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Sixth Form Course Information Guide


A levels Art and Design

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Biology

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Business Studies

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Chemistry

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Computing

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Dance

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Drama and Theatre Studies

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Economics

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English Literature

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Fashion and Textiles

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Film Studies

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French

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Further Mathematics

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Geography

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German

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History

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ICT

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Mathematics

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Music

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Music Technology

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PE

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Philosophy and Ethics

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Photography

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Physics

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Psychology

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Spanish

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Level 2 Progression Programme BTEC Level 2 First Certificate in Business

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BTEC Level 2 First Certificate in ICT

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Welcome Choosing what to study after Year 11 is one of the most important decisions you will make. Get it right and your time in the sixth form will prepare you successfully for the next stage in life’s journey. Our curriculum offers a huge range of possibilities and has been designed to give you the opportunity to specialise or to retain a breadth of choice. Use the information contained within this guide to assist you with your decision making. I am confident that if you choose wisely you will be well prepared to access the best universities, high quality employment and the best apprenticeships.

Mr S Victory, Head of Sixth Form

A brief summary of our courses A Levels We will be offering 26 different subjects to study at A level. We expect the majority of students in Year 12 will begin by studying four AS levels, although a few might choose three and some will choose five. In Year 13 most students will continue with three of their subjects to A2 level. Entry requirements 5 A*-C GCSE passes including English and Mathematics plus individual subject requirements (see subject pages for these). Level 2 Progression Programme This is a one year course for those students who would benefit from an extra period of time at Teddington. This package of Level 2 courses includes two BTEC First Certificates, one in Business and another in Information & Creative Technology, and for those who need them, resits of GCSE English and Mathematics. Successful completion of this programme will equip you to progress on to another Level 2 or Level 3 vocational or academic course, an apprenticeship or employment. Entry requirements 5 GCSE passes (with at least two at grade D) plus an interest in, and commitment to, the course.

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Guidance on choosing your courses With such a wide range of courses to choose from, selecting the most appropriate combinations to study can be a difficult task. Ensure this is an informed decision by carefully researching the different courses we have on offer. As a starting point, take a moment to consider the questions below. I then urge you to read through the individual subject pages contained in this document and discuss possible options with your parents, other family members and friends. We will also be here to help you with your decision making, so please speak with subject staff, your form tutor and myself for further information, advice and guidance. To help ensure you select the most appropriate programme of study, please note, everyone who applies to join Teddington Sixth Form will be invited to attend a guidance interview with a member of the School Leadership Team.

Which subjects really interest you? This is important because you will be studying them for the next two years and you will need to be motivated to consistently deliver your best efforts. Which subjects are you good at? Since this will increase your chances of success. This is crucial as access to the best universities and the best employment opportunities are becoming increasingly competitive. Which subjects are you qualified to study? Identify whether you meet the course entry requirements by looking at each subject guide. Are there any new subjects which sound interesting (e.g. Psychology, Economics)? If so, talk to subject staff and carry out further research into what each subject involves. Which subjects fit well together? Some combinations naturally work well together, e.g Maths and Sciences; History and English Literature; Art, Drama and Photography. However, you may prefer a more broad and balanced choice of subjects to keep your options open. If you are unsure ask for advice. Do you have a particular career in mind? If so, research which qualifications you might need in the future and therefore what subjects you need to study in the sixth form. Is there a particular course or university you would like to attend? Research which subjects and grades you are likely to need. Look at university websites, ucas.com, or speak with me or university admissions officers to find relevant information. Some of the more selective universities (in The Russell Group) are quite specific about the subjects you need to study at A level. Read the section opposite for further guidance. Which subjects will best keep your options open? Many students at your age are uncertain about what they want to do in the future. The information opposite gives further guidance on which subjects to choose to keep your options open.

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A level choices and university applications Your choice of A level subjects can have a significant impact on the course options available at university. You therefore need to be aware of the likely entry requirements you will face in the future, in terms of both the grades you need to achieve and the actual subjects you study. With the steady increase in top grades achieved at A level over the past five years, many universities have become more specific about the qualifications they expect of their applicants. If you have already decided on a university course, I recommend that you examine the requirements at a number of universities before you finalise your choices, to ensure that your A levels are suitable for your application If you are still undecided, I advise you to select subjects which maximise your potential course choice. Certain subjects are considered either essential or useful for a number of degree courses, so choosing one or more of these will help you keep your higher education options open. Take a look at the Russell Group’s ‘Informed Choices’ guidance booklet, which advises on the best subject combinations for a wide range of courses at the UK’s top universities. It also has a list of ‘facilitating subjects’ which are highly regarded and will keep your options open for entry at these institutions. Students aspiring to study at a Russell Group University should look to study at least 2 facilitating subjects. These are: Mathematics, Further Mathematics, English Literature, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Geography, History and Languages. ‘The Informed Choices’ document can be downloaded from the Teddington Sixth Form website or by visiting: http://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/media/informed-choices/ InformedChoices-latest.pdf The guidance above is given because those universities offering the more traditional, ‘academic’ degree courses (ie. many of the Russell Group ones) are more demanding than others in what they expect of their applicants. Cambridge has gone furthest in this respect, publishing very clear guidance on its entrance requirements and even going so far as to identify subjects that, in its view, ‘do not provide a good preparation for the courses that the University of Cambridge offers.’ Full information can be found at: http://www.cam.ac.uk/ admissions/undergraduate/requirements/#course Cambridge has taken this very public lead in its attempt to distinguish between the growing number of Grade A applicants, but increasingly other universities that offer the most competitive theoretical, exam-based degrees are also placing a greater emphasis on grades achieved in ‘academic’ A level subjects. For example: Law at Manchester has two lists of subjects that are either not suitable or ‘less preferred’, Government at LSE prefers ‘at least two traditional academic subjects’ and Oxford publishes a table of ‘Essential’, ‘Recommended’ and ‘Helpful’ A level subjects for all of its degree courses: http://www. admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/enreq.shtml#tab For those considering Medicine, for example, A level Chemistry is essential, along with one or two subjects from Biology, Physics and Maths, but the admissions criteria for each Medical School vary and need to be checked individually. Some prefer a contrasting ‘nonscientific’ subject at AS level. In conclusion, as universities are more transparent about what they are looking for, applicants need to make sure that they are better informed at an earlier stage when making their A level choices. To assist you, lots of information can be found on university websites or through UCAS (www.ucas.com). Alternatively there are a number of independent guides (eg Brian Heap’s, ‘The Essential Guide to Winning Your Place At University’) available. Mr S Victory

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‘After seeing the plans for the Sixth Form Centre I believe it will provide a great learning experience for both students and staff. I am very much looking forward to starting here in September 2014.’ Ben Nossiter

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Art and Design Edexcel Specification AS (6AD01/6AD02), A2 (6AD03/6AD04) Are you passionate about art and keen to develop your artistic skills? Do you enjoy visiting galleries to stimulate your creativity? Are you interested in the work of traditional and contemporary artists? If so, this course will help fire your imagination and give you the confidence to work independently, to present your ideas in fulfilling and confident ways, and allow you to progress as a creative art practitioner. If you are committed, imaginative, and have the determination to work hard independently, then A level Art is for you. Overview At AS you will develop your expressive skills using a range of media, new techniques and technologies, gaining an understanding of the possibilities within contemporary visual arts. Contextual studies will enhance your critical thinking and understanding of concepts within artistic practice. At A2 you will develop your personal identity as an artist by following your interests and determining your areas of research. You will complete ambitious projects and engage in focused research to further your understanding and help you to create more sophisticated and successful work. Course structure AS Unit 1 Personal Project Unit 2 Externally Set Assignment

A2 Unit 3 Personal Project Unit 4 Externally Set Assignment

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Coursework portfolio. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Controlled 8 hr assignment and supporting studies. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Extended project. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Controlled 12 hr assignment and supporting studies. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grade in one of Art, Photography, Textiles or Graphics and a portfolio of relevant work Where next with this course? The traditional route for art based students is progression on to an Art Foundation course or to university to study a degree in an Art & Design related subject. However, Art has a number of transferable skills and it is therefore a recognised qualification for entry onto a wide range of other degree courses. Potential career options are many and varied and can include all aspects of Design, Illustration, Animation & Film, Advertising, Architecture, Magazine Layout, Styling, Theatre Design, Interior Design, Conservation, Visual Communication, Curator, Museum Work, Art Therapy, Teaching & Lecturing and being a Fine Artist. For further information contact Mrs White: dwhite@teddingtonschool.org

