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WELL

CONNECTED 1


BECOME

BE SMART • BE STRENGTHENED • BE MOTIVATED • BE HUMBLED • BE KIND • BE RESILIENT • BE COMPASSIONATE • BE BRILLIANT • BE INSPIRED • BE BRAV •

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THE WORLD NEEDS YOU Yes, you. Smart, motivated, big-thinking, bigdreaming you. The world we live in is changing. And fast. The world needs graduates who greet change with creativity, optimism, reslilience, leadership, and intellectual stamina. That’s where we come in. A legal education gives you advantages because it gives you insight. It hones your natural abilities and brings out others you never knew you had. It helps you engineer the kind of work you want to do and the kind of world you want to live in. And it changes you. One of our grads said it best: “Law school has changed the way I see myself. I don’t think there is a better gift, and I am trying not to squander that.”

VE• BE GENEROUS • BE CREATIVE • BE PREPARED • BE HUMAN • BE TRANSFORMED

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ENVISION • EXPLORE • EXCEL


Dean’s Message When it comes to your future, we’ve got connections. Connections to accomplished faculty at the top of their field who will challenge, engage, and inspire you to succeed. Connections to an extensive network of friends and alumni who will provide invaluable support throughout your career. Connections to the ways you can make a difference in the world through unselfish public service. You will leave this place a different person than when you arrived: armed with a critical mind and a solid foundation in the law. You’ll be amazed by your new friendships, your growth, your potential, and your capacity to contribute to – and shape – the world around you. We look forward to welcoming you to our remarkable community.

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Contents 6

Get Connected

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By the Numbers

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Admissions Timeline

10 Halifax 12 Programs 14 Internships 16

Learning for Life

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Career Development

20 Faculty 24 Students 26 Tradition 28 Alumni

CAMILLE CAMERON Dean and Weldon Professor of Law Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University

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Photo credit: Rachael Kelly

GET CONNECTED Attending the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie goes beyond choosing one of the most prestigious and comprehensive legal educations in North America. It means you are choosing to make an invaluable investment in growing your strengths as a professional, expanding horizons you may never have thought existed, taking control of your vision for the future, and joining a long tradition of graduates committed to excellence and unselfish public service. By starting here, you will be well prepared to go anywhere and do anything.

Jill D’Alessio JD ‘15
 Associate at Carter Ford LLP Former Olympic sprint kayaker, two-time Pan American Games champion

“Schulich Law allowed me to build a network from the moment I stepped into my first class. Whether it was with other students, former students, legal practitioners, or the professors, these relationships will continue long after graduation. Just as I felt supported while in school, this network extends to a deeply rooted alumni base that I feel very fortunate to be a part of.” 6


1883 Founding year

ALUMNI AROUND THE GLOBE

The Schulich School of Law is the oldest university-affiliated law school in Canada and the model on which most others were based.

CLOSE TO HOME AND AROUND THE GLOBE, THE SCHULICH SCHOOL OF LAW OPENS A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITY FOR OUR GRADUATES.

170 First-year class WE ARE HERE...

YOU ARE HERE

14:1 Student/full-time faculty ratio

Average age of incoming students

65

% of students are from outside NS

% of students receive financial aid

$2 MILLION Scholarships given per year

50/50 gender

AND EVERYWHERE

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES We believe that an essential part of a legal education is learning about the larger role law plays in the world around us. Our internship and global learning programs enable students to put their Canadian legal education in a global context. You can spend the summer doing a paid internship or study for a term at one of our partner institutions.

