that merit the wearing of body painting, and this is clearly a trend. For instance you will find lavishly colorful interpretations at different parades, such as the Love Parade or several music festivals.   Let us take Marilyn Manson as an ex-

ample. He consciously overloads his selfdramatization through celebrating rituals on the stage and showcasing bodies full of scars and body paintings in his videos.   Furthermore, he never goes out in public without wearing make-up. He has created his own world, his own role. In this way he is not only addressing taboos and provoking discussions but also achieving his goal, of heightening media presence.


History

#3 Extraordinaire

Sometimes Western society also celebrates colorful rituals and traditional rites. The carnival for instance; it is widespread but one of the most famous ones may be the Carnival in Venice. For this specific occasion, but only for a short time, people paint and dress themselves in a very outstanding and colorful way.   For some celebrities this is everyday life, they even have to go one step further. Women and men are over-painting, tattooing themselves and wearing extremely strikingly clothes in order to grab people’s attention and be provocative. It is not enough to be pretty, stars have to convince people of their "star quality". So self-dramatization makes them stand out from the crowd and gets them noticed.   Decoration can also have a purely aeaesthetic purpose, such as cosmetic painting or tattoos. The ideal concept of

a beautiful body depends on certain norms and value judgments of the culture in question. Indigenous peoples decorate themselves with different things they find in their habitat and modern society is buying expensive products.   One has different perceptions of aesthetics, symbols and colors, hence, there are so many varieties of decoration. Nonnetheless the original intention worldwide is very similar, namely transporting the the informative itentions and messages through the colorful dress on the skin, simsimply said: wearing your own kind of message on your body.


27


History

Africa’s inspiration on the fashion scene, including runways, labels, photographer, etc., is impossible to imagine.


29


History

#4 Runway

Essentially the difference between African and European culture is that African artartists create forms that provide the content of their religion and philosophy of life. They are bound by strict traditions and meanings. All those body decorations have one style and form a harmonious and ethnical unit. Many European people take over the motifs from different cultures without knowing anything about them. Through the different styles there is no unit anymore - just a decorative composition out of insignificant patterns.   So in Western culture decoration and painting has mostly an aesthetic purpose but African people want to transmit certain statements. In our modern society you can find the impact of African culture not only in clothes but also in tattooing. Throughout history, humanity has found the most different means, forms and

ways of decorating bodies to accentuate individuality, personal beauty and sexual attraction. Clothes, ornamental painting, tattoos, scars and jewelry played a role in appearances. You are how you look. First impressions are vital in making contacts and connections. People automatically judge a person, whether it is conscious or unconscious, on appearances.   So the way a person presents themselves is an important factor in communication. The decorated body is an expression of personal identity. This is always questioned by society, either they accept it or they don't.   There are comromises, not only in everyday life, but also for festive occasions, betw. personal unfolding and social policy.


31


History


33

#5 Designer

African influences are nothing new on the catwalk ever since Yves Saint Laurent‘s landmark 1967 collection of shift dresses made from raffia, shells and wooden beads, generations of international designers, from Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano to Diane von Furstenberg and Vivienne Westwood, have looked to the continent.   But now a crop of talented indigenous and diaspora designers are rising up in the fashion mainstream, riding a wave of global interest in Africa‘s cultural and economic ascension. Their work is bolstered by a growing number of Africa focused fashion weeks, such as the annual Africa Fashion Week in Johannesburg, magazines including Faband Canoe, blogs such as One Nigerian Boy and Shadders plus retail environments both online, such as heritage1960.com, and on the street,

such as Temple Muse in Lagos. The pursuit of individuality should also not be underestimated. People want to be different from others and underline their independence and uniqueness. They are afraid of getting lost in the crowd, disappearing into the mass of society.   Moreover tattoos increase their body consciousness. A tatoo boosts the desire to be beautiful and perfect. It is similar to going to the fitness center frequently. In today‘s society, tattoos are not entirely free from prejudice. Above all elderly people are skeptical of them.   Also parents do not often have problems with tattoos - as long as their children have none. Eventually, though they usually accept their children's decision.


“Africa is not a tren influence. The mai cing of African influ show how strong a our textiles and ma Now African design spotlight to showca new and refreshing - Mimi Plange; Designer


d, it is a continuous nstream’s embraences just goes to nd multifaceted terials can be. ers must use this se our own work in ways.�


Designer

UrbaN Labels For every issue we pick out three labels which are outstanding because of their individual and unique works. They all interpret Africa's history in their variety of ways.

Photography: Susanne Spiegel; Author: Lukas Klein


39


Designer

#1 Trine Lindegaard

Trine Lindegaard was born in Odense, Denmark. She finished her studies at the Royal College of Art where she graduated with an MA in menswear 2010.   Her clothes are colorful with a light-hearted and playful approach to menswear. She uses bold emblishment and innovative textile techniques in her collections as well as playing with shapes and soft shiny silhouttes. The Danish designer was inspired by the African market next to her place. For her Spring /Summer 2013 collection she saw it would best fit to create an African collection. Lindegaard teamed up with the Mimi Kiffe textiles – weavers from Ghana and the Ivory Coast who wove this collection to life.   Lindegaard‘s has created an interesting twist to the collection by using Kente pieces combined with a laid back sporting style and some unique embellishments.   The Danish designer was inspired by the African market next to her place. For her Spring/Summer 2013 collection she saw it best fit to create an African collection. Lindegaard teamed up with the Mimi Kiffe textiles, weavers from Ghana and the Ivory Coast who wove this collection to life.   Lindegaard‘s has created an interesting twist to the collection by using Kente pieces combined with a laid back sporting style and some unique embellishments. Lindegaard‘s has created an interesting twist to the collection by using Kente pieces combined with a laid back sporting style and some unique embellishments.Danish designer was inspired by the African market next to her place. For her Spring/2013 collection she saw it best fit to create an African collection.


