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AHA!

SOUTH CAROLINA HONORS COLLEGE / UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA / SUMMER 2014


Contents

p. 12 In this issue 8/ON THE COVER Teasing out the sound A BARSC major researches the fundamentals of human hearing in the quest for better hearing aids and cochlear implants.

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SUMMER 2014 South Carolina Honors College Dean/ Steven Lynn Managing Editor and Writer/ Aïda Rogers Director of Communications/ Anna Redwine Contributing Photographer/ Jim Clark Copy Editor/ Susan Ward Director of Development/ Chappell Wilson Assistant Director of Development/ Caitlyn McAnulty Stay Connected: University Home Page: sc.edu SCHC Home Page: schc.sc.edu Facebook: www.facebook.com/SCHonorsCollege Twitter: twitter.com/SCHonorsCollege Linkedin: “University of South Carolina Honors College” University Writers Group / University Creative Services The University of South Carolina does not discriminate in educational or employment opportunities or decisions for qualified persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, genetics, age, disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University of South Carolina has designated as the ADA Title II, Section 504 and Title IX coordinator the Executive Assistant to the President for Equal Opportunity Programs. The Office of the Executive Assistant to the President for Equal Opportunity Programs is located at 1600 Hampton Street, Suite 805, Columbia, SC; telephone 803-777-3854. UCS14106 5/14

SCHC artists and their art The inaugural edition of an artist-in-residence program cultivates a bountiful crop of artistic endeavors.

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Life after thesis A sampling of notable SCHC thesis projects from 2014.

14 / Project Vida

A student-led project teaches the fundamentals of good health to children living in Columbia shelters.

15 / Q&A with Toby Jenkins-Henry

A 1997 SCHC alumna reflects on her life since graduation.

16/Donor honor roll A listing of SCHC’s 2013-14 supporters.

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Alumni news Updates from alumni from 1970s to present.


I

just wrote this sentence: “It’s a particularly exciting time in the Honors College — we’re recruiting next year’s class,

which looks like another spectacular one; we’re advising students for the fall and talking with them about their summer plans; we’re doing thesis defenses with our seniors, and we’re finding out what they’ll be doing next.” Then I stopped and wondered when in my three years as dean has it not been an exciting time? Every day has been an adventure. Many have been mind-bogglingly wonderful. Things like our Honors College don’t just pop up. You can’t buy one — although money surely is helpful. It takes many people and many years to get where we are now. Bill Mould, Peter

STEVEN LYNN DEAN, SOUTH CAROLINA HONORS COLLEGE LOUISE FRY SCUDDER PROFESSOR

Sederberg, President John Palms, Davis Baird, Patsy Tanner, Jim Burns — I realize having started naming people that I could fill my allotted space ten times over and wouldn’t have made a dent. The Honors College is great today because of its dedicated and talented staff; the faculty who have given us their best, most imaginative teaching and mentoring; its visionary leadership; the incredibly generous people who have supported it; and of course the students who choose us, thrive here and go on to amazing careers. Yes, it’s a particularly exciting time — just like almost every other day at the office. Cordially,

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SCHC AT A GLANCE

1

188 Number of freshmen from South Carolina

No.

14 Average SCHC class size

223 Number of freshmen from out of state

Ranking in “Review of Public University

(Class of 2017)

Honors Programs� (honors factors only)

100%

Average SAT score (Class of 2017)

Freshmen received financial aid awards in 2014

After graduation: ~1/3 of Honors College students go to graduate school. Students in the Class of 2014 will attend Oxford, Harvard, Yale, Duke, Vanderbilt, Stanford and many other prestigious programs.

~1/3 pursue professional training in law and medicine. Consistently about 85 percent of Honors College graduates are accepted into medical school on first application.

~1/3 take jobs in engineering, business, screenwriting, politics, nursing, public service, banking, teaching and myriad other vocations.

And one goes backpacking across Europe.

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Photo by Jonathan Goley.

Michael Pisaro and Greg Stuart codirected the concert at the Columbia Museum of Art in November.

N E W YO R K TI M ES E X TO L S SCH C E XPERI M ENTAL M USIC CO N CERT R ECO R DI N G

Praise in print Many professional musicians toil for years in obscurity. But in January, the New York Times praised a concert recording that featured 14 SCHC students in the college’s Experimental Music course. Critic Steve Smith described “asleep, forest, melody, path” as a “patient, unpredictable, exceedingly beautiful mingling of simple structures, improvised textures and field recordings.” California composer Michael Pisaro wrote the piece for Greg Stuart, who teaches the course to students of varying musical experience. To complement the composition’s sounds of wind, water, and small animals from Congaree National Park, less experienced students played unconventional instruments, including plastic bags and cardboard boxes. Public Health junior Alexi McHugh played a water bottle and teacup, and says Stuart changed the way he sees things, including unhappy memories of piano lessons. “Any object can be used to play music,” he said. “I may pick up the violin.”