North America Europe Africa Australia Asia Quebec Arizona California Massachusetts Texas Mexico United Kingdom Norway Sweden

The Netherlands Germany Spain South Africa India China Australia Singapore New Zealand

balance

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ADMISSIONS TIMELINE

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LSAT • SCHOLARSHIPS •INTERVIEWS • ACCEPTANCE


End of August

Application opens

End of November

Early admissions application due

End of December

Scholarship applications due

February

Last LSAT accepted for September entrance

February

Entrance scholarships awarded

End of February

Final admissions application due

Early to mid-March Weldon Welcome Days* Early May

Winter semester transcripts will be considered as long as received in a timely manner

May

Interview consideration begins

Early June

Interviews

Mid- to late June

All final decisions will be made and letters will be sent

*Weldon Welcome Days are invitation-only events for applicants who have been accepted during the early admissions period

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@lotsixbar

EAST COAST CHARM • COMMUNITY • DISCOVERY

A vibrant, diverse, oceanfront city, Halifax is the perfect size and personality for enhancing the lives of the more than 30,000 students attending the six universities here. This concentration of students injects Halifax with an optimistic energy and the city gives back by welcoming, encouraging, and inspiring newcomers to experience our unique way of life and make it their own.

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We’re Mild-Mannered Our coastal location means our summers are comfortably warm and our winters are milder than many parts of Canada.

Our population is internationally diverse and our residents are more than just friendly — they welcome the contribution other cultures make to life in Nova Scotia.

We’ve Got Pride Halifax is home to an active LGBTQ community, and the city and Dalhousie University take strides to ensure that everyone feels included, safe, and supported.

Wetspot, Pride closing party

We’ve Got a Huge Welcome Mat

Ask alumni what one of the best things about attending the Schulich School of Law was and they will likely answer: “Halifax.” As the capital of beautiful Nova Scotia, Halifax is large enough to offer arts and culture, sports, culinary, outdoor recreation, and a fantastically diverse and famous music scene, and small enough to make it easy for people to become part of the community and feel like they belong. The expression ”East Coast charm” may seem like a cliché, but once you’ve been here for a while, you’ll realize that it’s actually an understatement. 11


Our internationally acclaimed faculty delivers a strong foundation in the practice of law as well as a range of course options and specialized degrees. Tailor your legal education to fit your passion and ambition.

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JD PROGRAM A Juris Doctor (JD) degree from the Schulich School of Law is your connection to a successful career. Recognized around the world, it symbolizes hard work, an analytical mind, and a comprehensive understanding of legal foundations. In first year, students take Contracts, Criminal Justice, Fundamentals of Public Law, Legal Research and Writing, Orientation To Law, Property in its Historical Context, Tort Law, Introduction to Legal Ethics, and Aboriginal and Indigenous Law in Context.

COMBINED AND JOINT PROGRAMS In association with other faculties at Dalhousie, one of the top-ranked research universities in Canada, you can combine your JD with a master’s degree in one of four partner programs. Juris Doctor and: • Master of Business Administration (JD/MBA) • Master of Health Administration (JD/MHA) • Master of Library and Information Science (JD/MLIS) • Master of Public Administration (JD/MPA)

SPECIALIZATION AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Marine and Environmental Law Health Law and Policy Law and Technology* Business Law * Informal area of concentration

LEADING RESEARCH INSTITUTES Health Law Institute Law and Technology Institute Marine and Environmental Law Institute

Angela Simmonds JD ‘17
 2017 recipient of Dalhousie Legal Aid Service’s Sarah MacWalker MacKenzie Clinical Law Award and co-recipient of the Judge Corrine Sparks Award

“I’m interested in social justice, access to justice for everyone, and advocating for my community, not just here in Halifax but all of Nova Scotia. I’m excited about making a change as a lawyer as well as a community advocate. I am very aware that respect and privilege come with a law degree.”

INDIGENOUS BLACKS & MI’KMAQ INITIATIVE Unique in Canada, the Indigenous Blacks & Mi’kmaq (IB&M) Initiative was established in 1989 to increase representation of Indigenous Blacks and Mi’kmaq in the legal profession. The IB&M Intiative was the result of efforts by African Nova Scotian communities and Mi’kmaq First Nations to obtain access to legal education and the legal profession and to address racism in the justice system. Since its inception, more than 180 Black and Indigenous graduates have pursued careers with private law firms, community organizations, and government and have taken up a range of leadership roles across the country. The IB&M Initiative has been nationally recognized numerous times as a model for change in legal education.

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INTERN SHIPS

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Hanna Garson JD ‘17
 As part of her 2016 Schulich Academic Excellence Fund Internship, Hanna decided to work for the Elizabeth Fry Society of Cape Breton for five months.