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Biology AQA Specification 1411/2411 One of the most exciting and fastest moving areas in science today, Biology touches the lives of everyone and offers solutions to many of the world’s problems: disease, food scarcity, infertility, conservation and pollution. Challenging, but exciting, A level Biology is the study of life, past, present and future. If you have a passion for studying those topics which are regularly discussed in the news, then A level Biology might be for you. Overview At AS you will develop your understanding of disease by studying pathogens, cellular biology, immunity and structures such as the heart and lungs. You will also study genetics and further your understanding of DNA, cell division and the causes of genetic variation. At A2 you will consider how energy is transferred and chemical elements recycled through living organisms and the environment by studying photosynthesis, respiration, energy transfer and population size. You will also develop your ideas on control in cells and organisms by studying coordination and response, protein synthesis (transcription and translation) and gene cloning and transfer. Throughout AS and A2, the topics studied will be related to real-life applications, with an emphasis on the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Course structure AS Unit 1 Biology and Disease Unit 2 The Variety of Living Organisms Unit 3 Investigative and Practical Skills

A2 Unit 4 Populations & Environment Unit 5 Control in Cells and in Organisms Unit 6 Investigative and Practical Skills

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Written paper, 1 hr 15. Worth 33.3% of AS / 16.7% of A level Written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 46.7% of AS / 23.3% of A level ISA Coursework – controlled assessment within the classroom. Worth 20% of AS / 10% of A level

A2 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6

Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 16.7% of A level Written paper, 2 hr 15. Worth 23.3 % of A level ISA Coursework – controlled assessment within the classroom. Worth 10% of A level

Entry requirements B grade in Biology (if triple science) or B in both Core & Additional Science. Where next with this course? A level Biology is well respected by all universities. Whilst many who take it progress on to courses in Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy and Pharmacy, Biology also offers access to courses and careers in Biochemistry, Marine Biology, Biomedical Engineering and Forensic Science. For more ideas have a look at http://tinyurl.com/5tt5hqo, as the list is endless. For further information contact Miss Waight: awaight@teddingtonschool.org

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Business Studies AQA Specification 1131/2131 The UK’s wealth and influence in the world has been built upon the success of its businesses. Led by entrepreneurs such as Alan Sugar and Richard Branson, the business world becomes a reality for us all when we leave full time education. Do you enjoy programmes like The Apprentice and Dragons Den, and have a keen interest in current affairs and the business world? Will you enjoy generating creative solutions to the problems faced by businesses? If so, then A level Business Studies is for you. Overview At AS you will look at the challenges faced by entrepreneurs when starting a business. This will provide a focus on marketing and various aspects of financial planning such as break even analysis, cash flow forecasting and budgeting. You will then consider how successful decision making in established businesses can improve performance. At A2 you study how key staff measure the performance of larger businesses and investigate the strategies which can be adopted to improve their efficiency. You will look at the financial accounts of large companies and consider how external factors can influence decisions which are taken. You will also consider how businesses attempt to plan for and manage the changes they face and how leadership style and corporate culture can influence their ability to respond to such changes. Course structure AS Unit 1 Planning and Financing a New Business Unit 2 Managing a Business

A2 Unit 3 Strategies for Success Unit 4 The Business Environment and Change

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 15. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 25% of A level Unit 4 Written paper (synoptic), 1 hr 45. Worth 25% of A level Entry requirements C grade in Business Studies (if taken) or BC / CB in English and Mathematics if not. Where next with this course? The varied nature of the course and the analytical and evaluative skills gained will equip you well for university and employment. Many students progress to university to study a degree in Business or a related subject such as Marketing, Finance, Accounting or Economics, although the knowledge and skills gained are relevant to a wide range of subject areas. In respect of employment, you will be well prepared to enter the world of Finance, Accountancy and Banking, or for various management roles in companies. Alternatively you could choose to start a business. For further information contact Mr Victory: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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Chemistry AQA Specification 1421/2421 No matter how the world changes in the 21st century Chemistry will always be at the centre of science and help you understand the world around you. Chemistry is everywhere and without it we would not have drugs, plastics, fuels, perfumes, fireworks or spacecraft! Our exciting and stimulating programme will allow you to develop your knowledge and understanding of this key science and provide you with a range of laboratory skills that will enable you to progress as a confident young scientist at university level and beyond. Overview At AS you will use ideas about atomic structure, bonding and the Periodic Table to develop your understanding of a range of chemical reactions, including the reactions of acids and bases and Group (II) and Group (VII) elements. You will then study aspects of organic chemistry, energetics and reaction rates. You will also study the mole concept as the focus of quantitative analysis, whilst qualitative work will centre on basic chemical tests and modern instrumental techniques. At A2 you will continue to develop your understanding of organic chemistry through the study of more complex molecules, including those based on ring structures. There will be an increasing emphasis on chemical synthesis. Work on reaction rates, energetics, pH and chemical equilibria will become more quantitative in nature. You will be introduced to the chemistry of the transition metals and will study more advanced analytical techniques such as n.m.r. Throughout AS and A2 the topics studied will be related to real-life applications, with an emphasis on the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills. Course structure AS Unit 1 Foundation in Chemistry Unit 2 Chemistry in Action Unit 3 Investigative and Practical Skills

A2 Unit 4 Kinetics, Equilbria & Organic Chemistry Unit 5 Energetics, Redox & Inorganic Chemistry Unit 6 Investigative and Practical skills

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Written paper, 1 hr 15. Worth 33.3% of AS / 16.7% of A level Written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 46.7% of AS / 23.3% of A level ISA Coursework – controlled assessment within the classroom. Worth 20% of AS / 10% of A level

A2 Unit 4 Written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 20% of A level Unit 5 Written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 20% of A level Unit 6 ISA Coursework – controlled assessment within the classroom. Worth 10% of A level Entry requirements B grade in Chemistry (if triple) or B in both Core and Additional Science. Where next with this course? The demand for people with qualifications in Chemistry is high. On the list of preferred subjects published by the Russell Group of universities and well respected by employers, A level Chemistry prepares students well for a wide range of diverse courses/careers (see http://www. rsc.org/Education/SchoolStudents/careers.asp). Essential for courses in Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Optometry, Biochemistry and the Chemical, Biological, Food or Forensic Sciences, many students seek careers in the Science and Health sectors. However, it also supports entrance to Law, Accountancy, Journalism, Finance & Teaching. For further information contact Mrs Walshe: mwalshe@teddingtonschool.org

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Computing OCR Specification H047/H447 May be taught at Orleans Park through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership Do you enjoy using computers? Do you have an interest in technology and programming? Will you enjoy learning about computer applications? Do you like solving problems? If so, then this may be the course for you. A level Computing is challenging, but in a good way! It will enable you to develop the capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. Whatever your future, A level Computing is a worthwhile qualification to have. Overview At AS you will gain an appreciation of computing fundamentals, including hardware, software, the presentation, structure and management of data, how data is transmitted and networked, the life cycle of systems development, the characteristics of information systems, and the implications of computer use. You will then look at designing solutions to problems and learn how procedural programs are structured, the types of data and data structures, the common facilities of procedural languages, how to write maintainable programs, and how to test and run solutions. At A2 you will get to understand the function of operating systems, the function and purpose of translators, how computer architectures are structured, how data is represented, structured and manipulated, high level language programming paradigms, low level languages and how databases function. Through the coursework element you will gain an understanding of definition, investigation and analysis, system design, software development and testing, documentation, evaluation and how to produce written reports covering these topics. Course structure AS Unit 1 Computer Fundamentals Unit 2 Programming Techniques & Logical Methods

