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Sally Schrum 3466 McMullin School Road De Soto, Missouri 63020 schrumsr@gmail.com 636.208.8061


Selected Work 7 About Me 8 EATS

Empowerment through Agriculture, Transportation and Sustainability Chicago, Illinois

14 ODBC

Pentania Housing Complex Lille, France

18 Wedding in the Woods Transforming a Ritual Western Missouri

20 410 House

Design/Build Prototype Pop-Up Shelter Lawrence, Kansas

22 Lawrence Elementary Lifecycle of a School Lawrence, Kansas

26 35mm Photography

Black + White, Hand developed film Greater Kansas City Area

28 Eat Your City, Live on Your Plate A Postpartum Analysis of the Italian Lifestyle Florence + Rome + Siena + Venice, Italy

34 Boom Troost

A Masterplan for the Future Kansas City, Missouri

39 RĂŠsumĂŠ


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ABOUT SALLY SCHRUM

WHO: WHAT: Architect + Designer + Dreamer WHEN: From now on. WHERE: The possibilities are endless. HOW: Collaboration + Education + Experiences + Inspiration + Intuition WHY Everything is architecture. Hello, my name is Sally Schrum and I am an architect-in-training. I graduated from the University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design and Planning in May 2011 after receiving a Master of Architecture. Following my fourth year Comprehensive Studio I participated in a Summer 2010 study abroad excursion to Italy (with particular attention placed on the urban spaces of Florence, Rome, Siena and Venice). It is here that I credit my full-circle approach to architectural design. In Fall 2010, I went to Paris in an International Internship Program. After a two-week studio at L’Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture, wtih renowned architects Isabel Hérault and Wojciech Lesnikowski, I went to work for ODBC (Odile Decq Benoit Cornette Architectes Urbanistes). I quickly adapted

to a fast-paced, working environment with focus on large scale, competitive projects. I gained experience in conceptual/schematic design through handsketching and physical modeling as well as construction drawing development through Graphisoft ArchiCAD. This experience confirmed my education at KU had supplied me with the necessary knowledge to enter the architectural field, and left me anxious to return for my final semester of schooling. I grew up in a small, country town approximately forty miles south of St. Louis. Since childhood, I have been an active artist, a passionate, curious learner, an intensive worker and a performer. These innate qualities continued to strengthen during my high school years where I was selected to attend, respectively from freshman to senior year, the: International Science and Engineering Fair, Missouri Fine Arts Academy (emphasis on visual art), Missouri Girls State and winner of NeoRenaissance Art Award. I have always had a unexplainably strong interest in art, mathematics, and the way people live, so I was naturally dir-

rected down an architectural path. I believe that design is a full-circle, collaborative process that should involve multiple disciplines. Furthermore, I believe in making goals and working hard to complete those goals, the importance of a unbreakable system of family and friends, and that a good (or bad) joke can fix just about anything. Computers are nowadays dominating the architectural field, but I will always most value the natural fluidity of ideas through hand sketching, physical modeling, and full-scale mock-ups. My passion for architecture and design continues to grow everyday as I see this as not only a professional choice, but a way of life.

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EATS Empowerment through Agriculture, Transportation and Sustainability WHO: Sally Schrum, Solo WHAT: A Kitchen for the Community WHEN: Spring 2010, 4 months WHERE: Chicago, Illinois HOW: Site Visit + Handsketching + Physical Models + Sketchup + Auto CAD + Indesign + Illustrator + Photoshop WHY The Woodlawn, Chicago area is in desperate need of a change. The purpose of this center is to be a place where community education and innovation can flourish, encouraging us to be critical consumers of REAL food and transport, for better individual health and collective community health. It should be a place where community residents can develop new skills, new attitudes, and new ideas for solving old problems.

In today’s home, the kitchen has become the center of not only eating but also for social activity. Through educational endeavors established in this community center, the members of Woodlawn will learn how to grow, cook and distribute their own food while maintaining a positive, encouraging atmosphere. This center will be a social space focused on food; A KITCHEN FOR THE COMMUNITY. This EATS Center will focus on every aspect of food. Through the GROWth, COOKing, LEARNing, and EATing of food the Woodlawn area will be able to come to together to celebrate this daily human ritual. With this center acting as a sort of community

kitchen, constant activities will be going on attract locals. If someone is physically incapable of using the center, a Meals on Wheels program, serving solely the Woodlawn area, will relocate the food grown and cooked in the community center. The main goal of EATS is to revitalize Woodlawn’s excitement for food, learning and each other. It will be a place to come to feel safe, eat and socialize healthily, and feel a sense of pride, understanding and newfound optimistm toward life. Everybody eats. Why not eat the best food possible?

Greenhouse + Roof Garden Stacked Kitchens Multi-Purpose Room Office + Conference Meals on Wheels Restrooms + Mechanical Classrooms + Library 9


2x Zoom! Light + VentilationWells Roof Gardens

Wood Skin

Floor System

Composite

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Summer 55 sun angle

Winter 25 sun angle

Light

Ventilation

Program


Structure

Mechanical

Circulation

Program


Outside

Inside

Ground Level

Level 2

Level 3


Plot 2 +53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

+37,31

Façade Ouest

Façade Sud

+37,31

Façade Sud

Façade Ouest

+53,76

+53,76

+53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

+37,31

Façade Est

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Plot 3 Façade Nord

+37,31

Façade Est

Façade Nord


ODBC

Odile Decq Benoit Cornette Architectes Urbanistes

WHO: Sally Schrum + WHAT: Pentania Housing Development WHEN: Fall 2010, 4 months WHERE: Lille, France HOW: Sketchup + ArchiCAD + Photoshop + Indesign + Physical Models + Sketching

WHY Semester internship in Paris, France working at Odile Decq Benoit Cornette Architectes Urbanistes. Gained individual and collaborative work experience in office environment through large scale, international projects, specifically, the Pentania Housing Development located in Lille, France. Projected start of construction: soon.