“There are a lot of really meaningful, exciting, perpetually interesting career opportunities you can get with a legal degree, and the Schulich internship is great for paying you for some of that work. If you’re willing to see what’s out there, you can always find rewarding projects.”

Internships are a great way to explore potential career paths, gain valuable experience, apply your legal knowledge to realworld issues, and make valuable contacts. Our law students find internship opportunities in many different types of organizations, both in Canada and around the world. Our Career Development Office will help you find the internship that’s right for you.

Jacob Millar JD ‘19


Lucy Jackson JD ‘17


As part of her Public Prosecutions Service Internship, Fenessa worked with Crown Attorneys at The Provincial Court of Nova Scotia in Halifax, NS.

As part of his 2016 Pamela and Andrew Brands International Summer Internship, Jacob worked at Herbert Smith Freehills LLP and Public Concern at Work from June to August in London, England.

As part of her Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society Presidents’ Summer Internship, Lucy worked for the Centre for Law and Democracy in Halifax, NS.

“This internship unleashed a passion for criminal law. It gave me the confidence boost that I needed to address matters in court and advocate on behalf of my clients. And I had such a great time. I would encourage everyone to take this opportunity to learn, if they can.”

“The internship is a great chance to gain some perspective. You’re going to be working in one of the biggest firms in the world and then you have the opportunity to work for the smallest NGO. That gives you a lot of insight into the kind of work you can end up doing.”

Fenessa WilliamsApostolakos JD ‘18


“The work we did on the editorial charter involved writing provisions and drafting a full legislative document that would be presented to the government. That type of drafting is something a lot of students don’t get to do, so to have that opportunity was really important.”

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REAL LAW REAL LIFE REAL LEARNING 16


An excellent example of the Weldon Tradition in action is the Dalhousie Legal Aid Service (DLAS), a community-based legal services office in north-central Halifax. Operated by the Schulich School of Law, it is also a clinical program for law students. It was established in 1970, when it began as a summer project of five Dalhousie law students based at the Halifax Neighbourhood Centre. At the time, it was the first legal service for poor people in Nova Scotia. Today, it’s the only community law clinic in the province – and the oldest clinical law program in Canada. DLAS is a unique partnership of community groups, law students, community legal workers, and lawyers. It offers community outreach, education, organizing, lobbying, and test case litigation to fight injustices affecting those with low incomes in Nova Scotia. In the fall and winter, up to 16 law school students can represent as many as 10 DLAS clients under the supervision of professional staff.

Home to Canada’s first clinical law program, we offer many opportunities to transcend the theory of law and experience its practical application in action. Choose from more than a dozen placement, clinical practice, and advocacy skills courses. Whether you choose the Dalhousie Legal Aid Service, the Clinical Class in Criminal Law, or the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia Placement, our program connects you to the reality of how law is practiced and how it can be used to create change, and it gives you a taste of life as a legal professional.

Donna Franey LLB ‘86
 Executive Director of Dalhousie Legal Aid Service, Member of the Public Legal Education Society

“The students are highly supervised and learn by doing. We see them really grow their knowledge and confidence while they’re here.”

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CAREER DEVELOPMEN 18


A law degree offers many career options within the legal profession and opens doors to many paths in addition to law. Our Career Development Office (CDO) is committed to helping you turn your law school education and experience into meaningful and fulfilling career opportunities, wherever your career may take you. We start by meeting with all first-year students to discuss career plans and aspirations, resumÊ and cover letter development, and preparing for interviews. Networking events, employer information sessions, and industry mixers with members of the legal community are hosted throughout the year, providing you with an opportunity to make valuable connections with others who share similar career interests. You will receive the very best legal education and the CDO is here for you throughout your law school program. We’ll help you understand who you are as an emerging professional and how to apply your education, skills, and abilities to acheive your career goals.

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MENTOR PROGRAM Many of the most accomplished professionals attribute part of their success to their relationship with a great mentor. A mentor can be your connection to experienced advice, guiding support, and valuable career opportunities. We have a network of alumni mentors across Canada from a broad section of practice areas who are eager to share their experience and insight. To give you the best possible start, we offer every first-year student the opportunity to be matched with recent Schulich School of Law alumni. So whether you want to work for the public prosecution in Yellowknife, in securities law on Bay Street, or in international diplomatic service, we have the connections to help you get there.