A2 Unit 3 Advanced Computing Theory Unit 4 Computing Project

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 50% AS / 25% A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 50% AS / 25% A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2hrs. Worth 30% A level Unit 4 Coursework. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grades in English and Mathematics. Where next with this course? A level Computing provides an excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue further studies or careers in the IT sector. Specific degree courses range from Computer Science to Computing or Computer Studies, but many students choose to study Mathematics, Engineering, Economics and the Sciences. Opportunities in the work place might include Systems Analysis, Design, Programming, Testing or Maintenance and Support, Network Analysis or Network Administration. For further information contact Mr Cowling: dcowling@orleanspark.richmond.sch.uk

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Dance AQA Specification 1231/2231 To be taught at RUTC through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership If you are passionate about dance then you will love this subject. The course fosters imagination and creativity as well as promoting your social and personal development. Whilst keeping you fit and building your confidence, this dynamic course uses choreographic concepts to develop original dance works that are both challenging and fulfilling. Overview At AS you focus on the development of your own choreography and performance within a duo or a trio. You will learn contemporary technique, the health and safety of the dancer, the dancer in action and dance composition. You will begin to develop critical skills for the analysis of choreography and performance within your own work and the work of professional choreographers, dancers and companies. At A2 the focus of choreography shifts towards choreographing a group dance and the skills and knowledge needed to successfully achieve this. You will develop your knowledge and understanding of a variety of techniques such as modern dance, ballet and jazz dance. Performance skills will also be developed in relation to a specific practitioner from one of the learnt techniques. You will also study a specific choreographic period of time and one set professional work to analyse, evaluate and discuss in a theoretical way. Course structure AS Unit 1 Understanding Dance Unit 2 Choreography & Performance

A2 Unit 3 Dance Appreciation; Content & Context Unit 4 Group Choreography & Solo Performance

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level. Unit 2 Practical moderation: solo choreography and performance, performance in a duo/trio. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 25% of A level Unit 4 Practical examination: group choreography and solo performance. Worth 25% of A Level Entry requirements C grade in Dance (if taken) or BC / CB in English and Mathematics if not. Where next with this course? A level Dance provides a useful foundation for degree courses in a wide variety of subjects including: Dance, Drama, Performing Arts, Theatre Studies, or in any course requiring good communication and team work skills. It provides a good background for a large number of careers such as: Dancer, Choreographer, Teacher, Freelance Dance Artist, Arts and Event Management or for those considering employment in Sport or Physical Education. For further information contact Mr Victory: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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Drama and Theatre Studies Edexcel Specification 8DR01/9DR01 Are you captivated by visits to the theatre? Do you love to perform in front of an audience? Do you enjoy exploring texts and have a great imagination? Do you have the creative flair to work as part of a team, leadership skills and the ability to self-manage? If the answer is yes to some of these questions then you should seriously consider A level Drama and Theatre Studies. This course is designed to encourage you to: explore the world through theatre, understand how theatre can be used to make meaning, engage in the creation of theatre, share your view of the world with different audiences, experience as much theatre as possible. Overview At AS you are required to analyse plays in a variety of ways so you become familiar with how written plays can be interpreted for realisation in performance. You will then have the opportunity to demonstrate skills in a performance environment through a monologue/duologue and a contribution to a full play text to an invited audience. The knowledge and understanding gained during the study of two plays in the first part of the course can be applied with a view to delivering a performance to an audience. At A2 you will be required to create a unique and original piece of theatre through a devising process. The knowledge and understanding gained in the AS units can now be applied to a created production. You will be assessed on both the process of creation and the finished product in the form of a performance to an invited audience. Course structure AS Unit 1 Exploration of Drama and Theatre Unit 2 Theatre Text in Performance

A2 Unit 3 Exploration of a Dramatic Performance Unit 4 Theatre Text in Context

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Unit 2

Internally assessed practical exploration with supporting written notes. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level Scripted practical performance to an external examiner. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level

A2 Unit 3 Internally assessed performance with supporting written evaluation. Worth 20% of A level Unit 4 Written Paper, 2 hrs 30. Worth 30% of A level Entry requirements B grade in Drama (if taken) or B in English if not. Where next with this course? Many people who study this subject progress to a degree course in Drama or Performing Arts, although it can provide an excellent foundation for an English degree due to the level of textual analysis required. In terms of careers, the subject is most useful for those looking to work in Film, Television, Performing Arts, Arts Administration, Journalism, and Teaching. Those who want a career in the management of others will also benefit from having taken this course. For further information Ms Sarson: ksarson@teddingtonschool.org

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Economics Edexcel Specification 8EC01/9EC01 How will the UK be affected if Greece and Spain are forced to quit the euro? Should we be spending money on hospitals or the armed forces? How should we reduce the level of UK debt? Should the wealthy be paying higher taxes? Why do footballers earn up to £200,000 per week and qualified nurses only £25,000 per year? Should we adopt minimum pricing on alcohol? How can we reduce traffic congestion? How will the continued growth of China and India affect UK citizens? Economics touches every aspect of people’s daily lives. It is continually discussed in the newspapers and on television. If these type of questions intrigue you then A level Economics awaits. Overview At AS you will be introduced to the nature of economics. Every society has to make decisions about how to use its limited resources and you will begin by studying how these decisions are made by individuals, firms and governments. You will examine how markets operate, analyse why sometimes they fail and look at possible solutions (microeconomics). You will then study how the UK economy operates and explore the main objectives and instruments of government economic policy (macroeconomics). Here you will study topics such as Economic Growth, Inflation and Unemployment and investigate how the government can control the level of these with the use of instruments such as interest rates, taxation and government spending. At A2 you will examine how the pricing and nature of competition between firms is affected by the number and size of market participants. You will study the classic economic models of Perfect Competition, Monopoly and Oligopoly and investigate the role government plays in promoting competitive markets. You will then look at the economics of globalisation: its causes and effects, why nation’s trade, and the interrelationships between the developed and developing nations. Course structure AS Unit 1 Competitive Markets: How they work and why they fail Unit 2 Managing the Economy

A2 Unit 3 Business Economics and Economic Efficiency Unit 4 The Global Economy

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 50% of AS / 25% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 50% of AS / 25% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 20% of A level Unit 4 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 30% of A level Entry requirements B grade in Mathematics. Where next with this course? Since A level Economics requires students to analyse complex data, develop problem solving skills and construct arguments, it is highly regarded by universities. Many students progress on to degree courses in Economics, Business, Management Science or Politics, with approximately half of Economics graduates going on to careers in Accountancy, Banking and Finance. However, it also equips students well for a career in Marketing, Law, Journalism or Management. For further information contact Mr Victory: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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English Literature AQA Specification B 1746/2746 Do you have a love of reading and a genuine interest in English literature? Do you enjoy discussing the books you have read and the ideas they raise? Would you enjoy exploring the texts independently? If so, then this course will inspire you. Ideal for those people who want to learn how to read more thoughtfully and critically and write more stylishly and fluently, A level English Literature will provide you with a rewarding challenge and an immense amount of satisfaction. Overview At AS you will begin by exploring the central position of narrative in the ways in which literary texts work. You will study many different aspects of literary representation, with particular focus on how narratives are constructed by authors, and the different ways in which they can be responded to by readers. You will then explore aspects of genre, currently the dramatic genre. You will also explore ideas, structures and characters in comedy. Finally, you will address the compulsory requirement by studying at least one Shakespeare play. At A2 you will develop ideas on the significance of genre which have been established during the AS course. Texts will be grouped within two broad categories: Elements of the Gothic and Elements of the Pastoral. Individual texts will be explored and evaluated against some of the commonly accepted principles of the chosen genre, and three texts (or more) will be compared as representatives of that genre. You will then be involved in the study of a wide range of texts, some of which will be of your own choosing. You will also be introduced to different ways of reading texts for study, including independently and explore some critical ideas, and for these ideas to be applied with discrimination to literary texts. Course structure AS Unit 1 Aspects of Narrative Unit 2 Dramatic Genres