Plot 1 +53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

Façade Ouest

Façade Sud

+53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

Façade Est

Plot 4

Façade Nord

Plot 5 +53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

+37,31

+37,31

+53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

Façade Ouest

Façade Sud

Façade Ouest

Façade Sud

+53,76

+53,76

+53,76

+53,76

+51,06

+51,06

+51,06

+51,06

+48,31

+48,31

+48,31

+48,31

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+45,56

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+42,81

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+40,06

+37,31

+37,31

+37,31

Façade Est

Façade Nord

+37,31

Façade Est

Façade Nord

15


OLD

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ENT. 10,5 m2

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CU. 213

CIR. 1,9 m2

307

18

307

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268

4 129

121

620

153

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43

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8

CH 3

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3

6

140

10,6 m2

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CU. 10,6 m2

142 15

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SJR

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191

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NEW

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T5

T4

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102

PL

448

13,9 m2

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PATIO 12,9 m2

PATIO 12,7 m2

SDE 5,2 m2

7

184

278

18

3,4 m2

CH 3

383

7

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SDE

18

18 1 061

SJR

258

591

167

CH1

CH1 3,4 m2

620

258

SJR 26,8 m2

306

350

TASK COMPLETE Configure skewed roof plane geometries of quadplexes through physical models and 3d computer modeling.

43

5

7

417

171

SJR

26,8 m2

702

7

43

CH1

43

12,9 m2

443

43

173

18

306 200

43

417

43

307

51

7

7

PL

153

43

712

102

8

359

977

51

PATIO

43

12,7 m2 PATIO

SDE SDE 5,2 m2 171

8

TASK COMPLETE Complete reworkings of elevations, sections, and floor plans of five apartment towers + five quadplexes.

CH1

CH 3

16

6

10,5 m

4

5

213

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448

268

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ENT.

338

10,6 m2

18

16

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142 10

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T5

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328

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CU.

843CIR.

1

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191

268

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10,6 m2

3

TASK COMPLETE Configure window sizing/placement for quadplexes through conceptual handsketching and computer modeling.

213

13,9 m2

CU.

51

129

121

6

CH 3

2

51


T5 8

9

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Faรงade Ouest

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T4 Faรงade Est

DRESSING

17,7 m2

TERRASSE

CHAMBRE 2

20

14

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ENT.

11

10

9

20,6 m2

8

7

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17,3 m2

TERRASSE

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CHAMBRE 2

Faรงade Nord DRESSING

2

16

8

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1,7 m

15

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T4 RDC + 1

Faรงade Sud 17


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WHO: Sally Schrum + 3 WHAT: Transforming a Ritual WHEN: Spring 2007 WHERE: Western Missouri HOW: Sketching + Physical Models + Hand Drafting + Illustrator + Photoshop

WHY Design an interactive structure located withtin the depth of the woods, with transformative capabilities to aid the commemoration of a special ceremony. Focus was paid attention primarily on the transfomation, sequence and interaction of the structure, eventually creating a ‘full circle’ event. Every piece of this structure was designed with a specific part of the ceremony, as well as a guest in mind. After traveling on a wooden plank walk

way cut through the woods, guests greet a large, flat object elevating over a concrete slab at their final destination. The guests immediately start folding up the walls and actually construct the structure for the couple to be married in. The bride and the groom then ascend up the pathway and from the front side of the now ‘cube’, a staircase has been revealed. The two parallel side walls are a double set of screens that open to different directions, giving shade and aesthetic to the object. The roof is a series of louvers that can

open and close depending on the amount of wanted light. The back wall has sticks set in circular windows that are free to push and pull during the vow exchange to symbolize progression through a couple’s relationship. The entire structure is set on an exaggerated hinge and can crack open to expose the interior. The structure not only has countless ways of moving, which allows for visually and functionally interesting spaces, but it is also highly personal and adaptable. 19


START

dosomething.org Disaster Grant Recipient

410

EMERGENCY RELIEF SHELTER

WHO: Sally Schrum + 14 WHAT: Design/Build Prototype Pop-Up Shelter WHEN: Fall , 4 months WHERE: Lawrence, Kansas HOW: Full Scale Mock-Up + Physical Models + SketchUP + AutoCAD WHY Design a disaster relief shelter to accommodate people who have been displaced from their homes due to natural catastrophe. Current solutions in use are poorly designed, expensive, time consuming and most of all, lack the fundamental elements of a home. Transportation, availiability of materials and ease of assembly were design constraints placed upon the development of the shelter. Thus, the 410 House is a modular shelter built of OSB (oriented strand board) and vinyl fabric. The ‘house’ can be shipped on various forms of transportation, can be put together in approximately five hours, and costs less than $2,000. Its structure consists of a series of 4’ x 10’ bays that can be easily be expanded

or contracted based on varying family size (three bays for two occupants, five bays for four occupants, etc.) Each bay consists of: c-shaped structural rib, columns, footings, and fabric. The south facing wall is a series of operable louvers, allowing inhabitants to control their surroundings. The contains “flat pack” furniture (chairs, tables, shelving) which can easily be taken out and used or stored away. Each bay contains two bunkstyle beds that fold down from the back wall. Each shelter also includes a passive solar heating system, 4’ x 10’ porch, entry ramp and sliding door. The ultimate goal would be to make these shelters adaptable to any climate in any part of the world.