41

Lindegaards clothes are colourful with a light-hearted and playful approach to menswear.


Designer

“

A guy who is rocking a Dent De Man suit or piece, is a guy riding high on the confident wave!

�


43

#2 Dent De Man

Dent De Man is about breaking the norms of the establishment, blending a simple approach to menswear with the twist of traditional african print – each fabric have been individually sourced and possessing it's own story.   Designed with the modern man in mind, Dent De Man offers a contemporary silhouette to reflect personality and lifestyle. DdM pieces are bright and uplifting additions to the wardrobe of today's man, who can be styled accordingly to suit your mood. For her Spring/2013 collection she saw it best fit to create an African collection. The pattens are heavy, the tailoring is sleek and modern, but it’s not for the everyday guy. A guy who is rocking a Dent De Man suit or piece, is a guy riding high on the confident wave!   This collection is taken from a selection of rare authentic vintage 70's african print material and offers the chance to own truly unique and desireable pieces at an affordable price.A guy who is rocking a Dent De Man suit or piece, is a guy riding high on the confident wave! This collection is taken from a selection of rare authentic vintage 70's african prints material and offers the chance to own truly unique and desirable pieces at the an affordable price.   A guy who is rocking a Dent De Man suit or piece, is a guy riding high on the confident wave! This collection is taken from a selection of rare authentic vintage 70's african print material and offer the chance to own truly unique and desirable pieces at an affordable price. A guy who is rocking a Dent De Man suit or piece, is a guy riding high on the confident wave!


Designer

#3 Shekudo

SheKudo is a label which was started in 2010 between two mates; Amy Iheeakanwa and Shetu Simone. A clothing label infusing elements of African fashion into everyday wewearable styles, with a hint of Vintage attitude interwoven in the mix. SheKudo stand firm in the belief that fashion is an extension of a person’s character, where one must always thrive to transcend the trend. This is what we aim to do here at SheKudo; creating and continuing to develop a label that thrives on being different, bringing you pieces that will set you apart from the masses. This SS12/13 Collection entitled ‘Wahala’ is the first release from the SheKudo label. The word Wahala is used mostly by Nigerians, means trouble. SheKudo hopes that all fashionable folk out there aim to cause a little bit of trouble with the outfits they wear each day, making statements whether large or small, rather than sliding unnoticed under the fashion radar. This is what the Wahala collection embodies.   This SS12/13 Collection entitled ‘Wahala’ is the first release from the SheKudo label. The word Wahala is used mostly by Nigerians, means trouble. SheKudo hopes that all fashionable folk out there aim to cause a little bit of trouble with the outfits they wear each day, making statements whether large or small, rather than sliding unnoticed under the fashion radar. This is what the Wahala collection embodies.


45

“

This label is put together, in-tuned, relevant, lively, fashionably abnormal!

�


Interview

“FORGET WALKING, COME AND DANCE

Amy Iheakanwa and Shetu Simone

Photography: Franz Xaver; Author: Lisa Kern

We talked with he upcoming label SheKudo and got som refreshing News.


47

WITH US ON OUR JOURNEY.

ZONE: So we’ll start with the awkward bits of getting to know you. So let’s pretend it is a date and my first courteous question is, tell us a little more about yourself and of course your ethnic backgrounds. AMY: Laughs). Well, I’ve grown up in Sydney, Australia – and I’m of Nigerian (dad) and Australian (mum) descent. I am a Health Science student by trade and I’m also a part of a Roots Reggae band called ‘Upright Sounds’. I love travelling, swimming, politics and Egusi Soup… And fashion of course! Did I mention Egusi soup? SHETU: I’ve also grown up in Sydney, most of my life anyway. I’m West African (Ghana and Nigeria reppin’) but Australian born, studied a Communications majoring in Journalism and love everything involving music, dance, fashion and art; sunny days, late night movies with lovers and large doses of anything potato make me a very happy hippo. ZONE: (Lovers with an “s”. Hehe!) Have your backgrounds had any influence on your career choices or on the label? AMY: Most definitely! For myself anyway. I’ve had one side constantly pushing for a career in medicine (3 guesses who) and the other side being happy with whatever I did. Being part African, it seems the older generation in particular seem to have a strong held belief that creative endeavours usually don’t count for actual professions. ZONE: Shetu, after some internet

stalking (hehe) we found what we may believe is a very apt self-description: Full time student, parttime journalist in the making, casual creative soul. A casual creative soul, now we want to knowmore! SHETU: Well, casually I like to make or alter things like part of the denim range we have. I love finding things and making other things out of them whether it be clothing, trinkets, oils and scents, hair dye and so on. I also love being around creative people like other designers, musicians, dancers, photographers – just being in the same atmosphere as people that make the world beautiful through what they love to do. ZONE: So you’ve been friends from childhood. I’m sure you go around completing each other’s sentences in conversation. What’s it been like over the years and what do you love or the most about each other? AMY: Funny you say that, because we’ve been catching each other out recently saying things at the same time – like twins. Yes we’ve known each other since we were 7 and it’s been a great 16 years of friendship so far. I love that Shetu shares my sense of adventure and trusts my ideas or plans when no one else seems. SHETU: Haha! It happens too often now! Or I’ll say something that Amy was thinking like that scene out of White Chicks. It has been a crazy ride so far, we have both grown so much and still remain tighter than ever and I really cherish that. It is got to be her optimism that keeps me coming back.

