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Turning Vision Into an Actionable Strategic Facilities Master Plan

CASE STUDY MARIAN UNIVERSITY

Sarah Hempstead, AIA, LEED AP Lisa Gomperts, FAIA, LEED AP


STEPS TO A SUCCESSFUL MASTER PLAN 1

DEFINE THE VISION

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• • • • • •

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Review Owner’s strategic plan Define big picture vision/goal for campus master plan Define anticipated program and enrollment growth triggers Identify project goals and objectives Outline process and schedule to align with approval process Identify Stakeholders and level of involvement

2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION

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Creating a Master Plan is like

• Document campus observations - strengths and moving along a spiral. With each step, you move closer to weaknesses the center — the solution. • Conduct a facility assessment • Project enrollment growth • Analyze current facility utilization • Observe and document operations flow • Document current campus infrastructure and drainage patterns • Perform tree survey • Document current landscaping, signage, and hardscape conditions and standards • Identify specific campus issues

3 IDENTIFY KEY MASTER PLAN INITIATIVES • • • • • • •

Identify key projects to address goals and projected growth Identify policies Create overall campus master plan Overlay landscape master plan Develop cost model for all initiatives - consider annual maintenance projects Create phasing plans based on priorities, growth model, and budget constraints Develop annual implementation plans

4 MEASURE SUCCESS • • • •

Assign someone to monitor progress Define a process and schedule to report on progress to executive leadership/board Create a metrics system to track progress Allow for flexibility with tools that can be adjusted and kept current

WHY AM I READING THIS? We want to show you ways to develop strategies that will help you avoid creating master plans that are never implemented and end up getting lost in the Master Plan Graveyard.

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MARIAN UNIVERSITY OVERVIEW • • • •

Private Catholic University Indianapolis, IN Around 2,900 full and part-time students Located on about 200 acres

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN Challenges • Aggressive growth strategy • Demonstration of impact on existing infrastructure • Land-use evaluation/urban campus with boundary constraints • Aging infrastructure of the buildings • Increased sustainability • Fostering a community

Marian University - Aerial View

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1 DEFINE THE VISION VISION

MISSION

To provide an education distinguished in its ability to prepare transformative leaders for service to the world.

To be a great Catholic university dedicated to providing students with excellent teaching and learning in the Franciscan and liberal arts tradition.

VALUES To reflect prayerfully on the Gospels to determine the ways in which we can advance: • • • •

The dignity of each individual Peace and justice Reconciliation Responsible stewardship

Wildly Important Goal (WIG): In order to meet the growing need for leaders who are well-educated, experienced, and trustworthy, by 2025 Marian University will

Double the number of annual graduates to 1,500 transformational leaders

who are prepared to serve in education, health care, business, ministry, and other professional fields.

Program Growth/Focus Areas (Next 24 Months)

• STEHM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Health Sciences, and Mathematics) • Business • International • Graduate Programs • Retention • Lacrosse (40-50 Students) and Wrestling • Other New Programs not yet identified

Anticipated Facility Needs • • • • • • • • • •

New research and teaching labs Additional athletic and recreation space Updated, high-tech library facilities Renovations to existing residence halls Student centered space including technology rich spaces New Business school facility Updated/expanded dining facilities International Student Center Leadership Center Updated/expanded chapel facilities

PROJECT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Create a comprehensive 10 year campus master plan to inform future facility and campus projects that compliment the University’s Strategic Plan. It needs to account for projected growth in the number of graduates, new programs, and diversity in the student population. • • • •

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Strong graphics for donors Repurpose existing facilities Consider impact of off-site development Enhance current utilization

• • • •

Develop art integration strategy Address operations workflow Create a campus landscape plan Develop parking policy


2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION CAMPUS OBSERVATIONS — STRENGTHS Unique historic context

Enchanting Tea Garden

Courtyards between buildings soften edges

Significant trees on campus add aesthetic value

Strong Franciscan symbolism around campus

CAMPUS OBSERVATIONS — OPPORTUNITIES Independent rain gardens do not create comprehensive storm water plan

Transitions and pathways need clarity

Main entry is understated and hidden Inadequate space for parking and operations storage

Signage: inconsistent and hard to read 5


2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION PROJECTED ENROLLMENT

Working backwards from the goal of 1,500 graduates per year, a breakdown of graduate, undergraduate, and MAP (Marian Adult Program) students is determined to figure an annual FTE (full-time equivalent student).