SCHC WELCOMES NEW ASSOCIATE DEANS The Honors College has selected two associate deans, Pearl Fernandes and Kimberly Eison Simmons, from the ranks of the university faculty. A former professor of biology at USC Sumter, Fernandes is an affiliate faculty member in Women’s and Gender Studies. She is the recipient of the John J. Duffy Excellence in Teaching Award, YWCA TWIN Award and was a finalist for the Governor’s Professor of the Year Award. Fernandes, who is also president of the S.C. Academy of Science, earned her Ph.D. in biological science from USC. An associate professor of anthropology and African American Studies, Simmons received the Michael J. Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award in 2010. She is author of “Reconstructing Racial Identity and the African Past in the Dominican Republic” and co-editor of “Afrodescendants, Identity, and the Struggle for Development in the Americas.” Past president of the Association of Black Anthropologists, Simmons earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from Michigan State University.

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‘I don’t want to be part of an apathetic generation’

NOT A BAD SCENARIO The high-energy fun of One Two Skidoo,

That’s how SCHC political science senior TAYLOR SEALE felt after Al Gore spoke to her Future of American Politics class in February. “His biggest point was to be passionate, no matter what field you choose, and to stay civically minded and to work together.”

a band fronted by international business student Rupert Hudson, pictured above second from left on bottom row, plays on post-graduation, thanks to the record label

Lecturing via Skype, the former vice president elaborated on his

he created. Scenario Records recorded,

book “The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change.” Professor DON

released, promoted, and distributed three

FOWLER chose the book and invited Gore to discuss how high-tech

four-song EPs for his band and two others

industry, the global economy and diverse populations will affect

as part of his senior thesis. For Hudson,

America in 20 years. About 200 people attended, with Gore taking questions from the 16 students, all of whom were children when he ran for president in 2000.

now in New York working for two start-up music companies, starting a record label was the highlight of his USC career. If

Fowler was struck by having a Nobel Prize-winning futurist lecture

Scenario takes off, we’ll be hearing from

about technology through Skype, but Seale experienced it more

him again. “It’s my baby,” he said, “so if it

viscerally: “It was a call to arms to focus more and care more about

did amazingly well, I’d focus on that more

what’s going on.”

than anything.” www.scenariobaby.com.

Al Gore on Skype

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Exercise science senior Emily Learner is USC’s 2014 Outstanding Woman of the Year. Four of the six nominees were SCHC students: Priyanka Juneja (management science), Kathryn Kingsmore (biomedical engineering), and Leila Heidari (public health), who nominated Learner, her roommate.

USC LE ADERS O FFER G U I DAN CE TH RO U G H N E W H O N O RS R ES E ARCH CO U RS E

Good advice In the 22 years USC students have been named Goldwater Scholars, all 45 have been SCHC members. The university’s 2014 Goldwater Scholars are computer science/ math junior Connor Bain and chemical engineering/chemistry sophomore Eric Bringley. Marine science junior Daniel Utter received Honorable Mention.

Pharmacy sophomore Amy Yanicak presented her research about the media’s negative portrayal of pharmacists to the American and S.C. societies of Health-System Pharmacists

Finding a professional pathway isn’t always clear. So Associate Dean Pearl Fernandes asked several USC leaders to give SCHC students advice. “This was a big-picture opportunity,” Fernandes said of her new Honors Research Series, a seminar-style course. “Students learned how to be leaders, what it takes to be successful, and what to do and not do.” Along with President Harris Pastides, Provost Michael Amiridis, and Vice President for Research Prakash Nagarkatti, Fernandes invited professors who are SmartState chairs — experts in fields critical to South Carolina. Polymer nanocomposites, tourism and economic development, brain imaging and digital humanities were just a few topics covered. Hard work, collaboration, and being “first in your field” was advised. Biology senior Richard McCain appreciated Pastides’ remarks. “I was glad to hear him talk about the importance of leaders serving the people.”

and the American Pharmacists Association. For her research, Yanicak spent 400 hours watching 300 television shows and movies.

The SCHC partnered with USC Press for the inaugural S.C. High School Writing Contest. Nearly 500 students entered, accepting SCHC Dean Steven Lynn’s prompt “How can we make South Carolina better?” Grand judge Pat Conroy gave a lecture to the 23 finalists, their parents and teachers during a campus event in October.

President Harris Pastides and senior Richard McCain

Hallie Chametzy of Columbia won first place in the junior category and Rowan Miller of Aiken won the Walter B. Edgar Award in the senior category. USC Press will publish the finalists’ poems, essays, and play in an anthology titled “Writing South Carolina: Selections from the First High School Writing Contest.”