A2 Unit 3 Texts and Genres Unit 4 Further and Independent Reading

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Two pieces of Coursework, 1200-1500 words. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Two pieces of Coursework, 1200-1500 words. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements BC / CB grades in English Literature and English Language. Where next with this course? The study of English Literature is great for encouraging people to think for themselves and to be analytical in their responses. This might explain why it is on the list of preferred subjects published by the Russell Group of universities. Whilst it leads naturally to a degree in English Literature, it is also highly regarded for courses in Law and History. It also prepares students well for a wide range of careers such as Journalism, Law, Publishing, Media, Teaching and the Civil Service. For further information see: http://www.rsc.org/Education/SchoolStudents/careers.asp For further information contact Mrs Yarker: hyarker@teddingtonschool.org

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Fashion and Textiles OCR Specification H160/H560 To be taught at Waldegrave through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership Do you have dreams of making your own clothes and accessories or developing a fashion line of your own? Do you have a creative flair? Whether you are designing dresses or editing a fashion spread for next season’s latest trends, the study of fashion and textiles tells the story of who we are through the clothes we wear. If you have a passion for fashion, an artistic mind and can visualise your ideas then this is the course for you. The most important attribute is a love of creativity, experimentation and a desire to spend hours making things. Overview Throughout the course you will learn the whole design process from researching a theme through to creating fashion illustrations, making your own paper patterns, experimenting with a huge variety of surface decoration techniques and then on to completing a finished garment. You will learn to use pattern, scale and drape and experiment with techniques such as printing, batik, silk painting appliquÊ, fabric manipulation, and embroidery. You will use photography, computer generated design and equipment such as heat guns and soldering irons to create exciting textures, shapes and patterns. Course structure AS Unit 1 Coursework Portfolio Unit 2 Controlled Assignment

A2 Unit 3 Personal Investigation Unit 4 Controlled Assignment

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Portfolio of work. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Early release question paper for preparation plus 5 hrs controlled time. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Project plus personal study of 1000-3000 words. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Early release question for preparation paper plus 15 hrs controlled time. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grade in either Art, Photography, Textiles or Graphics. Where next with this course? You can progress on to an Art Foundation course before choosing to study a related arts degree. Alternatively, you can choose to study a Fashion or Textiles related degree straight from A level study. Potential careers are many and varied including: Fashion Design, Textile Design, Marketing, Retail Management, Print Design, Costume Design, Fashion Buyer, Fashion Journalism or Teaching. For further information contact Mrs Page: info@waldegrave.org.uk

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Film Studies WJEC Specification 2181/3181 Are you interested in films and the way they are made? Would you like to learn more about the language of film, the film industry and its history and development? If you love visiting the cinema, watching films at home and following developments in the film industry, then A level Film Studies could be for you. Overview At AS you will develop as an informed, independent film watcher. You will study a variety of genres and eras of film both independently and in lessons to improve your critical response to film. You will also consider how audiences’ responses are shaped by the context, by directors’ choices and by other audiences’ critical interpretations. At A2 you will be expected to put learning into practice to create your own short film, reflecting and exploring the directorial and narrative styles of established film makers. You will also develop your research skills to explore an aspect of a film of your choice. An examination into World Cinema topics and Documentary, as well as a close critical reading into the psychological and philosophical responses to a film will develop your critical awareness and analytical style. Course structure AS Unit 1 Exploring Film Form Unit 2 British and American Film/Audiences and Producers

A2 Unit 3 Film Research and Creative Projects Unit 4 Varieties of Film Experience – Issues and Debates

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Coursework: two pieces. One of 1500 words, the other a project. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 2hr 30. Worth 60% of AS / 30% A level A2 Unit 3 A research project on a film of your choice. Worth 25% of A level. Unit 4 Written paper, 2hr 45. Worth 25% of A level. Entry requirements C grade in English. Where next with this course? Film Studies is a rapidly growing subject and becoming more widely accepted as an academic discipline. Whilst many students will go on to study Film/Media at degree level, the subject is regarded as an acceptable entrance qualification for other degree courses as it develops skills in research, analysis and creative production. In respect of employment, A level Film Studies will help access a career in Film Production, Television and Media. For further information contact Mr Robinson jrobinson@teddingtonschool.org or Mr Murray nmurray@teddingtonschool.org

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French AQA Specification 1651/2651 The ability to speak a foreign language is fast becoming an essential life skill as we play an increasing part in the European Union and travel further afield in our work, education and leisure. If you are interested in learning more about the language, culture, and history of the French speaking world and want to enhance your career opportunities, then A level French is for you. Overview At A level, you build on your linguistic level from GCSE. The course concentrates on developing oral fluency and conversation skills through the study of a range of stimulating topics with contemporary, literary and cultural content. At AS these topics include: Media (TV, advertising and communication technology), Popular Culture (cinema, music, fashion/trends), Healthy Living/Lifestyle (sport/exercise, health and wellbeing, holidays) and Family/Relationships (relationships within the family, friendships, marriage/ partnerships). At A2 the topics for study include: Environment (pollution, energy, protecting the planet), The Multicultural Society (immigration, integration, racism), Contemporary Social Issues (wealth and poverty, law and order, impact of scientific and technological progress) and Cultural Topics (two from the following: a period of 20th century French history, a French author, either dramatist or poet, a director, architect, musician or painter). You will also undertake translation tasks to aid grammatical knowledge. Course structure AS Unit 1 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 2 Speaking

A2 Unit 3 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 4 Speaking

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 70% of AS / 35% of A level. Questions based on 5 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 2 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level. A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hr 30. Worth 35% of A level. Questions based on 6 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 4 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 15% of A level. Entry requirements B grade in French. Where next with this course? A level French is on the list of facilitating subjects published by the Russell Group of universities. This gives you lots of flexibility in respect of Higher Education course choices. Although many people progress to university to study a degree in Languages or Linguistics, there are a wide range of courses where a language can be combined with other subjects such as Business, Law, Economics, Marketing and International Relations. Study at this level will usually combine time spent studying or working abroad. These courses prepare students well for a wide range of diverse careers ranging from Translator to Accountant. See:http://www.languageswork.org.uk/ career_choices.aspx and http://www.whystudylanguages.ac.uk/post16/why_languages For further information contact Ms Green: sgreen@teddingtonschool.org

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Further Mathematics Edexcel Specification 8372/9372 If you genuinely love Mathematics and get a bit of a thrill out of solving mathematical problems then this course might be for you. Taken alongside A level Mathematics (leading to two separate A levels) it is not an easy qualification to achieve, however, you will find it rewarding if you enjoy abstract Maths and are interested in seeing ‘just how deep the rabbit hole goes’. If you are considering Further Mathematics then you should speak with Mr Jacobs or Mr Mahay to see if they think it is a suitable course for you. Overview To achieve an A level in Further Mathematics, you must study six modules which have not already been used for your Mathematics A level. These six modules must consist of Further Pure 1 and either Further Pure 2 or Further Pure 3 along with any other four modules. In Further Pure 1 you will study: series, complex numbers, numerical solution of equations, coordinate systems, matrix algebra, proof. In Decision 1 you will cover: algorithms, algorithms on graphs, the route inspection problem, critical path analysis, linear programming. In Decision 2 you will study: transportation problems, allocation (assignment) problems, the travelling salesman, game theory, further linear programming, dynamic programming, flows in networks. In Further Pure 2 you will study: inequalities, series, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, further complex numbers, Maclaurin and Taylor series. In Statistics 2: The Binomial and Poisson distributions, continuous random variables, continuous distributions, samples, hypothesis tests. In Mechanics 2 you will study: kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane, centres of mass, work and energy, collisions, static’s of rigid bodies. Course structure AS Unit 1 Decision 1 Unit 2 Decision 2 Unit 3 Further Pure 1

A2 Unit 4 Statistics 2 Unit 5 Further Pure 2 Unit 6 Mechanics 2

Please note the specific modules chosen or the order in which they are taught may be subject to change