ZONE: Australia is very far off from all else with a fashion and style culture to die for and I’m guessing you sometimes long for a little bit of ‘African-ness’, for lack of a better word. How accessible is African fashion, food and culture? AMY: Well Australia is still a young nation, so still has some growing to do, particularly in regards to cultural fusion and acceptance. African fashion is slowly on the come up here and we have some great designers such as Francis Kwame and Suzan Mutesi, who have an increasing amount of support for their collections. Food is not as readily available, there are only 2 prominent African food restaurants in Sydney although quite a few in our neighbouring state of Victoria. Africans in Australia are still quite a minority, so it’s really dependant on our growth, establishment and innovations. We are getting there. ZONE: Anyone have a professional background in fashion? AMY: Nope. SHETU: Nope. ZONE: What’s in the name “SheKudo”? SHETU: SheKudo is a fusion of our Nigerian names. ‘She’ is from the Hausa name Shetu and ‘Kudo’ is from Amy’s Igbo middle name Akudo. We thought it would be quite catchy… ZONE: And it is indeed! You both are very artistic young ladies, and we know the SheKudo brand covers reaches


Interview

farther than fashion. What else are you dabbling in? SHETU: We love to Dibbledy dabbledy doo! And once our clothing label is more established we hope to get back to our second focus which is on Hip Hop. We are both massive music lovers, and feel that Australian Hip Hop has heaps of potential to grow on the International music scene. So we support it wholeheartedly and will get back to interviews and reviews on our ‘SheKudo Func’ blog in 2013. ZONE: How did the idea to start a fashion label come about? AMY: We often got frustrated that we could never find certain outfits we wanted without patrolling 100 different stores. Particularly denim pieces – and we love denim. The typical denim staples such as jeans, shorts and button ups were quite common but nothing more. So we started revamping and recycling pieces for ourselves when going out and then this extended onto designing actual pieces and starting our own label. ZONE: Who’s the SheKudo woman and can we look forward to having a SheKudo man in the near future? AMY: SheKudo woman is a strong eccentric woman who loves to have fun with what she wears; a woman who will confidently walk the streets no matter what she’s wearing, and most importantly staying one step ahead of the trends. ZONE: Sure we can all agree on that! You launched your first collection, ‘Wahala’, a few months back. What was the inspiration behind the collection? SHETU: Wahala! Meaning ‘trouble’ in Pidgin. It wasn’t the most provocative, troublesome collection, but we intended to launch with this name to introduce the ‘calm before the storm’. Wahala draws on our love for Wax print (a bit of African flavour thrown in the mix) alongside soft colours in classic silhouettes. We took inspiration from both sides, a bit of West vs. East and vintage attitude thrown in the mix. Much of our denim range is revamped pieces. We are big on recycling and did a lot of this with

the denim. Our ‘T4-t-shirt and bustier are made from used men’s jeans. We love the vintage jeans patterns. ZONE: The styling for the collection also caught our attention like there was a story to tell. Is this right? AMY: Styling was a mash up between us and our stylist ‘Stelly G’. Not so much a story to tell but rather an interaction between our clothes and the location. We shot the promotional look book in the back streets of Sydenham, which is still quite a rundown industrial zone. We just loved that every corner had character, and that we could create something beautiful with what we had. We also believe this when it comes to fashion, creating something amazing with whatever you have. ZONE: Who are your fashion inspirations and do you have any muses? AMY: Oumou Sy was probably the first African designer I laid eyes on. Then I fell in love with Black Coffee, Suzaan Heyns, Maki Oh, Balenciaga (my all-time fave!), Marni, and some Australian designers such as Sass & Bide, Josh Goot, Ellery and Life with Bird. SHETU:: Gloria Wavamunno, Maki Oh, William Okpo there’s so many I love. Aussie designers Romance Was Born, Life with Bird, Sass and Bide, Camilla, Kobe Husk there’s too many to list. I am very widely inspired.

SheKudo is a Fusion of our Nigerian names.

ZONE: If you had the chance to work with or be an understudy at any African fashion house, which one would it be? AMY: Definitely Black Coffee. I want to penetrate his complex fashion mind. SHETU: I would love to watch Gloria Wavamunno create her next line. ZONE: What can we look out for in the next 5 years for SheKudo? SHETU: Whether we make it big or have