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Teasing out the sound SCHC student explores how we hear speech in the midst of noise

Hearing aids and cochlear implants don’t solve every problem for those who need them. There is, for example, the very real problem of hearing conversations clearly in noisy places. For that to happen, hearing aids and implants need improvement. Could there be a better project for a student getting a BARSC in biomedical engineering, music and psychology? “This research was a perfect fit,” said Michael Hood, a spring 2014 graduate. “I’m into music, and speech is similar to music. I thought the cochlear implant would be a cool piece of technology to look into.” Hood plays piano and guitar, composes contemporary classical piano music, performs with a jazz ensemble and has released four CDs — he’s “into music” all right. He also helped start Communities in Harmony, a USC outreach initiative that brings music to underprivileged children in Columbia. It might be that his two years as a research assistant in USC’s speech perception lab will benefit those he never meets. “Michael’s findings can contribute to more successful approaches for processing speech in noise,” said Dan Fogerty, an assistant professor in USC’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. “He found evidence that listeners rely on frequency changes over time to focus on a target talker in the context of several talkers in the background. Once we can attend to the target talker, we use amplitude changes over time to understand the message.”

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A Science Undergraduate Research Fellowship grant for $4,500 funded Hood’s lab research, and a $1,500 Magellan Scholar grant underwrote travel to Chicago to present his findings at a conference of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. “Learning about the ear this much has been very interesting,” the Irmo native said, chuckling. “I can tell you for 20 minutes how it works.” He also can tell you how different types of noise — the fluctuating sound of a passing car or the speech “babble” you might hear at a restaurant — affect your speech comprehension. And he knows that just because two people have similar cochlear anatomy doesn’t mean they’ll experience the same benefits from implants. While his research will help others, it also has helped him. Hood found a subject for his senior thesis and clarity about his future: He has accepted a four-year, merit-based Pedestal Scholarship to the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville campus. “My research might lead me to become an ear, nose and throat doctor, but I definitely know it’s fueled my love for anatomy,” he said, noting that pathology and radiology are other interests. “Adding to the knowledge base has been immensely gratifying,” he said. “I got a taste of the whole research experience — the methodology, problem-solving, data analysis, writing a paper and presenting it at a conference. And hey, if 10 people read my thesis, I’ll be happy.”


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SCHC artists and their art

Visits to South America and Africa inspired sophomore Spanish major Madeline Willet’s mixed media pieces.

New artist-in-residence program supports multi-media projects The South Carolina Honors College is the proud — albeit temporary — owner of eight original works of art. Thanks to its first artist-in-residence program, eight student artists have created visual, musical, literary and film pieces that will stay with the SCHC for one year. “All the projects are really distinct and have many layers,” said Sarah Koslov, student curator. “We’ve been very surprised by how interdisciplinary their work is.” Music performance senior Clara Logue wrote a short story titled “Buchenwald,” based on a trip she took to the Buchenwald concentration camp in Weimar, Germany, and she called on student composer Rachelle Armstead to write an accompanying piece of classical music. “The story looks at what happens when happy innocence brushes up against incomprehensibly deep grief,” Logue said, explaining that the SCHC Echoes in Blues course triggered her interest in the connection between music and words. Biology freshman Clarie Randall chose photography to study the “complex relationships among humans in modern society.” Her exhibit, “Microaggressions,” focuses on discrimination, stereotyping and imbalances of power and privilege. Other students combined calligraphy and photography, music and film, poetry and websites.


POETRY CORNER Junior English major Eric Roper created a website, IRL (In Real Life) for his Internet-based collection of hyperlinked poetry. Through his poems, Roper explored “the ways in which the increasing integration of Internet-based activity into our daily lives might problematize or even negate the delineation that the term IRL proposes.” HOW AM I SUPPOSED 2 WRITE

“They have been pioneers in our effort to cultivate a creative community within the Honors College,” said Ed Munn-Sanchez, senior associate dean. He, Koslov, and SCHC alumnus Ryan Lindsay interviewed applicants, who created budgets for their proposed projects. Lindsay, who manages artist John Ross Palmer’s gallery in Houston, gave a public business of art workshop with Palmer in Columbia. Lindsay and Palmer also met with students individually to discuss their work. An April showcase at the Honors Residence Hall gave the students an opportunity to publicly read, perform and unveil their work. The pieces will remain with the SCHC for a year before returning to the artists. “Art is something from which I derive the confidence and energy to do other projects,” said international business freshman Sarah Singh, who painted one abstract piece and four portraits. Except for her self-portrait, she put mirrors in the eyes of her subjects. “I like the idea of people being able to see themselves in a painting.” She sees herself in rural India after graduation, “building a school for children where they could grow passionate about books, music, art and all the things that open the world to us.”

a poem when I was [in]cited (indicted) n a pic n a RT n a comment by @, THIS JUST IN! BREAKING NEWS: @, @, and @ just liked @’s tweet #2k14 #lol #blessed #bffl #bae #turnup #softgrunge #thinspiration #thisjustin #alienation #thisjustin #hey #HI #subtweet #haters Instagram-Twitter-Facebook-Gmail-Tumblr Tumblr-Gmail-Facebook-Twitter-Instagram ( r e p (e)l (a)e t [e] ) (it’s the right thing 2 do) myspace xanga livejournal geocities angelfire #RIP #never4get stay with me your smile lives on file your teeth tagged stay with me remember when I was happy and not alone look: photographic evidence (things have gone downhill since) It is getting harder 2 forget ppl now that they live in my pocket the human mind has a remarkable defense mechanism against things idgaf about (one (1) new message(s)) U! YES U! WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME U SPENT QUALITY TIME W/ UR COMPUTER? my o my where has the time gone~

Read more of Roper’s poetry here: http://2k14irl.com/

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Life

after thesis Thrilling, frustrating, time-consuming, gratifying. Some senior thesis projects even help others. Here are three notable projects from 2014.