Current Student Breakdown

This FTE number is used to calculate space utilizations. Undergraduate

Graduate

Marian Adult Program

Student % Transition Over the Next 10 Years 2015

2025

There was an intentional shift from more undergrads to more graduate students in the next 10 years.

4,800 FTE

Annual Goal by 2024-2025

Program duration and retention impacts the overall graduation rate.

1,500 GRADUATES 6


2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION CURRENT UTILIZATION - PARKING

2,809 Spaces required to maintain current parking ratios

CURRENT UTILIZATION - CLASSROOM

Projected shortage of approximately 1,345 Spaces

Projected shortage of 26 classrooms in 10 years

CURRENT UTILIZATION - SUMMARY Parking:

Current parking capacity = 75% of all permit holders at any one time Future = additional 1,350 spaces

Classrooms:

Current = 80 classrooms Future = Additional 26 classrooms

Housing:

Current = 60% of undergraduates and 10% of graduates students on campus Future = Additional 408 beds

Work Spaces:

Current = ~400 work spaces Future = Additional ~200 work spaces 7


2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION OPERATIONS FLOW Current Operations Currently operational functions are distributed throughout campus creating access issues and challenges for deliveries. • Facilities – Large deliveries go to the back of campus requiring large trucks to drive all the way around the campus • Dining/Kitchen – The main student dining area is in Clare Hall and deliveries are currently taken on the south side of the building requiring trucks to drive around the north side of campus and through several parking lots • Mail – Currently received in Marian Hall through the west court yard • Bookstore – Received on the east side of campus in the newly constructed Alumni Hall

Recommendations These recommendations will consolidate on-campus deliveries to two locations. • Facilities – Locate Operations off of the main campus proper • Kitchen – Take deliveries on the north side of Clare Hall in the new service yard • Mail – Move deliveries to the new Student Center that will be housed out of the existing Library after it is renovated (connected to Alumni Hall) • Bookstore – To remain in Alumni Hall

Further study will be done as additional properties are acquired. Services Key Proposed Existing

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2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION FACILITY ANALYSIS A summary of all the facilities on campus was created to understand: • Total square footage, • Age of each structure • Primary usage

BUILDING SUMMARY — EXAMPLE CONDITION: Constructed in 1911. Recently had roof and interior plaster work completed. CURRENT UTILIZATION: Office of the President and event function space. RECOMMENDATIONS: Use to remain as is. Expand restroom facilities and improve overall accessibility.

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2 ASSESSMENT & OBSERVATION PROPOSED CAMPUS DRAINAGE PLAN An analysis was conducted of the overall campus drainage strategy due to current issues on campus. A comprehensive solution was developed that addresses future facilities and problem areas, tying together existing raingardens and underground infrastructure.

LANDSCAPE ANALYSIS An analysis was completed of the existing campus landscaping to gain an understanding of the unique characteristics and areas of greatest opportunity. There are several recent projects on campus (identified in light green) that had landscaping projects associated with them. They typically included a raingarden with an ordered arrangement of native plantings that didn’t always tie into the rest of campus. This master plan has started to establish a campus landscaping standard for future projects. Significant tree groups on campus Significant individual trees Priority landscape areas • The top three tree species on campus: Maple, Pine, and Linden • The majority of trees on campus rated: “Fair - may require attention”

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3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES OVERALL CAMPUS PLAN An overall campus master plan was developed that identified all the recommended capital projects over the next 10 years.