a small group of fashion loyalists, we hope for SheKudo to be a recognised name on the streets delivering quality, UNIQUE, must-have pieces for the wardrobe that continuously transcend trends. ZONE: Will your collections be available in Africa and the rest of the world any time soon? SHETU: That’s what we’re currently working on, although this part takes time. Our online store will be launching in early 2013 so that people from all over the world can purchase our pieces through the shekudo.com online store. We are also working on collaborating with other online boutiques to spread our reach, so keep them eyes peeled! ZONE: Amy, this one’s for you! When will you return to HFA? AMY: (Laughs) I miss the HFA team so much! I will hopefully be back on board once everything with SheKudo is flowing smoothly. I will be more inclined if you were to make me some Egusi soup and Garri. WE often got frustrated that we could never find certain outfits we wanted without patrolling 100 different stores. Particularly denim pieces – and we love denim. The typical denim staples such as jeans, shorts and button ups were quite common but nothing more. ZONE: So we’ll start with the awkward bits of getting to know you. So let’s pretend it is a date and my first courteous question is, tell us a little more about yourself and of course your ethnic backgrounds. AMY: Laughs). Well, I’ve grown up in Sydney, Australia – and I’m of Nigerian (dad) and Australian (mum) descent. I am a Health Science student by trade and I’m also a part of a Roots Reggae band called ‘Upright Sounds’. I love travelling, swimming, politics and Egusi Soup… And fashion of course! Did I mention Egusi soup? SHETU: I’ve also grown up in Sydney, most of my life anyway. I’m West African (Ghana and Nigeria reppin’) but Australian born, studied a Communications majoring in Journalism and love everything invol-


49

Last collection with denim parts.


Interview

“ ” Whether the label will be big or small, Shekudo hopes to be recognised on the streets as a LABEL WHICH DELIVERS QUALITY.

ving music, dance, fashion and art; sunny days, late night movies with lovers and large doses of anything potato make me a very happy hippo. ZONE: (Lovers with an “s”. Hehe!) Have your backgrounds had any influence on your career choices or on the label?

AMY: Most definitely! For myself anyway. I’ve had one side constantly pushing for a career in medicine (3 guesses who) and the other side being happy with whatever I did. Being part African, it seems the older generation in particular seem to have a strong held belief that creative endeavours usually don’t count for actual professions. ZONE: Shetu, after some internet stalking (hehe) we found what we may believe is a very apt self-description: Full time student, parttime journalist in the making, casual creative soul. A casual creative soul, now we want to knowmore! SHETU: Well, casually I like to make or alter things like part of the denim range we have. I love finding things and making other things out of them whether it be clothing, trinkets, oils and scents, hair dye and so on. I also love being around creative people like other designers, musicians, dancers, photographers – just being in the same atmosphere as people that make the world beautiful through what they love to do. ZONE: So you’ve been friends from childhood. I’m sure you go around completing each other’s sentences in conversation. What’s it been like over the years and what do you love or the most about each other? AMY: Funny you say that, because we’ve been catching each other out recently

saying things at the same time – like twins. Yes we’ve known each other since we were 7 and it’s been a great 16 years of friendship so far. I love that Shetu shares my sense of adventure and trusts my ideas or plans when no one else seems. SHETU: Haha! It happens too often now! Or I’ll say something that Amy was thinking like that scene out of White Chicks. It has been a crazy ride so far, we have both grown so much and still remain tighter than ever and I really cherish that. It is got to be her optimism that keeps me coming back. ZONE: Australia is very far off from all else with a fashion and style culture to die for and I’m guessing you sometimes long for a little bit of ‘African-ness’, for lack of a better word. How accessible is African fashion, food and culture? AMY: Well Australia is still a young nation, so still has some growing to do, particularly in regards to cultural fusion and acceptance. African fashion is slowly on the come up here and we have some great designers such as Francis Kwame and Suzan Mutesi, who have an increasing amount of support for their collections. Food is not as readily available, there are only 2 prominent African food restaurants in Sydney although quite a few in our neighbouring state of Victoria. Africans in Australia are still quite a minority, so it’s really dependant on our growth, establishment and innovations. We are getting there. ZONE: Anyone have a professional background in fashion? AMY: Nope. SHETU: Nope.

ZONE: What’s in the name “SheKudo”? SHETU: SheKudo is a fusion of our Nigerian names. ‘She’ is from the Hausa name Shetu and ‘Kudo’ is from Amy’s Igbo middle name Akudo. We thought it would be quite catchy… ZONE: And it is indeed! You both are very artistic young ladies, and we know the SheKudo brand covers reaches farther than fashion. What else are you dabbling in? SHETU: We love to Dibbledy dabbledy doo! And once our clothing label is more established we hope to get back to our second focus which is on Hip Hop. We are both massive music lovers, and feel that Australian Hip Hop has heaps of potential to grow on the International music scene. So we support it wholeheartedly and will get back to interviews and reviews on our ‘SheKudo Func’ blog in 2013. ZONE: How did the idea to start a fashion label come about? AMY: We often got frustrated that we could never find certain outfits we wanted without patrolling 100 different stores. Particularly denim pieces – and we love denim. The typical denim staples such as jeans, shorts and button ups were quite common but nothing more. So we started revamping and recycling pieces for ourselves when going out and then this extended onto designing actual pieces and starting our own label. ZONE: Who’s the SheKudo woman and can we look forward to having a SheKudo man in the near future? AMY: SheKudo woman is a strong eccen-tric woman who loves to have fun


with what she wears; a woman who will confidently walk the streets no matter what she’s wearing.

ZONE: If you had the chance to work with or be an understudy at any African fashion house, which one would it be?

ZONE: Sure we can all agree on that! You launched your first collection, ‘Wahala’, a few months back. What was the inspiration behind the collection?

AMY: Definitely Black Coffee. I want to penetrate his complex fashion mind. SHETU: I would love to watch Gloria Wavamunno create her next line.