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OVERCOMMITTED AND UNDERPREPARED It’s a typical pickle for the SCHC student: How do I do it all? Enter “Overcommitted and Underprepared: A College Guide for the Over-Achiever.” Written by six seniors who saw a need for Honors College advice books, the 156-page thesis debuts as a trial text for SCHC U101 this fall. Satirical and practical, “Overcommitted” focuses on the Honors College experience, from roommates, romance and research to staying physically, mentally and spiritually well. The crisis of making a B, what to do if you’re assaulted and adjusting after a semester abroad are just a few topics covered. “It’s funny, it’s clever and while it’s written specifically for USC, it could be reworked for honors colleges everywhere,” said Dean Steven Lynn, the group’s thesis director. “These students would be great on ‘The David Letterman Show.’” Writing it provided welcome reflection, observed Caroline Hendricks, the group’s spokesperson. “It’s helped me think about how I’ve grown and that’s helped me interview for med school. It’s important to take our experiences and give advice to freshmen so they can make better decisions or learn our study techniques.”

Five of the six "overcommitted" authors

THE DIESEL Having endured numerous injuries from years of lacrosse, business student Zach Miller decided to turn his pain into someone else’s gain. Now there’s “The Diesel,” a Prowler-type weight sled he built for the one doctor who didn’t tell him to be happy to walk without limping. Miller, 6' 3'' and not limping, followed a plan and used railroad ties to build the piece of exercise equipment he credits with keeping him strong and active. The Diesel — Miller’s lacrosse nickname — is now in Dr. Nevin Markel’s Charlotte training facility. Miller painted it garnet and black, and knows he’ll see it often as an investment banker in his native city. “I figure I’ll use it there,” he said. “Why can’t I share it with others?”

Zach Miller and The Diesel

DAISY V Ashley Ehlers and Kaitlyn Torres made a new friend, literally. But they’re leaving her behind. Daisy V, a fabric body they created to show the organs of the abdomen, will stay with the SCHC or be donated to a high school anatomy class. The duo spent 100 hours researching, preparing and sewing the surgical quilt, which was inspired by surgeries they observed last May at oncology and general surgery clinics in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, during the medical practices and culture travel course. Different suture knots mark locations of five abdominal surgeries, and organs — made of cotton and polyfill — can be removed for interaction. “We learned so much about the body and how everything is set up inside the abdomen,” said Torres, who is headed to medical school. While Ehlers is undecided about what’s next, both are sure they won’t be sewing anytime soon. Their description of the making of Daisy V? “Intensive!”

Student quilters Ashley Ehlers and Kaitlyn Torres with Daisy V, in “What Happens in Romania … Comes Back to the United States and Becomes a Quilt”

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Salem Carriker and a St. Lawrence Place resident demonstrate hygiene and disease prevention with help from Larry the Skeleton.

Project Vida

When one good thing leads to another

In 2010, when pre-med student Jon Aun challenged freshmen to “Drop Everything and Lead” as part of his senior thesis, Salem Carriker took note. And started her own student organization, one that would send her and her comrades to shelters in Columbia to teach children about good health. Four years later, Project Vida has educated nearly 200 disadvantaged children about nutrition, hygiene, first aid and exercise. Hands-on and interactive, Project Vida makes learning fun. Children make trail mix, participate in field days and skits and get health and exercise kits to prompt them to practice what they’ve learned. For Carriker, a McNair Scholar and anthropology major with plans for medical school, Project Vida was the best part of her USC career. “There were many times when I arrived at a site exhausted from the week, only to have my spirit renewed through talking and playing with the kids,” she said. “Project Vida taught all of us about the importance of being involved in our community, and it also provided a safe and fun experience for the children.” Magellan Scholar and biochemistry major Fides Elamparo discovered her own unexpected rapport with children through Project Vida. She attributes her new confidence to Carriker, her friend since freshman year. She says the communication techniques

14 / S O UTH C A R O L IN A H ONORS COLLEGE

she developed — using balloons to demonstrate air flowing through lungs, for instance — will help when she becomes a doctor. About 65 students have devoted 430 hours of direct service through Project Vida since 2010. They’ve taught children about body systems, diseases, buying and growing healthy food and careers in health and science. The Bernard and Arline Ramsdale Endowment Fund, which supports community service and social needs research by SCHC students, helped underwrite Project Vida. Unlike many initiatives that fade when dynamic leaders graduate, Project Vida is continuing. “Salem and Fides have built a great team of successors who will make sure Project Vida continues to thrive,” said Susan Alexander, Project Vida’s faculty advisor and director of Service Learning and Undergraduate Research at the Honors College. “It’s as though from the moment they began, they not only understood the value of their mission but the importance of sustaining it.” Project Vida won USC's 2014 Outstanding Student Organization Service Award. Communities in Harmony, which teaches children music, was named USC's 2014 Student Organization of the Year.