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ENGAGING • CHALLENGING • INSPIRING

The faculty at the Schulich School of Law is world renowned for their knowledge of law, their pursuit of excellence in interpreting legal issues, and their impassioned approach to engaging students. They come from the hallowed halls of universities like Oxford, Yale, Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, and the Sorbonne and include Rhodes, Fulbright, and Trudeau Scholars. As academics and practitioners, they are shaping the front lines of the law and have been instrumental in the development of groundbreaking policy. What this impressive collection of academics and practitioners has in common is that they chose the Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie. They chose you. This is a place where your professors know your name and your work and are eager to both support and challenge you.

Professor Naiomi Metallic BA Hons (Dalhousie), LLB (Dalhousie), LLL (Ottawa), LLM (Osgoode), Dalhousie Chancellor’s Chair in Aboriginal Law and Policy, Named to the 2016 “Best Lawyer in Canada” list in Aboriginal law

FACULTY 20 credit: Rachael Kelly Photo

“After a rewarding practice in Aboriginal law as a Mi’kmaq lawyer, I moved to academia to continue my work for First Nations in a different way – through teaching, writing, and speaking about the issues facing Aboriginal peoples in Canada and how the law can be used as a tool for reconciliation and improving the lives of Indigenous peoples. Dalhousie was the obvious choice for me, given its commitment to community through the Indigenous Blacks & Mi’kmaq Initiative (of which I am a proud alumna), the Weldon Tradition of giving back, and its location on Mi’kmaw territory.”


Photo credit: Rachael Kelly

HERE, GREAT FACULTY IS THE LAW.

Professor Jonathon Penney

Professor Michelle Williams

BA (Dalhousie), JD (Dalhousie), LLM (Columbia – Fulbright Scholar), MST (Oxford – Mackenzie King Scholar), PhD (Oxford), Fellow, Berkman Center – Harvard University, Research Fellow, Munk School of Global Affairs, U of T

BSW (Dalhousie), LLB (Toronto), LLM (NYU), Director, Indigenous Blacks & Mi’kmaq Initiative

“My graduate studies and work took me to several universities abroad, including three law schools on three different continents. This was a rich and life-shaping experience, but in the end, I managed to find my way back to Dal — lured, still, by its strong sense of community and public duty coupled with a truly national orientation.”

“To me, the greatest gift about working at Dalhousie — and in Nova Scotia and Mi’kma’ki more broadly — is engaging with African Nova Scotian and Mi’kmaw students and our communities on justice issues. The histories and cultures are enormously rich and have a lot to teach us.”

Professor Matthew Herder BSc Hons (Memorial), LLB (Dalhousie), LLM (Dalhousie), JSM (Stanford), Director, Health Law Institute, Associate Professor of Medicine cross-appointed in Law, Harkness Associate in Health Care Policy and Practice at Yale University

“Returning to Dal as a faculty member felt too good to be true. My experiences here as a student, and the relationships I formed with professors in the law school and related disciplines like bioethics, were what made me want to pursue an academic career. The level of intellectual exchange I had as a student and continue to enjoy as a member of the medical and law schools is simply unmatched by other law schools I’ve attended.”

Professor Jocelyn Downie BA (Queen’s), MA (Queen’s), MLitt (Cambridge), LLB (Toronto), LLM (Michigan), SJD (Michigan), Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, Adjunct Professor Australian Centre for Health Law Research

“What I love most about this law school is its commitment to community. The student body is close-knit and so mutually supportive. The faculty really look out for each other – I always feel like there’s someone there to support me and push me to be better. The school as a whole really lives its express commitment to unselfish public service. We all, in our own ways, try to make our communities better for everyone.”