SHETU: Wahala! Meaning ‘trouble’ in Pidgin. It wasn’t the most provocative, troublesome collection, but we intended to launch with this name to introduce the ‘calm before the storm’. Wahala draws on our love for Wax print (a bit of African flavour thrown in the mix) alongside soft colours in classic silhouettes. We took inspiration from both sides, a bit of West vs. East and vintage attitude thrown in the mix. Much of our denim range is revamped pieces. We are big on recycling and did a lot of this with the denim. Our ‘T4-t-shirt and bustier are made from used men’s jeans. We love the vintage jeans patterns.

ZONE: What can we look out for in the next 5 years for SheKudo?

ZONE: The styling for the collection also caught our attention like there was a story to tell. Is this right? AMY: Styling was a mash up between us and our stylist ‘Stelly G’. Not so much a story to tell but rather an interaction between our clothes and the location. We shot the promotional look book in the back streets of Sydenham, which is still quite a rundown industrial zone. We just loved that every corner had character, and that we could create something beautiful with what we had. We also believe this when it comes to fashion, creating something amazing with whatever you have. ZONE: Who are your fashion inspirations and do you have any muses? AMY: Oumou Sy was probably the first African designer I laid eyes on. Then I fell in love with Black Coffee, Suzaan Heyns, Maki Oh, Balenciaga (my all-time fave!), Marni, and some Australian designers such as Sass & Bide, Josh Goot, Ellery and Life with Bird. SHETU:: Gloria Wavamunno, Maki Oh, William Okpo there’s so many I love. Aussie designers Romance Was Born, Life with Bird, Sass and Bide, Camilla, Kobe Husk there’s too many to list.

SHETU: Whether we make it big or have a small group of fashion loyalists, we hope for SheKudo to be a recognised name on the streets delivering quality, UNIQUE, must-have pieces for the wardrobe that continuously transcend trends. ZONE: Will your collections be available in Africa and the rest of the world any time soon? SHETU: That’s what we’re currently working on, although this part takes time. Our online store will be launching in early 2013 so that people from all over the world can purchase our pieces through the shekudo.com online store. We are also working on collaborating with other online boutiques to spread our reach, so keep them eyes peeled! ZONE: Amy, this one’s for you! When will you return to HFA? AMY: (Laughs) I miss the HFA team so much! I will hopefully be back on board once everything with SheKudo is flowing smoothly. I will be more inclined if you were to make me some Egusi soup and Garri. WE often got frustrated that we could never find certain outfits we wanted without patrolling 100 different stores. Particularly denim pieces – and we love denim. The typical denim staples such as jeans, shorts and button ups were quite common but nothing more.

For further Information visit their online-shop: www.shekudo.com or their facebookpage www.facebook.com/pages/SheKudo

51


Photographer

Topshots For every issue we pick out three photographers which got influenced by Africa's multifaceted Art and turned it into a photo series. - by Tobias Sagmeister

Last November, Cara Delevingne was named model of the year at the British Fashion A. – the prize was well earned. She's been photographed by Mario Testino for this cover of British Vogue; she's appeared in ad campaigns for Chanel, and Burberry mong others; and she seems to have landed on every runway in Paris, Lodon New York and Milan during the recent fashion season. But the title hardly seems sufficient for the many moods and manifestations of Cara Delevingne. She has a "look" – those eyes, that lipolicious mouth, and the most famous eyebrows since Groucho

Marx. Then there is her background: her aristo lineage (described by the Daily Mail as "pure Chelsea posh"); her colorful mother, Pandora, a personal shopper foSelfridges; her father, Charles, a handsome man about town; and her older sister Poppy, also a successful model. And, to top it all off, there's her well-known punch of personality – witty, and charmingly unpredictable.   So what if she is 45 minutes late? She gives you 5,000 percent when she gets there (and like the best designers, Delevingne gives what you want before you even know you wanted it).

While the 20-year-old self-described tomboy was amazed by her sudden rocket into the heart of the fashion universe (not to mention by just how tough all that runway walking can be), she is setting her sights on other stars – acting, making music, inventing, Nobel Prizes – as long as there's plenty of goofing off to be done along the way.


53

Tomas Falmer


Photographer

TOMAS FALMER THE HONEST ONE

Tomas Falmer’s love of photography began while taking an art foundation course in Stockholm in the latley 90s. Tomas then moved on to assisting for a few years before moving to London in 2000 to pursue a career as a photographer. Tomas divides his time between London and Stockholm. Tomas’s many editorial clients include: Esquire, GQ, Exit, Schon, Ponytail, Surface, Bon, Vogue Russia, L’uomo Vogue, Dansk Magazine and 7th Man Magazine which has led to successful campaigns for H&M, Liberty’s by Jones, Office, Part Two, Vision Express and Nikolaj d’etoiles.

ZONE: Do you think the art world and the fashion world are becoming more intertwined? TOMAS FALMER: There is definitely interest from the art world. But in my case, it was always there. I remember even when I did the big fashion shows in the '90s, the art people were always there. They were really intrigued by the way I was putting together fashion shows and how I was staging it to. I think that you could [view] it a little bit like performance art – that type of fashion show. So I have, for a long time, followers that are interested in all my work. ZONE: Can you tell me a little bit about the idea behind your "Silent Secrets" collection? TOMAS FALMER: I'm showing here in Dallas two collections. The first one is "Silent Secrets," which is the one from summer, which is now in the shops, and then the other one is "Lust Never Sleeps," from the winter before.