QA Alumni

&

with Toby Jenkins-Henry, Ph.D.

Ask Toby Jenkins-Henry for words to live by, and she

What do you do that you said you never would?

uses her own: "Do not spend your life searching for

Wake up early. I haven’t had to be somewhere at 8 a.m.

heroes; become one." Few could say she hasn’t done just

since high school. Then I married a man in the military. I

that. The 1997 public relations graduate, now assistant

am now up at 5:30 each morning. I’m starting to feel like

professor of higher education at the University of Hawaii

an adult.

Manoa, has written two books, fought breast cancer and lupus and in March welcomed son Kai with husband, Gay

What do most people not know about you?

Henry II, a former USC football player. A whiz at cooking,

My first job after graduating from Carolina was driving

decorating and writing poetry, Jenkins-Henry has skills

the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

she’s yet to master. What are your go-to places at USC? What’s your favorite movie? “Life is Beautiful.” It crystalizes the idea that life is bigger

The Horseshoe and Little Camden, a small, modest community near Williams-Brice Stadium. It had dirt roads

than ourselves. The father was solely focused on making

and families living pseudo-rural lifestyles. I played at my

sure his son was OK physically and emotionally. He

grandparents’ home there before condos were built to

sacrificed his life for that.

support our football program.

What are you reading now? “Managing with Aloha,” by Rosa Say, for a leadership class

What advice would you give SCHC students? Take advantage of opportunities to learn many things—

I’m teaching. It’s helping me integrate Hawaiian values

language, photography. Take guitar lessons, study

into my understanding of leadership.

abroad, attend campus open mics. There’s more to being a well-learned person than just completing the minimum

What aren’t you good at?

requirements for a degree.

I never learned to ride a bike. I’m in Hawaii! I have to go bike riding!

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donor honor roll The success of the South Carolina Honors College wouldn’t be possible without generous support from faithful alumni and friends. Thanks to you, we have raised more than 95 percent of our Carolina’s Promise campaign goal and made a significant impact on our students’ educational experiences at the University of South Carolina.

Ms. Pamela Gail Cobb

$1,801 AND ABOVE

$1,000 TO $1,800

Dr. and Mrs. James P. Jamison

Dr. Christopher T. Bardi

Mr. and Mrs. Eldon A. Bailey

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Johnson

Dr. and Mrs. Francis J. Dannerbeck

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Kingsmore

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan M. Skvoretz

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Douglas Hibbard

Ms. Susan McBurney and Mr. Michael S. Gadd

Ms. Dianne Thiergartner Mr. Alan D. Thomas

Dr. Joseph C. Muller

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce D. Walker

Ms. Randi Berry Ms. Susan Carson Bryan and Mr. Frank W. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Aaron L. Hark Ms. Catherine E. Heigel Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Jones III Dr. Suzy L. Kim and Dr. Walter Ott Mr. David A. Knight Dr. Theresa Knoepp and Dr. Louis F. Knoepp Mr. Aaron W. Knowlton Dr. Annette Lynn and Dr. Steven Lynn Ramsdale Law Firm LLC Dr. Janice Love and Dr. Peter C. Sederberg Dr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Jerre D. Sumter LTG and Mrs. William P. Tangney Dr. and Mrs. Charles R. Tatum Mr. Robert K. Taylor III The Honorable Thadeous H. Westbrook III and Mrs. Westbrook

Dr. Judith Farley Hoffman and Dr. Thomas C. Hoffman Mr. and Mrs. Michael W. Hogue The Reverend James C. Howell Dr. Ann E. Ruderman and Dr. William Richard Keane Mr. and Mrs. Ronald W. McKinney Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin H. Rex Ms. Julia C. Royall Mr. and Mrs. M. Jeffrey Vinzani

$500 TO $999 Mr. and Mrs. James Richard Ball Mr. and Mrs. Martin Andrew Barth Dr. Gretchen Van Der Veer and Mr. J. Steven Beckham Jr.

Ms. Elizabeth E. Endler and Mr. Gary J. Wells Dr. Paula C. Herrmann and Mr. Stuart R. Olson

Ms. Betsy Johnson

Ms. Elaine Preston Ms. M. Alicia Sikes Dr. T. Daniel Silvester Mr. and Mrs. Frank Andrew Smoak Mr. and Mrs. Robert James Wheaton

$250 TO $499 Mr. and Mrs. Scott A. Cilley Mr. G. Lee Cole Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd B. Nicholson Jr.