Course assessment AS Unit 1 - 3 Written papers, calculator, 1hr 30. Worth 33.3% of AS / 16.67% of A2 A2 Unit 4 - 6 Written papers, calculator, 1hr 30. Worth 16.67% of A2 Entry requirements Strong A grade in Mathematics. Also speak with Mr Jacobs or Mr Mahay to check your suitability for this course. Where next with this course? A level Further Mathematics provides a strong foundation for all university courses which have a significant mathematical content. It is also becoming an essential (or highly desirable) A level to have if you intend to undertake further study of Mathematics, Engineering, Physics or Computer Science (and even Economics and the Natural Sciences) at the best universities. You therefore need to check subject entry requirements carefully with individual universities before making your final A level course choices. In respect of careers, for those with a degree in Mathematics there are lots of opportunities, including Scientific Research, Actuarial Work, Investment Banking, Accountancy and Computing. For further information contact Mr Mahay: @kmahay@teddingtonschool.org or Mr Jacobs: mjacobs@teddingtonschool.org

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Geography AQA Specification 1031/2031 Do you have a genuine interest in the world around you and want to find out more about topical issues in the news like flooding, population growth, poverty, fair trade, globalisation, climate change and coastal management? Are you interested in rural and urban landscapes, how they are formed and how they relate to mankind? Do you want to be able to relate theory to the real world and help develop as a true global citizen? The world we live in is changing. If you want to discover more about it then A level Geography could be for you. Overview At AS you will study two core geographical concepts (Rivers, Floods & Management, and Population Change) along with contrasting themes of contemporary or environmental impact, management and sustainability. One optional unit of Physical Geography will be studied from a choice from Cold Environments, Coastal Environments and Hot Desert Environments, with a Human unit chosen from Food Supply Issues, Energy Issues and Health issues. Throughout the course you also will develop a variety of key geographical (investigative, cartographic, graphical, ICT and statistical) and fieldwork skills. At A2 you will consider a range of contemporary Physical geographical issues: Plate Tectonics & Associated Hazards, Weather & Climate and Associated Hazards, and Ecosystems: Change & Challenge. You will then investigate Human issues such as: World Cities, Development & Globalisation and Contemporary Conflicts & Challenges. Course structure AS Unit 1 Physical and Human Geography Unit 2 Geographical Skills

A2 Unit 3 Contemporary Geographical Issues Unit 4 Geography Fieldwork Investigation or Geographical Issue Evaluation

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 70% of AS, 35% of A level Unit 2 Geographical skills written paper, 1 hr, based on the content of Unit 1. Worth 30% of AS, 15% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hrs 30. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements C grade from Higher Paper. Where next with this course? A level Geography is a broad based academic subject which opens up lots of options in the future. Both employers and universities see Geography as a robust academic subject rich in skills, knowledge and understanding. As a subject linking the arts and the sciences it is highly flexible. Geography provides a useful foundation for degree courses in a wide variety of subjects including, Geography, Geology, Oceanography, Law and Sociology. The range of career areas accessed by graduates of Geography may surprise you. Since geographers work in such a wide range of sectors and roles it is true to say that there is no such thing as a Geography job, there are jobs that geographers do. These include careers in Planning, Meteorology, Oceanography, Travel & Tourism, Environmental Management, Teaching, The Forces and Journalism. Statistics for employability consistently show that Geography graduates are highly employable with a recent HECSU report highlighting they experience some of the lowest rates of graduate unemployment.

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For further information contact Mrs McAteer: lmcateer@teddingtonschool.org


German AQA Specification 1661/2611 May be taught at Orleans Park through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership The ability to speak a foreign language is fast becoming an essential life skill as we play an increasing part in the European Union and travel further afield in our work, education and leisure. If you are interested in learning more about the language, culture, and history of the German speaking world and want to enhance your career opportunities, then A level German is for you. Overview At A level, you build on your linguistic level from GCSE. The course concentrates on developing oral fluency and conversation skills through the study of a range of stimulating topics with contemporary, literary and cultural content. At AS these topics include: Media (TV, advertising and communication technology), Popular Culture (cinema, music, fashion/trends), Healthy Living/Lifestyle (sport/exercise, health and wellbeing, holidays) and Family/Relationships (relationships within the family, friendships, marriage/ partnerships). At A2 the topics include: Environment (pollution, energy, protecting the planet), The Multicultural Society (immigration, integration, racism), Contemporary Social Issues (wealth and poverty, law and order, impact of scientific and technological progress) and Cultural Topics (two from the following: a period of 20th century German history, a German author, a dramatist or poet, a director, architect, musician or painter). You will also undertake translation tasks to aid grammatical knowledge. Course structure AS Unit 1 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 2 Speaking

A2 Unit 3 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 4 Speaking

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 70% of AS / 35% of A level. Questions based on 5 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 2 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level. A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hr 30. Worth 35% of A level. Questions based on 6 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 4 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 15% of A level. Entry requirements B grade in German. Where next with this course? A level German is on the list of facilitating subjects published by the Russell Group of universities. This gives you lots of flexibility in respect of Higher Education course choices. Although many people progress to university to study a degree in Languages or Linguistics, there are a wide range of courses where a language can be combined with other subjects such as Business, Law, Economics, Marketing and International Relations. Study at this level will usually combine time spent studying or working abroad. These courses prepare students well for a wide range of diverse careers ranging from Translator to Accountant. See: http://www.languageswork.org.uk/ career_choices.aspx and http://www.whystudylanguages.ac.uk/post16/why_languages For further information contact Ms Green: sgreen@teddingtonschool.org

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History Edexcel Specification 8HI01/9HI01 Since many current issues are hugely influenced by events in the past, do you want to understand and explore how the modern world has evolved and why people in the past behaved as they did? Do you like to question, discuss and debate ideas and situations? A level History is a lively and provocative subject to study. Full of issues and arguments it will allow you to reflect on the experiences of people from across the centuries. Overview The course will cover a wide variety of periods in history from a wide geographical area. At AS you will study two history topics from the twentieth century: Unit 1 will develop your essay writing skills and will cover the Russian Revolution, 1881-1924 and Stalin’s Russia, 1924-1953. This will cover the first half of the twentieth century. Unit 2 will develop your source analysis and will cover British Political History, 1945-90. This will cover the second half of the twentieth century. At A2 you will study two further topics. Unit 3 will cover a mid-twentieth century topic: The United States, 1917-54. This topic will assess your ability to analyse sources. Unit 4 will cover a medieval topic: Crusading Europe, 1095-1204. This topic will combine both essay writing skills and source analysis. Course structure AS Unit 1 Unit 2

Russia in Revolution, 1881-1924: From Democracy to Dictatorship. Stalin’s Russia, 1924-53. British Political History, 1945-90: Consensus and Conflict.

A2 Unit 3 The United States, 1917-54: Boom, Bust and Recovery. Unit 4 Crusading Europe, 1095-1204

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 20. Worth 50% of AS / 25% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1 hr 20. Worth 50% of AS / 25% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 25% of A level Unit 4 Coursework. Worth 25% of A level Entry requirements C grade in History. Where next with this course? History is a firmly established and respected academic subject. On the list of facilitating subjects for the Russell Group of universities, it provides useful preparation for a wide range of subjects at university, including degrees in History, Archaeology, Law, Economics and Politics. It is also allows entry in to a range of careers such as: Journalism, Law, The Police, Civil Service, Banking, Accountancy, Business Management and Teaching. For further information contact Mr McConnell: amcconnell@teddingtonschool.org or Ms Todd: ltodd@teddingtonschool.org

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ICT OCR Specification H117/H517 May be taught at Orleans Park through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership In today’s world, the impact of ever changing ICT on society is enormous. As the number of businesses and households connected to communication networks such as the internet grows and grows, the need for individuals who possess the skills to master and manipulate these new technologies grows with it. On this course not only will you develop the capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically and logically, you will become a discerning user of ICT. You will learn to apply skills, knowledge and understanding in ICT to solve problems in a range of contexts, explore how ICT is used by individuals, organisations and society, and develop an understanding of the impact of emerging technologies. Overview At AS you will study topics such as: data, information, knowledge and processing; software and hardware components of an information system; characteristics of standard applications software and application areas; spreadsheet concepts; relational database concepts; applications software used for presentation and communication of data; the role and impact of ICT - legal, moral and social issues. You will then have the opportunity to explore design, software development, testing and documentation. At A2 you will gain an understanding of the systems cycle; designing computer-based information systems; networks and communication; applications of ICT; implementing computer-based information systems and implications of ICT. You will then have the opportunity to explore definition, investigation and analysis; design; software development, testing and implementation; documentation and evaluation through a client-driven project. Course structure AS Unit 1 Information, Systems and Applications Unit 2 Structured ICT Tasks