"Silent Secrets" is referring to how secret societies are dealing with that subject. I wanted to bring it into our actual world and refer to social networks. I think that today, it's really very difficult to keep secrets because everything is spread out immediately all over the world – the question of the privacy and still having the possibility to have a secret. The second inspiration was the form of clothing and the dress codes that are used in secret societies, which I interpreted in my own way, in new, contemporary variations. ZONE: Is it important to keep secrets? TOMAS FALMER: Yes, I think so. I think you should have at least the possibility. I'm sometimes a little bit shocked [by] how quickly something travels around the world, and how difficult it is to keep something secret. Immediately, pictures are taken by smartphones. Immediately, they're spreading these images on the Internet. Of course, it's also part of how we live and how we are working today, but sometimes it's too quick and too anonymous. These messages and images are not credited anymore, and that is making me a little bit sad. Sometimes you lose the content and you lose the credit of an image. ZONE: I really love your closing collars with the arrows in them from "Silent Secrets." TOMAS FALMER: I forgot to talk about that, it's important to mention that. The hats and the collars with the arrows and the detailing, it was a collaboration with de Jong.


55


Photographer

Hans Silvester


57

Tomas Falmer


Photographer

Hans Silvester


59

Tomas Falmer


Photographer

Hans Silvester


61

Tomas Falmer


Photographer


JULIA HETTA THE FUNNY ONE

Julia Hetta’s love of photography began while taking an art foundation course in Stockholm in the latley 90s. Julia then moved on to assisting for a few years before moving to London in 2000 to pursue a career as a photographer. Tomas divides his time between London and Stockholm.   Juia’s many editorial clients include: Esquire, GQ, Exits, Schon, Ponytail, Surface, Bon, Vogue Russia, L’uomo Vogue, Dansk Magazine and 7th Man Magazine which has led to successful campaigns for H&M, Liberty’s by Jones, Office, Part Two, Vision Express and Nikolaj d’etoiles.

ZONE: Do you think the art world and the fashion world are becoming more intertwined? Julia Hetta: There is definitely interest from the art world. But in my case, it was always there. I reme-mber even when I did the big fashion shows in the '90s, the art people were always there. They were really intrigued by the way I was putting together fashion shows and how I was staging it to. I think that you could [view] it a little bit like performance art – that type of fashion show. So I have, for a long time, followers that are interested in all my work. ZONE: Can you tell me a little bit about the idea behind your "Silent Secrets" collection? Julia Hetta: I'm showing here in Dallas two collections. The first one is "Silent Secrets," which is the one from summer, which is now in the shops, and then the other one is "Lust Never Sleeps," from the winter before.

"Silent Secrets" is referring to how secret societies are dealing with that subject. I wanted to bring it into our actual world and refer to social networks. I think that today, it's really very difficult to keep secrets because everything is spread out immediately all over the world – the question of the privacy and still having the possibility to have a secret. The second inspiration was the form of clothing and the dress codes that are used in secret societies, which I interpreted in my own way, in new, contemporary variations. ZONE: Is it important to keep secrets? Julia Hetta: Yes, I think so. I think you should have at least the possibility. I'm sometimes a little bit shocked [by] how quickly something travels around the world, and how difficult it is to keep something secret. Immediately, pictures are taken by smartphones. Immediately, they're spreading these images on the Internet. Of course, it's also part of how we live and how we are working today, but sometimes it's too quick and too anonymous. These messages and images are not credited anymore, and that is making me a little bit sad. Sometimes you lose the content and you lose the credit of an image. ZONE: I really love your closing collars with the arrows in them from "Silent Secrets." Julia Hetta: I forgot to talk about that, it's important to mention that. The hats and the collars with the arrows and the detailing, it was an collaboration with de Jong.

63


Photographer

Hans Silvester


65

Julia Hetta


Photographer

Hans Silvester


67

Julia Hetta


Photographer

Hans Silvester


69

Julia Hetta


Photographer

BENJAMIN VNUK THE MYSTIC ONE

Benjamin Vnuk’s love of photography began while taking an art foundation course in Stockholm in the latley 90s. Benjamin then moved on to assisting for a few years before moving to London in 2000 to pursue a career as a photographer. Tomas divides his time between London and Stockholm.   Benjamin Vnuk’s many editorial clients include: Esquire, GQ, Exit, Schon, Ponytail, Surface, Bon, Vogue Russia Two, L’uomo Vogue, Dansk Magazine and 7th Man Magazine which has led to successful campaigns for H&M,Liberty by Jones, Office, Part Two, Vision Express and Nikolaj d’etoiles.