STOP 20


START 6:30AM STOP 6:30PM

10 December 2008

7:06 AM

8:12 AM

8:16 AM

8:25 AM

8:39 AM

8:47 AM

8:47 AM

8:50 AM

11:01 AM

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11:10 AM

11:11 AM

11:12 AM

11:27 AM

11:34 AM

11:36 AM

11:46 AM

11:57 AM

12:06 PM

12:18 PM

12:33 PM

1:27 PM

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WHY A structural steel elementary school designed to enhance the playful nature of children while considering aspects of sustainability and site specifity. Located to the east of bustling Massachusetts Street, the Lawrence Elementary School is situated directly next to the Lawrence Arts Center. Using the concept of desconstructed, geometric building blocks in bright, modern colors, the design was formed. With children taking up the majority of the occupancy of this structure, it seemed completely necessary to take into account the things they enjoy most right from the beginning of the design process and have those things influence the remainder of the project. After spending some time analyzing children, it came to an understanding they need to have the ablility to explore and play, to be outside, and to interact with other children, all of which became critical in the final design. The sense of the playfulness of children was a huge driving force behind the design. Simple geometric forms that were pushed, pulled and skewed, created lively massing on the exterior and little niches for play and social interaction on the interior. Playfulness and adventure were furthermore articulated with the addition of roof playgrounds on three of the four roofs, with exterior ramps wrapping the building.

LAWRENCE

ELEMENTARY

CIrculation became the main aspect in the design for the school. Children need options in the way they travel through a building; by combining indoor and outdoor circulation patterns, this is possible. The students of the school are encouraged to be outside, make independent choices, socialize and explore the full potential of the building. This playfulness and freedom expressed in the design of the building will encourage the same approach to be taken toward education.

Lifecycle of a School

WHO: Sally Schrum, Solo WHAT: Structural Steel Competition WHEN: Spring 2009, 5 weeks WHERE: Lawrence, Kansas HOW: Site Visit + Sketchup + Auto CAD + Indesign + Illustrator + Photoshop + Physical Models + Sketching 23


24


Massachusetts Street

North Ground Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor

Fourth Floor

25


Sculpture, Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City


Storage, Judith Shea, Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City

Lobby Level Ramp, Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City

Wagon Wheel, Lawrence, Kansas

35mm

Photography WHO: Sally Schrum, Solo WHAT: Architectural Photography WHEN: Spring 2009, 4 months WHERE: Greater Kansas City Area HOW: Canon T70 35mm Camera + DarkRoom

27


A Postpartum Analysis of the Italian Lifestyle As Americans, we have preconceived notions of everything Italian—the culture, the people, the food—and as citizens, we leave our homeland to fulfill those notions as tourists. Once landing in this country of temptation, one can take one of two paths, the tourist or the architect. As a tourist, one will put on tennis shoes, a fanny pack and trek through cities, blatantly and embarrassingly gawking at treasures. Booking solid every minute of the day, overloading on guided museum tours and dining in deceptively ‘authentic’ corner cafes leaves the tourist with sore feet, a sweaty body and a desperate longing for air conditioned spaces. “Tourists visit cities only to confirm impressions already formed from postcards or movies.”1 The architect, on the other hand, longs to live like an Italian whilst she is on ‘vacation’. Letting go of maps and relentless waiting in lines in order to aimlessly wander the mystery-ridden alleys and to take afternoon naps, the architect is willing to sacrifice traditional tourist traps (and regular showering 1 2

28

habits) to experience a more authentic Italian way of life. “…authenticity has more to do with the intangible experience than with anything else.” 2 When one chooses the latter, less traveled path, an elusive souvenir is taken back home in the form of personal fulfillment and happiness. A better understanding of a place has in turn left the architect with a better understanding of herself. While the journey of the tourist and architect have drastically different personal outcomes, they will each experience key concepts on their journey. The themes of food, people, urban spaces and architecture are a constant throughout Italy. They are even more apparent in the cities of Venice, Florence, Siena and Rome, the Italian magnets for tourists. Both the tourist and architect alike will come into contact with these concepts on a daily basis. “It is here—within the context of seeking out the authentic—that the boundaries between tourist and scholar blur.”2 While food/eating is a no brainer, it has to be done, and

Allen, Stan. Dazed and Confused. pg. 47-54. Lasansky, D. Medina. Blurred Boundaries Between Tourism an History: The Case of Tuscany. Architourism. pg 50-55.

grand, important architecture will be seen by both parties, urban space and people can become a little more difficult to understand. Whereas tourists will visit major plazas, to enjoy gelato and be tempted by gypsy vendors, the architect will recognize the importance of the tiny, interwoven veins, that are just as important if not more so, that the heart of the city. Alleyways pump life and energy into a city, a place where tourists take the larger, core arteries and locals take the dark spidery passages. To take it even further, people think they understand people. But just because you are one, and believe that you know yourself, it is not safe to make assumptions that you understand ‘people’ as a whole distinguishing part of a society. As architects, our profession is based around our awareness and ability to learn about others and provide our intellectual insight to better their lives in anyway we possibly can. If one can take these lifealtering trips through the eyes of an architect, and not as a tourist, maximum knowledge for other civilizations can be


recognized. “This desire has been present since Alberti, when he described the architect as someone who needs to master not only specific architectural knowledge but knowledge of various cultural practices.”1 I, personally, came out of this trip with what I consider a more complete comprehension of different cultures, those of my own culture, of myself and the place I hold in the future architectural world.