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BA (McGill), GrDip (Concordia), LLL (Ottawa), JD (Ottawa), LLM (McGill), PhD candidate (McGill), Member of the Law Society of Upper Canada

Professor Jodi Lazare came to our law school as a Schulich Fellow in 2014, taught as a part-time member of faculty, and was appointed a full-time assistant professor in 2017. She holds degrees in both civil law and common law, completed her articles as a law clerk to the Honourable Mr. Justice Michael Moldaver at the Supreme Court of Canada, and has worked in small and large private practice. What do you like about teaching law? I enjoy everything about teaching, from the deep thinking and creativity that goes into preparing a course to the lively exchanges with students in the classroom, which bring to light new perspectives and ways of understanding legal and social issues. What are your research interests? Some of my interests include family law, financial consequences of family breakdown, gender equality, legal education, nonhuman animals and the law, and constitutional law. My doctoral thesis looks at the practice of judicial reliance on the Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines, and I am working on publishing a number of articles from it. It’s satisfying to see your contributions to a larger conversation. What excites you about this next chapter in your legal career? All of it! Dal was my No. 1 choice. I’m extraordinarily lucky to be able to lean on, learn from, and collaborate with a group of scholars with diverse interests and expertise. And the students are fabulous; they’re always giving back to the community, which is inspiring and humbling.

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Photo credit: Rachael Kelly

Professor Jodi Lazare


THE SCHULICH SCHOOL OF LAW IS A POLICY POWERHOUSE FOR THE PUBLIC GOOD. PROFESSOR NAIOMI METALLIC IS ADVANCING ISSUES IN INDIGENOUS

GOVERNANCE. PROFESSORS SHEILA WILDEMAN & ARCHIE KAISER ARE LEADING AND

MODERNIZING

PERSONS ACT.

THE

LAW REFORM

INCOMPETENT

PROFESSOR JOCELYN DOWNIE

IS DRAFTING LEGISLATION FOR END-OF-LIFE

CARE

AND ASSISTED DYING. PROFESSOR DAVID

VANDERZWAAG IS DEVELOPING LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY REFORMS IN

GOVERNANCE.

GLOBAL OCEAN

PROFESSOR JAMIE BAXTER IS

CHAMPIONING POLICY ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN CANADIAN

FOOD LAW AND POLICY.

PROFESSOR JOANNA ERDMAN IS SHAPING GLOBAL

PRACTICE IN ADVOCATING FOR WOMEN’S

SEXUAL AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH. PROFESSOR JENNIFER LLEWELLYN IS A LEADING

SCHOLAR IN RESTORATIVE JUSTICE . . . 23


ENGAGING • CHALLENGING • INSPIRING

Mary Rolf JD ‘17
 Mary was a research assistant for Professor Emeritus Wayne MacKay from 2015–2017. She also assisted with various projects for Professors Rob Currie, Steve Coughlan, David Fraser, and Elaine Gibson.

“Working as a research assistant gave me the chance to work with wonderful mentors on topics I was interested in on a much more focused level than I’d encountered in general law classes. My main interest is Internet and tech law and policy, and as a research assistant I worked with several professors in the Law and Technology Institute on a few different projects. I also had the opportunity to co-present some of the research I worked on with one of my professors at a conference and for the provincial government. In my final semester I was able to take the work I had done and write a directed research paper of my own for academic credit, which I submitted for publication.”

STUDENTS 24


Greg Johannson JD ‘17
 Greg struggled with debilitating addiction his first year of law school. He was met with acceptance and support from the law school community. He not only made his way back but also found ways to give back. Greg is now articling in Gander, NL

“An essential part of the law school experience is having someone to sympathize and not judge. It’s easier to be candid about my experience with alcohol and drug addiction because society has become more accepting of addiction and other mental health conditions. The law school and the faculty and students exemplify that acceptance. I want other students to know that with the right supports, recovery is possible. We’re all in this together at law school, and knowing you aren’t alone as you struggle through mental health issues is so important.”

Jenn Teryn JD ‘16


Nayha Acharya LLM ‘12

Jenn was a Pro Bono Dalhousie program co-ordinator while she was at law school. After Convocation, she returned to her hometown of Victoria to article with McCullough Gustafson Watt.

Nayha recently defended her PhD thesis entitled “The Virtue of Process: Finding the Legitimacy of Judicial FactFinding in Personal Injury Litigation,” an inquiry into the legitimacy of judicial fact-finding in civil litigation. She is now a part-time faculty member at the Schulich School of Law.