ZONE: Do you think the art world and the fashion world are becoming more intertwined? Benjamin Vnuk: There is definitely interest from the art world. But in my case, it was always there. I reme-mber even when I did the big fashion shows in the '90s, the art people were always there. They were really intrigued by the way I was putting together fashion shows and how I was staging it to. I think that you could [view] it a little bit like performance art – that type of fashion show. So I have, for a long time, followers that are interested in all my work. ZONE: Can you tell me a little bit about the idea behind your "Silent Secrets" collection? Benjamin Vnuk: I'm showing here in Dallas two collections. The first one is "Silent Secrets," which is the one from summer, which is now in the shops, and then the other one is "Lust Never Sleeps,"

from the winter before. "Silent Secrets" is referring to how secret societies are dealing with that subject. I wanted to bring it into our actual world and refer to social networks. I think that today, it's really very difficult to keep secrets because everything is spread out immediately all over the world – the question of the privacy and still having the possibility to have a secret. The second inspiration was the form of clothing and the dress codes that are used in secret societies, which I interpreted in my own way, in new, contemporary variations. ZONE: Is it important to keep secrets? Benjamin Vnuk: Yes, I think so. I think you should have at least the possibility. I'm sometimes a little bit shocked [by] how quickly something travels around the world, and how difficult it is to keep something secret. Immediately, pictures are taken by smartphones. Immediately, they're spreading these images on the Internet. Of course, it's also part of how we live and how we are working today, but sometimes it's too quick and too anonymous. These messages and images are not credited anymore, and that is making me a little bit sad. Sometimes you lose the content and you lose the credit of an image. ZONE: I really love your closing collars with the arrows in them from "Silent Secrets." Benjamin Vnuk: I forgot to talk about that, it's important to mention that. The hats and the collars with the arrows and the detailing, it was a collaboration with de Jong.


71


Photographer

Hans Silvester


73

Benjamin Vnuk


Photographer

Hans Silvester


75

Benjamin Vnuk


Photographer

Hans Silvester


77

Benjamin Vnuk


Trend

african fe I S

E V E R Y W H E R E

A N D

Latest news related on Africa's influence on the fashion scene.Don't miss the Shootings, Collections, Labels, Fabrics, Blogger,...

H A R D L Y


81

ver T O

I G N O R E


Trend

AFROKLETIC Afroklectic.com is an online space celebrating the emerging creative culture within the African-Australian community, Africa and the Diaspora.

#1 When I went to Ghana for the first time in 2004, I went a number of shopping trips with my Aunty and Mum to get fabrics. My Mum would see people on the street or members of my family in fabrics she liked and she would try to describe it to fabric store owners so she could purchase them. Once they figured out the fabrics, they would confirm the name. They would often be random names and my Mum would laugh or gasp and ask why. Every time she asked, there would always be an interesting story behind it. My mother and I were even amazed at how the stores owners were able remember

FABRICS come with Stories

TOPSHOP Style Nomad

the names, meanings and top it off with the occasions to wear it. As if there was a fabric dictionary they all had in their minds.

for the up-coming European summer and the last months of the Australian autumn at a price which won’t break you bank account!

“1004 Blocks’ refers to a prison complex in Lagos, Nigeria, where many Igbos were incarcerated after the Biafra war. Also known as: Akwa ete-Lagos, Milliardaire (Togo/Benin).”

#2 High-street fashion giant TOPSHOP is currently suffering from African fever in their editorial Style Nomad. The edit features pieces perfect

KLECTIC FIND Brother Vellies x Mickalene Thomas

#3 New York based artist Mickalene Thomas recently collaborated with Namibian/ American shoe label Brother Vellies (formerly known as Schier Shoes) to create a 5 piece capsule collection of Brother Vellies signature hand-

Hey there! Hope you enjoyed the upcoming news! Next time I have some new refreshing stories about the African community. See you next time, xoxo Diane Silverstone www.dianesilverstone.com

made bellies (desert boot) using a mixture of prints, regal ostrich hides and tufts of this spring bok fur. Only 25 of each style was made and displayed as part of a pop-up exhibition titled curated by Mickalene Thomas at Proposition Gallery last month this year.


#4 Last weekend the Afroklectic team hung out at the annual Africultures Festival in Auburn (Sydney). The weather was nice but a bit of a scorcher! A contrast to last year’s wetness! To be honest, the festival didn’t have the same kind of vibrancy it had last year. Although, I must admit that it was a great event to chill and see fellow Africans in-tuned with the atmosphere. One thing which stole my heart was a food

#6 If I had children, they would be rocking Isossy Children! The children’s label was started in 2009 by Amanda Rabor. It is celebration of colour, vivacity, global influences and fun fashion for children. Rabor uses African prints, laces and Asian textiles to create contemporary styles. Whatever the occasion, you are bound to find the perfect outfit in one of their baby to tween ranges

83

FESTIVVAL Africultures festival 2013

ASOS Africa A/W12

stall which was cooking kebabs on a portable barbeque. The kind you see when you walk the streets of Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone at night. Seasoned mouth watering meat with capsicums and onions. A wave of nostalgia overflowed. I felt Africa had truly come to Australia at that stall!

“Inspired by Arts and Crafts, this season’s ASOS Africa collection sees hand-drawn paisley prints interspersed with sporty grey marl and reworked across brocade jersey sweatshirts, pinafore dresses and oversized hoodies.”

The OuRoutine boys came out of their year long hiatus on Saturday and captured the stylistic atmosphere.   I personally think that the collection is inspired by baroque style curtains forced with gingham, jersey and crazy kaleidoscope prints.

#5 Since the release of the first ASOS Africa collection in 2010, I have loved seeing the fresh direction of each collection. I purchased something last collections and the very first collection.   I constantly check just to make sure I am in the loop for the release of the next collection ready to start a wishlist and purchase. Unfortunately the AW12 collection doesn’t tickle my fancy. But this one just kicks all the limits, up in the sky and more.