LEGEND New Construction Renovation F-#: New Facility P-#: New Parking S-#: New Site Feature

F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8

Business School – Addition/Renovation of Ruth Lilly Student Center Acquire and Renovate Cold Spring School Mansion Center for Student Success - Clare Hall Dining/Kitchen Expansion Center for Student Success - Addition/Renovation to PE Center Acquire and Renovate South Hall Acquire and Renovate Allen Hall Student Housing (250 Bed) Arts & Science Expansion

F9 F10 F11 F12 F13 F14 F15 F16

Center for Student Success - Fieldhouse New Operations Building – off site New Equipment Building New Library Student Housing (200 Bed) New Chapel – Addition to Oldenburg Hall Music Building Addition Evans Center Addition

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3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES OVERALL CAMPUS PLAN Once the overall campus plan was developed, specific initiatives were identified as the first projects to be implemented. Currently the main entry to campus is understated and not clearly differentiated from the other entries into campus. In addition, overgrown landscape blocks current signage. The master plan creates a new boulevard to be developed on the east side of campus with a turn circle at the main entry. In the center of the turn circle, a sculpture of a knight on a horse (the school’s mascot) could help define the entry.

Concept Image

Byrum School of Business Rendering

Existing Building

The new Byrum School of Business will be developed from the existing Ruth Lilly Student Center to give the business school a prominence on campus to help with recruitment.

Student Center 12


3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES OVERALL CAMPUS PLAN The existing gym currently seats about 1,500 and is dark and dimly lit. It currently has two cross courts. This project will allow for the introduction of natural light from the north and the west while increasing seating capacity to approximately 3,000 seats.

Gym Rendering

Existing Gym 13


3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES LANDSCAPE MASTER PLAN Based on analysis and project facility projects, a series of landscape projects were identified to help beautify and unify campus.

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3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES PHASING PLAN Once all the master plan initiatives were identified, they were prioritized and listed by year to see their impact on the four key utilization areas: classrooms, work spaces, beds, and parking. Annual Phasing Plan

ANNUAL IMPLEMENTATION PLAN After all the projects are prioritized by year, a cost is applied to determine an overall total project cost. This includes a $6 million annual budget to cover routine maintenance projects. From there, an annual implementation plan outlining each capital project is created to provide a clear roadmap for Marian University.

MASTER PLAN COST PROJECTIONS

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3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES EXISTING (2015)

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3 IDENTIFY INITIATIVES PROJECTED MASTER PLAN (2024-2025)

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4 MEASURING SUCCESS WHAT WE DID In order to create accountability and keep everyone on the same page, a series of tools and processes were created.

• • • •

Yearly tracking of projects and progress by facilities staff Monitoring progress on larger projects 5-year engineering assessments of deferred maintenance Yearly updates to Board of Trustees

The detail spreadsheet allows for annual budgeting, on-going tracking, and the ability to shift projects from one year to another if needed.

Red: capital projects

Green: site projects

Yellow: summarize maintenance projects

Maintenance projects summarized in the chart above are further broken down by item from a previous engineering assessment:

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4 MEASURING SUCCESS Once a capital project moves into the design and construction phase, a detailed cash flow document is created and regularly distributed to help ensure budgets are met and fundraising goals are achieved.

HOW ARE WE USING IT NOW? • Informing project decisions • Policy discussions • Driving donor development effort

The master plan has become a living document for Marian University. It informs current and future project decisions and it has initiated policy discussions — parking and open office environments. In addition, it has helped to communicate its strategic direction and vision for campus to key stakeholders and donors.

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FLEXIBILITY IS KEY Master plans need to stay flexible in order to remain a viable resource. Over the last 10 years, Marian University has updated their master plan to reflect their most current vision and address their growing enrollment and programs with each iteration.