“Weldon will always have a special place in my heart. Because it’s a small community, you get to know most of the people in your class, along with the faculty, staff, librarians, and cleaners. The people are so great. As an alumna, I plan to stay connected to Dal. Not only did Dal offer me the opportunity to attend law school, but I also received generous bursaries and scholarships every year. I’m definitely going to give back to the institution that has helped me fulfil my life’s ambition.”

“Finishing a long degree gave me occasion to reflect on my time as a graduate student at the Schulich School of Law. The law school provided me many opportunities to present my work at home and abroad, to do my research with an excellent supervisory committee, and to teach the wonderful students who come to Dal. I’m grateful for the head start that I’ve been afforded by pursuing this degree here, and I’m excited now for what is to come.”

Melissa Pike JD ‘19
 Melissa spent the summer of 2016 working at Dalhousie Legal Aid Service thanks to the support of a Schulich Academic Excellence Fund for Internships.

“The most moving part of my internship was being able to provide legal information to people who feel trapped in their situation to help them exercise their rights. It re-instilled what an empowering tool the law can be in effecting change. Working with such remarkable lawyers, community legal workers, and support staff taught me how powerful a tool the law is in helping people access justice. It was inspiring to contribute to an organization of people who have dedicated their careers to helping those in need.”

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A “daring experiment” is how Dean Richard Chapman Weldon referred to Dalhousie’s Law School on opening day in 1883. He envisioned a very different kind of school, one that not only provided students with a foundation in the practice of law but also instilled a sense of the power and responsibility of using law as a tool for social change. Dean Weldon believed that every lawyer, regardless of area of practice, had an obligation to use their knowledge of the law to serve the community for the greater good. This belief came to be known as the “Weldon Tradition,” and more than 130 years later, it remains in our DNA. In classrooms and study groups, from professors to students, and among new graduates and well-established alumni, the Weldon Tradition is honoured and practiced. It’s about community, unselfish public service, and effecting positive change.

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Carrying on the Weldon Tradition almost 135 years later is the not-for-profit Artists’ Legal Information Society (ALIS). Founded in 2010 by Daniel Pink (JD ’11) and a group of law students who recognized that artists often face unique legal issues but may not have the right resources to address them, ALIS provides free legal services to artists in Atlantic Canada. Lawyers like Kelsey McLaren (JD ‘11), Noémi Westergard (JD ’11), and Pink generously give time and expertise to help artists with issues like copyright, intellectual property, contracts, and royalties. Access to dedicated legal help ensures that artists’ voices are heard and that their interests are protected.

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HOW DOES LAW SCHOOL CHANGE YOU? Lesra Martin (LLB ‘97) Lesra Martin is an inspiring example of the power in each of us to make a difference. Once an inner city kid dismissed by society, his mesmerizing life story of hope, courage, and change formed part of the 1999 film The Hurricane starring Denzel Washington. Lesra worked to sucessfully bring about the exoneration of boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, who had been wrongfully convicted of murder. “My decision to enter law school set off a struggle within myself of two seemingly irreconcilable differences: a passion to be actively engaged in real time, with making a difference or a contribution, and choosing a profession steeped in ‘dead traditions.’ How could you make a difference with crusty history and dusty precedents? Law school helped change this apparent dichotomy, revealing that the law itself is a living tree rooted in the past with ever-growing tentacles, enabling those lucky enough to be part of the legal profession the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives daily.”