A2 Unit 3 ICT Systems, Applications & Implications Unit 4 ICT Project

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Coursework. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Coursework. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grade in ICT (if taken) or BC / CB in English and Mathematics. Where next with this course? A level ICT offers a good route on to degree courses such as ICT, Networking or Computing. In terms of careers, virtually every chosen profession in the market place makes use of ICT to some extent. However, typical career paths for ICT graduates can include: Animation, Project Management, Finance, Advertising and Web Design. For further information contact Mr Cowling: dcowling@orleanspark.richmond.sch.uk

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Mathematics Edexcel Specification 8371/9371 There are lots of exciting and practical uses of Mathematics in the modern world. This course will help shed some light on them. If you enjoyed solving problems at GCSE and want to be challenged further, studying A level Mathematics will offer you a rewarding experience. It will help train your mind in clear and logical thought and allow you to develop your reasoning abilities. Whilst worth studying in its own right, A level Mathematics also provides excellent support for the physical and social sciences. Overview At AS the course consists of three units, two of which are compulsory (Core 1 and Core 2) and one optional (either Statistics or Mechanics). During Core 1 you will cover algebra and functions, equations and inequalities, sketching curves, coordinate geometry, sequences and series and elementary calculus. In Core 2 you will study further algebra and functions, the sine and cosine rule, exponentials and logarithms, further coordinate geometry, binomial expansion, radian measures, geometric series, graphs of trigonometric functions, differentiation, integration and trigonometrical identities. In Statistics you will study: representing data, probability, discrete random variables, the normal distribution, correlation and regression. In Mechanics you will cover topics such as mathematical modelling, kinematics, dynamics, statics, moments, vectors. At A2 you will also study three units, again two of which are compulsory (Core 3 and Core 4) and one of which is optional (either Statistics or Mechanics). In Core 3 you will study algebraic fractions, functions, exponential and log functions, numerical methods, transforming graphs of functions, trigonometry, further trigonometric functions, further differentiation. In Core 4 you will study partial fractions, further coordinate geometry, further binomial expansion, implicit differentiation, further vectors. You will then study either Statistics or Mechanics. Course structure AS Unit 1 Core 1 Unit 2 Core 2 Unit 3 Statistics or Mechanics 1

A2 Unit 4 Core 3 Unit 5 Core 4 Unit 6 Statistics or Mechanics 1

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Unit 2 & 3

Written paper, non-calculator, 1hr 30. Worth 33.3% of AS / 16.67% of A level Written papers, calculator, 1hr 30. Worth 33.3% of AS / 16.67% of A level

A2 Unit 4 - 6

Written papers, calculator, 1 hr 30. Worth 16.67% of A level

Entry requirements B grade in Mathematics. Where next with this course? A level Mathematics is a much sought after qualification which is essential for further study of the subject (as is Further Mathematics at some universities) and is often a requirement for degree courses in Physics, Economics, Medicine, Architecture, Engineering, Accountancy, Psychology and Computing. There are many careers which require mathematical ability and by studying it to A level you can demonstrate to employers you possess thinking and problem solving skills. A degree in Mathematics could lead to opportunities in Actuarial Work, Investment Banking, Accountancy and Computing. For further information contact Mr Mahay: @kmahay@teddingtonschool.org or Mr Jacobs: mjacobs@teddingtonschool.org

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Music Edexcel Specification 8Mu01/9Mu01 To be taught at Waldegrave through the Richmond Post 16 Partnership ‘Love it, or like it, only a cursed few loathe it. The ubiquitous nature of music ensures that everybody has an opinion where melodic matters are concerned. A level Music will allow you to deepen your understanding of a human obsession’. The course will promote rigour and focus as effectively as creativity and expression. It will allow you to develop every aspect of musicianship, analysis to performance, in myriad musical settings, Baroque to Drum and Bass. If you play an instrument and are interested in developing a wider knowledge of music then this course is for you. Analytical minds that thrive on logic will enjoy the study of harmony whilst fans of chaos will warm to improvisation. If you are a performer who seeks to hone your instrumental skills in a range of ensembles you will find this an excellent platform to shine. Overview You will build on any existing aural and analytical skills through the study of a broad spectrum of music. You will compose from a variety of musical starting points for a variety of different timbres, acoustic, electric and electronic. A solid foundation of harmony and theory will be established and augmented throughout the course. There will be opportunities for you to develop as both a soloist and an ensemble performer, performing a range of composed music or improvising. Course structure AS Unit 1 Performing Music Unit 2 Composing Unit 3 Developing Musical Understanding

A2 Unit 4 Extended Performance Unit 5 Composition and Technical study Unit 6 Further Musical Understanding

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Coursework. Solo and / or ensemble performance lasting 5-6 minutes. Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level Coursework. One piece lasting 3 minutes & CD sleeve notes to be completed in 15 hours. Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level

A2 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6

Coursework. A 12-15 minute programme of solo/ensemble performances. Worth 15% of A level Coursework, two pieces (from a number of options). Worth 15% of A level Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 20% of A level

Entry requirements B grade in Music and instrument played to at least Grade 5. Where next with this course? Many students continue to study Music or Performing Arts at Conservatoires or university. Alternatively, Music A level will add an extra layer of context for many arts and humanities subjects and the attention to detail and focus on sequence and form makes music an excellent complement to the logical pursuits such as Physics or Maths. A recent survey for Oxford University suggests that Music A level is an excellent and incredibly useful choice. Whilst competitive to enter, careers involving music may include Performing, Recording/Sound Engineering, Composing, TV and Radio, Publishing, Events Management and Journalism. For further information contact Mrs Page: info@waldegrave.org.uk

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Music Technology Edexcel Specification 8MT1/9MT01 New technology has caused major changes in the creation of music around the world. Are you interested in studying the impact it has had on the development of popular music? Do you want to know how to produce, engineer and compose using music technology? Do you want to explore your creativity and musicality through the means of music technology? If so, then this course is for you. Overview Very hands on with lots of practical work this course will allow you to explore and make music through technology. It will equip you with a range of skills that are encountered in modern music production and the media workplace. Throughout AS and A2 you will learn the principles of sequencing, recording, arranging, editing, improvising, listening and analysing, producing and composition using modern computer software and traditional recording techniques. You will develop your listening and analytical skills through the study of popular music genres from 1910 onwards. Course structure AS Unit 1 Music Technology Portfolio 1 Unit 2 Listening and Analysing

A2 Unit 3 Music Technology Portfolio 2 Unit 4 Analysing and Producing

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Coursework. Worth 70% of AS / 35% of A level. You will produce an audio CD containing 3 tracks of work, and present a logbook. Unit 2 Listening / written paper, 1 hr 45. Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level A2 Unit 3 Coursework. Worth 30% of A level. You will produce an audio CD containing 3 tracks of work, and present a logbook. Unit 4 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grade in Music or Merit at Music BTEC, plus instrument played to at least Grade 5 or equivalent standard (if not formally examined). Where next with this course? A level Music Technology is an ideal qualification to meet the needs of the 21st century. It may be undertaken in preparation for further study for a Diploma, Extended Diploma or Degree in Music Technology or as part of a balanced programme of A level study. In respect of careers, it can create opportunities in Performing, Producing, Recording, Sound Engineering, TV and Radio, Promotion and Management in the Music Industry. For further information contact Mr Cragg: wcragg@teddingtonschool.org