Most people, well, most tourists, don’t go to cities to admire the urban spaces. You are supposed to eat the architecture. Eat your city. Food is the common ground in the ritual of dining. It is layered artfully, carefully upon the plate, much like the architecture of a city should be. “The great work of cities is best accomplished in small steps, block by block. It confirms a sense of place and permanence.”2 Another dimension to the city is the addition of people. LoIf one begins to think about food, spe- cals, tourist, the old, the young, the procifically the way Italians dine (predinner fessionals, the gypsys, everyone adds drink, bread, appetizer, main course, an essential flavor to the plate, which dessert, afterdinner drink, and flow- would otherwise leave the city bland ing wine throughout) you can begin and unpalatable. to understand the cultural, and more specifically urban aspects of Italian cit- THE ACT OF EATING ies. Think about the dining experience Finally, think of the act of eating as life, and the urban condition as one in the or the everyday interactions between same. This theme of the meal being an people, architecture and urban space. urban space will act as an underlying You eat to live, but maybe you should theme for the remainder of this writing, live to eat. The place and time in which in which the plate becomes the urban one interacts with urban space and arspace of the city, the architecture and chitecture is the most important aspect the people become the food, and the of the meal. Eating should not be seen actual act of eating is life, or the interac- as a chore, but as an everyday event tions amongst these three ideas. that can be celebrated. The same is true when thinking about cities. When THE PLATE moving through, between spaces, think Think about the plate as urban space. of it as an experience just the same. The base, the holder, the container of the city. It is easy to pass over the im- Like the layering of courses during a portance of the place due to the tempt- meal and the layering of food upon a ing food that sits upon it. However, a plate, the city is layered similarly. When plate can be a simple, white, disposable visiting such historically significant paper plate (a city with poor urban de- and architecturally pleasing cities, it is sign) or can be a delicate piece of china incredibly easy to use only your eyes. with intricate detailing (a city with good “While the city presents different layurban design). A piece of fine china al- ers of inscription, architecture adds levlows the food to become the star of the els of meaning to the city with its own show even more. Good urban space en- reading mechanism.”1 You are in such hances architecture. Urban space, and an intense visual overstimulation, that plates, are often taken for granted, but other senses can go not unused but when you encounter a good one, it sure unnoticed. When traveling throughout is obvious. Italy, it was especially important, to me personally, to keep all senses aware of the surroundings I was in at all times. THE FOOD Now think of the food on the plate (or Everything was different, not only from urban space) as the architecture and the United States, but between every people that inhabit he city. Food, in all city visited. The sound of vespas scootreality, is the sole purpose of the dining ing along, old men speaking in scruffy experience. Most people don’t go to a Italian and children playing became meal expecting to admire the plate. my iPod for the trip; I didn’t need head2

phones, I just needed to open my ears and listen to the local beats. The smell of the hot summer air, flowers growing and constant food activated my sense of smell like never before. I found myself with perpetually filthy hands from touching everything: buildings, walls, railings, plants, the ground. And when I found a piece of architecture that I was particularly drawn to, I had an overwhelming urge to completely embrace it. The noises, smells and tactile elements of the city were just as appealing to me as what I saw. The food, and tastes we experienced in each location not only represented another sense, but another way of interpreting and exploring the city at another, visually unobservable layer. In the remainder of this document, I will delve into a deeper, more personal analysis of the concepts of food, people, urban spaces, and architecture and how they relate to urban tourist magnets. Venice, a city floating upon water, which also serves as its main transportation source, pridefully boasts itself in seafood delights. This is the most obvious and most perfect city to talk about the importance of food in Italian culture. Florence is a city based around the tourist. Everything, from the food to the shopping to the transportation, have been developed to make the most ‘authentic’ environment for tourists and people in general, to inhabit. Here, within the interactions between people and these city elements, you are see the Italian significance and strength of relationships. Siena is the smallest of the urban hubs we visited and the one in which we stayed the longest, allowing us to gain the greatest possible understanding. Siena has one of the strongest urban cores in the world and the connection the locals have to their city are quite impressive. We did not encounter many interactions with tourists here until the end of our stay, until we were nearing the Palio. This allowed us to reach maximum natural fluidity through the city and explore all its offerings. Rome is the architectural hotspot of Italy. Classics such as the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, and the Vatican

1 Gandelsonas, Mario. The City as the Object of Architecture. pg 129-144. Kotkin, Joel. The Rise of the Ephemeral City. Metropolis Magazine. 18 April 2005. pg 1-4.

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reside here along with countless others. A handful of contemporary buildings are scattered throughout Rome, answering the question of how to combine both the architectural ideas of the present with noteworthy antiquities of the past. Specific meals that were actually eaten in these four magnets will become the basis for a further understanding of the layers within each city. FOOD: The Aquatic Delicacies of Venice So many people come to Italy for one sole purpose: to eat. “Cuisine is one of the most defining and saleable attributes of Italy today.”2 The food of Italy is incredible, and I feel that there is no where else in the world you can travel to only one country and be exposed to so many different varieties of cuisine. With each different region you visit, the food differs immensely. In the Tuscany region, food is rich with dark meats being the main focus of the meal. As you get closer to water, the food becomes lighter and marine based. In Venice, the food, like the culture was an extravagant display of what the region has to offer.