The focus has changed slightly, but the master plan helped to outline the options.

FOCUS AREAS — HOW THEY’VE CHANGED

PROMINENT CORNER

2005 — Student Center and Housing

2005 – Residential

2010 — Chapel, Student Center, and Housing

2010 – Chapel

2016 — Business School, Student Center, Library, and Housing

2016 – Medical School

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FLEXIBILITY IS KEY CHANGING METRICS In the case of Marian University — just before the team completed the final master plan, the president adjusted the enrollment goal from a 50% increase in enrollment to doubling the graduate rate (adding 750 additional students to the projected FTE). This change increased the projected parking and work space needs significantly.

* Adjusted FTE/Classroom ratios to better utilize current space and reduce need for new space ** Adjusted % of Students to stay on campus

It is inevitable, changes will happen. New opportunities will arise, enrollment trends may vary significantly, the economy may drive new program growth, or the vision of the president may change. The key to success is to be flexible.

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MASTER PLAN COMPLETED PROJECTS AS OF 2018 Michael A. Evans Center for Health Sciences

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MASTER PLAN COMPLETED PROJECTS AS OF 2018 Byrum School of Business

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Steps to a Successful Master Plan Checklist 1

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Define the Vision A Review Owner's strategic plan B Define big picture vision/goal for campus master plan C Vision Define anticipated program and enrollment growth triggers Define the D Identify project goals and objectives A Review Owner's strategic plan E Outline process and schedule to align with approval process B Define big picture vision/goal for campus master plan F Identify Stakeholders and level of involvement C2 Assessment Define anticipated program and enrollment growth triggers and Observation D Identify projectcampus goals and objectives A Document observations - strengths and weaknesses B Conduct a facility E Outline process and assessment schedule to align with approval process C Project enrollment growth F Identify Stakeholders and level of involvement D Analyze current facility utilization Assessment and Observation E Observe and document operations flow A Document campus observations - strengths and weaknesses F Document current campus infrastructure and drainage patterns B Conduct a facility assessment G Perform tree survey C Project enrollment growth H Document current landscaping, signage, and hardscape conditions and standards D Analyze current facility utilization I Review existing campus policies (i.e. parking, housing, etc.) J Identify Campus Issues E Observe andSpecific document operations flow K Identify Specific Campus Issues F Document current campus infrastructure and drainage patterns 3 Identify Key Master Plan Initiatives G Perform tree survey A Identify key projects to address goals and projected growth H Document current landscaping, signage, and hardscape conditions and standards B Create overall campus master plan I Review existing campus policies C Overlay landscape master plan (i.e. parking, housing, etc.) J Identify Specific D Develop costCampus model forIssues all initiatives - Consider annual maintenance projects E Create phasing plans based on priorities, growth model, and budget constraints K Identify Specific Campus Issues implementation plan Identify FKeyDevelop Masterannual Plan Initiatives 4 Measure Success A Identify key projects to address goals and projected growth A Assign someone to monitor progress B Create overall campus master plan B Define a process and schedule to report on progress to executive leadership/board C Overlay landscape mastertoplan C Create metrics system track progress D Develop cost model for all initiatives maintenance projects D Allow for flexibility with tools that can- Consider be adjustedannual and kept current

Steps to a Successful Master Plan Checklist

E Create phasing plans based on priorities, growth model, and budget constraints F Develop annual implementation plan Measure Success A Assign someone to monitor progress B Define a process and schedule to report on progress to executive leadership/board C Create metrics system to track progress D Allow for flexibility with tools that can be adjusted and kept current

Turning Vision Into an Actionable Strategic Facilities Master Plan

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415 Massachusetts Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46204 317.263.6226 • www.schmidt-arch.com

Turning Vision Info an Actionable Strategic Facilities Master Plan  

A case study featuring Marian University

Turning Vision Info an Actionable Strategic Facilities Master Plan  

A case study featuring Marian University