Ms. Jillian Suzanne Brown

Mrs. Gamble Cousar Ouzts and Mr. Charles Allen Ouzts

Ms. Nancy F. Buckstad

Ms. Karen Petit Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Pulte Mr. and Mrs. Alan Richard Silver Mr. and Mrs. Alender O. Simmons

Ms. Christy A. Tinnes

Mr. Travis Lee Weatherford Mrs. Andrea Jean West Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Williams Jr. Mr. Timothy Cain Woodlee

$100 TO $249 Dr. and Mrs. Douglas M. Addy

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Dumiak Jr.

Anonymous

Mr. and Mrs. Wade Franks

Ms. A. Lorraine Aun and Dr. Pierre H. Barakat

Mr. and Mrs. David P. Garner

Mrs. Sona Shah Arora

Mr. Todd D. Bailey

Mr. Thomas P. Guilderson

Mr. Matthew S. Ballard

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Hardaway

Mrs. Amanda Kay Seals Bersinger and CAPT D. Austin Bersinger

Mr. Robert H. Hill

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Scott Bingham

Ms. Julia E. Hunt and Mr.

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony E. Bowser

Ms. Julye M. Johns

Matthew W. Jochim

Mr. Stephen M. Brown

Dr. and Mrs. O. William Lever Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Brunelli

Dr. Richard S. McCain

Bold indicates Dean's Circle members

16 / S O UTH C A R O L IN A H ONORS COLLEGE

Dr. Lorraine Dustan

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Morris

Mr. Keith M. Bentley

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Joseph Black Dr. Melinda S. Borrero and Mr. Michael A. Rundle Mrs. Rebecca Calmes Brendle

Dr. Barbara S. Burch and The Reverend Marcus C. Burch Mr. G. James Burns Mr. and Mrs. James P. Byrd Ms. Amanda Brooke Casto Mr. James R. Clark Mr. and Mrs. T. Charles Conrad III Dr. and Mrs. G. Britt Cooper Mr. and Mrs. Derek L. Copeland Dr. Virginia M. Corley and Dr. Stephen H. Corley Mr. and Mrs. Glenn M. Cornwell Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Cousar Mr. and Mrs. William S. Cowan Dr. Pamela N. Davenport and Mr. Richard Davenport Ms. Teresa deBorde Glenn and Mr. Terrell Lyles Glenn Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas James Dwork Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Esselman Mr. Richard L. Farley Mr. Ryan B. Floyd Mr. Robert C. Furr Mr. and Mrs. Mark Glenn Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Graybill Mrs. Iris C. Griffin Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin Harvey Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Steven C. Hendrickson Mr. and Mrs. Chris L. Herron


We are pleased to announce that for the seventh consecutive year, 100 percent of the Honors College staff gave back to the University through the Family Fund pledge drive.

Mr. and Mrs. William O. Higgins

Ms. Kathleen Moeller-Peiffer

Ms. Susan L. Hitchcock and Mr. James Garner

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Paul Mooney

Mr. and Mrs. Kaz Holley

Mrs. Tanja Ostapoff

Ms. Xiaojin Yu and Mr. Weijia Hu

Dr. Maja Osterman

Dr. and Mrs. David Isenhower

Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Pennisi

The Reverend and Mrs. Norman Ernest Jones Jr. Dr. Prashanth Jayarum Kamath Dr. and Mrs. Obaid Khan Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery E. Kinard Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Kingsmore Jr. Dr. Rita F. Klein Mr. Wade S. Kolb III Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. Koslov Kim and Jason Land Mrs. Sue Nannette Lanham Dr. Amy Y. Lawton and Dr. Boyce M. Lawton III Mr. R. Ryan Lindsay Dr. Courtney H. Mann Mr. and Mrs. William Walker McAnulty Ms. Patricia A. McDonald Mr. John McGovern Mr. and Mrs. William A. Minton Mr. William Andrew Minton Jr.

Ms. Beverly A. Pascoe

Mr. Christian A. Price Dr. Patricia L. Pruitt and Dr. Dennis A. Pruitt Mrs. Lynn E. PruittTimko and Mr. Joseph M.Timko Mr. and Mrs. Marlon Pujol Dr. and Mrs. Glenn Richard Quarles Dr. and Mrs. Robert Frederick Rafoth Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Rawson Mrs. Jean H. Terrell and Mr. Alain Recaborde Ms. Judy M. Rehberg Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence L. Richardson II Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Robbins Dr. and Mrs. Roger Holmes Sawyer Mrs. Neeta Shah Mr. and Mrs. Reid T. Sherard Dr. Susan P. Shimp and Mr. John A. Shimp Dr. Kimberly Eison Simmons and Dr. David Simmons

The Reverend Dr. Bradley D. Smith and Mrs. Smith Dr. and Mrs. A. Emerson Smith Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Phillip H. Smith Mr. Evan L. Smoak Mrs. Elva C. Stinson and Mr. Basil Garzia Prof. and Mrs. James L. Stiver Mr. and Mrs. William C. Stokes Dr. Randall W. Stowe Mr. Terry Strout Mr. and Mrs. Ernest T. Thompson III Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Timmons Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph David Walker Dr. and Mrs. William B. Ward Dr. and Mrs. Patrick Lee Warren Mr. David M. Washer Ms. Rachel L. Waterhouse and Mr. James Selleh Dr. Mary C. Watzin Chappell and Marty Wilson Mr. and Mrs. James W. Winkley Mr. and Mrs. R. Marshall Winn III Ms. Jennifer L. Wu