style. I feel as though all events of the day are focused around food and meal time. Food markets are frequent and open throughout the day. Unlike here in the States, grocery shopping happens on almost a daily basis. Since foot transportation is encouraged throughout Italy, especially Venice, you can only buy what you can carry. This idea of shopping allows for the freshest, local ingredients at meals. After being visitors to Italy for such a long time, we began to live authentically. We frequented the markets, sometimes multiple times a day, took pleasure in going out to dinner, or making dinner together as a group, and tried new foods representing specific regions. “Those seeking the truly “authentic” vacation are now encouraged to pursue agritourism – a subculture of tourism in which food is central.”2 Although meals are rich, and almost always involve an abundance of wine, the food and the atmosphere they are enjoyed in feels healthy. The group dinner we had at the Black Cat on the island of Burano was by far my favorite dinner outing. We had been on a ‘death march’ all day, and by the time we finally made it to the restaurant,

the best meals of my life, but the ride back to the Venice mainland was just as good. We were full of good food, good wine and by this point of the trip, we were all good friends. On the water taxi ride, we all went crazy. Dancing on the boat, singing, laughing, it was perfect. This aftereffect, of pure joy and happiness is one we experienced throughout the trip after our group dinners. All meals in Italy usually consist of more than one course. This layering of flavors allows each dining experience to be well-rounded and showcase the delicacies each region has to offer. By having multiple courses at each meal, this lengthens the dining time. Making it a relaxing, enjoyable experience to strengthen relationships. Food is a central way of life in Italy and when exploring cities, it should be taken from the same vantage point of sitting down for a good meal.

PEOPLE: The Great Flock to Florence I consider Florence to be the ‘little Rome’ of Italy. When walking through the city, it is almost impossible to recogVenice is considered one of the most nize who the locals are, for all you see romantic cities in the world, and it are tourists trying to find how to get well deserves to have that title. The “Those seeking the truly “authentic” to Brunellschi’s dome. This attractive complete lack of automobiles has outlook for tourists that Florence has vacation are now encouraged turned most roads into alleys, barely to pursue agritourism – a subculture created for itself has become an opwide enough for two people to pass portune economic factor. “A number of tourism in which food is central.” of cities now regard tourism, culture, through. Paths are dark, exuding an undeniable sense of mystery, while and entertainment as “core” assets.”1 at the same time welcoming you Florence has so much, architecturally, to explore. Venice is a city of opuhistorically, etc., and tourism allows lence. High-end designer fashions the city to be kept at its maximum pocan be seen throughout the island. tential. Ornately decorated masks, glistening jewelry and beautiful glassware Throughout Italy, I was intensely are no rarity. Venice displays a rich drawn into the importance of family, juxtaposition of modern lavishness social interactions and leisure time, and historical context. “The extraoror il dolce far niente (the joy of doing dinary cultural production of other great we were exhausted and ready to eat. nothing). Although this is a stereotypicities – Alexandria, Venice, Amsterdam, We had a light pasta dish some of Ven- cal observation, I was amazed at the London, New York – rested upon similar ice’s best offerings: shrimp, clams, mus- overall beauty of the Italian population. nexuses between the aesthetic and the sels, squid and octopus. Next, we were At all hours of the day, they looked efmundane.”1 The combination of lush treated to a “fried orgy” of shrimp and fortlessly chic with their glitzy, designer Venetian customs and ties to an archi- calamari. We finished off the meal with clothes, bronzed skin and dark hair. I tectural past make this city truly unique. a grappa milkshake and cookies. The relate this attractiveness to healthy rewine, as always, was flowing generously. lationships and emphasis on personal Food is a critical aspect of the Italian life- The food was exquisite, probably one of time everyday. Taking midday breaks 1 2

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Kotkin, Joel. The Rise of the Ephemeral City. Metropolis Magazine. 18 April 2005. pg 1-4. Lasansky, D. Medina. Blurred Boundaries Between Tourism an History: The Case of Tuscany. Architourism. pg 50-55.


at the cafes and sitting on ledges to simply admire the other people of the city is a seemingly sufficient past-time for Italians. The focus of life seems to be on emotional, familial connections instead of careers and egotistical self-gratification. Shutting down the office for long lunch breaks, followed by afternoon naps seems to have a positive impact on the society as a whole. Everyone, from the children to the elderly interacted on a daily basis. These connections were constantly strengthened around the dinner table through long, two to three hour meals, where being together was just as important as the food being served. We began to experience this development of relationships focused around food on our first trip to Florence.

life and set as a core daily ritual, it is easily understood now why family is such an important aspect to this culture. Leisurely eating food while enjoying the company of those you care most about is the key to happiness.

In addition to being a great apex for food, Florence is known as a shopping mecca. People, tourists and Italians alike, make the trip to Florence to buy handmade leather goods in speciality shops. High end designers are bountiful; their extravagantly complex window displays are tempting to even the most unwilling of shoppers. Small, family owned shops with one-of-a-kind items are strewn across the city, making the urge to buy almost impossible. The Ponte Vecchio is the most recognized Our string of group dinners was started bridge in Florence. Lined with shops of in Florence at the Cat and the Fox. one after another, this bridge is always Here at this meal, we ate as a family, bustling with people fighting their way and the importance of people and their to look at beautiful, ornate jewelry. In relationship to hearty food, and long stark contrast to these most refined dining periods became relevant. We shops are the gypsys and street venstarted off the meal with salads and br- dors, trying to weasel anyone they can uschetta that was passed around fam- to buy something. An Italian flag, a hat, ily style. The best balsamic vinegar I’ve a t-shirt, some sort of souvenir lacking ever had, dark and thick, was poured any authentic Italian value, but rather over the salad and swiped up with soft to be a status object when returning bread. For my main course I had a veg- home. The shopping culture, is only anetarian ravioli. It was creamy and sweet other magnetizing layer of the city that but somehow managed to feel light all attracts countless visitors on a yearly the same. House made prosecco was basis. flowing freely and before we knew it we were all full of drink, food and good The transportation in Italy, especially feelings. After this meal we stomped in Florence, is focused around people. through the streets to get gelato, some In other parts of the world, one moves of the best in Florence. Lunch at the through a city primarily by automobile Cat and the Fox was one of my favorites or by metro, but in Florence, the main of the trip. Not only was the food be- source of transportation is by foot. This yond delicious, but I felt like we came allows people to have a more intimate, together as a group to enjoy some of personal relationship with others, the the best Italy has to offer. Every meal is architecture and the urban spaces. executed this way in the Italian lifestyle. “The car has created wastes in our citWhen eating is such an intimate part of ies, and this process has been acceler 1