ISOSSY CHILDREN Label for children

SASS & BIDE Ladysaint

– Isossy Girl, Isossy Boy, Isossy Tweens and Isossy Baby.

#7 Australian label Sass & Bide never ceases to amaze me with their doses of Africa in there pieces. Their designs are very tribalistic and I mean that in the most creative sense. Their pieces adopt traits from a number of ethic groups around the world. Australian Vogue simply describes the style of Sass & Bide eclectic tribal aesthetic’. I think their are strong hints of certain African tribes. For example the heavy beading used by the Masai tribe and use of bright colours by the Ndebele people.

The designs are surely contemporary, but their campaign shots just seal the deal! I wish labels like Isossy Children were around when I was a child. If would have saved me from the countless fashion faux pas my Mum made me commit! The frilly dresses with matching overcoats, or the threepiece outfit which including a skirt, vest and jacket suffocating in bright floral or polka dots. Not to mention the white Mary-Jane shoes with the white frilly socks with a yellow or pink tip.

For their 2013 eyewear collection ‘Ladysaint‘, Sass & Bide have taped into Africa meshed with Asia. Sass & Bide (SarahJane Clarke and Heidi Middle-

I personally think that the collection is inspired by baroque style curtains forced with gingham, jersey and crazy kaleidoscope prints. I have loved seeing the fresh direction of each collection. I purchased something last collection and the very first collection. I am hoping next collection will be a different story and I will be ready to burn a hole in my wallet!!!

ton) recently went to Kenya as part of the International Trade Centre’s Ethical Fashion Initiative. Yes, another luxury/highend label trying to change Africa a collection at a time! In-sert sarcasm here! There was no surprise seeing bits of Africa floating through in this collection. Sass & Bide also designed bags for the International Trade Centre.


Blog

Joshua Kissi and Travis Gumbs. Two guys who are with their blog of “Street Etiquette” at the top of the bloggers list.


85

MAN POWER


Blog

The Faces behind the scene.

These boys are in a creative class of their own and are topping that class. Their job titles include blogger, photographer, stylist and writer. If being wise was a profession, I would add ‘wise men’ to their job titles as well. The two guys have channeled their thoughts and creativity into a blog which has become a hub overflowing with inspiration and creativity. Street Etiquette was founded by Kissi and Gumbs in 2008. Their mission was to create a men’s style blog with an urban perspective. They have since been featured in magazines such as GQ and Complex, been labelled as the Best Men’s style blog by UK’s The Guardian and named amongst the ’40 Bloggers Who Really Count’ by the London Times. Their projects list is endless with a shoe collaboration with Del-Toro, a photographic journal through Brazil, portrait series about personal hair style titled ‘Crowned‘, a film with musician Jesse Boykins, and the list goes on. I think their work goes beyond creativity. A New York Times article about the boys sums up the essence of what the boys are doing in it’s title − ‘Pushing the boundaries of Black Style‘. They have brought in a fresh and positive element to ‘Black Style’ with suave, sophistication and creativity. There are African guys I know in Sydney who I have watched emulate the Street Etiquette kind of flow with doses of their personality. I think it’s absolutely amazing because they are tapping into something new in our circle. Before it was the girls who fussed over fashion and sometimes creativity, but now it’s the guys who are stepping up with photography projects on instagram, videos and style posts on tumblr. Street Etiquette has paved the way for the guys in our community to express their creativity openly rather than in the closet!


87

Street Etiquette was founded by Kissi and Gumbs in 2008. Their mission was to create a men’s style blog with an urban perspective. They have since been featured in magazines such as GQ and Complex, been labelled as the Best Men’s style blog by UK’s The Guardian and named amongst the ’40 Bloggers Who Really Count’ by the London Times. Their projects list is endless with a shoe collaboration with Del-Toro, a photographic journal through Brazil, portrait series about personal hair style titled ‘Crowned‘, a film with musician Jesse Boykins, and the list goes on.


Would you rather make it, take it, fake it, or create it? The Bronx has been known for the latter from hip-hop to sneaker culture. With their own unique style, crossing genres and eras, the borough bred gentlemen from Street Etiquette are one step ahead. Call them smooth. Call them classic. Call them dapper. These modern day dandies are creating the next movement of street culture with a refined etiquette that has evolved from the days of be-bop to Bambaataa to bubble jackets. With the same creative energy, this young new breed of style is fresh, exciting, and new... No lies... Just Street Etiquette...


89

Call them smooth. Call them classic. Call them dapper.

Photography: Street Etiquette; Author:Max Huber

- Jake Davis for T-MagazinE


imprint Publisher Nina Köffler Chief editor Nina Köffler Editor Clemens Gabriel Layout ZONE Showroom Schottenfeldgasse 48b/2 1070, Wien, Österreich Lyrics Tatjana Schmidt Raphael Steiner Lukas Klein Lisa Kern Tobias Sagmeister Diane Silverstone Jake David Max Huber Photos Hans Silvester Focus Feautures Susane Spiegel Franz Xaver Eduard Reich Manuel Traxler Christine Müller Karin Berger Street Etiquette Print KONTEXT Druckerei GmbH Mariahilfer Str. 61, 1060 Wien, Österreich Marketing Morawa Pressevertrieb

NEXT ISSUE: Volume II.


ZONE-Where Africa meets Europe  

This magazine is about the influence of Africa’s culture on the European fashion scene. From designers and labels to photographer, it is imp...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you