Cheryl Martin (LLB ‘98) Cheryl grew up as part of a big East Coast family. Cheryl and Lesra run their own firm, Martin & Martin Lawyers, in Kamloops, BC “I started attending law school thinking it was a means to an end: Get a decent education to be in the best position to help people in a substantive way. I felt law school could teach me to be resourceful and be that problem-solver for people that I felt so many needed. I was on a mission to complete three years, get my degree, and get on with my life. Making friends and the social world at school was not on my radar, until an acquaintance in law school (upper year) said to me one day: ‘You come into the school, attend class, do a few things, and then leave. You never talk to anyone. It is not fair to not let people get to know you — not fair to all of us and not fair to yourself.’ I left the school — angry — but I thought about what he said. “The next day, I attended my classes and headed toward the front door after my day was done. And stopped. I sat on a table in the lobby and eventually chatted with a few people. After a few weeks of this, I discovered that I liked meeting new people. Twenty-plus years later, I still enjoy meeting people and getting to know them, along with knowing I have the resources to help them in many ways. I left law school with the closest of friends and a law degree to help people. Some of the friends are family to me now, including the student who told me I wasn’t being fair. I married him!”

A Family Affair While students sometimes do meet their life partners in law school, to the best of our knowledge, Cheryl and Lesra are the only alumni we know of to actually be married IN the law school! It was fun to see them show their daughters the very spot they tied the knot, under the arches of the law library, on a recent visit to the law school. 29


MENTOR • ASPIRE • SUPPORT

OUR ALUMNI USE THEIR LEGAL EDUCATION TO FOLLOW MANY DREAMS: MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT. CORPORATE LAWYER. KNOWLEDGE LEAD. HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATE. COMMUNITY ORGANIZER. ENTREPRENEUR. COMEDIAN. DIPLOMAT. LEGAL AID LAWYER. PROFESSOR. CSIS DIRECTOR. PREMIER. AUTHOR. SOLE PRACTITIONER. CROWN COUNSEL. NHL AGENT. SENATOR. FILM DIRECTOR. JOURNALIST. SUPREME COURT JUDGE. IMMIGRATION LAWYER. PRIME MINISTER. ARTIST. POLICY ANALYST. WHERE WILL YOUR DREAM TAKE YOU?

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Dr Pamela Palmater

LLM ‘99, JSD ‘09 Mi’kmaq lawyer and activist, Ryerson professor and Chair in Indigenous Governance, Named to Canadian Lawyer’s 2013 “25 Most Influential” list, 2012 Bertha Wilson Honour Society Inductee

“The professors at Dal are not just trained in law, they are activists in their own right. I am thankful to Dal for giving me some of the tools I needed to pursue my own advocacy efforts.”

Senator Kim Pate

LLB ‘84 Senator, former Executive Director, Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies, 2009 Canadian Bar Association’s Touchstone Award Recipient, 2003 Weldon Award for Unselfish Public Service Recipient

“At Dal, I met students, professors, and other staff who remain some of my closest friends and mentors. Working at the Dal Legal Aid Clinic launched me on a social justice trajectory for which I am extremely grateful. I recommend Dal to everyone.”

Jade Buchanan

JD ‘11 MacPherson Leslie & Tyerman LLP, Regina, Clerked for Chief Justice Klebuc, Court of Appeal for Saskatchewan “The advantage I knew I would get from Dalhousie was a degree that would distinguish me at home. That has absolutely been the case. The advantage I didn’t expect is that I now have friends in every city in Canada.”

Abbey (Junior) Sirivar LLB ‘02 McCarthy Tétrault, Toronto, 2010 Lexpert Zenith Award Recipient

“Students from each and every province in the country comprised our graduating class. There was a diversity of perspective that has proven to be an enduring part of the education we received.”

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CONNECT TO WHAT’S IMPORTANT NOVEMBER 30 All completed applications received by November 30 will be given early consideration for admission and all entrance scholarships.

FEBRUARY, JUNE, SEPTEMBER, DECEMBER The LSAT (Law School Admission Test) is administered four times a year at designated testing centres.

FEBRUARY 28 Deadline to complete your application (subject to filing LSAT scores, the current year’s academic transcript, and letters of reference).

CALL Speak with Rose Godfrey, Director of Admissions and Outreach, about all of your Schulich School of Law questions. T: 902.494.2068 E: law.admissions@dal.ca W: dal.ca/law/apply

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Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie - JD Viewbook 2018  

Close to home and around the globe, the Schulich School of Law opens a world of opportunity for our graduates. Study law at the school that...

Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie - JD Viewbook 2018  

Close to home and around the globe, the Schulich School of Law opens a world of opportunity for our graduates. Study law at the school that...