ated by another, equally effective factor: the separation of the various urban functions.”1 As people filter through the alleyways pouring into the urban cores of the city, it becomes apparent that when the paths around the plate are naturally suggested, the food becomes more appetizing. URBAN SPACE: The Heart of Siena When talking to people about my Italy experience, the first question they almost always ask is ‘where did you stay?’ I answer Siena. Most people are unaware of the smaller Tuscany towns because their minds are so infiltrated with the imagery of the larger tourist cities of Venice, Florence and Rome. “So we should be concerned not with activity alone, but at the same time with the framework in which it takes place. This framework is urban space.”1 After explaining the significance of Siena and the importance of the study of urban space, it was instantly clear why the majority of our trip was dedicated to the exploration of Siena.

Krier, Rob. The Erosion of Urban Space in 20th Century Town Planning. pg 64-85.

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“The architectural-urban fantasy – an architectural universe of buildings in which the city is the largest building.” For me, Siena was the ideal location for our home base. The campo was the heart of the city, and everyone knew it. All vessels, no matter the size or indirectness of path, all seemed to lead to this public square. “Urbanism is embodied in every facet of city life and experience, and not only where this is at its most concentrated”1 It was the center of all cultural activity. My favorite thing to do, and I believe the favorite thing for many of the locals to do as well, was just go, sit and people watch. This space was a stage for viewing social interactions. A stage for life. A stage for architecture. The plate on which all other layers of the city was blatantly yet elegantly displayed.

city, a tourist destination such as Rome or Florence. The feelings of authenticity that I had worked so hard to maintain had been almost instantly depleted. It was strange to me to leave Siena on such a note. We had entered Italy as a tourist in awe of our surroundings, transformed into an architect during our stay, taking note on the not so obvious but equally significant facets of the city, and suddenly we were finished, thrown back into the world as a tourist. Our way of life had slowed down while we were in Italy. I enjoyed the feelings of having no commitments, having the choice to do what I wanted, not what I was expected to do for the first time. I can honestly say that during this month, it was the least stressed I have ever been in my Our most memorable group meal in Si- life. My mind was clear and open to new ena was the final dinner. At the end of ideas, allowing me to see the world in a our trip, we were excited, refreshed, and way I never have before. Then all of a had a new obsession for the complex- sudden, the stress returned. We were ity of architecture. We dressed up and cramming our bags, running to catch wore our contrada’s flag with pride. We a bus for fear of missing our plane or were part of the city, of the Siena cul- train. We left Siena and became Ameriture. The final dinner was the climax of can once again. my architectural understanding and its relationship to food. I had the gnocchi, Siena was a magical place for me. My which was delicious, but only left me in heart races still when I think about it. I great anticipation for the main course. have never experienced a city that had It signified the excitement, the increase so many layers. The architecture, food in heart rate, as you are nearing the ulti- and people were seamlessly stacked mate urban destination. The Florentine upon the plate, almost making it diffisteak, the largest piece of meat I have cult to pry them apart. Siena is a whole, ever had on my plate, represented the perfect place. “The architectural-urban campo of Siena. It was the central as- fantasy – an architectural universe of pect of the dinner, of the city. The star buildings in which the city is the largest of the show. All other courses, much building.”2 It is here in Siena that I delike the winding paths of Siena, led up veloped a new interest in architecture, to this one defining moment. at the urban scale, and how people interacted within the city. As the days of the Palio grew nearer, the tourists quickly began to flood the city. I ARCHITECTURE: Rome in All It’s Glory had a sense of anger, constantly think- In Rome, I had hands down my most ing, what are all these people doing in emotional experience of the trip. It my city? I wanted them to leave. After was definitely not my favorite city when being in Siena for almost a month, I had it comes to architecture, urban space, developed a strong connection to the anything really, but somehow I still credplace, people, and way of life. All of a it Rome with being the place that comsudden, I felt like I was in some other pletely changed my ideals on not only 1 2 3

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Allen, Stan. Dazed and Confused. pg. 47-54. Gandelsonas, Mario. The City as the Object of Architecture. pg 129-144. Krier, Rob. The Erosion of Urban Space in 20th Century Town Planning. pg 64-85.