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PE OCR Specification H154/H554 Are you passionate about sport? Do you want to understand what makes an athlete stronger, faster and able to perform better under pressure? Sport plays a large part in British culture and in recent years has grown in to a multi billion pound industry. Widely accepted by universities, A level PE offers you the chance to study sport at the next level and prepare you well for the future. Overview The course includes both theoretical and practical aspects which will help you to develop an insight and understanding of movement, performance and behaviour in relation to play, sport, physical education and recreation. It will also allow you to develop your knowledge and skill to enable you to reach a high standard of performance. At AS you will study modules in Anatomy and Physiology, Acquiring Movement Skills and SocioCultural Studies. These will give you an introduction to PE. You will be assessed in two practical activities; firstly as a performer, and then as a performer, coach or official. At A2 you will develop the skills from AS to bridge links between the principles and concepts in a range of areas in PE and use this information in order to improve your performance. It is likely that you will study the following 3 units: Historical Studies, Sports Psychology and Exercise & Sport Physiology. You will also be assessed practically, but only in one activity either as a performer, coach or official. Course structure AS Unit 1 An Introduction into Physical Education Unit 2 Acquiring, Developing and Evaluating Practical Skills in PE

A2 Unit 3 Unit 4

Principles and Concepts across Different Areas of PE The Improvement of Effective Performance and the Critical Evaluation of Practical Activities in PE

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Practical Assessment in two chosen activities from two different activity profiles. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hr 30. Worth 35% of A level Unit 4 Practical Assessment in one chosen activity. Worth 15% of A level Entry requirements BC grades in Core and Additional Science. Where next with this course? Sport has become a growing field of study over the last 10-20 years, and this course will prepare you to access a number of sport related degree courses such as Sports Science, Sports Development, Sports Management, Sports Psychology, Physiology, Physiotherapy and Teaching. Outside of sports specific courses, A level PE will help prepare you for courses in Science and other related fields. In respect of careers, this course will prepare you to enter: Teaching and Coaching, the Leisure industry, Recreational Management, the Health and Fitness industry and Professional Sport. For further information contact Ms McGrandles: amcgrandles@teddingtonschool.org

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Philosophy and Ethics OCR Specification H172/H572 As Socrates once said ‘the unexamined life is not worth living’. An ideal subject for those who like to argue, Philosophy will allow you to examine some of the greatest questions known to mankind. Is there a God? Did Jesus really perform miracles? Is there life beyond death? What is the purpose of life? Is there absolute right and wrong? In this hugely popular subject you will discuss the thoughts of intellectual giants like Plato and Aristotle, and improve both your own thinking skills and your ability to develop an argument. Overview At AS you will acquire knowledge, develop understanding and use evaluative skills with respect to the key topics of Philosophy of Religion and Religious Ethics. It will provide you with an opportunity to think philosophically about issues, understand how key ideas have developed through the work of philosophers in the past, and recognise their influence on ideas in society today. The Philosophy of Religion unit focuses on Ancient Greek and Judaic Christian influences on philosophy, including a study of the work of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. This unit also includes a study of the classical arguments for and against the existence of God and modern challenges to religious belief. In The Religious Ethics unit you will then look at both ethical theories and applied ethics. At A2 the Philosophical unit looks at religious language, religion and experience, life and death, the nature of God, and miracle, whilst Religious Ethics focuses on meta–ethics, free will and determinism, conscience, virtue ethics and applied ethics. Course structure AS Unit 1 Philosophy of Religion Unit 2 Religious Ethics

A2 Unit 3 Philosophy of Religion Unit 4 Religious Ethics

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 50% AS / 25% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 50% AS / 25% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 25% of A level Unit 4 Written paper, 1hr 30. Worth 25% of A level Entry requirements BC or CB grades in English and Mathematics. Where next with this course? Universities regard Philosophy and Ethics as an academically rigorous subject. Whilst it provides ideal preparation for further study in Philosophy, Theology, Psychology and Sociology, all humanity disciplines appreciate the skills that it provides. Taken by many students as a ‘fourth’ A level, it also adds balance and breadth to those who specialise in science subjects (especially Medicine). Like many academic subjects, the skills Philosophy develops can lead to a wide range of career opportunities such as Law, Journalism, Social Services, Policing, Civil and Public Services and Teaching. For further information Mrs Waiting: cwaiting@teddingtonschool.org

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Photography Lens and Light Based Media Edexcel Specification AS (6PY01/6PY02), A2 (6PY03/6PY04) Photography is the visual voice of the 21st century. Do you want to understand how photographers use the photographic medium to communicate? Do you have the desire to create exciting and visually interesting imagery? If so, A level Photography will help you to explore the world of visual images through a variety of exciting and stimulating photography based projects. Overview At AS you will develop expressive skills, using a range of techniques and styles, gaining an understanding of the many aspects of Photography. Contextual studies will enhance your critical thinking and understanding of the visual language of Photography. You will use this to communicate ideas and develop independent and personal work, leading to imaginative and purposeful outcomes. At A2 you will continue to develop a personal identity as a photographer, following your interests and determining your areas of research and the projects you wish to engage in. You will also produce a piece of sustained research in order to develop informed opinions and critical judgements about your own work and that of other photographers.

Course structure AS Unit 1 Personal Project Unit 2 Externally Set Assignment

A2 Unit 3 Personal Project Unit 4 Externally Set Assignment

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Coursework portfolio. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level Unit 2 Controlled 8 hr assignment, plus supporting studies. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level A2 Unit 3 Extended project. Worth 30% of A level Unit 4 Controlled 12 hr assignment, plus supporting studies. Worth 20% of A level Entry requirements B grade in one of: Art, Photography or Textiles, or a portfolio/digital portfolio of relevant work if not studied at GCSE. Where next with this course? A Level Photography is a recognised qualification for entry into Art Foundation and university degree courses such as Photography, Film making, Animation, Graphic Design, Advertising, Fashion, Creative Technology, Television and Video Technology. Possible options for careers could include any aspect of professional Photography (Advertising, Still Life, Interiors, Corporate, Graphics & Print, Architectural, Travel, Photojournalism, Reportage, Press & Editorial), Art Administrator, Museum Curator or roles within Graphic Design, TV & Film, Fashion and Teaching. For further information contact Mrs White: dwhite@teddingtonschool.org

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Physics AQA Specification 1451/2451 Physics is crucial to understanding the world around us and the world beyond us. From the study of the largest galaxies to the smallest subatomic particles, Physics lies at the heart of all science, engineering and much of our everyday lives. If you have an interest in the Physics topics studied at GCSE, an enquiring mind, enjoy problem solving, have mathematical ability and are up for a real challenge, then A level Physics could be for you. Overview At AS you will begin by studying particles and radiation, the on-going development of new ideas in Physics and the application of well established topics such as electricity. You will also study mechanics, materials and waves which extends the work already covered at GCSE. At A2 you will develop further the basic mechanics experienced at AS into the ideas behind circular motion, simple harmonic motion and gravitation. You will study electrical and magnetic fields, nuclear and thermal physics and then one option on a chosen area of physics. Throughout the course practical work will be used to illustrate the material taught and as part of the assessment. There will be an emphasis on the application of physics in the real world and the course will help develop your critical thinking and problem solving skills. Course structure AS Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity Mechanics, Materials and Waves Investigative and Practical Skills

A2 Unit 4 Fields and Further Mechanics Unit 5 Section A: Nuclear and Thermal Physics Section B: One option from: Astrophysics Medical Physics Applied Physics Turning Points in Physics Unit 6 Investigative and Practical Skills

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 15. Worth 40% of AS / 20% A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1 hr 15. Worth 40% of AS / 20% A level Unit 3 Coursework. Worth 20% of AS / 10% of A level A2 Unit 4 Written paper, 1hr 45. Worth 20% of A level Unit 5 Written Paper, 1hr 45. Worth 20% of A level Unit 6 Coursework. Worth 10% of A level Entry requirements B grade in Physics (if triple) or B in both Core and Additional Science. Where next with this course? A level Physics is a well respected and intellectually challenging course. It is a requirement for further study of Physics and for entry on to engineering courses (Civil, Mechanical and Electronic). It is also well thought of by universities for entry on to a wide range of courses such as IT, Computing, Maths, Medicine and pure Science. Physics graduates are highly valued for their problem solving and numerical abilities with employment opportunities ranging from Engineering to Accountancy. For further information contact Mr Barker: ibarker@teddingtonschool.org