CHAPPELL WI L SO N If you would like to support the Carolina’s Promise campaign for the South Carolina Honors College, contact Chappell Wilson at 803-777-7511 or cswilson@sc.edu

The Dean’s Circle: Make Your Mark The South Carolina Honors College announces its new Dean’s Circle, a special giving society for alumni and friends of the college! The Dean’s Circle allows alumni and friends to support the SCHC’s meaningful programs and scholarships through annual unrestricted gifts of $1,000 or more. Unrestricted giving is essential to the growth and success of the Honors College because it allows your donation to be applied toward an area of greatest need. Inspired by our new Artists in Residence program (page 10-11)? Already looking forward to this year’s Homecoming Champagne Brunch? These opportunities are supported by unrestricted giving. Join the Dean’s Circle to help make experiences like these possible. Visit schc.sc.edu/support/deans-circle to learn more or to become a member. Questions can be directed to Caitlyn McAnulty, assistant director of development, at 803-777-8555 or caitlynm@sc.edu.

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CAROLINA SCHOLARS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Honors College would also like to thank the following donors who supported our students with gifts to the Carolina Scholars Scholarship Program.

$10,000 AND ABOVE

Dr. and Mrs. Walter J. Bristow III

Mr. and Mrs. Barrett H. Jones, Jr.

Bill and Connie Timmons Foundation

The Honorable Mark W. Buyck, Jr. and Mrs. Buyck

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Ted Mayden

Estate of William B. Douglas

Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer M. Caplin

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Graybill

Mr. Lonnie N. Carter

Ms. Kennerly M. McLendon

Mr. and Mrs. George B. Cauthen

Mr. and Mrs. William G. McMaster

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Cohn

Mr. and Mrs. R. Rothrock Menge

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Sean Cooney, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Steven T. Motes

Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Daniel

Mr. Robert L. Nelson

Dr. Anita S. Hood and Dr. Charles G. Hood Mr. E. Roe Stamps IV The Honorable Mack I. Whittle, Jr. and Mrs. Whittle Mr. and Mrs. R. Marshall Winn III

$1,000 TO $9, 999 Mr. James H. Addison

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry E. Dempsey Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan L. Dieter, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. David E. Dukes

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan F. Breckenridge, Jr.

Mr. E. F. DuPree, Jr.

Dr. Leslie Poinsette and Dr. Michael Poinsette

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne C. Fritz

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Vlahoplus

Ms. Ellen A. Geary

$100 TO $999

Mr. James Cranston Gray, Jr.

American Bar Foundation Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Tyler Baldwin, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. James Russell Banks Mr. and Mrs. James S. Beskid

Freeman and Moore, PC

Ms. Elizabeth Van Doren Gray

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Hatfield The Reverend Susan B. Heath and Mr. Benjamin Rush Smith III Mr. and Mrs. H. Neel Hipp Dr. and Mrs. Charles R. Hubbard, Jr.

McDowell-Pearman, LLC

Dr. and Mrs. John M. Palms Mr. Lucian T. Pera Ms. Pamela J. Roberts and Mr. Joel H. Smith Ms. Julie Beth Schexnayder Mr. Thomas J. G. Scott Jane and Tommy Suggs Mr. and Mrs. William H. Theus Mrs. F. W. Toole, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Stephen N. Zack

ARE YOU IN? More than 200 students and alumni have joined the official South Carolina Honors College group on LinkedIn. Are you connected? Our goal is to facilitate connections among students, alumni, faculty and staff for internship, career and other professional opportunities. Along with SCHC event updates and news, we hope you will join us in posting professional updates, sharing job openings and engaging in general conversation. This is an excellent opportunity to foster both business and personal relationships, but we need your participation to make it successful!

These lists include donors for the 2014 fiscal year (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014) as of April 16, 2014. Every effort has been made to ensure their accuracy. For a complete list of donors, visit schc.sc.edu.

Visit LinkedIn and enter “University of South Carolina Honors College” in the search field. To maintain the integrity of the group, membership is restricted to students, alumni and other individuals directly affiliated with SCHC. All requests will be reviewed to confirm affiliation, but we do encourage you to invite fellow SCHC alumni to join.

Special gratitude is extended to the Robert and Janice McNair Foundation for their substantial support of the McNair Scholars Scholarship Program and to the Stamps Family Charitable Foundation for their new partnership with the Carolina Scholars Scholarship Program.