architecture but life. Rome is a strange place to me. It is like an amusement park. Flocks of tourists, kitschy faux-gladiator salesmen huddle around significant pieces of architectural jewels like they are standing in line for a rollercoaster. Urban space becomes the highway to get to these deceptively more important rides. Pick up a map, and you will instantly be given the quickest route to hit all the hotspots in one day. “Individual building types, such as the colosseum, the circus, the baths and many others, are interlocked like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, without any recognizable town plan resulting.”3 Even the designated urban masterpieces (i.e. Piazza Navona) have fallen victim to the tourist trap. The golden mummy man will open his eyes and move for 2 Euro and for 20 Euro you can get a caricature of yourself and a random, good-looking Italian man. WHERE ARE WE? Is this what Rome has become? What is going to happen to the future of Rome? Obviously, all of these questions are of great concern to myself, but then again, WE have done this to Rome. “Therefore, in response to Mark Rakatansky, I would say that users manage architecture much more than architecture manages users.”1 After our tourist excursion at the Vatican, I was feeling exhausted, famished, overwhelmed by tourists, and honestly tired of the majority of our group. After being with the same people at all hours of the day/night, I desperately needed a break; for a short bit of time, I ashamedly wanted to feel like I was in America again. Lindsey and I decided to sneak away to grab some food on our own. While dining, we talked about lots of things, but mostly architecture; this was the defining moment when our true friendship blossomed. This three-hour late lunch ranks as one of my top dining experiences of the trip.


After wandering for too long, we stumbled into a little place called Friends Café, not too far from our hotel. We had huge Caesar salads, grilled veggies, fried, fresh mozzarella balls and wine, lots of wine. It was the perfect meal, as the quality Italian ingredients were used in comforting, feelings toward Rome. This meal was not authentic, but I enjoyed it. It was not the best meal I had, but it was one of the most memorable. This meal signifies the familiarity with home when being in a foreign place. I now realize that tourism is a kind of comfort food. With tourism, you can always count on trivial elements to define your happiness. Souvenirs, photos with souvenirs, photos with actors in costume they all equal happiness, or an American idea of happiness. Anytime in the future that a clichéd souvenir is pulled out of the closet, memories will flood you and take you back that time. The time when you were shying away from the authentic. No matter how far you travel from home, you can always count on the comfort food to take you right back.

overhead, one can really understand the influence the neighboring structures had on the design of the Maxxi. “Each building in a town must be subordinate to the overall plan. That is, its scale, building type, architectural vocabulary must harmonise with the existing architectural fabric,”1 The inside was clean and powerful and enhanced the art it held. The building was beautiful, the art was beautiful, its fitting into the urban space was beautiful. This day was perfect, especially after Lindsey and I returned for round two at Friends Café. During this Italy trip, I went to Rome three times. I flew into Rome and had instant culture shock. Stayed for a total of fifty hours, and beat the living daylights out of all the touristy stuff in one day. After that first day I had blisters, I was sunburnt, hungry, sweaty, blah blah blah, just what I expected. I went through my personal, emotional excursion on the second trip, when we visited as a group. Thirdly and lastly, I ended my trip in Rome. Revisiting some of the same paths I took my initial introduction to Rome, but seeing them more clearly Sunday was our day off. Since I had this time around. already accomplished the typical Roman tourist routes, I chose to visit I broke down and allowed myself to be Zaha Hadid’s new Maxxi: Museo Na- raw in Rome. A student willing to soak zionale delle Arti del XXI Secolo. This up architectural knowledge as much as was hands down my favorite building of possible. The meals I consumed and the trip. I have never been to a Zaha the conversations during allowed me to building before. I have never been to a summarize my thoughts on architecture building by any woman in the forefront and the disconnect I experienced with of the architectural world, as a matter urban space while in Rome. I walked of fact. Part of this building struck me around a paper plate and feasted solely so powerfully because it was designed on the buildings, leaving me with a fulfillby a strong woman. I felt like one day I ment in my heart and eagerness in my could do this, I could design an amazing mind. I was revitalized with the energy piece of architecture that hundreds of to eat my way through the remainder of people are waiting in line for. I am all for this trip; I was determined to get back ‘girl power’ and whatnot, but whether on the plate. In Rome, I discovered who this was designed by a male or female, I am and who I want to be. I started it is downright good. I consider this a here as a tourist, but ended my journey perfect building. It is sharp, and bold here as an architect. from the outside, creating its own architectural language while fitting its urban For me, personally, these elements of surroundings like a glove. Although the food, people, urban space and archimuseum was located outside the heart tecture with an underlying concept of of Rome, this suburban area had an layers was key to my comprehension of equally compelling fabric. Looking from the Italian lifestyle. I believe that I took 1

this trip at the most opportune moment in my education, the summer after my fourth year, and Comprehensive Studio. I feel like I received a better “comprehension” of architecture after traveling abroad than I have with any studio. I learned about the importance of people, culture, historical influence on new building types and the absolute necessity to integrate urban space in design. I now look at the world in an entirely new light. I feel like I am more culturally and architecturally aware of my surroundings. After being thrown into a completely unknown environment in which I did not know the language, I am now more confident and independent. I am trying to learn to live with less extravagant items, value my relationships more and take more time for myself. I make smaller, more frequent trips to the grocery store and don’t rely as much on my old fast food standby. I want to be closer to my family and friends and enjoy meals for hours on end with them. My passion and interest in people, art, fashion, architecture, and urban space is more intense now than ever. I ate up the Italian architecture, but didn’t take the urban spaces for granted; that is where I found the real delicacies of the city.

Krier, Rob. The Erosion of Urban Space in 20th Century Town Planning. pg 64-85.

All sketches done by Sally Schrum while in Italy. 33


TROOST Zone 1

Zone 3 34


WHO: Sally Schrum + 2 WHAT: A Masterplan for the Future WHEN: Spring 2011, Chapter 1: 2 months, Chapter 2: 2 months WHERE: Kansas City, Kansas HOW: Site Visit + Lectures + Research + Sketching + SketchUP + Illustrator + Indesign + Photoshop WHY The Troost Avenue area of Kansas City has been in rapid decline for many years. The goal for this project is to provide current and future community members with an affordable opportunity to age in place. A complete revitalization will welcome a diversity of people with varying levels of health, age and social stature. Three “large” zones, Healthy Living, Lifelong Learning and Commercial Living will be linked by “small” zones comprised of retail, cultural and recreational elements. Although focus is directed mostly toward the development of the Troost corridor, housing units can be found scattered throughout the neighborhood. A complete public transportation system in the area will guarantee a fluid movement between all areas of the newly restored community.