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Psychology Edexcel Specification 8PSO1/9PSO1 The human mind is the most complex machine on earth. Do you want to investigate how it works and understand why people behave as they do? A hugely popular, but challenging sixth form subject, alongside preparing you well for Higher Education it will prove useful in helping you to develop your everyday relationships and allow you to build a wide range of transferrable skills. Overview At AS you will be introduced to the five approaches, key issues and studies in Psychology. You will compare and contrast the qualities of each approach whilst considering scientific procedures and sampling relevant to carrying out psychological studies. You will study the individual as a member of society and look at the Freudian ideas of what makes each individual unique. You will also discover why people do or believe particular things. At A2 you will use your knowledge from AS to understand the process children go through during their development and the affect factors such as deprivation can have on this. You will consider the psychology of crime and the factors which influence criminal behaviour. You will also study clinical psychology: looking at mental illness, its causes and treatments. The course will conclude with a synoptic section considering debates and issues such as ‘Is psychology a science’ and ‘Nature vs Nurture’. Course structure AS Unit 1 Social and Cognitive Psychology Unit 2 Understanding the Individual

A2 Unit 3 Applications of Psychology Unit 4 How Psychology Works

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 1 hr 20. Worth 40% of AS / 20% of A level Unit 2 Written paper, 1 hr 40. Worth 60% of AS / 30% of A level A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 1 hr 30. Worth 20% of A level Unit 4 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 30% of A level Entry requirements BC or CB grades in English and Mathematics. Where next with this course? Psychology is an excellent choice at A level because it ensures many options will remain open in the future. It will prepare you well for a social science degree (eg Psychology, Sociology, Economics), as well as Law, Geography and Medicine. In respect of employment, Psychology is extremely useful for careers that deal with people. Those who go on to study it at university will be well prepared for a career as a Psychologist (Sport, Clinical, Educational, Occupational), in Social Work, Law, Policing, Childcare, Nursing, Teaching or Business Management. For further information contact Mr Victory: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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Spanish AQA Specification 1696/2696 The ability to speak a foreign language is fast becoming an essential life skill. As we play an increasing part in the European Union and travel further afield in our work, education and leisure, the ability to communicate confidently and understand the culture and society of other countries is becoming increasingly important. If you are interested in learning more about the language, culture, and history of the Spanish speaking world and want to enhance your career opportunities, then A level Spanish is for you. Overview At A level, you build on your linguistic level from GCSE. The course concentrates on developing oral fluency and conversation skills through the study of a range of stimulating topics with contemporary, literary and cultural content. At AS these topics include: Media (TV, advertising and communication technology), Popular Culture (cinema, music, fashion/trends), Healthy Living/Lifestyle (sport/exercise, health and wellbeing, holidays) and Family/Relationships (relationships within the family, friendships, marriage/partnerships). At A2 the topics for study include: Environment (pollution, energy, protecting the planet), The Multicultural Society (immigration, integration, racism), Contemporary Social Issues (wealth and poverty, law and order, impact of scientific and technological progress) and Cultural Topics (two from the following: a period of 20th century Spanish history, a Spanish author, either dramatist or poet, a director, architect, musician or painter). You will also undertake translation tasks to aid with grammatical knowledge. Course structure AS Unit 1 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 2 Speaking

A2 Unit 3 Listening, Reading and Writing Unit 4 Speaking

Course assessment AS Unit 1 Written paper, 2 hrs. Worth 70% of AS / 35% of A level. Questions based on 5 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 2 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 30% of AS / 15% of A level. A2 Unit 3 Written paper, 2 hr 30. Worth 35% of A level. Questions based on 6 minutes of heard material and a selection of written texts. Unit 4 Speaking test, 35 minutes (inc 20 prep). Worth 15% of A level. Entry requirements B grade in Spanish. Where next with this course? A level Spanish is on the list of facilitating subjects published by the Russell Group of universities. This gives you lots of flexibility in respect of Higher Education course choices. Although many people progress to university to study a degree in Languages or Linguistics, there are a wide range of courses where a language can be combined with other subjects such as Business, Law, Economics, Marketing and International Relations. Study at this level will usually combine time spent studying or working abroad. These courses prepare students well for a wide range of diverse careers ranging from Translator to Accountant. See: http://www.languageswork.org.uk/ career_choices.aspx and http://www.whystudylanguages.ac.uk/post16/why_languages

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For further information contact Ms Green: sgreen@teddingtonschool.org


BTEC Level 2 First Certificate in Business Edexcel Specification 600/6815/2

8PSO1/ 9PSO1

You will begin by planning and presenting an idea for a realistic business start-up in your local area, based on research you have carried out. You will then develop your understanding of business start-ups by exploring the costs involved in setting up and running a new business and the ways in which the sale of products and services can generate income to make profit. After studying Marketing in depth you will next focus on the ways in which a business can promote itself to customers through its brand and image. Having investigated the most up to date laws affecting both buyers and sellers in the business world you will then explore how businesses develop their online activity. This will link closely with the topics studied on the Information & Creative Technology course. Course structure The course contains 7 units, 3 of which are compulsory (*). The others are optional (which we are considering) and therefore could be subject to change. Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 8 Unit 9 Unit 12 Unit 14

Enterprise in the Business World * Finance for Business * Promoting a Brand Recruitment, Selection and Employment Principles of Marketing * Introducing Law and Consumer Rights Business On Line

The course is worth the equivalent of 2 GCSEs. You can achieve Pass (C), Merit (B), Distinction (A) or Distinction*(A*) grades on this course. Course assessment The course is assessed through a series of coursework portfolios and a combination of computerbased and written examinations. All units have the same weighting except for Unit 14, Business on Line, which is worth double the others. Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 8 Unit 9 Unit 12 Unit 14

Coursework On line examination, 1hr Coursework Coursework Written paper, 1hr 30 Coursework Coursework

Entry requirements 5 GCSE passes with at least 2 at grade D. You should also be able to demonstrate an interest in and commitment to the course. Please note we will consider any extenuating circumstances which might have prevented you from achieving these requirements. Where next with this course? You will be equipped to progress on to another Level 2 or Level 3 vocational or academic course or an apprenticeship. Alternatively, in due course, you could consider a career in one of the many business disciplines, such as Marketing, Finance, Sales, Recruitment or Retail in a wide range of junior job roles. For further information contact Mr Victory: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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BTEC Level 2 First Certificate in ICT Edexcel Specification 600/6071/2 The course begins with an introduction to the modern online world. Focusing on the main technologies and processes behind the internet, you will investigate how they come together so we can view websites and send information across the world. You will then consider how technology systems are involved in many of the objects we use every day; from a laptop relaying internet traffic, to logging in to a social networking site. Next you will plan, record and edit digital audio and video products. Using methods similar to those used in industry you will be introduced to the technology and techniques used by the professionals. You will also investigate the characteristics and uses of mobile apps and learn how they are developed. Finally you will design, develop, test and review your own mobile app and learn how to design, develop and test a website. Course structure The course contains 7 units, 3 of which are compulsory (*). The others are the optional units we are considering, however, these could be subject to change. Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 5 Unit 7 Unit 8 Unit 13

The Online World* Technology Systems* A Digital Portfolio* Creating Digital Audio Creating Digital Video Mobile Apps Development Website Development

The course is worth the equivalent of 2 GCSEs. You can achieve Pass (C), Merit (B), Distinction (A) or Distinction*(A*) grades on this course. Course assessment The course is assessed through a series of electronic coursework portfolios and computer-based exams. All units have the same weighting except for Unit 13, Website Development, which is worth double. Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 5 Unit 7 Unit 8 Unit 13

On screen examination, 1 hr On screen examination, 1 hr Coursework Coursework Coursework Coursework Coursework

Entry requirements 5 GCSE passes with at least 2 at grade D. You should also be able to demonstrate an interest in and commitment to the course. Please note we will consider any extenuating circumstances which might have prevented you from achieving these requirements. Where next with this course? You will be equipped to progress on to another Level 2 or Level 3 vocational or academic course or an apprenticeship. In due course, you could consider junior job roles within the information technology industry and/ or the creative industries, such as developing websites or apps. For further information contact Miss Flanagan: rflanagan@teddingtonschool.org

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Contact us Teddington School Broom Road Teddington Middlesex TW11 9PJ Tel: 020 8943 0033 Or visit our website www.teddingtonschool.org Email any enquiries to: svictory@teddingtonschool.org

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