18 / S OUTH C A R O LIN A H ONORS COLLEGE

If you’re not already a member of LinkedIn, sign up for free and create your profile today. We want you in our network!


alumni news 1970 John Dorn, ’76, is a selfemployed physician/ writer/photographer and recently began publishing a novel, “Wicked,” in serial form on Amazon Kindle. Elizabeth McLendon, ’74, was recently featured in the documentary “Keep the Promise: The Global Fight Against HIV/AIDS.” Felicia Mitchell, ’77, an English professor at Emory & Henry College since 1987, received the James A. Davis Faculty Award from the college’s alumni association. Donnie Smith, ’78, and

wife, Elaine, are the proud grandparents of seven grandchildren. Donnie is the music minister at New Heights Church in Columbia, S.C., and director of the New Heights Community Players.

1980 Jason Kreutner, ’93,

headmaster of University School of the Lowcountry in Mount Pleasant, received the Aimar Educational Leadership Award as most outstanding headmaster from the S.C. Independent Schools Association. Kreutner founded the school in 2007.

1990 John Davis, ’91, married

Kathryn Rich in 2013 and is currently director of the Minnesota State Academy for the Blind. Allison (Ali) Freeman Winter, ’99, and

husband, Preston, welcomed their second son, Simon Jeremiah Winter, to their family in 2013. She works part time for Greenwire, reporting on environmental and energy issues.

2000 Tom Benning, ’09,

staff writer for the Dallas Morning News, interviewed George W. Bush about his exhibit of paintings of world leaders. “The Art of Leadership: A President’s Personal Diplomacy” was on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Susan Crook, ’07, graduated from North Carolina State University with a Ph.D. in applied mathematics in 2013 and is an assistant professor at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa. Lauren (Edwards) Liles, ’05, married USC

alumnus Robbie Liles and is employed as a senior project manager with EngenuitySC.

Danielle Gleaton, ’06,

graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology with an MBA in 2013. She is an assistant vice president at Bank of America in the Technology MBA Leadership Development Program. Candice and Aaron Hark, ’03, have been

appointed to the advisory board for the Faber Entrepreneurship Center in USC’s Moore School of Business. Priscilla Grace (Larkin) Harris,’05, married

Trevor C. Harris, a native of Cambridge, England, and lives and works in the western suburbs of Paris. Patrick Kelly, ’03,

was named Richland School District Two Teacher of the Year for 2014. Kelly teaches advanced placement government at Blythewood High School and coaches the boys’ cross country team. He and his wife, Heather , ’03, have two daughters.

with a focus in curriculum and pedagogy. Laura Sima, ’07, is

working for the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C. Rachel Marie (Perkins) Worth, ’06, married

Tristan John Worth at Bella Luna Farms in Seattle, Wash. The wedding party included Meredith Thomas (‘06). Rachel is a corporate and securities attorney at DLA Piper LLP in Seattle, and Tristan is a master’s candidate at Seattle Pacific University.

Daniel Peach, ’10, is living in Washington, D.C., and working for IBM as a federal financial management consultant. David Prim, ‘13, and

Rosanne Sullivan, ‘13, were engaged in Charleston in 2013. David is pursuing a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at USC and Rosanne is pursuing a J.D., also at USC. Kristen (Bailey) Schwiers, ’13, married Charles

H. Schwiers and lives in Charleston, S.C. Karly Marie Miller, ’09,

2010 Bruce Davis, ’10, is

working as a process engineer for Westinghouse Electric’s Uranium Recovery and Recycle Services Department in Irmo, S.C. Melanie Dunn, ’12, was

engaged to David Sullivan in August 2013 on the Horseshoe. They first met in Rutledge College and are to be married this fall.

Stephanie McCauley, ’01, is living in Greenville, S.C., and working as a researcher for Climate Interactive.

Mary F. Glenn, ’12, is

Jeremy Shumpert, ’01, is pursuing a doctorate in education at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.,

Emily Ingram, ’12, is currently working as a registered nurse at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.

living in Columbia and began working for Elliott Davis in October 2013.

is pursuing a Ph.D. in marine science at UC Santa Barbara. Evelyn Cate (Ackermann) Galletti, ’03,

spent six months participating in Deloitte’s sabbatical program. Through this program, she and her husband volunteered with two organizations in Bangladesh, where Evelyn was a Peace Corps Volunteer in 2003-05. From Bangladesh, the Gallettis traveled throughout Southeast Asia while Evelyn wrote about her Peace Corps experience and returning 10 years later: http:// whereshouldwebetoday.wordpress.com/.

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Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Permit #766 Columbia, SC

Columbia, SC 29208

As a Gamecock, my advocacy for others has No Limits. Elizabeth Filaseta

The trill of new languages, the allure of unfamiliar roads and spontaneous adventure — through study abroad Elizabeth Filaseta has reveled in the excitement of international travel. But along the way she’s encountered difficulties most college students never do; she travels in a wheelchair. That’s made the Honors College junior acutely aware of the many obstacles faced by people with physical challenges, at home and abroad. Elizabeth plans to study disability law to become an effective advocate for those who, like her, want the freedom to travel, explore and discover, just like everyone else. Help USC students by giving to Carolina's Promise at give.sc.edu.

sc.edu/nolimits

AHA! Summer 2014  
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