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Section No. 1

HOUSE HOUSE HOUSE HOUSE CAMPBELL STREET

HOUSE HARRISON STREET

CHURCH

GROCERY STORE TROOST AVENUE

FORREST AVENUE

Section No. 2

HOUSE CAMPBELL STREET

HOUSE

LOFTS LOFTS

HARRISON STREET

LOFTS GALLERY

HOUSE

TROOST AVENUE

COMMUNITY GARDEN FORREST AVENUE

Section No. 3

HOUSE CAMPBELL STREET

HARRISON STREET

SKILLED

LOFTS

DENTIST OFFICE

NURSING TROOST AVENUE

My health levels may decrease...but my way of life will not!

My friends and family love BOOM TROOST!

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HOUSE

HOUSE FORREST AVENUE


Zone 1

Zone 2

Zone 3

TRACY AVENUE

TRACY AVENUE

Assisted Living Facility Expanded Grocery Store Residential Housing Jewelry Store Pharmacy Cell Phone Store Flower Shop Fitness Center Clothing Store Fabric Store Hair Salon Bakery Church

Thrift Store Residential Housing Nail Salon Antique Shop Cash Advance Gas Station Candy Shop Community Outreach Hotel

Daycare Preschool Community Garden Farmers Market Indoor/Outdoor Trolley Stop Vistors Center Job Placement Center Technology Center Children’s Art Gallery Bank Cafe Library/Reading Room Bars

Restuarants Church Mosque Tax Service Two Car Dealerships Auto Repair Rent a Center Hair and Nail Salon Construcion Co. Preschool Dry Cleaning Residential Housing

Skilled Nursing Facility Residential Housing Dentist Eye Doctor Chiropractor Health Clinic Reservable Rec Rooms Theatre Physical Therapy Medical Supply Store Fitness Center Two Fast Food Restuarants

Pharmacy Hardware Store Auto Repair Electrical Supply Car Dealership Residential Housing Historic Firehouse Christian Fellowship

THE PASEO

EAST 36TH STREET

VIRGINIA AVENUE

TRACY AVENUE

TROOST AVENUE

Everything I need is right here!

HARRISON STREET

CHARLOTTE STREET

CAMPBELL STREET

TRACY AVENUE

ris

on

EAST 37TH STREET

H

ar

EAST 38TH STREET

im

he

an

M

EAST 39TH STREET

HOLMES STREET

KENWOOD AVENUE

d

oa

R

Section No. 1

EAST 40TH STREET

EAST 41ST STREET

East 42nd Street

Section No. 2 East 43rd Street

East 44th Street

Gil

lha

m

Ro

ad

East 45th Street

Section No. 3 Brush Creek

Zone 3

Master Site Plan

Emanuel Cleaver II

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Until we meet again.


Contact

Sally Schrum

3466 McMullin School Road De Soto, Missouri 63020 schrumsr@gmail.com 636.208.8061

Education

Work Experience

School of Architecture, Design + Planning Lawrence, Kansas (2006-2011) Master of Architecture

Odile Decq Benoit Cornette Architectes Urbanistes Paris, France (Fall 2010) Intern

University of Kansas

L’Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture Paris, France (Fall 2010)

Architecture in Italy

Reading the City-Exploring the Civic Realm Italy (Summer 2010)

De Soto Senior High School De Soto, Missouri (2002-2006)

Computer Skills

ODBC

La Defense Tower (Paris, France) Completed sustainability diagrams and initial facade pattern diagrams for schematic design phase of international tower competition in La Defense district of Paris. Pentania Housing Development (Lille, France) Completed reworkings of elevations, sections, and floor plans of large scale housing complex (five apartment towers + five quadplexes + landscaping) in Lille, France. Configured skewed roof plane geometries of quadplexes through physical models and 3D computer modeling. Additionally confiugred most economic facade paneling system for apartments, window sizing/placement for quadplexes through conceptual handsketching and computer modeling.

Adobe Acrobat Professional Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe Indesign ArcGIS Autodesk AutoCAD Autodesk Revit Google Sketch-Up Graphisoft ArchiCAD Kerkythea MAC + PC Operating Systems Microsoft Office Vray for SketchUp

University of Kansas

Additional Skills

Membership + Awards

35mm Photography + Darkroom Experience Drawing (Freehand Sketching + Drafting) Physical Model Building French Language Wood Shop Certification (2006-2011)

Murphy Art + Architecture Library Lawrence, Kansas (2006-2011) Lead Student Assistant Front desk attendee, assisted patrons with simple tasks to more in depth research questions, processed new books, reshelved books, scanned for interlibrary loan requests, completed special projects under supervision of head librarian, assisted in training of new students, member of Summer 2011 search committee for new Student Supervisor position, took phonecalls, assisted patrons with simple computer tasks (scanning, Adobe Suite, printing), searched for lost books, etc.

American Institute of Architecture Students dosomething.org Disaster Grant Recipient Freshman Honors Scholarship Millenium Development Goals Organization Mount Oread Scholars Program Tau Sigma Delta Architecture Honorary Society

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Sally Schrum Architecture Portfolio