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Brandon Martin, C. Keith Harrison, and Scott Bukstein


 “It takes a village” for African American male scholarathletes: Mentorship by parents, faculty and coaches in American higher education Abstract

 The
purpose
of
this
study
was
to
explore
the
influences
of
mentors
on
African
American
male
scholar‐ athlete
success.
Participants
(N=27)
consisted
of
high
achieving
African
American
male
student‐athletes
from
four
 academically
rigorous
American
universities.
Participants
competed
primarily
in
revenue‐generating
sports
(i.e.,
men’s
 basketball
and
football)
and
were
interviewed
to
obtain
a
deeper
understanding
of
the
role
various
mentors
play
in
 relation
to
their
academic
success.
By
utilizing
a
phenomenological
approach,
three
major
themes
emerged:
My
Parents
 Always
Had
High
Expectations,
I
Have
Healthy
Relationships
With
My
Professors,
and
No
Support
From
Coaches.
Mentorship
 theories
and
relevant
literature
are
examined
through
the
African
American
family
influences
on
sport
mobility
(Oliver,
 1980;
Harris,
1994),
faculty
interaction
with
African
American
male
student‐athletes
(Harrison,
Comeaux
&
Plecha,
2006;
 Comeaux,
&
Harrison,
2007)
and
coaching
role
strain
(Edwards,
1973;
Coakley,
1994)
and
interpreted
with
the
findings.
 Recommendations
for
faculty,
student
affairs
professionals,
athletic
administrators
and
other
stakeholders
are
suggested.


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“It takes a village” for African American male scholar-athletes (Harrison et al 2010)