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Between Romanticism and industrialization »If my name ever rings a bell in you, then the triple-layered icecream specialty will come to your mind first. The delicacy had once been dedicated to me, but, unfortunately, I didn’t invent it myself. Instead, I can be proud of

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my own will. I eventually sacrificed all my fortune to it. When my money came to an end, which, however,

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other things – first of all, of my parks, of course. All my life, I was driven by the urge to design landscapes after

my plans and ideas never did, my wife even agreed to our formal divorce, so that, by re-marrying, I would have the opportunity to get hold of fresh money ... – It was in 18th century England where they first began to turn away from the geometric landscaping forms of the Baroque to start designing landscape gardens close to nature instead. Soon thereafter, the call »Back to nature!« had its effect in Germany, too – and my Muskau Park is certainly one of the most famous and beautiful among the newly designed grounds of that time. For building mansions and palaces in my time, architects borrowed shapes and forms from all styles of architectural

»THE E G A I R R MA « R E L SWIND

history. What used to be Baroque pomp was now answered by Classicist simplicity. Then the Romantic yearning for the Middle Ages was complemented by Gothic elements, such as little towers, pointed arches, vaults and buttresses. Towards the end of the century, even forms of the Renaissance, Romanticism and Baroque were »revived« and often merged with each other. In all new palaces, villas and manors, their builders were thereby striving for originality and high standards – noblesse oblige.

Prince Hermann von Pueckler-Muskau (1785 – 1871)

www.schloesserland-sachsen.de

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Old splendor in new glory  

Die bekanntesten der sächsischen Schlösser, Burgen und Gärten in Wort und Bild - eine Broschüre des Schlösserland Sachsen - die englische A...

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